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  • 51.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Storm, Louise Kamuk
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Pyrdol, Nicklas
    Team Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Larsen, Carsten Hvid
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Successful and Less Successful Interventions with Youth and Senior Athletes: Insights from Expert Sport Psychology Practitioners2019Ingår i: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 13, nr 1, s. 72-94Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is focused on reflections of expert sport psychology practitioners about their interventions with competitive youth and senior elite athletes. Two objectives include: (1) to identify key structural components used by practitioners to describe sport psychology interventions and integrate them into an empirical framework, and (2) to analyze the practitioners’ experiences in regard of their successful and less successful interventions in competitive youth and elite senior sport contexts using the empirical framework. We conducted semi-structured interviews with twelve internationally recognized sport psychology practitioners (SPPs) and analyzed the data thematically. The empirical framework derived from the SPPs’ accounts contains eight structural components integrated into two categories: (1) the content and focus (with three components, e.g., adaptation of content), and (2) the organization and delivery of interventions (with five components, e.g., initiation and assessment of athletes’ needs). Using the empirical framework we found differences between successful and less successful interventions and between youth and senior contexts in terms of needs assessment, adaptation and breadth of content, athlete-practitioner relationship, and intervention settings. The empirical framework might inform SPPs in their efforts to design, implement, and evaluate their services in these two contexts.

  • 52.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Storm, Louise
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Carsten
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Creating optimal environments for talent development2017Ingår i: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, s. 242-243Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The holistic ecological approach (HEA) to talent development in sport shifts researchers’ attention from the individual athletes to the broader environment in which they develop. The HEA provides a theoretical grounding, ecologically inferred definitions of talent development, two working models, and methodological guidelines. The HEA highlights two interconnected ways of analyzing athletic talent development environments (ATDE). First, there is a focus on the structure of the environment, particularly the roles and cooperation of key persons. Second, there is a focus on the organizational culture of the team. A number of in-depth case studies of successful talent development environments in Scandinavia have shown that while each environment is unique, they also share a number of features. They are characterized by proximal role modeling; an integration of efforts among the different agents (family, coaches, management etc.); inclusive training groups rather than early selection; a focus on long-term developmental rather than on early success, and a “strong and coherent” organizational culture. Moving from ecological research to ecologically informed practice, we add applied principles and provide an example of how these principles were used in developing a culture for goal directedness in a group of under-17 players in a football academy in Denmark. The case example demonstrates two main ideas: (1) a team’s organizational culture influences the athletes, or in popular terms the characteristics of culture become the character of the athletes; and (2) the coach plays a vital part in creating and maintaining a team culture. Together, the eight common features of successful ATDEs, the case examples, and the applied HEA principles can serve as a guide for practitioners aiming to improve talent development environments in sport.

  • 53.
    Hvatskaya, Elena
    et al.
    St.-Petersburg State University of Physical Education and Sports, St.-Petersburg, Russia.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    St.-Petersburg State University of Physical Education and Sports, St.-Petersburg, Russia.
    Perception of the first competition: Retrospective analysis made by elite athletes1997Ingår i: Innovations in sport psychology: linking theory and practice : proceedings / [ed] Bar-Eli, Michael & Lidor, Ronnie, ISSP , 1997, s. 321-323Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 54.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player2015Ingår i: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, s. 241-242Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In the career literature, an injury is termed as a non-normative transition (e.g., Stambulova & Wylleman, 2014), and therefore, it is implied that there is a process behind it. But the injury transition process has never been in focus of the career researchers in sport psychology, and therefore this study is a pioneering exploration unpacking this process. The study was designed as a single subject case study based on a constructivist narrative approach with the objectives (1) to explore the athlete’s career development, injuries within the career and their impact, and (2) to explore in detail the athlete’s injury experiences. The participant was a 26 years old former handball player who had experienced two major ACL-injuries during his career. To guide the research process from formulation of the research objectives and to interpretation of narratives, the narrative oriented inquiry framework or NOI (Hiles & Čermak, 2008) was followed. Following combination of the holistic-content and the categorical content analyses allowed conceptualizing injuries as career transition processes embedded into the athlete’s career development. Moreover, the participant’s narratives made possible to identify four phases in the injury transition (i.e., pre-injury, injury and first reactions, diagnosis and treatment, rehabilitation and consequences) with distinct psychological content (e.g., demands, resources, barriers, and coping strategies) relevant to each phase. Based on the results of the study it is possible to anticipate that athletes, sport psychology consultants, coaches, and members of the sport medicine teams might benefit from being aware about specific demands and barriers relevant to the different phases of the injury transition process. This knowledge can be further used to facilitate development of adequate resources and coping strategies to help injured athletes with rehabilitation process and successful comeback to active sport involvement. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science

