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  • 1.
    Aerts, Ria
    et al.
    Global Opportunities Commercialization, Melbourne, Australia; Ku Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Pikkarainen, Minna
    University Oslomet, Oslo, Norway; Oulu Business School, Oulu, Finland.
    Xu, Yueqiang
    Oulu Business School, Oulu, Finland.
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Overcoming hospital resistance in an international innovation co-creation2023In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 187, article id 122195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The health sector is very specific and difficult market for firms to access and deal with. The main reasons for this is that the healthcare systems are in continuous change, the co-creation processes in hospitals are complicated involving many different actors which also affects on firms commercialization and internationalization approaches. However, there is a growing demand of health services and the sector is growing also due to the COVID situation, that has been dramatically speeding up the digitalization of the healthcare services in the hospital settings. Approaching international hospital markets is, however, challenging for the start-up companies. On their journey they are facing a resistance, that they have to overcome in many different ways. The aim of this paper is to increase understanding how a start-up can overcome hospital resistance in an international innovation co-creation process. The results of are based on in depth case study in which the data collection was done over the four years of data gathering. The paper highlights how start-up companies can overcome the resistance in the international innovation co-creation in the hospital markets. It shows the importance of different activities, actors, capabilities and international activities in different phases of the international innovation co-creation journey. © 2022

  • 2.
    Calof, Jonathan
    et al.
    University Of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa; National Research University Higher School Of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Klavans, Richard
    Scitech Strategies, Wayne, PA, United States.
    Abdulkader, Bisan
    Central European University, Vienna, Austria; Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, Ben Guerir, Morocco.
    Moudni, Ismail El
    Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, Ben Guerir, Morocco.
    Understanding the structure, characteristics, and future of collective intelligence using local and global bibliometric analyses2022In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 178, article id 121561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Collective Intelligence” has been a popular area of research for more than a decade. We apply two different analytical approaches (local and global bibliometric analysis) to describe how this literature is organized and how it has evolved. A local approach focuses on the 3,138 articles indexed in the Scopus database where ‘collective intelligence’ is in the title, abstract, or keyword. A global approach reclassifies all of the Scopus documents into research communities using all (1.28 billion) citations in the database and proceeds to identify which research communities are populated by the 3,138 Collective Intelligence (CI) articles. These two approaches provide significantly different perspectives on how CI is structured, who the leaders of the field are, and how it is evolving. A synthesis of these two perspectives provides ideas for those who wish to contribute to the collective intelligence field. Our findings support the Kuhnian idea of research communities as a useful concept in bibliometric analysis. © 2022 The Authors.

  • 3.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Mikael
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM). Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Democratic revolutions as institutional innovation diffusion: Rapid adoption and survival of democracy2013In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 80, no 8, p. 1546-1556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent 'democratic revolutions' in Islamic countries call for a re-consideration of transitions to and from democracy. Transitions to democracy have often been considered the outcome of socio-economic modernization and therefore slow and incremental processes. But as a recent study has made clear, in the last century, transitions to democracy have mainly occurred through rapid leaps rather than slow and incremental steps. Here, we therefore apply an innovation and systems perspective and consider transitions to democracy as processes of institutional, and therefore systemic, innovation adoption. We show that transitions to democracy starting before 1900 lasted for an average of 50. years and a median of 56. years, while transitions originating later took an average of 4.6. years and a median of 1.7. years. However, our results indicate that the survival time of democratic regimes is longer in cases where the transition periods have also been longer, suggesting that patience paid in previous democratizations. We identify a critical 'consolidation-preparing' transition period of 12. years. Our results also show that in cases where the transitions have not been made directly from autocracy to democracy, there are no main institutional paths towards democracy. Instead, democracy seems reachable from a variety of directions. This is in line with the analogy of diffusion of innovations at the nation systems level, for which assumptions are that potential adopter systems may vary in susceptibility over time. The adoption of the institutions of democracy therefore corresponds to the adoption of a new political communications standard for a nation, in this case the innovation of involving in principle all adult citizens on an equal basis. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

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  • 4.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars, UX Vision, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Faculty of Information Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Fore-sighting autonomous driving - An Ethnographic approach2021In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 173, article id 121105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing body of Human-Computer-Interaction research and the automotive industry has identified that un- derstanding user needs and creating positive user experience (UX) is crucial in order to successfully introduce Autonomous Driving (AD) vehicles to the market. AD research is commonly undertaken to provide user insights by studying the individual-technology experiences in lab settings or by forecasting attitudes and acceptability through large surveys. However, these approaches base their knowledge on people’s past or present expectations and limited real life experiences of AD. To better understand upcoming individual user needs and to enable new innovations beyond acceptability forecasts and UX lab tests, we need to identify new concepts through alter- native methodologies that can generate user foresights based on users’ evolving anticipations of AD in their everyday lives. We propose an ethnographic approach with iterative speculative scenarios, which we demon- strate through a study undertaken with participants from five families who were introduced to evolving levels of AD, in real-life situations. To demonstrate the methodology, we draw on empirical findings which reveal anticipatory experiences, which we abstract through the concepts of confidence, hope and being-in-the-moment. We show how these concepts structured our user foresights, and outline the implications of engaging them in innovation processes.

  • 5.
    Rodgers, Waymond
    et al.
    University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom.
    Al Shammakhi, Badriya N.
    Higher College of Technology, Muscat, Oman.
    Johansson, Jeaneth
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Wincent, Joakim
    University of St. Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Adams, Kweku
    Huddersfield Business School, Huddersfield, United Kingdom.
    DIY Entrepreneurship: a decision-pathway framework for ethical thought structures2020In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 161, article id 120290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper provides a decision-making framework that enhances our understanding of how Do-It-Yourself (DIY) laboratory entrepreneurs execute ethical standards by dismissing fraud. Although our theory assumes that most DIY entrepreneurs are by nature ‘ethical’, we discuss how the unique nature of DIY laboratory entrepreneurship provides risks for fraud. Drawing on three ethical theoretical lenses, utilitarianism, deontology and egoism, our paper proposes different potential causes of fraud and motivates further analysis about why DIY laboratory entrepreneurship is an important context for the study of fraud. We contribute to theory and government policy by providing a conceptual framework that explains how entrepreneurial choices lead to three main types of fraud based on the dominant decision pathways. Further research and practical implications are discussed. © 2020 Elsevier Inc.

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