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  • 1.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Accessible luxury fashion brand building via fat discrimination2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 2-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate if accessible luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: The physical sizes of garments are surveyed in-store and compared to the body sizes of the population. A gap analysis is carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the demand of each market segment.

    Findings: The surveyed accessible luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The survey is limited to London while the corresponding population is British. It is therefore possible that the mismatch between assortments and the population is in part attributable to geographic and demographic factors. The study’s results are however so strikingly clear that even if some of the effect were due to extraneous variables, it would be hard to disregard the poor match between overweight and obese women and the clothes offered to them.

    Practical implications: For symbolic/expressive brands that are conspicuously consumed, that narrowly target distinct and homogenous groups of people in industries where elitist practices are acceptable, companies can build brands via customer rejection.

    Social implications: The results highlight ongoing discrimination of overweight and obese fashion consumers.

    Originality/value: The study is the first to provide quantitative evidence for brand building via customer rejection, and it delineates under which conditions this may occur. This extends the theory of typical user imagery. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2018

  • 2.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Intermediate Luxury Fashion: Brand Building via Fat Discrimination2016In: 11th Global Brand Conference / [ed] Stuart Roper, Saltaire, UK: Greenleaf Publishing , 2016, p. 23-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate if intermediate luxury fashion brands discriminate overweight and obese consumers.

    Design/methodology/approach: 1,454 intermediate luxury garments were tallied and measured in-store in London. The physical sizes of the garments were matched to the body sizes of the population, and a gap analysis was carried out in order to determine whether the supply of clothes match the relative importance of each market segment.

    Findings: While previous research shows that mass-market fashion companies do not discriminate overweight and obese consumers, intermediate luxury garments come in very small sizes compared to the individuals that make up the population.

    Research limitations/implications: The findings show that purveyors of intermediate luxury fashion limit assortments of garments so they avoid fat typical user imagery.

    Practical implications: Companies that market products that are sensitive to the typical user imagery can optimize their brands by limiting undesirable customer types access to their brands, provided that 1) they have the financial strength to reject customers whose image would be detrimental to the brand, 2) the companies are active in an industry in which people would tolerate customer rejection, and 3) they sell a product that actually can be denied undesirable customers.

    Social implications: The study shows that fat consumers are relegated to mass-market fashion but are excluded from intermediate luxury fashion. This constitutes a social inequality.

    Originality/value: The result of this study provides quantitative evidence that companies control assortments to exclude undesirable typical user imagery. It also delineates under which conditions they do it. This adds to the theory of user imagery.

  • 3.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 557-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of obese models vs. normal weight models on fashion brands’ attractiveness.

    Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 1,225 university students in Sweden and Brazil rated the attractiveness of a fashion brand worn by a normal weight model and an obese model.

    Findings: The overall effect of obese models’ effect on fashion brand attractiveness was insignificant. Further, neither culture, nor the consumer’s own weight had a significant effect. There was, however, a significant effect of the participant’s own gender; women rate fashion brands worn by obese models significantly higher on attractiveness than they did fashion brands worn by normal weight models. Men displayed the inverse response.

    Research limitations/implications: The effect of the model’s ethnicity was beyond the scope of the experiment, and the brand attractiveness scale captured only one aspect of brand character, leaving other potential brand effects for future studies.

    Practical implications: Companies can use obese models with no overall brand attractiveness penalty across markets and for marketing to women of all sizes. Given men’s negative reactions, such models might however be unsuitable for the male-to-female gift market.

    Social implications: The results support the use of obese models, which can lead to greater representation of larger women in the media, and consequently, reduced fat stigma.

    Originality/value: The study validates the theory of user imagery, and it extends the theory by examining how different target consumers react to user imagery traits and thus provides evidence for gender bias towards obese models. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2018

  • 4.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Department of Business Administration School of Business, Economics and Law University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Impact of User Weight on Brands and Business Practices in Mass Market Fashion2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight people claim to be mistreated by the fashion industry. If they were, it would be in line with branding theory supporting the idea of rejecting fat consumers to improve user imagery for fashion brands. However, fashion companies do not confess to such practices.

    To shed some light on the subject, I have conducted two studies.

    The first attempts to illustrate what effect, if any, user imagery has on fashion brands. It is an experiment designed to show how the weight of users affects consumers’ perceptions of mass market fashion brands. The findings show that consumers’ impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of its users. The effect of male user imagery is ambiguous. For women’s fashion on the other hand, slender users are to be preferred.

    In the second study I examine what effects these effects have on assortments. I compare the sizes of mass market clothes to the body sizes of the population. No evidence of discrimination of overweight or obese consumers was found -quite the contrary.

    The reasons for these unexpected findings may be explained by the requirements a brand must fulfil to make management of the customer base for user imagery purposes viable. The brand must be sensitive to user imagery; a requirement that mass market fashion fulfils. However, it must also be feasible for a company to exclude customers, and while garment sizes can be restricted to achieve this, the high volume sales strategy of mass market fashion apparently cannot.

  • 5.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). School of Business, Economics, and Law, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The influence of real women in advertising on mass market fashion brand perception2011In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 486-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the weight of ideal users affects the perception of mass market fashion brands. Design/methodology/approach: An experiment was carried out in which 640 university students replied to a web survey, rating the brand personality of jeans and shirts according to Aaker's Big Five construct. The garments were worn by thin, overweight, and obese models. Findings: The findings show that consumers' impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of ideal users. Slender models lead to the most positive brand perception followed by obese models. Overweight user imagery is for pure fashion brand building the least attractive kind. Research limitations/implications: A limitation of this study is the use of convenient student samples. Consequently, the generalization of the results beyond this convenience sample may be limited. It is further possible, even probable, that high fashion would suffer more from the negative imagery of overweight and obese users than mass market fashion. It would therefore be interesting to replicate this experiment using clothes of higher fashion grade and price. Practical implications: The demonstrated effects of user imagery support the industry practice of slim ideal female imagery. Social implications: The results inform the debate over skinny models vs real women in advertising. Originality/value: Previous research regarding the effectiveness of real women in advertising has been inconclusive. This paper demonstrates not only that model weight affects consumers' brand perception, but also how. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 6.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Department of Business Administration School of Business, Economics and Law University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    To sell or not to sell: overweight users’ effect on fashion assortmentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight people claim to be mistreated by the fashion industry. Fashion companies disagree. Despite the controversy, actual research has been scarce. This study compares the sizes of clothes the four leading mass marketing fashion retailers in Sweden offer to the body sizes of the population. Although branding theory would support the idea of rejecting fat consumers to improve user imagery for fashion brands, such practices were not evident. The main contribution of this paper is that it provides the first quantified empirical evidence on the theory of typical user imagery.