  • 55.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player2018Ingår i: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, nr 4, s. 365-381Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This single-subject case study adopted a narrative approach and focused on two objectives: (a) to explore an athlete’s career development, including the impact of injuries, and (b) to explore that athlete’s injury experiences in detail. The participant was a 26-year-old former elite handball player who had experienced two major anterior cruciate ligament injuries during his career. To guide the research process from the formulation of its objectives to the interpretation of the participant’s narratives, we followed the narrative-oriented inquiry framework. To collect the participant’s stories, a low-structured interview guide consisting of open questions and requests for information about the participant’s handball career and injury experiences was used. The holistic content analysis allowed us to conceptualise injuries as career transition processes embedded in the athlete’s career development. Moreover, the participant’s narratives made it possible to identify four phases of injury transition and the distinct psychological content (demands, resources, barriers, and coping strategies) relevant to each of the four phases. Based on the results of the study, we anticipate that athletes, sport psychology consultants, coaches, and members of sport medicine teams can benefit from greater awareness of the specific demands and barriers relevant to each phase of the injury transition process. This knowledge can be further used to facilitate the development of adequate resources and coping strategies to help injured athletes navigate the rehabilitation process and successfully return to active sport involvement. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 56.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Editorial to the QHW Thematic Cluster “Health, Physical Activity and Lifestyle”2015Ingår i: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, artikel-id 29156Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 57.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Performance Enhancement Issues in Sport Psychology Consulting: Seventeen Cases Summary2006Ingår i: 11th annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, 05-08 July, LAUSANNE 2006 - Switzerland, BOOK OF ABSTRACTS / [ed] Hoppeler H., Reilly T., Tsolakidis E., Gfeller L., Klossner S., Cologne: European College of Sport Science , 2006, s. 440-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 58.
    Jonsson, Linus
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Weman Josefsson, Karin
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Papaioannou, G. Athanasiosos
    University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece.
    Exploring exercise behavior and well-being of Swedish university students: A self-determination perspective2013Ingår i: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between motivational profile, self-efficacy, basic needs satisfaction, exercise behavior, and well-being among Swedish university students. A set of the instruments including GLTEQ, SHIS, BPNES, BREQ-2 and BARSE was distributed at a university in southern Sweden. The respondents (n=260) included men (n=122) and women (n=138). For analysis and processing of the gathered data SPSS was used with Pearson’s r and Multiple Regression Analysis. The results showed that competence, autonomy and relatedness were positive predictors of self-determined motivation, whilst identified regulation, intrinsic regulation and barrier self-efficacy were positive predictors for strenuous exercise. Moreover, a regression analysis showed that only competence was a significant predictor for well-being; however, positive correlations were shown between all the basic needs and well-being. Satisfaction of the basic needs seem to result in more self-determined motivation and higher levels of barrier self-efficacy, which in turn increases the number of strenuous exercise sessions per week. Furthermore, satisfaction of the basic needs, especially competence through exercise, appears to be important for university students’ well-being. Strenuous exercise itself may also have the potential to positively influence well-being.

  • 59.
    Junggren, Stephan E.
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Elbæk, Lars
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott. University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Examining coaching practices and philosophy through the lens of organizational culture in a Danish high-performance swimming environment2018Ingår i: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 13, nr 6, s. 1108-1119Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in coaching and coaches, as well as coach–athlete relationships, has for a long time been a traditional and solid part of talent development literature. In recent times, talent development research has employed a holistic ecological approach and emphasized the important role of a broader athletic environment in athletes’ development and a constitutive role of organizational culture in the success of such an environment. This case study uses the holistic ecological perspective to examine coaching practices and philosophy through the lens of organizational culture in a Danish high performance swimming environment. The environment was selected based on its performance success but also because of its nontraditional organization compared to typical Danish swimming clubs. Data were generated from in-depth interviews with six coaches, 30 h of participant observation of training and meetings, and analysis of related documents. Thematic data analysis was guided by Schein’s model of organizational culture. The findings revealed the organizational culture that incorporates specific features of coaching practices and philosophy through cultural artifacts, espoused values, and basic assumptions. In the artifacts, coaching practices were explicit (e.g. flexible training groups and schedules) and philosophy implicit (e.g. ongoing flow of feedback), while in the espoused values, coaching philosophy was explicit (e.g. swimmers as whole persons, long-term development focus) and consistent with basic cultural assumptions(e.g. swimmers’ autonomy as a basis for progress). The study revealed that the cultural lens was helpful in exploring consistency between what coaches communicate about what they do (and how and why they do it) and what they actually did (and how they did it). © The Author(s) 2018.

