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  • 1.
    Andersson, Niclas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    BIM Adoption in University Teaching Programs: The Swedish Case2013In: Proceedings of CITA BIM Gathering Conference 14-15 November 2013 / [ed] Dr. Allan Hore, Barry McAuley, Dr. Roger West, Dublin: The Construction IT Alliance , 2013, p. 163-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation of BIM in the construction industry relies on sufficient knowledge and skills about BIM in order to gain momentum and success. Thorough understanding of the possibilities as well as challenges related to the application of BIM constitutes essential drivers for the adoption of BIM among all the industry actors throughout the construction process. Thus, there is a need for supply of knowledge and skills about BIM and its implications on the organisation, communication, management, business models etc. in construction. Accordingly, universities play an important role as a knowledge and skills supplier that helps to provide the necessary conditions for the implementation of BIM in the construction industry. This study investigates how the curricula of engineering and architectural teaching programs at Swedish universities and university colleges have responded to the apparent and increasing demand for BIM competences in industry. The study relies on a survey of 10 universities and 8 university colleges that provide engineering and architectural teaching programs at a master’s and/or a bachelor’s level. The findings show that bachelor’s engineering programs at university colleges generally have adopted BIM into the curricula to a somewhat larger extent compared to engineering programs at a master’s level. The BIM-adoption in architectural programs is, however, significantly limited. Further, the degree of BIM-adoption differs significantly between the respective teaching programs. Only few universities have adopted BIM as an integrated subject in courses that deal with general construction related issues. The predominant approach is to implement BIM-subjects as discrete teaching modules, i.e. stand-alone courses, rather than as a cross disciplinary aspect implemented in a number of the existing courses. Besides, a considerate mismatch is identified between the technical characteristics of the BIM curricula at universities and the process-oriented approach to BIM represented by the industry. Thus, the universities would benefit from a closer collaboration with the industry in BIM-related matters and they need to take on a strategic approach to BIM at an overall university or program level in order to avoid isolated BIM initiatives at a single course level.

  • 2. Andreasson, Mats
    et al.
    Werner, Sven
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Energiteknik.
    Borgström, Margaretha
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Värmeanvändning i flerbostadshus och lokaler2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Multi­family houses and service sector premises constitute 80 % of the customer stock in the Swedish district heating systems. The level of future heat use in these buildings will then have a strong influence on the future district heating economy and the cor­ responding investment demand. As a foundation for a planned study of future heat use, we have per­formed an extensive study of the current heat use for large buildings in Sweden. The input information for this study was the anonymous answers to the an­ nual enquiry of energy use in multi­family houses and service sector premises regarding 2006. Answers were available from 11253 buildings having 77.6 million square meters of residential areas and premises. By using scale factors, estimations could be made for the whole country having 310 million square meters of multi­family houses and premi­ ses. Hence, the enquiry sample constituted a large share of the whole building stock.The specific heat use was analysed by distribution, degree­days, construction year, ventila­tion system, performed conservation measures, and co­operation with other heat supply. A separate study was performed concerning high and low heat use buildings. The use of cold for cooling and water were also analysed.The results show that the individual variations are much larger than the systematic explana­tions for the parameters analysed. Just above 10% of the building spaces were high users of heat (above 200 kWh/m2). The average difference between Northern and Southern Sweden was small, implying a small climatic impact in heat use. The time period between 1965 and 1974 containing the national million dwelling program did not show dramatically higher heat use in the construction year analysis. Installed heat recovery in the ventilation gave a reduction in heat use with 11 kWh/m2 for multi­family houses. This small difference im­plies that the recovery efficiencies were only in average 20­30%. However, the heat recov­ery in service sector buildings was in average more efficient: About 50% in recovery effi­ciency. The conclusion from the conservation analysis is that the measures performed dur­ing the 10 years were done by late­comers rather than by early adopters, since the heat uses after measures in general correspond to the average level for all buildings. Out of 34000 heat pumps installed in the buil­ dings, about half of them were installed in buildings con­nected to district heating.But when more the one heat supply exists, district heat supply dominates, especially in multi­family houses.Typical users with high demands were buildings in the Västmanland and Norrbot­ ten coun­ties, fuel users, certain co­use with electricity, municipal premises, and small buildings. Typical users with low demands were buildings in the Halland county, heat pumps (but due to the systematic error of just accounting for the electricity supply to the heat pumps), state­owned buildings, and large buildings.The district heating companies can help their customers by identification of them as users with high, normal or low demands. This can be accomplished by adding infor­ mation about building space surfaces in the customer files. The heat use above the level 150 kWh/m2 was only 13 % for the multi­family houses and 14 % for the premises. Complete elimination of high use of district heat would then only give a limited, but significant reduction of the total district heat supply.

    Our 6 major conclusions from the project became: • Individual variations dominate compared to systematic causes considering heatuse in multi­family and service sector buildings. • Some systematic causes were identified. • A demand exists for more local measurements of electricity used for heating, thevolume of water use for hot water. • The district heating companies can help their customers to identify them as high,medium or low users of heat. • On short term, a significant potential exists for lower heat use in the Swedishmulti­family and service sector buildings. • More efficient heat use in building will probably be the most important competi­tor to district heat supply in the future.

  • 3.
    Borgström, Karin Margaretha
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Determination of the thermal conductivity of the insulation in district heating mains: Field measurements1994Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concerns the development of a measurement method for determination in the field of the thermal conductivity of the insulation in buried district heating mains.

    The thermal conductivity of the insulation is calculated from the measured value of the radial heat flow through the heating main, the measured temperature difference across the insulation, and the dimensions of the heating main. The heat flow has been measured with a heat flux sensor which was fitted to the surface of the casing. The temperature has been measured with copper/constantan thermocouples.

    It is a necessary condition for the method used in the project for determination of the thermal conductivity of the heating main insulation that the heating main is uncovered and is not in contact with the surrounding soil over a distance of about 1.5 m and that the measurements are made directly on the heating main. In this way, no account need be taken of the material surrounding the heating main, nor of the effect of this material on the measurements. No interference is needed with the heating main which would affect the distribution of the district heating water, and the heating main can remain in operation during measurements.