    In the discussion, it is posited that although mass market fashion brands should be susceptible to negative user imagery related to overweight and obese users, the companies avoid such problems by making garments that are not directly attributable to a specific brand, thus mitigating the negative effect of overweight and obese user imagery. 

  • 7.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    To sell or not to sell: Overweight users’ effect on fashion assortments2010In: Journal of Brand Management, ISSN 1350-231X, E-ISSN 1479-1803, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 66-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overweight people claim to be mistreated by the fashion industry. Fashion companies disagree. Despite the controversy, actual research has been scarce. This study compares the sizes of clothes that the four leading mass-marketing fashion retailers in Sweden offer to the body sizes of the population. Although branding theory would support the idea of rejecting fat consumers to improve user imagery for fashion brands, such practices were not evident. The main contribution of this article is that it provides the first quantified empirical evidence on the theory of typical user imagery. In the discussion, it is posited that, although mass-market fashion brands should be susceptible to negative user imagery related to overweight and obese users, the companies avoid such problems by making garments that are not directly attributable to a specific brand, thus mitigating the negative effect of overweight and obese user imagery. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Ltd.

  • 8.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    Department of Business Administration School of Business, Economics and Law University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    User BMI effects on mass market fashion brandsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the weight of users affects the perception of mass market fashion brands.

    Design/methodology/approach: This study attempts to show effects of typical - as well as ideal user imagery on fashion brands. An experiment was carried out in which 1848 university students replied to a web survey, rating the brand personality of jeans and shirts according to Aaker’s Big Five construct. The garments were worn by digitally manipulated versions of one person as thin, overweight, and obese.

    Findings: The findings show that consumers’ impressions of mass market fashion brands are significantly affected by the weight of its users. The effect of male user imagery is ambiguous. For women’s fashion on the other hand, slender users are to be preferred.

    Research limitations/implications: It is possible, even probable, that high fashion would suffer more from negative typical user imagery than would mass market fashion. It would therefore be interesting to replicate this experiment using clothes of higher fashion grade and price.

    Practical implications: The demonstrated effects of user imagery support the industry practice of slim ideal female imagery. However, excluding customers to boost brand perception should not be an option for these brands.

    Social implications: The results inform the debate over skinny models vs. “real women” in advertising as well as the debate over discrimination of overweight consumers through assortment decisions.

    Originality/value: This is the first time typical user imagery effects are included in a study of this type, and it is the first study to test user imagery effects on fashion. 

  • 9.
    Aagerup, Ulf
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Handelshögskolan i Göteborg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Green consumer behavior: being good or seeming good?2016In: Journal of Product & Brand Management, ISSN 1061-0421, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 274-284, article id 115980330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to expand the emerging field of symbolic green consumer behavior (GCB) by investigating the impact of anticipated conspicuousness of the consumption situation on consumers’ choice of organic products. In addition, the paper also explores whether self-monitoring ability and attention to social comparison information (ATSCI) influence GCB in situations of anticipated high conspicuousness.

    Design/methodology/approach: Two experiments test the study’s hypotheses.

    Findings: The results of both experiments show that the anticipation of conspicuousness has a significant effect on GCB. Moreover, in Experiment 2, this effect is moderated by consumers’ level of ATSCI but not by their self-monitoring ability.

    Research limitations/implications: Because ATSCI significantly interacts with green consumption because of the anticipation of a conspicuous setting, although self-monitoring ability does not, we conclude that social identification is an important determinant of green consumption.

    Practical implications: Marketers who focus on building green brands could consider designing conspicuous consumption situations to increase GCB.

    Social implications: Policymakers could enact change by making the environmental unfriendliness of non-eco-friendly products visible to the public and thus increase the potential for GCB.

    Originality/value: The results validate the emerging understanding that green products are consumed for self-enhancement, but also expand the literature by highlighting that a key motivating factor of GCB is the desire to fit in.

  • 10.
    Abalo Caldera, Ernesto
    et al.
    Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap, Växjö universitet, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap, Växjö universitet, Sweden.
    Om aktiva herrar för aktiva herrar: Mediesporten och dess publik2006In: Idrottsforum.org, ISSN 1652-7224, p. 12 s.-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    et al.
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Digitalisering och social exklusion: Om medborgares användning av och attityder till Arbetsförmedlingens digitala tjänster2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research report focuses on the users of e-government in a social science perspective. Our aim is to study how different social groups, registered at the Swedish Public Employment Service, relate to the internet, the agency and the services offered on its website (www.ams.se).

    The field of e-government research is dominated by studies that centre attention on the supply side (videlicet research investigating the entrance of IT in organizations and the implications that new technology have to these), while usercentred research (demand side) is still scarce. Our study, focusing on how citizens relate to the internet in general and e-government in particular, therefore helps to bridge a knowledge gap within the field.

    Our survey is based on a questionnaire sent to 2 000 randomly selected persons, all registered at the Swedish Public Employment Service. Of these, 762 job seekers responded, which gives us a frequency rate of 40 percent. The questions asked were related to the job seekers’ usage of and attitudes towards the internet in general and the agency’s webpage in particular, but also to their attitudes to the Swedish Public Employment Service.

    The main results show that social factors, particularly education, play a major role for the job seekers’ ability to use the web based services offered by the agency. People with a lower educational level are less inclined to use the agency’s website, and at the same time they experience the site as more complicated to use. We also found a strong link between the relations to the internet (access, usage, experience and attitudes) and the relations to the agency’s website. Those with advantaged internet relations – mostly well educated people, white collars and people living in bigger cities – also use the agency’s website more diligently and tend to have more positive attitudes towards it (and vice versa). Thus, its necessary to talk in terms of digitally well equipped and less well equipped groups.

    The unequal relations to the internet in general and the agency’s website in particular not only indicate that e-government is more suitable for the digitally well equipped, but that it in fact exclude those with less digital resources. This new kind of exclusion has great implications for the job seekers’ possibilities to enter the labour market, and to act their role as citizens. If e government also means a reformation of the citizen role – in the sense of increased individual responsibility towards the government - not bridging the digital divide will carry even more exclusion to those that’s already excluded.

