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  • 1.
    Inoue, Jun
    et al.
    Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA.
    Taha, Walid
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES). Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA.
    Reasoning About Multi-Stage Programs2012In: Programming Languages and Systems: 21st European Symposium on Programming, ESOP 2012, Held as Part of the European Joint Conferences on Theory and Practice of Software, ETAPS 2012, Tallinn, Estonia, March 24 - April 1, 2012. Proceedings / [ed] Helmut Seidl, Berlin: Springer Publishing Company, 2012, Vol. 7211, p. 357-376Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We settle three basic questions that naturally arise when verifying multi-stage functional programs. Firstly, does adding staging to a language compromise any equalities that hold in the base language? Unfortunately it does, and more care is needed to reason about terms with free variables. Secondly, staging annotations, as the name “annotations” suggests, are often thought to be orthogonal to the behavior of a program, but when is this formally guaranteed to be true? We give termination conditions that characterize when this guarantee holds. Finally, do multi-stage languages satisfy useful, standard extensional facts—for example, that functions agreeing on all arguments are equivalent? We provide a sound and complete notion of applicative bisimulation, which establishes such facts or, in principle, any valid program equivalence. These results greatly improve our understanding of staging, and allow us to prove the correctness of quite complicated multi-stage programs. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  • 2.
    Smeraldi, Fabrizio
    et al.
    Halmstad University. Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL-DI), Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Bigun, Josef
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Gerstner, Wulfram
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL-DI), Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Support vector features and the role of dimensionality in face authentication2002In: Pattern recognition with support vector machines / [ed] Seong-Whan Lee, Alessandro Verri, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2002, Vol. LNCS-2388, p. 249-259Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of the dimensionality of the Face Authentication problem using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and a novel dimensionality reduction algorithm that we call Support Vector Features (SVFs) is presented. Starting from a Gabor feature space, we show that PCA and SVFs identify distinct subspaces with comparable authentication and generalisation performance. Experiments using KNN classifiers and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) on these reduced feature spaces show that the dimensionality at which saturation of the authentication performance is achieved heavily depends on the choice of the classifier. In particular, SVMs involve directions in feature space that carry little variance and therefore appear to be vulnerable to excessive PCA-based compression. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002.

  • 3.
    Sörensen, Susanne
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM).
    Five English Verbs: A Comparison between Dictionary meanings and Meanings in Corpus collocations2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Norstedts Comprehensive English-Swedish Dictionary (2000) it is said that the numbered list of senses under each headword is frequency ordered. Thus, the aim of this study is to see whether this frequency order of senses agrees with the frequencies appearing in the British National Corpus (BNC). Five English, polysemous verbs were studied. For each verb, a simple search in the corpus was carried out, displaying 50 random occurrences. Each collocate was encoded with the most compatible sense from the numbered list of senses in the dictionary. The encoded tokens were compiled and listed in frequency order. This list was compared to the dictionary's list of senses. Only two of the verbs reached agreement between the highest ranked dictionary sense and the most frequent sense in the BNC simple search. None of the verbs' dictionary orders agreed completely with the emerged frequency order of the corpus occurrences, why complementary collocational learning is advocated.

  • 4.
    Taubner, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    DYSLEXI, INTERNET OCH STIGMA: en netnografisk studie av nätbaserad kommunikation hos personer med dyslexi2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Titel (translated from Swedish): Dyslexia, the internet and stigma – a netnographic study of online communication in people with dyslexia

    Author: Helena Taubner

    Supervisor: Åsa Wengelin

    Examinator: Magnus Tideman

    Masters thesis (30 ECTS) in Disability Studies, University of Halmstad, Sweden, spring 2013

    The thesis is written in Swedish.

    Our communication continually changes, and the internet is an important factor in that development. New ways of making writing more efficient, for example the use of abbreviations and special symbols are emerging. We mix written language with photos, films, sound clips and links. Norms for what is considered to be the correct use of language are displaced. When our abilities do not match society’s expectations, stigmatization occurs. This is what happens to a person with dyslexia when the demands placed upon them for their reading and writing abilities become too high. What happens when the communication moves into the online environment? The following three issues are addressed:

    How do individuals with dyslexia communicate online?

    How do individuals with dyslexia relate to their online communication?

    How do individuals with dyslexia control their stigma when communicating online?

    The study is a two-part qualitative case study based upon semi-structured interviews and netnographic shadowing with two informants, Andreas and Linda. The results were analysed with reference to Goffman’s theory of stigma. In spite of the fact that Andreas has greater difficulties with reading and writing than Linda, he experiences less stigma in relation to communication, since he more consciously manages to control his stigma. A crucial factor for both informants is whether or not the online forum is synchronous or asynchronous (it is impossible for them to pass in synchronous forums). Hence, the study suggests that the degree of stigmatization does not necessarily correspond to the degree of difficulties with reading and writing.