    Shielding insulation consisting of preformed insulation sections which were placed over the casing of the heating main and covered the heat flux sensor and some of the casing. The function of this insulation was to shield the heat flux sensor from external thermal disturbances. In the field measurements, a copper guard plate of 0.5 mm thickness, the temperature of which could be adjusted, was also placed over the shielding insulation in order to maintain the temperature on the heat flux sensor as constant as possible.

    When temperature and heat flow are measured, the instruments used will be affected by conditions which prevail at the time of measurement. It is therefore very important to analyse the sources of error which may arise in the measuring situation at hand.

    The effect of these factors on the measured values has been studied by

    ' laboratory measurements

    ' theoretical calculations

    ' field measurements

    On the basis of the resulting values of heat flows and temperatures obtained in field measurements on plastic heating mains which were operating under normal conditions, the thermal conductivity of the insulation of the main has been estimated.

    The method has been tested on plastic heating mains with directly foamed insulation, since this is the most common type of heating main both in the existing district heating network and in new construction. The measuring method can also be used on other circular heating mains.

     

  • 4.
    Borgström, Karin Margaretha
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Effects of energy saving actions in reconstruction: An evaluation of dwellings built in the period 1965-74 - proposal2003In: Construction economics and organization: Proceedings of the 3rd Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization, 23-24 April 2003, Lund, Sweden / [ed] Bengt Hansson & Anne Landin, Lund: Division of Construction Management, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund University , 2003, p. 91-95Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Borgström, Karin Margaretha
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Effects of Energy Saving Measures at Renovation2008In: Proceedings of the 2008 World Sustainable Building Conference: world SB08 Convention Centre 21-25 September 2008 / [ed] Greg Foliente et al, Balnarring, Vic.: ASN Events Pty , 2008, p. 441-444Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the necessity of having knowledge about different energy saving measures when renovations and reconstructions are planned and designed. It is also of great importance to have routines to follow up what effects the actions taken have had on the energy consumption as well as on the indoor climate when the renovation is completed. A big part of the existing buildings in Sweden are built during a ten-year period between 1965 and 1974. When these buildings are to be renovated there is a great potential for energy saving.

  • 6.
    Borgström, Karin Margaretha
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Energy efficiency in buildings after renovation2005In: Proceedings of the International Conference Sustainable Building 2005 SB05, Tokyo, 2005, p. 326-331Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Borgström, Karin Margaretha
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Energy Efficiency in Buildings with a Good Indoor Climate: An Evaluation of Actions Taken at Reconstruction2006In: Proceedings of Healthy buildings 2006: Vol. 1 : Indoor air quality (IAQ), building related diseases and human response, Lisboa: Lisboa Institute of Mechanical Engineering (IDMEC) , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Borgström, Karin Margaretha
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Böhm, Benny
    A comparison of different methods for in-situ determination of heat losses from district heating pipes1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the IEA Network Supervision project a special method, the Tx-factor method, is investigated. Several other methods exist for in-situ heat loss determination from district heating (DH) pipes. These methods have advantages and disadvantages compared to the Tx-factor method. It is the purpose of this work to make a comparison of the methods on a particular DH pipe. This makes this investigation special as in most previous work only one or very few methods have been applied on the same DH pipe. The purpose of this work was thus to go out to the site and make measurements of the heat loss from the DH pipe at this particular time of the year - an estimate of annual heat losses could then to be made afterwards. The aim of this work being to develop methods for practical applications not very sophisticated tools were used at the experimental site. This means that although very advanced equipment could have been used for determining the centre line and the depth of the DH pipe only measurement sticks, water levels and strings were used. For the same reasons the temperature sensors were installed by using measurement sticks

  • 9.
    Borgström, Karin Margaretha
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Böhm, Benny
    Technical University of Denmark.
    A method for using thermistors to measure thermal conductivity1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents some measurements for determining thermal conductivity in different materials, using a single thermistor. This thermal conductivity measurement technique is appropriate for materials like fine-grained soils, gel-like materials such as silicon grease, and insulation materials. To verify the usefulness of this method, additional measurements are needed for several materials with well-known thermal conductivities, especially solid materials with thermal conductivity in the range of 0.5-2.5 W/m C.

  • 10.
    Borgström, Karin Margaretha
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Werner, Sven
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Distribution of heat use in Sweden2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current heat use refers normally to the average heat use in a country or a sector during the course of a year. But it is also important to be aware of the distribution of high to low use when estimating the potential for reducing total heat use.Energy statistical data published in the annual report from Statistics Sweden have been supplemented by a deeper analysis of distribution of heat use and systematic causes regarding high heat use.The aim of this paper is to explain the variation in heat use with respect to construction year, degree days and energy efficiency measures.In the Swedish energy efficiency debate, many voices refer to systematic causes for high heat use. However, the results from this study do not support this opinion, since the use distribution mostly comes from individual causes. The most important implication of the study results is that systematic policy measures will have a low impact on the total national energy efficiency.