  • 12.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    et al.
    Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap, Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap, Växjö universitet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Olika publiker, olika livsstilar: Om idrott, kultur och regional utveckling2008Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Johansson, Håkan
    Lunds universitet.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Digital inkludering eller exkludering?: Arbetslösas användning av Arbetsförmedlingens webbplats2010In: Den ifrågasatte medborgaren: Om utsatta gruppers relation till välfärdssystemen / [ed] Torbjörn Hjort, Philip Lalander, Roddy Nilsson, Växjö: MiV, Linnéuniversitetet , 2010, p. 69-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Johansson, Håkan
    Lunds universitet.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Lunds universitet.
    Emerging Patterns in the Era of E-governance: A Study of Users of 'Swedish Public Employment Service' on Internet2012In: Media in the Swirl / [ed] Dhar, R.K. & Rana, P., New Delhi, India: Pentagon Press , 2012, p. 114-125Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM). Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Johansson, Håkan
    Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tobias
    Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden & Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Emerging Patterns of Inclusion and Exclusion in the Era of E-government: A Study of Users of ‘Swedish Public Employment Service’ on the Internet2008In: Media and Global Divides: abstracts: IAMCR World Congress, Stockholm 20-25 July 2008 / [ed] Ester Pollack, Sigurd Allern, Robert Kautsky, Håkan Lindhoff, Emelie Strand & Andreas Widholm, Stockholm: Organizing Committee for the IAMCR Congress 2008 , 2008, p. 44-45Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the area of governmental information for and services to citizens digitalization has certainly become a buzzword. Framed within the discourses on e-government or e-governance – or differ­ent mixtures of the two – various analyses have tried to point out, or even anticipate possible consequences of the appropriation of digital technologies, mainly the internet, in governmental services.

    On the one hand, these analyses have pointed out a great deal of opportunities connected to the incorporation of the internet into governmental information and services. Policy makers have been quick to point to the increased accessibility as a great opportunity for the citizens; in Sweden this vision of accessibility has even been referred to as ‘24:7-governmental agencies’. Academics, among others, have also suggested that the digitalization of information and services opens up new possibilities for citizen control of governments.

    On the other hand, a number of problems have also been identified. For instance, the digitalization of public registers holding personal information has been interpreted as a threat to the citizens’ integrity: Will digitalization bring a new surveillance society? The most frequently debated prob­lem, however, at least within research, has been the fear of digital divides. Will the internet create digital cleavages between different groups of citizens?

    So far, however, neither the hopeful nor the dystopian analyses have made enough efforts to critically evaluate their claims. Such evaluations can start from different points of departure, and in this paper the starting point is the citizens as users of governmental information and services through the internet: What patterns of inclusion and exclusion emerge as a governmental agency digitalizes its information and services by making them increasingly internet based?

    The paper presents statistical data from a survey of 762 unemployed citizens using the Swedish Public Employment Service, a governmental agency that has come to rely specifically heavy on internet based information and service. The initial analysis of data reveals interesting differences between social groups in terms of both perception and use of the internet – in general – and the resources offered by SPES in particular. For instance, the users’ various degrees of education is a strong, determining factor when it comes to use of internet SPES’ services.

    The paper starts from a conceptual elaboration of various notions of e-government and e-gov­ernance. Thereafter, the survey data is described and elaborated on before moving into a discus­sion of the wider significance of the findings: What does data suggest in terms of patterns of in­clusion in and exclusion from a society in which governmental agencies, to an increasing extent, use the internet for their information and services?

  • 16.
    Abbas, Taimoor
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Elect & Informat Technol Dept, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Katrin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES).
    Kåredal, Johan
    Lund Univ, Elect & Informat Technol Dept, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Tufvesson, Fredrik
    Lund Univ, Elect & Informat Technol Dept, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    A Measurement Based Shadow Fading Model for Vehicle-to-Vehicle Network Simulations2015In: International Journal of Antennas and Propagation, ISSN 1687-5869, E-ISSN 1687-5877, article id 190607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) propagation channel has significant implications on the design and performance of novel communication protocols for vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). Extensive research efforts have been made to develop V2V channel models to be implemented in advanced VANET system simulators for performance evaluation. The impact of shadowing caused by other vehicles has, however, largely been neglected in most of the models, as well as in the system simulations. In this paper we present a shadow fading model targeting system simulations based on real measurements performed in urban and highway scenarios. The measurement data is separated into three categories, line-of-sight (LOS), obstructed line-of-sight (OLOS) by vehicles, and non-line-of-sight due to buildings, with the help of video information recorded during the measurements. It is observed that vehicles obstructing the LOS induce an additional average attenuation of about 10 dB in the received signal power. An approach to incorporate the LOS/OLOS model into existing VANET simulators is also provided. Finally, system level VANET simulation results are presented, showing the difference between the LOS/OLOS model and a channel model based on Nakagami-m fading.

  • 17.
    Abrahamsson, Cristian
    et al.
    Institutionen för utbildningsvetenskap, Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    En Delfistudie om lärares uppfattning av elevengagemang i NO-undervisningen2019In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 128-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What happens in a science classroom where students are engaged and how do teachers observe and interpret student engagement? This article highlights teachers’ perspective on students’ engagement in science education and to what extent it is connected to the scientific content. This approach complements earlier research which focuses mostly on students’ attitude towards science education and their interest in various topics in science.

    The findings are based on a three-stage Delphi survey distributed to 39 expert science teachers. The results shows science education with a range of different perspectives and that most teachers do not perceive any direct connection between specific science topics and the students’ engagement. The survey also shows that teachers to a high level interpret students’ emotional expressions and academic behavior as engagement rather than their cognitive behavior.

  • 18.
    Abrahamsson, Kajsa H.
    et al.
    Department of Periodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Box 450, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden..
    Wennström, Jan L.
    Department of Periodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Box 450, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden..
    Hallberg, Ulrika
    Department of Periodontology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Box 450, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden..
    Patients' Views on Periodontal Disease; Attitudes to Oral Health and Expectancy of Periodontal Treatment: A Qualitative Interview Study2008In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 209-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    The aim of the study was to explore and gain an understanding of patients' views on their periodontal conditions, their perceived impact of periodontitis on daily life, as well as their attitudes to oral health and expectations of treatment.