  • 60.
    Järphag, Ulf
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Centrum för idrott och hälsoforskning (CIHF).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Centrum för idrott och hälsoforskning (CIHF).
    Psychological aspects of athletic retirement among elite Swedish athletes2003Ingår i: New Approaches to Exercise and Sport Psychology: Proceedings of the 11th European Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] R. Stelter, FEPSAC , 2003, s. 81-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. This study is a part of the international project „European perspectives on athletic retirement“ (Alfermann, Stambulova, & Zemaityte, in press). It focuses on: a) reasons for sports career termination; b) perceived emotional problems, need for adaptation, and duration of transitional period; c) differences in the process of retirement between athletes who planned and did not plan it in advance.Method. The „Retirement from sport“ questionnaire (Alfermann, Stambulova, & Zemaityte, 2001) was send to retired Swedish athletes by mail, and after considering returned answers 88 subjects were selected for this study on the basis of two criteria: international level athletic career; 1-10 years period after the sports career end. Participants included males (n=57) and females (n=31) – representatives of different individual and team sports.ResultsQuantitative analyses showed that elite Swedish athletes terminated mainly because of sport-related reasons followed by health- and familyrelated reasons. About a half of the subjects (46%) perceived a specific need to adjust to the life after sports, and 24% experienced emotional problems during the transitional period, which lasted 19.0 months (SD=15.7). Several one-way ANOVAs were conducted to identify differences in the process of athletic retirement between two groups of subjects: who planned (67%) and did not plan (33%) retirement. These revealed that athletes who planned retirement were more satisfied with their athletic careers (p< .01) and the timing of retirement (p< .01); they also used „acceptance“ of retirement as a coping strategy more often (p< .01). Athletes who did not plan retirement had more negative emotional reactions on this event (p< .01), and used „denial“ as a coping strategy more often (p< .05).Conclusion. The results will be discussed from the point of view of the Sports Career Transition model (Stambulova, 1997).