  • 11.
    Chen, Le
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Manley, Karen
    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lewis, Joanne
    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Helfer, Fernanda
    School of Engineering, Griffith University, Nathan, Australia.
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Procurement and Governance Choices for Collaborative Infrastructure Projects2018In: Journal of construction engineering and management, ISSN 0733-9364, E-ISSN 1943-7862, Vol. 144, no 8, article id 04018071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative approaches to infrastructure procurement are increasingly popular around the world due to their potential to provide improved project performance compared with more traditional approaches. The problem is that project outcomes continue to be unpredictable. Previous research has shown that this is the case regardless of whether the chosen procurement approach is based on price or non price selection of the project team. This is a major choice that clients make, but the presented research shows that governance choices for project execution are more important. This is significant because clients tend to focus more on procurement choices and typically do not differentiate governance based on those choices. This needs to change, and the authors show that optimal governance configurations vary on the basis of the chosen type of team configuration. For example, three specific governance arrangements for workshops are highlighted for single teams, and two specific governance arrangements for risk/reward sharing are highlighted for multiple teams. This study identifies governance actions that are associated with superior time and cost outcomes on collaborative infrastructure projects in Australia run by experienced public-sector clients under the two procurement scenarios. Based on a survey of 320 senior managers, independent sample t-tests were conducted to compare the application of governance actions among three distinct groups of projects, based on type of team selection and type of project outcome. The study provides evidence of the most effective approaches to project governance in a country that is a world leader. The results provide much needed recommendations for improved project performance based on large-scale quantitative analysis, which before now has not existed. Overall, the study recommends more attention be paid to noncontractual governance under both approaches to team selection, although the specific actions recommended vary. © 2018 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  • 12.
    Cuesta, Marta
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB). Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Intersectional Perspective in Elderly Care2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research has shown that power relationships at workplaces are constructed by power structures. Processes related to power always influence the working conditions for (in this study in elderly care) the working groups involved. Power structures are central for intersectional analysis, in the sense that the intersectional perspective highlights aspects such as gender and ethnicity (subjective dimensions) and interrelates them to processes of power (objective dimension). This qualitative study aims to explore in what way an intersectional perspective could contribute to increased knowledge of power structures in a nursing home where the employees were mostly immigrants from different countries. By using reflexive dialogues related to an intersectional perspective, new knowledge which contributes to the employeés well-being could develop. Narrative analysis was the method used to conduct this study. Through a multi-stage focus group on six occasions over six months, the staff was engaged in intersectional and critical reflections about power relationship with the researchers, by identifying patterns in their professional activities that could be connected to their subjectivities (gender, ethnicity, etc.). The result of this study presents three themes that express the staffs experiences and connect these experiences to structural discrimination. 1. Intersectionality, knowledge and experiences of professionalism, 2. Intersectionality, knowledge and experiences of collaboration, 3. Intersectionality, knowledge and experiences of discrimination. The result demonstrates that an intersectional perspective reinforces the involved abilities, during the conversations, into being clear about, for example, their experiences of discrimination, and consequently developing a better understanding of their professionalism and collaboration. Such deeper reflections became possible through a process of consciousness-raising, strengthening the employee’s self-confidence, in a positive way. © 2016 M. Cuesta.

  • 13.
    Dzamalija, Zada
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Den fysiska arbetsmiljön på väg- och anläggningsprojekt: Hur styrs säkerhetsarbetet på Skanska för att uppnå bättre arbetsmiljö2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 14.
    Hjort, Bengt
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Larsson, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Adoption of a Working Environment Innovation: “Rollout Bar Carpets”2015In: Proceedings CIB W099 Belfast 2015 / [ed] Mike Behm & Ciaran McAleenan, Downpatrick: EEI Publishing , 2015, p. 417-425Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work environment problems associated with reinforcement work at constructions sites are often great and difficult. This applies especially to the ergonomic situation. The situation is particularly difficult in connection with reinforcement in horizontal structural elements such as slabs and foundation slabs on the ground, where several of the most difficult load factors occur. Since about 15 years there is an innovation (rollout bar carpets) available on the Swedish market. This innovation can many times be used at these structural elements and gives both time savings and working environmental benefits. Despite this the innovation has been and is adopted rather seldom. The reasons for this have been studied through semi structured interviews with with design-engineers, site-managers, workers and persons working at a reinforcement manufacturing company. The main results from the study are as follows: i) Rollout bar carpets have a potential of improving both work environment and time consumption on site. However, this may not be enough in itself to achieve a general adoption of the technology. ii) The implementation and adoption of innovations in construction may be more complex than the novelty of the innovation may suggest. This is due to the contextual delimitations of a project-based industry and the different roles in the construction process.

  • 15.
    Hjort, Bengt
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Lindgren, John
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Larsson, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Emmit, Stephen
    School of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Success Factors Related to Industrialized Building in Sweden2014In: CIB International Conference 2014: W55/65/89/92/96/102/117 & TG72/74/81/83: Construction in a Changing World: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Dilanthi Amaratunga, Richard Haigh, Les Ruddock, Kaushal Keraminiyage, Udayangani Kulatunga & Chaminda Pathirage, Salford: School of the Built Environment, University of Salford , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade there has been intense discussion in Sweden about industrialization in construction. The discussion has focused on industrialization in connection with erection of multi dwelling houses. It has been argued that industrialization is a key factor as regards obtaining affordable high-quality dwellings. During the last ten years some new industrialization concepts have been developed and tested. Even though some concepts have failed others have been more successful and are under further development. Industrialization is a reality within the Swedish construction sector and can be assumed to play an important role in the future as regards obtaining affordable high-quality dwellings. In this paper success factors related to four industrialized building concepts/methods are described and discussed. The review is based on available literature relating to each of the concepts/methods/producers, from which it was possible to ascertain success and failure factors.

  • 16.
    Hjort, Bengt
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Petersson, Pontus
    Sendabo, Teferi
    Ström, Kaleb
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Introduction of sustainable low-cost housing. Experiences from a demonstration project viewed from an innovation diffusion perspective2016In: Proceedings of the CIB World Building Congress 2016: Volume V - Advancing Products and Services / [ed] Nebil Achour, Tampere: Tampere University of Technology, 2016, Vol. 5, p. 431-442Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to describe and analyse, from an innovation diffusion perspective, factors important when using demonstration projects as a tool for introduction of sustainable low cost housing. The study is focused on Ethiopia, a country with big challenges as regards population increase, lack of resources, deforestation, land erosion and a general need for better and sustainable housing, especially in rural areas. The study is furthermore focused on the adobe technology as a more sustainable alternative to the traditional building technology which is very timber consuming. Many attempts have been made to introduce this technology with the use of demonstration buildings. A great part of these attempts have failed, some have been successful. In order to study and discuss important factors in connection with the use of demonstration buildings, a project executed some years ago in southern Ethiopia has been analysed. The study is based on findings collected during and after the erection of these buildings mainly through practical tests, interviews and observations. From a technical point of view this demonstration project was successful. It was possible to develop an appropriate production technology and the result was buildings with a good standard and good function. Experiences up to now indicate a good durability. From an innovation diffusion perspective however the demonstration buildings have not fulfilled their purpose. The impact in the region seems to be very small. The conclusion in the paper is that the reasons behind this failure mainly are: (1) Lack of clear and visible relative advantage in comparison to the traditional building technology. The supply of construction timber in the area in question is still good. (2) Lack of a champion advocating the technology by using the demonstration buildings and thereby giving the message to the society that the technology is valuable and trustworthy. (3) Lack of continuity in the demonstration efforts, as a result of the lack of a champion.