    Materials and Methods:

    The study subjects were patients with chronic periodontitis, who had been referred to a specialist clinic. The constant comparative method for grounded theory was used to collect and analyse the data. Audiotaped, open-ended interviews were conducted after periodontal examination, but before treatment. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and consecutively analysed in hierarchical coding processes and continued until saturation was reached (n = 17). In the analysis, a conceptual model that outlined the steps involved in the diagnosis of periodontitis was generated. The core concept of the model, keeping up appearance and self-esteem, was related to the following four additional categories and their dimensions; doing what you have to do trying to live up to the norm, suddenly having a shameful and disabling disease, feeling deserted and in the hands of an authority, and investing all in a treatment with an unpredictable outcome.

    Results:

    The results illustrated that subjects diagnosed with chronic periodontitis felt ashamed and were willing to invest all they had in terms of time, effort and financial resources to become healthy and to maintain their self-esteem. However, they perceived a low degree of control over treatment decisions and treatment outcome.

    Conclusions:

    The results demonstrate the vulnerability of patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis and emphasise the importance of communication in dentistry.

  • 19.
    Abramson, Norman
    et al.
    Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Hawaii, USA.
    Sacchi, Claudio
    Information Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Trento, Italy.
    Bellalta, Boris
    Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain.
    Vinel, Alexey
    Saint-Petersburg Institute for Informatics and Automation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia.
    Multiple access communications in future-generation wireless networks2012In: EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking, ISSN 1687-1472, E-ISSN 1687-1499, p. Art nr 45-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Aceto, L.
    et al.
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Iceland.
    Birgisson, A.
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ingolfsdottir, A.
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, TU/Eindhoven, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Decompositional Reasoning about the History of Parallel Processes2011In: Fundamentals of software engineering: revised selected papers, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, Vol. 4171, p. 32-47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a decomposition technique for Hennessy-Milner logic with past and its extension with recursively defined formulae. In order to highlight the main ideas and technical tools, processes are described using a subset of CCS with parallel composition, nondeterministic choice, action prefixing and the inaction constant. The study focuses on developing decompositional reasoning techniques for parallel contexts in that language. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  • 21.
    Aceto, L.
    et al.
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavík University, Kringlan 1, 103 Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Fokkink, W. J.
    Department of Computer Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ingólfsdóttir, A.
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavík University, Kringlan 1, 103 Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Lifting non-finite axiomatizability results to extensions of process algebras2010In: Acta Informatica, ISSN 0001-5903, E-ISSN 1432-0525, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 147-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a general technique for obtaining new results pertaining to the non-finite axiomatizability of behavioural (pre)congruences over process algebras from old ones. The proposed technique is based on a variation on the classic idea of reduction mappings. In this setting, such reductions are translations between languages that preserve sound (in)equations and (in)equational provability over the source language, and reflect families of (in)equations responsible for the non-finite axiomatizability of the target language. The proposed technique is applied to obtain a number of new non-finite axiomatizability theorems in process algebra via reduction to Moller's celebrated non-finite axiomatizability result for CCS. The limitations of the reduction technique are also studied. In particular, it is shown that prebisimilarity is not finitely based over CCS with the divergent process Ω, but that this result cannot be proved by a reduction to the non-finite axiomatizability of CCS modulo bisimilarity. This negative result is the inspiration for the development of a sharpened reduction method that is powerful enough to show that prebisimilarity is not finitely based over CCS with the divergent process Ω. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  • 22.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Birgisson, Arnar
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ingolfsdottir, Anna
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Reniers, Michel A.
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Rule Formats for Determinism and Idempotence2012In: Science of Computer Programming, ISSN 0167-6423, E-ISSN 1872-7964, Vol. 77, p. 889-907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determinism is a semantic property of (a fragment of) a language that specifies that a program cannot evolve operationally in several different ways. Idempotence is a property of binary composition operators requiring that the composition of two identical specifications or programs will result in a piece of specification or program that is equivalent to the original components. In this paper, we propose (related) meta-theorems for guaranteeing the determinism and idempotence of binary operators. These meta-theorems are formulated in terms of syntactic templates for operational semantics, called rule formats. In order to obtain a powerful rule format for idempotence, we make use of the determinism of certain transition relations in the definition of the format for idempotence. We show the applicability of our formats by applying them to various operational semantics from the literature. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 23.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Iceland.
    Birgisson, Arnar
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Iceland & Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ingólfsdóttir, Anna
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, TU/Eindhoven, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Decompositional Reasoning about the History of Parallel Processes2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Decompositional reasoning aims at automatically decomposing a global property of a composite system into local properties of (possibly unknown) components. In concurrency theory, decompositional reasoning techniques date back to the seminal work of Larsen and Liu in the late 1980s and early 1990s. However, we are not aware of any such decomposition technique that applies to reasoning about the "past". In this paper, we address this problem and present a decomposition technique for Hennessy-Milner logic with past and its extension with recursively defined formulae. As a language for processes, we use a subset of Milner's CCS with parallel composition, non-deterministic choice, action prefixing and the inaction constant. We focus on developing decompositional reasoning techniques for parallel contexts in that language.

  • 24.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Cimini, Matteo
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ingolfsdottir, Anna
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Reniers, Michel A.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Rule Formats for Distributivity2012In: Theoretical Computer Science, ISSN 0304-3975, E-ISSN 1879-2294, Vol. 458, p. 1-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes rule formats for Structural Operational Semantics guaranteeing that certain binary operators are left distributive with respect to a set of binary operators. Examples of left-distributivity laws from the literature are shown to be instances of the provided formats. Some conditions ensuring the invalidity of the left-distributivity law are also offered. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 25.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Cimini, Matteo
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ingolfsdottir, Anna
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Reniers, Michel A.
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    SOS Rule Formats for Zero and Unit Elements2011In: Theoretical Computer Science, ISSN 0304-3975, E-ISSN 1879-2294, Vol. 412, no 28, p. 3045-3071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes rule formats for Structural Operational Semantics guaranteeing that certain constants act as left or right unit/zero elements for a set of binary operators. Examples of left and right zero, as well as unit, elements from the literature are shown to fit the rule formats offered in this study. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Cimini, Matteo
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ingólfsdóttir, Anna
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Reniers, Michael A.
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    On Rule Formats for Zero and Unit Elements2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a rule format for Structural Operational Semantics guaranteeing that certain constants act as left or right zero elements for a set of binary operators. Our design approach is also applied to reformulate an earlier rule format for unit elements developed by some of the authors. Examples of left and right zero, as well as unit, elements from the literature are shown to be checkable using the provided formats.