  • 61.
    Kiuppis, Florian
    et al.
    Catholic University of Applied Sciences Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Special issue of Sport in Society: Transitions in Sport Life2017Ingår i: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 20, nr 10, s. 1485-1486Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 62.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Lindahl, Kent
    Riksidrottsförbundet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Eriksson, Pernilla
    Umeå Universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Idrottares dubbla karriärer2018Ingår i: Specialidrott: tränings- och tävlingslära / [ed] Avdelningen Elitidrottsstöd, Riksidrottsförbundet, Stockholm: SISU Idrottsböcker , 2018, s. 237-251Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 63.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    From the Swedish dual career model to a national digital system of dual career support services2015Ingår i: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, s. 241-241Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The sport and educational systems in Sweden have a long history (since the 1970s) of cooperating on a high school level. Recently steps have been taken by the Swedish Sport Confederation to initiate cooperation in higher education (i.e., university level). Swedish research on athletes’ dual careers has mainly focused on the high school level (e.g., Stambulova, Engström, Franck, Linnér, & Lindahl, 2014; Uebel, 2006), with Fryklund (2012) as the only one who targeted the university level. Stambulova et al. (2014) presented the Swedish dual career model to set up an agenda for future dual career research in Sweden. The model aligns the stages in the Swedish educational system with related age markers and stages in athletic as well as vocational development illustrating possible dual career pathways and related transitions. Outlined by the Swedish dual career model a new project has been initiated.  Demands and challenges as well as the relevant needs in psychological support of Swedish university student-athletes are investigated through mixed-method qualitative and quantitative explorations. Based upon findings and in collaboration with researchers in health innovation and embedded intelligent systems a national digital system of dual career support services is going to be developed and tested. The digital service can be explained as an online national career assistance program including dual career education, networking and training from a preventive-supportive perspective. That is, helping university student-athletes to develop knowledge, competencies and skills to become more competent and (with time) autonomous in managing their own careers. In a broader sense, the system is seen as facilitating implementations of the Swedish dual career philosophies of “winning in the short-run”(i.e., obtaining an optimal dual career balance) and “winning in the long-run”, that is, proactively preparing student-athletes for athletic career termination (Stambulova et al., 2014). © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 64.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Profiles of Dual Career Competences of Swedish University Student-Athletes2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining sport and education (or work) is termed as athletes ‘dual careers’ (DC) and it is an evolving area of research in Europe, guided by the European Union Guidelines on Dual Careers of Athletes (2012). In this presentation, results from a Swedish national study will be presented. The aim of the study was to investigate university student-athletes’ DC competences (i.e., knowledge, skills, experience and attitudes) for a successful DC. The study is part of the European project ‘Gold in Education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) involving eight other European countries. Seventy-one Swedish university student-athletes (mean age= 25.2) representing various sports completed the DC Competence Survey. The survey measured student-athletes’ perceptions (i.e., importance and possession) of 38 DC competences (e.g., ability to prioritize, dedication to succeed, self-discipline, ability to cope with stress), and student-athletes’ experience of, coping with, and use of competences in seven challenging DC scenarios (e.g., missing important days in school, moving away from home, injury). The Latent profile analysis on student-athletes’ possession of competences indicated that the model with a 3-profile solution provided the best fit (entropy = 0.876; Parametric Bootstrapped likelihood ratio test =.01). Profile-1 (P1: n=7) corresponded to student-athletes with an average level of competence; Profile-2 (P2: n=42) to an average-to-good level of competence, and Profile-3 (P3: n=22) to a good competence level. Profile-3 outscored the two other profiles in terms of mean coping with all seven DC scenarios (P1: M=3.39; P2: M=3.58; P3: M=4.15), indicating that the more competences student-athletes possessed the better they coped. However, the pattern of coping between profiles was not consistent across all scenarios, suggesting that some competences were more important for some scenarios and less important for others. Further analysis aims to reveal scenario-specific competences to guide practitioners helping student-athletes in specific DC scenarios.

  • 65.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Eriksson, Pernila
    Umeå University.
    Uebel, Maja
    The Swedish Sports Confederation.
    Lindahl, Kent
    The Swedish Sports Confederation.
    Development of a system of dual career support foruniversity student-athletes:: Swedish national dual career guidelines.2019Ingår i: Abstract book of the 15th European Congress of Sport and Exercise Psychology / [ed] B. Strauss et al., Muenster, Germany, 2019, s. 281-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 66.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Eriksson, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Uebel, Maja
    Riksidrottsförbundet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Kent
    Riksidrottsförbundet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Development of a system of dual career support at Swedish National Sports Universities: Swedish national dual career guidelines2019Ingår i: Abstract book: Building the Future of Sport and Exercise Psychology / [ed] B. Strauss et al., 2019, s. 281-281Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2012 the European Commission issued European guidelines on dual careers (DC) of athletes to inspire “the formulation and adoption of action-oriented national dual career guidelines and to raise awareness at national level about the concept of dual careers” (p.3). In parallel with the ongoing expansion of the Swedish DC system to include the higher education level, the Swedish Sports Confederation initiated a working group to develop a system of DC support at Swedish National Sports Universities (RIUs) and Elite Sports-friendly Universities (EVLs) summarized in the Swedish national DC guidelines (2018). The working group consisted of four practitioners representing RIUs/EVLs (e.g., DC-coordinators, study counsellors), two Swedish DC researchers, and two officials of the Swedish Sports Confederation. Six two-day working group meetings were conducted during two years (2016-2018) to develop this policy document as a culturally informed synthesis of national and international DC research, EU guidelines on DCs, experiences and knowledge from RIUs and EVLs including best practice examples, and in line with the Swedish strategy for Sports. The Swedish national DC guidelines outline the organizational model for RIUs and EVLs and provide 36 guidelines in how to facilitate (a) an environment for DCs, (b) academic development, (c) athletic development, (d) a balance between sport, studies and private life, and (e) student-athletes’ career transitions. The Swedish national DC guidelines currently set a national standard for DC support across the country and inspire universities to further develop their support in line with recommendations from national and international DC research.