  • 17.
    Hjort, Bengt
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Sendabo, Teferi
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The demonstration project as a tool for introduction of sustainable low cost housing – some experiences from Ethiopia2011In: Innovation and Sustainable Construction in developing countries / [ed] Ben Obinero Uwakweh, Hanoi: Construction Publishing House , 2011, p. 133-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of many serious problems in Ethiopia today is the rapid pace of deforestation. This accelerates fire-wood shortage and put a high stress on the natural resources including timber for construction. Based on the assumption that low cost housing based on soil is an economically viable and environmentally sound choice, a research programme at Halmstad University was initiated in 2004. This research, aiming at the Kambaata Region in Southern Ethiopia, has focused on the introduction of adobe technology and cement stabilised soil block technology.

    A final stage of this research programme is to erect demonstration buildings. Its objective is to demonstrate new building technologies and to use the demonstration buildings as reference objects in studies regarding building technique and attitudes towards these new technologies.

    This paper is focused on the role of demonstration projects at the introduction of sustainable low cost housing. As an introductory background some executed demonstration projects are described and their impact is analysed. Against this background, a currently executed demonstration project is described.

  • 18.
    Hjort, Bengt
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Introduction of Sustainable Low-cost Housing in Ethiopia – an Innovation Diffusion Perspective2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As many developing countries, Ethiopia is facing a lot of problems. A high population growth and erosion caused by deforestation can be considered the most serious one. The need for housing is increasing while deforestation causes a lack of sustainable and appropriate timber for construction. A challenge facing the Ethiopian society is thus to give a growing population opportunities to obtain decent, sustainable and affordable housing. One way to achieve this is to use adobe technology, which means that houses are built with sun-dried clay blocks. Used correctly, the adobe technology has many benefits. The main advantages are that the technique is relatively simple, local materials can be used and that timber demand is low. Because of this, the technology also has many advantages from a sustain ability perspective. In Ethiopia, most attempts with the adobe technology have been less successful without lasting impacts. In this paper, the reasons for this are discussed. Six cases where adobe has been used are described an analysed. Many factors have been identified as being important for the diffusion of the technology, i.e., a strong champion, market and risk factors, cultural factors creating stigma and basic training. © 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 19.
    HOANG, QUYLAN
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Inblandning av flygaska i betong - inverkan på tidig hållfasthetsutveckling vid låg temperatur2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta examensarbete har haft till syfte att undersöka utvecklingen av tryckhållfasthet vid låg

    temperatur hos betong med olika innehåll av flygaska. Tryckhållfastheten har bestämts genom

    provtryckning av kuber med åldrar upp till 28 dygn. Provningen har utförts på tre delserier;

    delserie 1 utan innehåll av flygaska, delserie 2 med 7,5 % och delserie 3 med 15% flygaska räknat

    på cementvikten. Kuber från dessa delserier har förvarats under olika temperaturförhållanden;

    från lägst ca 7 °C till höst ca 20 °C. Temperaturutvecklingen i representativa kuber har

    kontinuerligt registrerats. Tryckhålfastheten har bestäts efter 1 dygn, 2 dygn, 7 dygn och 28

    dygn.

    Resultaten frå de utföda mäningarna ä i huvudsak föjande: (i) Inblandning av 7,5 % flygaska ger

    en reduktion med 8,3 –11 % av hålfastheten vid hädning vid ca 20 °C och vid provning vid olika

    åder. Inget klart samband mellan provningsåder och reduktion. (ii) Inblandning av 15 % flygaska

    ger en reduktion med 22,1 –24,6 % av hålfastheten vid hädning vid ca 20 °C och vid provning vid

    olika åder. Inget klart samband mellan provningsåder och reduktion.

    Pågrund av svåigheter att styra temperaturen hos provkropparna påett noggrant sät visade det

    sig svåt att dra sära slutsatser avseende inverkan av säkt hädningstemperatur. Föjande kan

    dock sköjas i de uppmäta resultaten. (i) Inverkan av reducerad hädningstemperatur minskar

    med öande åder. Detta gäler oavsett halten av flygaska. (ii) Lå temperatur i tidigt skede (de 7

    fösta dygnen) ger en föhöd sluthålfasthet. Detta gäler oavsett halten av flygaska.

    Fö de olika kuberna som provtryckts har den ekvivalenta mognadsådern beränats med hjäp av

    uppmäta temperaturer. Detta har gjorts dels med TT-faktormetoden, dels med hjäp av

    Ahrreniusfunktionen. Baserat pådetta har teoretiska hålfasthetsutvecklingsfunktioner formulerats

    fö de tre serierna. Genom dessa funktioner har inverkan av flygaska och temperatur kunnat

    analyseras. Dessa analyser tyder påföjande: (i) En inblandning av 7,5 % flygaska ger en reduktion

    av den relativa hålfastheten med 5 –10 %. En minskande temperatur och en minskande åder ger

    minskande inverkan. (ii) En inblandning av 15 % flygaska ger en reduktion av den relativa

    hålfastheten med ca 20 %. Detta gäler oavsett åder och temperaturnivå

  • 20.
    Lindgren, John
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Diffusion of systemic innovations in the construction sector2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of research dealing with innovation has increased dramatically, construction management research included. This thesis focuses on innovations with inter-organizational effects, systemic innovations, which may radically change and improve the construction process. The overall aim of the thesis is to contribute understanding of diffusion of systemic innovations in the construction sector through the study of two different types of systemic innovations, Building Information Management and Multi-Story Housing in Timber (MSHT). It explores what facilitates and hinders innovation diffusion, with a special focus on knowledge integration and mechanisms used in the diffusion process and their effects on knowledge development. The studies conducted were made in a Swedish context related to two separate companies work with diffusing the innovations, using a broad approach with different data collection methods.