  • 27.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Cimini, Matteo
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ingólfsdóttir, Anna
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Reniers, Michael A.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Rule Formats for Distributivity2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes rule formats for Structural Operational Semantics guaranteeing that certain binary operators are left distributive with respect to a set of binary operators. Examples of left-distributivity laws from the literature are shown to be instances of the provided formats.

  • 28.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Iceland.
    Cimini, Matteo
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Iceland.
    Ingólfsdóttir, Anna
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Reniers, Michel A.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Rule Formats for Distributivity2011In: Language and Automata Theory and Applications: 5th International Conference : Proceedings / [ed] Adrian Horia Dediu, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, Vol. 6638, p. 79-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes rule formats for Structural Operational Semantics guaranteeing that certain binary operators are left distributive with respect to a set of binary operators. Examples of left-distributivity laws from the literature are shown to be instances of the provided formats. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  • 29.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    Reykjavík University, Kringlan 1, IS-103, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Fokkink, Wan
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, NL-1081HV, The Netherlands.
    Ingólfsdóttir, Anna
    Reykjavík University, Kringlan 1, IS-103, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Eindhoven University of Technology, NL-5600MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Lifting non-finite axiomatizability results to extensions of process algebras2008In: Fifth Ifip International Conference On Theoretical Computer Science – Tcs 2008 / [ed] Ausiello, G, Karhumaki, J, Mauri, G, Ong, L, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2008, Vol. 273, p. 301-316Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a general technique for obtaining new results pertaining to the non-finite axiomatizability of behavioral semantics over process algebras from old ones. The proposed technique is based on a variation on the classic idea of reduction mappings. In this setting, such reductions are translations between languages that preserve sound (in)equations and (in)equational proofs over the source language, and reflect families of (in)equations responsible for the non-finite axiomatizability of the target language. The proposed technique is applied to obtain a number of new non-finite axiomatizability theorems in process algebra via reduction to Moller’s celebrated non-finite axiomatizability result for CCS. The limitations of the reduction technique are also studied.

  • 30.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Fokkink, Wan J.
    Department of Computer Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ingólfsdóttir, Anna
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Lifting non-finite axiomatizability results to extensions of process algebras2008Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Goriac, Eugen-Ioan
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ingolfsdottir, Anna
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE), Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES).
    Reniers, Michel A.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Exploiting Algebraic Laws to Improve Mechanized Axiomatizations2013In: Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science: 5th International Conference, Calco 2013, Warsaw, Poland, September 2013, Proceedings, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 36-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of structural operational semantics (SOS), there have been several proposals both for syntactic rule formats guaranteeing the validity of algebraic laws, and for algorithms for automatically generating ground-complete axiomatizations. However, there has been no synergy between these two types of results. This paper takes the first steps in marrying these two areas of research in the meta-theory of SOS and shows that taking algebraic laws into account in the mechanical generation of axiomatizations results in simpler axiomatizations. The proposed theory is applied to a paradigmatic example from the literature, showing that, in this case, the generated axiomatization coincides with a classic hand-crafted one. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  • 32.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavík University, Kringlan 1, 103 Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Ingólfsdóttir, A.
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavík University, Kringlan 1, 103 Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Reniers, M. A.
    Algebraic properties for free!2009In: Bulletin of the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science, ISSN 0252-9742, Vol. 99, p. 81-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Algebraic properties specify some natural properties of programming and specification constructs. This paper provides an overview of techniques to guarantee or generate algebraic properties of language constructs by investigating the syntactic shape of the deduction rules defining their operational semantics.

  • 33.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science, Reykjavík University, Kringlan 1, IS-103, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Ingólfsdóttir, Anna
    Department of Computer Science, Reykjavík University, Kringlan 1, IS-103, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Reykjavík University, Kringlan 1, IS-103, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Impossibility results for the equational theory of timed CCS2007In: Algebra and Coalgebra in Computer Science: Second International Conference, CALCO 2007, Bergen, Norway, August 20-24, 2007. Proceedings, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, Vol. 4624, p. 80-95Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the equational theory of Timed CCS as proposed by Wang Yi in CONCUR'90. Common to Wang Yi's paper, we particularly focus on a class of linearly-ordered time domains exemplified by the positive real or rational numbers. We show that, even when the set of basic actions is a singleton, there are parallel Timed CCS processes that do not have any sequential equivalent and thus improve on the Gap Theorem for Timed CCS presented by Godskesen and Larsen in FSTTCS'92. Furthermore, we show that timed bisimilarity is not finitely based both for single-sorted and two-sorted presentations of Timed CCS. We further strengthen this result by showing that, unlike in some other process algebras, adding the untimed or the timed left-merge operator to the syntax and semantics of Timed CCS does not solve the axiomatizability problem.

  • 34.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ingólfsdóttir, Anna
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Reniers, Michel A.
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    A Rule Format for Unit Elements2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers a meta-theorem for languages with a Structural Operational Semantics (SOS) in the style of Plotkin. Namely, it proposes a generic rule format for SOS guaranteeing that certain constants act as left- or right-unit elements for a set of binary operators. We show the generality of our format by applying it to a wide range of operators from the literature on process calculi.

  • 35.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University Kringlan 1, IS-103 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ingólfsdóttir, Anna
    ICE-TCS, School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University Kringlan 1, IS-103 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Ei ndhoven, The Netherlands.
    Reniers, Michel A.
    Department of Computer Science, Eindhoven University of Technology P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Ei ndhoven, The Netherlands.
    A rule format for unit elements2010In: SOFSEM 2010: Theory and Practice of Computer Science: Proceedings / [ed] VanLeeuwen, J, Muscholl, A, Peleg, D, Pokorny, J, Rumpe, B, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, Vol. 5901, p. 141-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers a meta-theorem for languages with a Structural Operational Semantics (SOS) in the style of Plotkin. Namely, it proposes a generic rule format for SOS guaranteeing that certain constants act as left- or right-unit elements for a set of binary operators. We show the generality of our format by applying it to a wide range of operators from the literature on process calculi.

