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  • 1.
    Hallberg, Lillemor
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Some reflections on qualitative research2008In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 66-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Undvik dispyter kring författarskap2013In: Universtietsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 16, p. 25-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Jönsson, Bodil
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences at Lund University, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Peter
    Flodin, Eva
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Nordgren, Camilla
    Svensk, Arne
    Malmborg, Lone
    Ethics in the Making2005In: Design Philosophy Papers, ISSN 1448-7136, E-ISSN 1448-7136, no 4, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Applied ethics in research is no longer regarded as a concern exclusive to the medical field. Exemplars in ethics from other fields such as design are, however, meagre, as are relevant practical and design applied guidelines. The more ethically grounded a given area of research is, the greater the chance it can contribute to long-term, meaningful breakthroughs in knowledge. An improved ethics in design can enable a critical questioning that in turn leads to entirely new research questions.

    The mere involvement of human subjects and the application of safety provisions in design research do not guarantee it will meet ethical considerations, best practices or standards. The entire complex interaction with users offers intriguing possibilities and risks, or can result in mediocrity in areas such as: preparation and implementation that is worth the research person’s time; respect for users’ contributions; dignified treatment; feedback in an iterative and interactive process with mutual information and inspiration; and products and processes that are truly influenced by the users. This reasoning applies to all, but with special distinction to people who are disabled and elderly. Starting with specific needs as opposed to more general ones (the latter of which result in the necessity for more abstract specifications for the multitudes) can, above and beyond the ethical dimension, also result in increased innovation and effectiveness for society on the whole. Proceeding from the particular to the general is of considerable value, for ethical reasons as well as for sheer effectiveness.

    Involving persons with a variety of disabilities in product development helps to ensure innovative and useworthy products.[1] One of many prerequisites for ethically sound user involvement is that all participants are aware of the interference taking place in an iterative design process.

    An elaboration of ethical aspects in design can be valuable for different stakeholders (user organisations, NGOs and the design community) and, of course, for the relevance of resulting products and processes. A more considerate ethical approach could have substantial economical value due to the higher relevance of the results. There has been a considerable increase in the ethical expectations placed on businesses and professions in recent years. Scores of organisations have reacted by developing ethical codes of conduct and professional guidelines to explicitly state their values and principles.[2] Moreover, the drafting of a code of ethics can be seen as an indication of professionalism in an emerging profession.[3]

  • 4.
    Lahti, Angelica
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    Naraha, Sanna
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    Svensson, Jesper
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Ethical Heuristics – A Tool for Applying Ethics in User-Involved IS Projects2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    User involvement in information system development, as well as in digital innovation processes, is viewed as a key element for success. By introducing users in IS projects, ethical consideration is needed. Even though ethical theoretical frameworks are available in the IS (and other) spheres; cheap and fast methods and tools for applying ethics efficiently and effectively in everyday design and development work remain scarce. This paper presents a suggested heuristics-based tool that bears the promise of quick integration, and effective and efficient application of ethics in user-involved IS projects.

  • 5.
    Nilsén, Åke
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Ethical consequences of the sociological classics2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethical consequences of the sociological classics In this paper I would like to challenge the ethical position taken by the sociological classics and conceptualize the present as ethical differentiated partly as a consequence of the classics positions.Ethics are the starting point for most sociological thinking historically. For Durkheim (1893) the question asked by philosophers on what kind of ethics should guide us in our actions was altered into investigate what ethics are guiding our actions. Weber (1914) did the distinction between different actions where only the value-oriented rational social action related actively to ethical dimensions. Had their basic question not been what is influencing action (Durkheim) alt. what do one recognize as having influence on ones actions (Weber) but instead what are the ethical consequences of ones actions, the sociological task would have been very different, in terms of ethical positioning.However, with this focus by the classics on what influence the social have on ones actions, the groundwork was paved for what I call an ethical differentiation when it comes to the social consequences of ones actions: different social influence result in different social actions, with different ethical consequences.

  • 6.
    Nilsén, Åke
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Societal Ethics in Merleau-Ponty: Three Attempts to Form an Ethics on the Phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty2016In: Ethics, Democracy and Markets: Nordic Perspectives on World Problems / [ed] Giorgio Baruchella, Jacob Dahl Rendtorff & Asger Sørensen, Köpenhamn: NSU Press, 2016, p. 55-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to investigate, out of three examples, the possible formation of a societal ethics upon the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty and how these examples relate necessarily to the societal dimension. For an ethics to qualify as a societal ethics it has to be derived from a practice and be related to or address social problems in this practice (Cortese, 2004). The three examples are: Maurice Hamington’s (2004) attempt to form an ethics upon embodiment; Michael Yeo’s (1992) ethics beyond the philosophy of identity; and Simone de Beauvoir’s (1948) ethics of ambiguity. Out of the three, Hamington’s attempt is the most successful one, since it is based on the encounter with the Other and includes a consideration of the influence of social institutions on the encounter. Yeo’s and de Beauvoir’s attempts lack a genuine societal dimension.

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