    The research departures in the interplay between the innovation content, context and process through which diffusion take place, displaying differences in how diffusion precedes and is affected. Where organizations are situated in the construction process and their ability to control the diffusion process is influential and diffusion is affected by established traditions and work procedures. For MSHT other structural materials form obstacles, while for BIM it is established work procedures and methods. Environmental pressure drives diffusion of MSHT and both innovations are supported by active clients. Diffusion also requires financial resources depending on the size of investment and associated risks. The cases show advantages with moving activities from projects into a continuous business that delivers to projects, where simplifying implementation is central. Mainly due to complexity, developing in steps enables simplifications and adjustments towards users in a controlled manner. MSHT to a higher degree depends on performing real projects for development and diffusion than BIM, which can be tested to a larger extent before diffusing into the real environment. MSHT in particular show a difference in relation to many traditional models of innovation and innovation diffusion where tests are assumed possible.

    The research relates to and has emphasized interaction and dynamics in the diffusion process and has provided additional understanding for managing complexity in the diffusion process. Projects are the most crucial knowledge integration mechanism with many underlying mechanisms, since they are a result of the development and show consequences of work performed. The applicability of codified knowledge in combination with more interactionintensive mechanisms has been shown and the introduction of the knowledge type’s domain-specific, procedural and general knowledge, complementing the current use of tacit and explicit knowledge, has provided additional understanding for diffusion and related knowledge flows. There are however differences in how knowledge types develop for the innovations. General knowledge is more influencing for BIM, while MSHT is about developing domain-specific knowledge. MSHT is about learning something new, while for BIM it is about re-learning. Findings show relevance in both using and developing the framework of innovation in organizations by Rogers (2003) for future diffusion studies in construction management research as well as the necessity of developing knowledge concerning implementation.

  • 21.
    Lindgren, John
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Exploring effects of the interplay of context, content and process for supplier innovation diffusionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research explores the interplay between innovation content, innovation context and the innovation diffusion process in a reinforcement supplier's work with diffusing different types of innovations. An important part is to gain understanding of what facilitates and complicates innovation diffusion in the construction industry context from a supplier perspective. The interpretative research presented builds on 28 semistructured interviews with the supplier and its customers and document studies. Three types of innovations were studied to explore how the dimensions innovation content, innovation context and the innovation process interacts in the diffusion process. The findings provide details concerning how the dimensions interact, influencing factors and how the diffusion process may unfold over time. It provides an example of how dynamics and detail in the diffusion process can be captured and the approach can be with additional concepts and frameworks. Besides the supplier perspective and the inter-organizational setting, it also emphasizes the necessity of researching the innovation process and how it may differ depending on the impact on affected parties.

  • 22.
    Lindgren, John
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Emmitt, Stephen
    Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom.
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Construction projects as mechanisms for knowledge integration: mechanisms and effects when diffusing a systemic innovation2018In: Engineering Construction and Architectural Management, ISSN 0969-9988, E-ISSN 1365-232X, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 1516-1533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The aim of this research is to study knowledge integration (KI) when diffusing a systemic innovation. The objectives are to understand what mechanisms are used, and when and what their effects are in terms of knowledge development.

    Design/Methodology/Approach - The method comprised a longitudinal case study which followed a firm’s attempts to develop and diffuse a timber multi-storey building system (the systemic innovation) over a number of projects.

    Findings - The findings emphasize actual projects as the most crucial activity for KI and when and why soft personalization mechanisms and codified knowledge should be mixed.  Furthermore, it shows how different types of knowledge is built up including construction process effects over a series of projects.

    Research limitations/implications -  The research contributes with knowledge about mechanisms for the diffusion of a specific systemic innovation type and provides input regarding mechanisms to use. The introduction of the concepts ‘domain-specific’, ‘procedural’ and ‘general knowledge’ into construction has increased understanding of innovation diffusion and knowledge flows and where and how they are integrated.

    Practical Implications – The research shows how knowledge develops and through which mechanisms, and where problems occur. Construction organisations can learn from this to avoid mistakes and potentially better understand how to manage knowledge to diffuse a systemic innovation.

    Originality/value - The research provides insight into systemic innovation diffusion over a series of projects and focuses on both projects and the construction process. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 23.
    Lindgren, John
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Diffusing BIM – knowledge integration mechanisms and their effects2016In: Proceedings of the CIB World Building Congress 2016: Volume V - Advancing products and services / [ed] Nebil Achour, Tampere: Tampere University of Technology , 2016, Vol. 5, p. 832-843Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) has for a number of years been seen as a systemic inter-organizational innovation that will have great impact on the efficiency of the construction process as a whole. In this study both successful and unsuccessful attempts to diffuse a BIM-service in the construction sector by a building material manufacturer has been studied through multiple data collection methods. Of special interest has been in what ways knowledge has been integrated, i.e. what mechanisms has been used in the case, since it is a key area for diffusion, and this is described and discussed.  Furthermore, the contextual characteristics of the construction sector have been highlighted as influential on diffusion, especially when it comes to areas such as learning, flow of knowledge and feedback loops. Therefore, the context of the different cases and in what ways this affects the knowledge integration process is also described and discussed.