  • 36.
    Aceto, Luca
    et al.
    Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Mousavi, Mohammad RezaEindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Proceedings First International Workshop on Process Algebra and Coordination2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Process algebra provides abstract and rigorous means for studying communicating concurrent systems. Coordination languages also provide abstract means for the specifying and programming communication of components. Hence, the two fields seem to have very much in common and the link between these two research areas have been established formally by means of several translations, mainly from coordination languages to process algebras. There have also been proposals of process algebras whose communication policy is inspired by the one underlying coordination languages. The aim of this workshop was to push the state of the art in the study of the connections between process algebra and coordination languages by bringing together experts as well as young researchers from the two fields to communicate their ideas and findings. It includes both contributed and invited papers that have been presented during the one day meeting on Process Algebra and Coordination (PACO 2011) which took place on June 9, 2011 in Reykjavik, Iceland.

  • 37.
    Achard, Paola Olimpia
    et al.
    Universita' degli Studi dell'Aquila, Faculty of Economics, L'Aquila, Italy.
    Nucciarelli, Alberto
    Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Department of Technology Management, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Rosato, Roberto
    Salini Costruttori S.p.A., Roma, Italy.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Risk Identification in the Infrastructure Construction Industry: A Supply Chain Case Study2008In: International Journal of Logistics Economics and Globalisation, ISSN 1741-5373, E-ISSN 1741-5381, Vol. 1, no 3–4, p. 343-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to describe the risk identification within a supply chain of an infrastructure construction project. This research is based on a case study of risk management within a supply chain in the infrastructure construction industry. Data have been collected from an international company emphasising the stage of risk identification. A particular view of risk management has been adopted. More specifically, a way to identify risk within the construction industry has been given. Technical and operational evidences have been revised and organised in order to take a first step in the direction of a systematic treatment. It has highlighted some crucial issues dealing with risk identification, while risk assessment and risk response provide an opportunity for further research. The article has underlined how risk management can be seen as the way to discover existing risks that are preventing firms from advancing their strategy. Main insights that emerged dealt with five categories: strategic objectives; critical success factors; environment and stakeholder influences; key performance indicators and principal risks; principal risk response strategies.

  • 38.
    Achtenhagen, Leona
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Laurell, Hélène
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Frühe Internationalisierung eines Unternehemens im Hoch-technologiebereich: Treiber und Hindernisse2011In: ZfKE - Zeitschrift für KMU und Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1860-4633, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 125-140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Reumark, Anna
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    What is a healthy Nordic diet? Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Reumark, Anna
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    What is a healthy Nordic diet? Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study2012In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 56, article id 18189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A healthy Nordic diet (ND), a diet based on foods originating from the Nordic countries, improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure and body weight in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare food and nutrient composition of the ND in relation to the intake of a Swedish reference population (SRP) and the recommended intake (RI) and average requirement (AR), as described by the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR).

    DESIGN: The analyses were based on an estimate of actual food and nutrient intake of 44 men and women (mean age 53±8 years, BMI 26±3), representing an intervention arm receiving ND for 6 weeks.

    RESULTS: The main difference between ND and SRP was the higher intake of plant foods, fish, egg and vegetable fat and a lower intake of meat products, dairy products, sweets and desserts and alcoholic beverages during ND (p<0.001 for all food groups). Intake of cereals and seeds was similar between ND and SRP (p>0.3). The relative intake of protein, fat and carbohydrates during ND was in accordance with RI. Intake of all vitamins and minerals was above AR, whereas sodium intake was below RI.

    CONCLUSIONS: When compared with the food intake of an SRP, ND is primarily a plant-based diet. ND represents a balanced food intake that meets the current RI and AR of NNR 2004 and has a dietary pattern that is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality.

    © 2012 Viola Adamsson et al.

  • 41.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Reumark, Anna
    Lantmännen R and D, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, I.-B.
    Bollnäs Heart Clinic, Mitt Hjärta, Bollnäs, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Eskil
    Bollnäs Heart Clinic, Mitt Hjärta, Bollnäs, Sweden.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Riserus, U.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effects of a healthy Nordic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in hypercholesterolaemic subjects: a randomized controlled trial (NORDIET)2011In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 269, no 2, p. 150-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a healthy Nordic diet (ND) on cardiovascular risk factors.

    Design and subjects:

    In a randomizedcontrolled trial (NORDIET) conducted in Sweden, 88 mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects were randomly assigned to an ad libitum ND or control diet (subjects' usual Western diet) for 6 weeks. Participants in the ND group were provided with all meals and foods. Primary outcome measurements were low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and secondary outcomes were blood pressure (BP) and insulin sensitivity (fasting insulin and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance). The ND was rich in high-fibre plant foods, fruits, berries, vegetables, whole grains, rapeseed oil, nuts, fish and low-fat milk products, but low in salt, added sugars and saturated fats.

    Results:

    The ND contained 27%, 52%, 19% and 2% of energy from fat, carbohydrate, protein and alcohol, respectively. In total, 86 of 88 subjects randomly assigned to diet completed the study. Compared with controls, there was a decrease in plasma cholesterol (-16%, P < 0.001), LDL cholesterol (-21%, P < 0.001), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (-5%, P < 0.01), LDL/HDL (-14%, P < 0.01) and apolipoprotein (apo)B/apoA1 (-1%, P < 0.05) in the ND group. The ND reduced insulin (-9%, P = 0.01) and systolic BP by -6.6 ± 13.2 mmHg (-5%, P < 0.05) compared with the control diet. Despite the ad libitum nature of the ND, body weight decreased after 6 weeks in the ND compared with the control group (-4%, P < 0.001). After adjustment for weight change, the significant differences between groups remained for blood lipids, but not for insulin sensitivity or BP. There were no significant differences in diastolic BP or triglyceride or glucose concentrations.