  • 5.
    Vaiciukynas, Evaldas
    et al.
    Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Verikas, Antanas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research. Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Gelzinis, Adas
    Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Bacauskiene, Marija
    Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Vaskevicius, Kestutis
    Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Uloza, Virgilijus
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Padervinskis, Evaldas
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Ciceliene, Jolita
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Fusing Various Audio Feature Sets for Detection of Parkinson’s Disease from Sustained Voice and Speech Recordings2016In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 9811, p. 328-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is the analysis of voice and speech recordings for the task of Parkinson’s disease detection. Voice modality corresponds to sustained phonation /a/ and speech modality to a short sentence in Lithuanian language. Diverse information from recordings is extracted by 22 well-known audio feature sets. Random forest is used as a learner, both for individual feature sets and for decision-level fusion. Essentia descriptors were found as the best individual feature set, achieving equal error rate of 16.3 % for voice and 13.3 % for speech. Fusion of feature sets and modalities improved detection and achieved equal error rate of 10.8 %. Variable importance in fusion revealed speech modality as more important than voice. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

  • 6.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dialogue Behavior Management in Conversational Recommender Systems2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines recommendation dialogue, in the context of dialogue strategy design for conversational recommender systems. The purpose of a recommender system is to produce personalized recommendations of potentially useful items from a large space of possible options. In a conversational recommender system, this task is approached by utilizing natural language recommendation dialogue for detecting user preferences, as well as for providing recommendations. The fundamental idea of a conversational recommender system is that it relies on dialogue sessions to detect, continuously update, and utilize the user's preferences in order to predict potential interest in domain items modeled in a system. Designing the dialogue strategy management is thus one of the most important tasks for such systems.

    Based on empirical studies as well as design and implementation of conversational recommender systems, a behavior-based dialogue model called bcorn is presented. bcorn is based on three constructs, which are presented in the thesis. It utilizes a user preference modeling framework (preflets) that supports and utilizes natural language dialogue, and allows for descriptive, comparative, and superlative preference statements, in various situations. Another component of bcorn is its message-passing formalism, pcql, which is a notation used when describing preferential and factual statements and requests. bcorn is designed to be a generic recommendation dialogue strategy with conventional, information-providing, and recommendation capabilities, that each describes a natural chunk of a recommender agent's dialogue strategy, modeled in dialogue behavior diagrams that are run in parallel to give rise to coherent, flexible, and effective dialogue in conversational recommender systems.

    Three empirical studies have been carried out in order to explore the problem space of recommendation dialogue, and to verify the solutions put forward in this work. Study I is a corpus study in the domain of movie recommendations. The result of the study is a characterization of recommendation dialogue, and forms a base for a first prototype implementation of a human-computer recommendation dialogue control strategy. Study II is an end-user evaluation of the acorn system that implements the dialogue control strategy and results in a verification of the effectiveness and usability of the dialogue strategy. There are also implications that influence the refinement of the model that are used in the bcorn dialogue strategy model. Study III is an overhearer evaluation of a functional conversational recommender system called CoreSong, which implements the bcorn model. The result of the study is indicative of the soundness of the behavior-based approach to conversational recommender system design, as well as the informativeness, naturalness, and coherence of the individual bcorn dialogue behaviors.

  • 7.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Degerstedt, Lars
    Department of Computer Science, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Department of Computer Science, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Emergent Conversational Recommendations: A Dialogue Behavior Approach2007In: Proceedings of the 8th SIGdial Workshop on Discourse and Dialogue / [ed] Simon Keizer, Harry Bunt, Tim Paek, East Stroudsburg, USA: Association for Computational Linguistics, 2007, p. 63-66Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and evaluates a behavior-based approach to dialogue management, where a system's complete dialogue strategy is viewed as the result of running several dialogue behaviors in parallel leading to an emergent coherent and flexible dialogue behavior. The conducted overhearer evaluation of the behavior-based conversational recommender system CORESONG indicates that the approach can give rise to informative and coherent dialogue; and that a complete dialogue strategy can be modeled as an emergent phenomenon in terms of lower-level autonomous behaviors for the studied class of recommendation dialogue interaction. © 2007 Association for Computational Linguistics.

  • 8.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science Linköping University, Sweden.
    Degerstedt, Lars
    Department of Computer Science Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Department of Computer Science Linköping University, Sweden.
    Interview and delivery: Dialogue strategies for conversational recommender systems2007In: Proceedings of the 16th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics NODALIDA 2007 / [ed] Joakim Nivre, Heiki-Jaan Kaalep, Kadri Muischnek, Mare Koit, Tartu, Estonia: University of Tartu, 2007, p. 199-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our work with conversational recommender systems we have derived two dialogue strategiescalled interview and delivery. We explorethe symmetry between preferential interview andtraditional clarification questions, and arrive atbasic interview and delivery strategies suitablefor conversational recommender system implementations.The strategies are based on a corpusanalysis of recommendation dialogues inthe movie domain. We illustrate the strategiesin a conversational music recommender systemcalled CORESONG.

  • 9.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    et al.
    Department of Computer and Information Science Linköping University, Sweden.
    Degerstedt, Lars
    Department of Computer and Information Science Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Arne
    Department of Computer and Information Science Linköping University, Sweden.
    PCQL: A Formalism for Human-Like Preference Dialogues2007In: IJCAI 07: 5th IJCAI Workshop on Knowledge and Reasoning in Practical Dialogue Systems: Workshop Proceedings, 2007, p. 46-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preference dialogues display several interestin gcharacteristics that have implications on how to design human-like dialogue strategies in conversational recommender systems. Using human-human preference dialogues as an empirical base, this paper introduces a novel data manipulation language calledPCQLthat comprises explicit descriptive, comparative and superlative preference management as well as implicit preference statements such as factual information queries. The usage of the PCQL language is demonstrated by an implementation of a music conversational recommender system.

1 - 9 of 9
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