  • 24.
    Lindgren, John
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Diffusing building information management: knowledge integration, mechanisms and knowledge development2017In: Architectural Engineering and Design Management, ISSN 1745-2007, E-ISSN 1752-7589, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 347-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building Information Management (BIM) is a systemic inter-organizational innovation predicted to have a great impact on the efficiency of the construction process. An enabler for its diffusion is knowledge integration (KI). This research investigates KI mechanisms used by a Concrete Reinforcement Supplier and its customers in the diffusion of BIM and BIM-related solutions. The research employs a qualitative approach with multiple data-collection methods at two different points in time. BIM diffusion and KI are viewed here as emergent and iterative processes, understood from a supplier perspective. The research examines the interaction between context, content of the diffusing innovation and the diffusion process. Knowledge development from the KI process has been assessed by exploring the interaction between (1) domain-specific knowledge, (2) procedural knowledge and (3) general knowledge, complementing the established emphasis on tacit and explicit knowledge found in relevant construction management research. The findings indicate that general knowledge needs to be high for increased BIM diffusion and the research raises the need to develop procedural knowledge both from a practical and research perspective. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 25.
    Manley, Karen
    et al.
    School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Prefabricated housing firms in Japan and Sweden: Learning from leading countries2019In: Offsite Production and Manufacturing for Innovative Construction: People, Process and Technology / [ed] Jack S. Goulding & Farzad Pour Rahimian, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 399-418Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Persson, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Developing and Managing Knowledge of Construction Methods in the Swedish Building Sector2010In: Building a Better World - CIB World Congress 2010: Full paper proceedings - CIB 2010 World Congress / [ed] Professor Peter Barrett, Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga, Dr Richard Haigh, Dr Kaushal Keraminiyage, Salford: The University of Salford , 2010, p. 11 s.-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 1960s and 1970s the construction industry made an effort to develop shared knowledge and performance measurement tools within the industry. This effort ceased as the bigger enterprises began to see information generated at their companies as enterprise assets and competitive resources. In recent years, the construction industry has begun to acknowledge the importance of detailed planning and work preparation on construction sites. The fragmentation of the construction process, with increased specialisation and involvement of many interested parties and actors calls for a shared format for creating, converting, and exchanging knowledge. There is a need for better documentation and control of what is actually done on the construction site, and of how it is done. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how knowledge about construction methods is created, converted, and shared in the Swedish construction sector. It examines past efforts to share information and how the efforts have developed over time. New initiatives are examined and analysed, looking at how well knowledge is managed and applied on construction sites. A web portal developed at Lund University (www.ByggAi.se) in close cooperation with the construction industry exemplifies a new initiative in this respect. The paper will also present end users’ analysis regarding the accessibility of information from the web portal. The web portal has a great potential to disseminate information to various actors: construction enterprises, manufacturers, consultants, and clients. The web portal has also developed to include other areas of interest, promoting issues such as health, safety, and ergonomics; energy-efficient buildings; energy-efficient construction work; and handling of moisture issues. The main advantage of the portal is its packaging of situational knowledge, so that workers at all levels can find all of the relevant information about specific construction methods before they begin work on the construction site. Moreover, the portal makes the information available on a “just-in-time” basis, so workers can continue to access it throughout the project, taking what they need to know at the time they need it.

  • 27.
    Persson, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    European Lifelong Learning Policy - Case study Sweden - Validation of Construction workers2010Report (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Persson, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    European Lifelong Learning Policy - Country report Sweden2010Report (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Persson, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    European Lifelong Learning Policy - Short track studies on good practices - National Framework of Qualifications in Ireland2010Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Persson, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Impact assessment and project appraisal in cases of coastal erosion2010In: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, ISSN 1759-5908, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 297-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There are several urban areas close to the sea and other water bodies that may be adversely affected by erosion and flooding. Global climate change, including sea-level rise and more intense and damaging storms, will increase the threats of natural hazards in several areas. Mitigating and adapting to these risks in urban areas are huge challenges for society. There is a need for a proper decision basis to build a society that is economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable. By incorporating coastal hazard and risk mapping into spatial planning, new developments can be diverted away from threatened areas. Further, by taking adaptation measures, risks in existing urban areas can be reduced. The purpose of this paper is to address these issues.

    Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents the results of two case studies and discusses the prerequisites for impact assessment and project appraisal and how this is used and accepted by the users and decision-makers.

    Findings: A guideline has been developed as a tool for the integration of costs and benefits in decision making on investments in coastal zones. The guideline gives an overview of why, when, and how impact assessments and project appraisals can be made using socio-economic valuations of coastal areas affected by erosion. Two case studies have been performed to demonstrate the practical application of the guideline and economic analysis and valuation in coastal management.

    Originality/value: The guideline can be used to prioritise areas that need attention due to threatened shorelines, and to decide which preventive measures are the most efficient from a socio-economic point of view.

  • 31.
    Persson, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal in Cases of Coastal Erosion2010In: Building a Better World - CIB World Congress 2010: Full Paper Proceedings - CIB 2010 World Congress / [ed] Professor Peter Barrett, Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga, Dr Richard Haigh, Dr Kaushal Keraminiyage & Dr Chaminda Pathirage, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are several urban areas close to the sea and other water bodies that may be adversely affected by erosion and flooding. Global climate change, including sea-level rise and more intense and damaging storms, will increase the threats of natural hazards in several areas. Mitigating and adapting to these risks in urban areas are huge challenges for society. There is a need for a proper decision basis to build a society that is economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable. By incorporating coastal hazard and risk mapping into spatial planning, new developments can be diverted away from threatened areas. Further, by taking adaptation measures, risks in existing urban areas can be reduced. A guideline has been developed as a tool for the integration of costs and benefits in decision-making on investments in coastal zones. The guideline gives an overview of why, when, and how impact assessments and project appraisals can be made using socio-economic valuations of coastal areas affected by erosion. The guideline can be used to prioritise areas that need attention due to threatened shorelines, and to decide which preventive measures are the most efficient from a socio-economic point of view. Two case studies have been performed to demonstrate the practical application of the guideline and economic analysis and valuation in coastal management. This paper presents the results of the two case studies and discusses the prerequisites for impact assessment and project appraisal and how this is used and accepted by the users and decision-makers.