    Conclusions:

    A healthy ND improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure at clinically relevant levels in hypercholesterolaemic subjects. © 2010 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  • 42.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Enheten för Klinisk Nutrition och Metabolism. Institutionen för Folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap. Uppsala Universitet.
    Reumark, Anna
    MSc Kostvetenskap Lantmännen Food R&D, Stockholm.
    Fredriksson, Ing-Britt
    SSK Mitt Hjärta, Bollnäs.
    Hammarström, Eskil
    SSK Mitt Hjärta, Bollnäs.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Enheten för Klinisk Nutrition och Metabolism. Institutionen för Folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap. Uppsala Universitet.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Riserus, Ulf
    Enheten för Klinisk Nutrition och Metabolism. Institutionen för Folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap. Uppsala Universitet.
    Effects of a Nordic diet on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in hypercholesterolemic subjects: a randomized controlled study2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Apart from lipid-lowering drugs, dietary changes can also reduce plasma LDL-C concentrations. No studies have been conducted to investigate the clinical effects of a diet with traditional foods originating from the Nordic countries. Method: In a randomised, controlled parallel-group intervention study 88 mildly hypercholesterolemic men and women were randomized to either an ad libitum Nordic diet (ND) or a control diet (CD) for 6 weeks. All meals and foods were provided to the participants in the ND group. Primary outcome measure was LDL-cholesterol, and secondary outcomes were blood pressure, plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. The ND was a high-fibre diet rich in plant foods (fruit, berries, vegetables, root vegetables, whole grain cereals and legumes), vegetable fats (rapeseed oil and nuts) and fatty fish, low-fat milk products, but low in salt, added sugars, saturated fats and red meats. Result: 86 subjects completed the study. Distribution of carbohydrates, fat and protein (E%) in ND was 54, 27, 19, respectively. ND lowered plasma total cholesterol 0.98±0.75 mmol/l (-16%), LDL-C by 0.83±0.67 mmol/l (-21%), HDL-C 0.08±0.23 mmol/l (-5%), including reduced LDL/HDL ratio by -0.42±0.57 (-14%) (all p<0.01 versus controls). Insulin concentrations decreased by 0.51± 2.25 (-9%, p=0.01) and systolic blood pressure by 7±13 mmHg (-5%, P<0.01) compared to controls. Despite diets were eaten ad libitum, body weight decreased by 3.0 kg in the ND (P<0.001). No significant differences were found for diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides or plasma glucose. Conclusion: A Nordic diet improves blood lipid profile, and insulin sensitivity as well as lowering blood pressure to a clinically significant extent in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

  • 43.
    Adolfsson, Petra
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet GRI.
    Dobers, PeterMälardalens högskola.Jonasson, MikaelHalmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Guiding and guided tours2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is based on the collaborative work and experience from Swedish researchers in an new and promising field of scientific and management oriented inquiry: guided tours. The book represents a wide range of scientific perspectives such as organizational theory, human geography, architecture, ethnology and technology.

    The chapters are divided into three themes: Guided tours as a phenomenon, Guided tours and guidebooks and finally Guided tours: their production, content and use. And your guides - the authors - will provide various kinds of insights. We will follow the history of guidebooks and their followers, experience the smell of sage and find out how a guided tour at a construction site can be performed. Let's take a walk...

  • 44.
    Aein, Mohamad Javad
    et al.
    Department for Computational Neuroscience at the Bernstein Center Göttingen (Inst. of Physics 3) & Leibniz Science Campus for Primate Cognition, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
    Aksoy, Eren
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Wörgötter, Florentin
    Department for Computational Neuroscience at the Bernstein Center Göttingen (Inst. of Physics 3) & Leibniz Science Campus for Primate Cognition, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
    Internet Provisioning in VANETs: Performance Modeling of Drive-Thru Scenarios2019In: The international journal of robotics research, ISSN 0278-3649, E-ISSN 1741-3176, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 910-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drive-thru-Internet is a scenario in cooperative intelligent transportation systems (C-ITSs), where a road-side unit (RSU) provides multimedia services to vehicles that pass by. Performance of the drive-thru-Internet depends on various factors, including data traffic intensity, vehicle traffic density, and radio-link quality within the coverage area of the RSU, and must be evaluated at the stage of system design in order to fulfill the quality-of-service requirements of the customers in C-ITS. In this paper, we present an analytical framework that models downlink traffic in a drive-thru-Internet scenario by means of a multidimensional Markov process: the packet arrivals in the RSU buffer constitute Poisson processes and the transmission times are exponentially distributed. Taking into account the state space explosion problem associated with multidimensional Markov processes, we use iterative perturbation techniques to calculate the stationary distribution of the Markov chain. Our numerical results reveal that the proposed approach yields accurate estimates of various performance metrics, such as the mean queue content and the mean packet delay for a wide range of workloads. © 2019 IEEE.

  • 45.
    Aerts, Arend
    et al.
    Control Systems Technology Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES).
    Reniers, Michel A.
    Control Systems Technology Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    A Tool Prototype for Model-Based Testing of Cyber-Physical Systems2015In: Theoretical Aspects of Computing – ICTAC 2015: 12th International Colloquium Cali, Colombia, October 29–31, 2015, Proceedings / [ed] Martin Leucker, Camilo Rueda, and Frank D. Valencia, Cham: Springer, 2015, Vol. 9399, p. 563-572Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a tool prototype for model-based testing of cyber-physical systems. Our starting point is a hybrid-system model specified in a domain-specific language called Acumen. Our prototype tool is implemented in Matlab and covers three stages of model-based testing, namely, test-case generation, test-case execution, and conformance analysis. We have applied our implementation to a number of typical examples of cyber-physical systems in order to analyze its applicability. In this paper, we report on the result of applying the prototype tool on a DC-DC boost converter. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

  • 46.
    Aerts, Arend
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Reniers, Michel A.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Mousavi, Mohammad Reza
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES).
    Model-Based Testing of Cyber-Physical Systems2016In: Cyber-Physical Systems: Foundations, Principles and Applications / [ed] H. Song, D.B. Rawat, S. Jeschke, and Ch. Brecher, Saint Louis: Elsevier, 2016, p. 287-304Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyber-physical systems (CPSs) are the result of the integration of connected computer systems with the physical world. They feature complex interactions that go beyond traditional communication schemes and protocols in computer systems. One distinguished feature of such complex interactions is the tight coupling between discrete and continuous interactions, captured by hybrid system models.

    Due to the complexity of CPSs, providing rigorous and model-based analysis methods and tools for verifying correctness of such systems is of the utmost importance. Model-based testing (MBT) is one such verification technique that can be used for checking the conformance of an implementation of a system to its specification (model).