  • 32.
    Persson, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Kunskapsbaserade arbetsinstruktioner: Slutrapport 2008-07-01 - 2011-06-302011Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Pullissery, Mehthab
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Reduction of heat loss for an immersion heater2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, an electrical immersion heater mounted on a water tank has been investigated. Themain aim was to reduce heat transfer and to utilize the maximum energy available from heater toheat the water. To observe the effects of essential geometrical and operating parameters on thesystem performance, different computational test cases were run for three different designs.In the first case of simulation, the immersion heater of existing design mounted on a water tankhas been analyzed. The cold-water tank with inlet and outlet and given appropriate boundaryconditions was used to see the temperature contours inside the water tank and temperature of theimmersion layer itself.In the second case, an insulation plate has been introduced in the immersion heater head in orderto reduce heat loss by considering the possible heat leakage through the gap inside the heaterhead by radiation.In the third case, an insulation ring has been introduced in the immersion heater head as asubstitute for the insulation plate which has the same aim as second case.The results obtained from the CFD simulation shows the thermal performance of immersionheater in a water tank for three different cases. The results are helpful in optimizing both heatingelement and immersion heater by introducing different changes to optimize the design. It showsthat the redesigned immersion heater and storage tank can provide improved working conditions.Also, at early design stages, CFD simulations could be used as an effective tool to optimizethermal storage tank parameters, so it may add value to the storage tank and immersion heaterperformance and efficiency, by optimizing the whole thermal heating system design and size.Different materials and geometry design are tested giving the minimum heat losses from thesystem and uniform temperature distribution in the water heater.

  • 34.
    Rose, Timothy
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Manley, Karen
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Do firm-level barriers to construction product innovation adoption vary according to position in the supply chain?2019In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 212-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to examine product innovation as a means of addressing infrastructure shortages in developed economies and to improve the sustainability of infrastructure. The obstacles to product innovation in the road industry are compared between different types of participants in the supply chain to provide guidelines for interventions to improve innovation rates.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This exploratory study uses descriptive data from a large scale survey of the Australian road industry. The three top-rated product innovation obstacles for the following four types of participants are examined: contractors, consultants, suppliers and clients.

    Findings

    The four groups were found to disagree about the relative importance of the obstacles. Contractors and suppliers ranked “restrictive price-only tender assessment” used by clients as their number one obstacle, while consultants thought there was too much emphasis by the clients on direct costs compared with whole-of-life costs. On the other hand, clients felt suppliers do not do enough thorough testing prior to proposing a new product and disagreed with suppliers about who should carry the risk of new product failure.

    Research limitations/implications

    The conceptual framework was found to yield novel insights with significant policy implications. The construction-specific contextual determinants that were integrated by the authors into a broad innovation diffusion process proved useful in categorising road product innovation obstacles across the four surveyed supply chain groups – without overlap or omission. The new framework also proved useful in ordering the key obstacles across groups for interpretation and discussion. In disaggregating product obstacles according to groups, these contextual determinants were proven to be mutually exclusive and to represent important focal points in promoting the uptake of product innovation in construction. Although the current study has usefully provided quantitative data concerning construction innovation obstacles, there are limitations due to its reliance on descriptive statistics. Future work by the authors is proposed to analyse the relationships between innovation obstacles and supply chain partners using inferential statistics to further develop and validate these early findings. The current study is an interim step in this work and an important contribution in identifying and addressing firm-level barriers seen to be constraining construction product innovation.

    Practical implications

    Results suggest there is a need for government clients to carefully consider the differing perspectives across the supply chain when developing strategies to encourage the adoption of mutually-beneficial innovative products on their construction projects. Inclusive focus groups examining the drivers, configuration and benefits of collaborative procurement systems are recommended to reduce innovation obstacles.

    Social implications

    Society relies on urban infrastructure for daily living and the current study contributes to stretching infrastructure investment dollars and reducing the environmental impact of infrastructure provision.

    Originality/value

    No previous study has compared the perception of product innovation obstacles across different road industry supply chain partners. This is a significant gap, as differences in opinions across the supply chain need to be understood to develop the shared expectations and the improved relationships required to improve product innovation rates. Product innovation is important because it has been shown to improve efficiency (potentially addressing the road investment gap) and reduce deleterious environmental impacts.

  • 35.
    Rundquist, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Emmitt, Stephen
    Loughborough University, School of Civil and Building Engineering, UK.
    Halila, Fawzi
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Hjort, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Larsson, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Construction Innovation: Addressing the Project–Product Gap in the Swedish Construction Sector2013In: International Journal of Innovation Science, ISSN 1757-2223, E-ISSN 1757-2231, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction sector is often accused of being inefficient, conservative and noninnovative, although some commentators have suggested that the construction sector is not backward, it is merely different to other industries. One of these differences is the uniqueness of construction projects, which are determined by the characteristics of the site, interaction of project participants (also partly site specific) and the relationship between contractors and building product producers (which changes from one project to another). These factors are known to colour construction innovation. Previous research into the Swedish construction sector has identified a significant gap between the building product producers who are 'product focused' and the contractors who are 'project focused', with concerns expressed about effectiveness of communication between two. The findings of previous research imply, both implicitly and explicitly, that this gap may be hindering innovation within the construction sector. This appears to have implications for those concerned with construction, the building users and society as a whole. In this paper the authors provide an extensive review of the literature and research findings from which a number of unique insights are offered. The reasons for the gap between producers and contractors are discussed and a number of innovative measures are proposed that may help to bridge the gap, and hence improve innovation systems. The paper concludes with some practical findings for producers and contractors as well as some thoughts on where future research should be targeted.