    In this chapter, we first review the main concepts and techniques in MBT. Subsequently, we review the most common modeling formalisms for CPSs, with focus on hybrid system models. Subsequently, we provide a brief overview of conformance relations and conformance testing techniques for CPSs. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Afifi, Mustafa
    et al.
    Department of Non-Communicable Diseases Control, Ministry of Health (HQ), Muscat, Oman.
    von Bothmer, Margareta
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Egyptian women's attitudes and beliefs about female genital cutting and its association with childhood maltreatment2007In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 270-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to establish Egyptian women's attitudes and beliefs about female genital cutting (FGC) or mutilation by applying a questionnaire module about violence to a subsample of 5249 married women from a total of 19 474 women who participated in the 2005 Egypt Demographic Health Survey. Women were interviewed to determine if they had been exposed to marital violence in the year prior to the survey, their attitudes and beliefs about FGC, and if they physically abused their children. The association of beliefs about FGC with maternal physical abuse was examined, adjusting for exposure to marital violence and other socio-demographic variables. Of the women surveyed 16.4% and 3.4% had been exposed to physical and sexual violence, respectively, during the year prior to the survey. Around 76% of the women surveyed intended to continue the FGC practice, and 69.8% had slapped or hit their children during the year prior to the survey. Holding positive beliefs about the practice of FGC or intending to continue it was associated with maternal physical abuse and this has significant implications for health and welfare workers in Egypt and for society in general.

  • 48.
    Afram, Basema
    et al.
    Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Verbeek, Hilde
    Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Bleijlevens, Michel
    Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Challis, David
    University of Manchester, Manchester, England UK.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland/Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Soto, Maria
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, CHU Toulouse University Hospital, France.
    Renom-Guiteras, Anna
    School of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health, University of Witten/Herdecke, Germany.
    Saks, Kai
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Zabalegui, Adelaida
    Nursing Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Spain.
    Hamers, Jan
    Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Predicting institutional long-term care admission in dementia: a mixed-methods study of informal caregivers’ reports2015In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 1351-1362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate agreement between: (1) expected reasons and actual reasons for admission of people with dementia according to informal caregivers; (2) scores on measurement instruments prior to admission and the actual reasons for admission according to informal caregivers.

    Background: Timely admission of people with dementia is a crucial issue. Information is highly warranted on whether informal caregivers are capable of prior identification of causes of admission and, can thus be considered a reliable prospective source on causes of admission.

    Design: A cohort study among informal caregivers of people with dementia who made a transition to institutional long-term care.

    Methods: Qualitative data on the expected and actual reasons for admission were collected via open-ended questions at baseline and follow-up. Furthermore, at baseline, data were collected using measurement instruments to measure pre-admission characteristics. Interviews took place between November 2010-April 2012. After categorizing the answers, the agreement between the expected and actual reasons was calculated. Furthermore, bivariate associations were calculated between the actual reasons for admission and scores on corresponding measurement instruments.

    Results/Findings: For most informal caregivers, there was agreement between their statements on the expected reason and the actual reason for admission. A third of the caregivers showed no conformity. Bivariate associations showed that there is also agreement between the actual reasons for admission and scores on corresponding measurement instruments.

    Conclusion: Informal caregivers can be considered reliable sources of information regarding what causes the admission of a person with dementia. Professional care should anticipate informal caregivers' statements and collaborate with them to strive for timely and appropriate admission. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 49.
    Agelis, Sacki
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE), Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Reconfigurable Optical Interconnection Networks for High-Performance Embedded2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In embedded computer and communication system the capacity demand for interconnection networks is increasing continuously in order to achieve high-performance systems. Recent breakthroughs show that by using reconfigurability inside a single chip substantial performance gains can be added. However, in this thesis the focus is on system level reconfigurability (between chips or modules) and the performance gains that potentially can be achieved by having support for runtime reconfigurability on the system level.This thesis addresses the field of runtime system level reconfigurability with the use of optics in switches and routers for data- and telecommunications, and in multi-processor systems used for embedded signal processing. Several reconfigurable systems for switching and routing with support to adapt for asymmetric traffic patterns are proposed and compared to identify how design choices affect flexibility, performance etc. The proposed solutions are characterized by their multistage optical interconnection networks with reconfigurable shuffle patterns, where the reconfigurability is provided by micro-optical-electrical mechanical systems. More specifically, application-specific bottlenecks can be resolved by reconfiguring the interconnection network according to the current application demands. The benefits of the architectural solutions are confirmed by simulations that clearly show that the architectures can achieve high performance for both symmetric application characteristics and for several classes of asymmetric application characteristics. The final architectural solution is characterized by electronic packet-switches interconnected through an optical backplane, which is reconfigurable. Moreover, the thesis presents how several signal processing applications can be mapped to run concurrently in a time-shared scheme on a single reconfigurable multi-processor system that has high flexibility to adapt for the application currently at hand. The interconnection network is then adapted (reconfigured) according to the demands of the currently executed application in each time instance. The analysis shows that it is feasible to build such a system with today’s components.

  • 50.
    Agelis, Sacki
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Jacobsson, Sofia
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Alping, Arne
    Ericsson Microwave Systems, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Ligander, Per
    Ericsson Microwave Systems, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Modular interconnection system for optical PCB and backplane communication2002In: Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium., Proceedings International, IPDPS 2002, Abstracts and CD-ROM, Los Alamitos, Calif.: IEEE Press, 2002, p. 245-250Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a way of building modular systems with a powerful optical interconnection network. Each module, placed on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), has a generic optical communication interface with a simple electronic router. Together with optical switching using micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology, packet switching over reconfigurable topologies is possible. The interconnection system gives the possibility to integrate electronics with optics without changing existing PCB technology. Great interest from industry is therefore expected and the cost advantages are several: reuse of module designs, module upgrades without changing the PCB, low-cost conventional PCB technology, etc. In the version described in this paper, the interconnection system has 48 bidirectional optical channels for intra-PCB communication on each board. For inter-PCB communication, a backplane with 192 bidirectional optical channels supports communication between twelve PCBs. With 2.5 Gbit/s per optical channel in each direction, the aggregated intra-PCB bit rate is 120 Gbit/s full duplex (on each PCB) while the aggregated inter-PCB bit rate is 480 Gbit/s full duplex. A case study shows the feasibility of the interconnection system in a parallel processing system for radar signal processing.

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