  • 36.
    Rundquist, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Hjort, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Developing a Design Process for Mobile Applications for Logistics in the Construction Industry2015In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ICIE-2015) / [ed] Ramjugernath, D., Reading: ACAD Conferences Ltd , 2015, p. 164-170Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction material suppliers have access to various types of information, such as construction data, price, production planning and logistics data. This information could be of great use for the different roles involved in a construction project if the right information is presented to the right role and through a user inter-face designed for best under standing by each role. This situation is not unique for the construction industry, but the specific context with temporary organizations (construction projects) that have to communicate with permanent organizations (construction material suppliers) combined with the fact that, at least, six roles (categories) of employees are involved in a construction project places challenges on the industry to achieve effectiveness. In this paper a process to develop a information interface between construction projects and construction material producers will be presented. Using an interventionist research approach with interaction designers involved, the process aim to guide the development of an application for exchange of information between the actors in the construction projects.

  • 37.
    Rydell, Bengt
    et al.
    Swedish geotechnical Institute.
    Persson, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Andersson, Mattias
    Swedish geotechnical Institute.
    Falemo, Stefan
    Swedish geotechnical Institute.
    Hållbar utveckling av strandnära områden: Planerings- och beslutsunderlag för att förebygga naturolyckor i ett förändrat klimat2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Strandnära områden vid kuster och vattendrag är av stort intresse och många kommuner planerar och bygger i stor utsträckning i sådana områden. Detta kan i flera fall medföra problem med stranderosion och översvämningar med risk för skador på värdefulla markområden, anläggningar och byggnader. I ett längre perspektiv kommer riskerna för erosion och översvämning i strandnära områden att öka till följd av klimatförändringar- na. I Klimat- och sårbarhetsutredningen konstaterades att längs ca 15 % av landets havskuster finns förutsättningar för stranderosion. På många platser kommer nederbör- den att öka och ge större flöden i vattendrag, vilket också ökar risker för ras och skred och översvämning.

    Under årens lopp har olika metoder använts för att skydda strandnära områden med va- rierande framgång såväl tekniskt som ekonomiskt. Nya synsätt och nya metoder har på senare tid vuxit fram som på ett bättre sätt tar hänsyn till naturens egna processer och som på ett kostnadseffektivt sätt tar hänsyn till ett bredare synsätt när det gäller miljö- aspekter. Behovet av ett tillförlitligt planerings- och beslutsunderlag för ny bebyggelse och anpassning av befintlig bebyggd miljö är därför stort. En modell för sammanställ- ning av ett sådant underlag har därför utvecklats och redovisas i denna rapport.

    Denna modell har prövats i praktisk tillämpning vid regionala klimat- och sårbarhets- analyser i flera län och vid översikts- och detaljplanering i Kristianstads och Ystads kommuner, vilka även delfinansierat studierna i respektive kommun.

  • 38.
    Saladdin, Marcel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Jerneborn, Isabelle
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Seat Cover: Utveckling av ett sätesskydd till förar- och passagerarsätet2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a product development and a study on seat cover made with Conmore AB, a consulting company in Mölndal and a car industry company in western Sweden. During the working process a study, brainstorming and a conceptualization has been made, which are the basic steps in the project.

    At the end of the engineering program with a focus on technical design you have a ending course which is about a degree project.

    The existing seat cover has a lack of function which is that it extends beyond the side airbag that is located on the driver’s and passenger’s seat. That leads to a defect as it reduces the safety of the passenger’s as well as the driver. The aim of this project is therefore to create a seat cover that is adapted to the company’s requirements.

    The result of this project is a developed concept that is called “Koncept 1” in this master thesis.

  • 39.
    Steinhardt, Dale
    et al.
    School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Manley, Karen
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Bildsten, Louise
    Department of Industrial Management and Logistics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    The structure of emergent prefabricated housing industries: a comparative case study of Australia and Sweden2019In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prefabricated housing is a disruptive innovation struggling to take hold in a traditional complex product system (CoPS). It is quicker to produce and has improved environmental performance compared to traditional housing. CoPS have more dense and complex network connections than commodity industries, making disruptive innovation more difficult. Effective relational capabilities can achieve the coordination necessary to address this challenge. The prefabricated housing industry needs to develop a structure that drives these capabilities. Using a case study methodology, the structure of the industry is examined in two contrasting countries, namely Australia and Sweden, as they represent an early and late stage of industry emergence, respectively. A new framework is proposed for this purpose, enabling a repeatable, orderly and comprehensive disaggregation of industry structure to examine the latent drivers of relational capability. The main empirical contribution is to (1) describe an industry that is yet to be formally recognized by national statistical agencies and (2) show how the adoption of prefabricated housing can be accelerated. The study found that younger industries need a focused industry association with diverse membership to act as an effective system integrator. © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 40.
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Innovation roles for clients: implementing building information modelling2017In: Clients and Users in Construction: Agency, Governance and Innovation / [ed] Kim Haugbølle & David Boyd, Abingdon: Routledge, 2017, p. 214-228Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Österberg, Ellen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Vilén, Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Utökad sätesjustering av “The Armadillo“2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes a solution to an adjustment problem found on “The Armadillo”. This product can be described as a bicycle, but with four wheels instead of two, and has a somewhat more complex construction than an electric bicycle. In today’s construction there are difficulties in using the bike if the driver is not within the range of 170-190 cm tall, which obviously limits the user of the product. The main user are those who work with the product. The task of the project was therefore to find a solution to this problem, with free hands without major limitations. This has been done in cooperation the company that owns the product, Velove, where a couple of visits have been made to study the design further, as well as examine the possibilities and limitations that exist. Methods such as Fredy Olsson with small modification have been used, this has simplified the work as a clear structure has been obtained on approaches. The project group has used different ideas to generating and evaluating product ideas, including where we included other students for inspiration, in order to reach a promising concept within the group. Two ready-made digital prototype concepts have been developed in Catia V5, where one of them has advanced into a physical prototype in plastic material. The construction allows a longer span and allows more drivers to use today’s Armadillo. The solution is another smaller rail that goes over the today’s existing rail witch makes it possible to further adjust the length span for the driver. The construction is a superstructure on the existing Armadillo and does not require a reconstruction of the bike.

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