  • 67.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Facilitating Student-Athletes’ Development in Sport and Life through Optimizing their Dual Career Development Environment2017Ingår i: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, s. 30-31Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 68.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Holistic approach to understanding a dual career environment at a Swedish university2017Ingår i: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, s. 243-244Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Dual career (DC; combination of sport and studies) research is traditionally focused on student-athletes’ developmental demands and coping resources. To support athletes’ talent development in combination with education, sport federations and universities (and others) co-create high performance centers or DC hubs. Research into these environments is limited. Inspired by the holistic ecological approach, and particularly by the athletic talent development environment model (Henriksen, 2010), we created the dual career development environment (DCDE) working model and then used this model to explore a ‘golf and study’ environment at a Swedish university. The DCDE model is structured into three levels (micro, meso, and macro) and three domains (study, sport, and private) taking into account societal institutions, sport and education systems. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with nine university elite golf-students about perceived support during their transition to, and first year within the environment, and with four stakeholders (e.g., coach, study director) to discover their perspective on the environment and the support they provided. Observations and documents collected from the environment web-page also supported the analysis. Key features of the investigated DCDE related mainly to the micro and meso levels and included: collaborative arrangements between sport and academic stakeholders aimed at facilitating the student-athletes’ DCs, high quality coaching and facilities, stakeholders’ shared focus on a ‘whole person’ including, for example, student- athletes’ physical and psychological well-being. It was also found that the daily life of the student-athletes was concentrated around the campus gym as a place to meet and discuss various sport, study and personal life issues with each other and with their physical coach (also a university teacher). Further study is planned to target the macro level of the environment to advance these findings. 

  • 69.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Lindahl, Kent
    Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Promoting dual career support services: Swedish perspectives and actions taken2017Ingår i: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, s. 47-47Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation we share: (a) key findings on experiences and competences of Swedish dual career support providers (DCSP) from the European Project “Gold in Education and Elite Sport”, and (b) insights into the actions derived from the Project and taken to advance the dual career (DC) support services in Sweden. Across the country, 31 DCSPs (mean age= 47.4) completed the DCSP survey that measured perceptions of 35 competences to facilitate student-athletes’ development (e.g., be an active and supportive listener) and explored experiences of, and coping with, six DCSP’s scenarios (e.g., supporting a student-athlete when missing days in school). Additionally, six DCSPs took part in a focus group discussion on how they work and what methods they use to support their student-athletes. Overall, the results revealed that the DCSPs demonstrated high awareness of DC and related challenges, possessed necessary competences, managed the relevant scenarios, and reflected on their work in congruence with a whole person perspective. Results also indicated that the DCSPs worked mainly part time, held higher education degrees, but lacked specific DC education and networks. When positioning the findings within the Swedish DC context two major actions were initiated. First, as a DCSP is a new job profile in Sweden that should be developed, planning efforts for a national DCSP education system and a complementary national digital DC support service are currently in progress. Second, with the recent expansion of the Swedish DC system to include the higher education level, a shared basis is needed for sustainable development. Therefore, the Swedish Sport Confederation initiated the action of developing Swedish national DC Guidelines. The Guidelines will be briefly outlined with strategies to facilitate student-athletes’ DC development including different transitions and their search for optimal balance between sport, studies, and private life.

  • 70.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Lindahl, Kent
    Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    "Support upon request": Exploring a dual career development environment at a Swedish university2019Ingår i: Abstract book: The 15th European Congress of Sport and Exercise Psychology – Building the Future of Sport and Exercise Psychology / [ed] B. Strauss et al., 2019, s. 274-274Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation shares a case study of a dual career development environment (DCDE) at a Swedish university based on the holistic ecological approach (Henriksen & Stambulova, 2017). The goal of the study was to explore the DCDE’s structure, DC processes, and philosophy of the DC support team. Data were collected through 10 semi-structured interviews (with eight university and sports staff members and two collaborative partners) and two focus groups (with four student-athletes, and four coaches). Participants were asked about their perceptions of the environment, key relationships, philosophy, and support. Observation of real-life events (e.g. meetings, training sessions), informal talks with 13 student-athletes and 21 staff members and stakeholders during eight full days, and analysis of relevant documents (e.g. webpage) provided additional insights into the environment. Results highlighted that the structure of the environment was characterized by a strong regional sports culture and collaboration between stakeholders with geographical and relational proximity and strong DC coordination. The coach-athlete relationship was the key relationship for DC support. The central DC processes were university regulations providing the student-athletes with the right to study flexibly, integrated DC planning between the coach and the athlete, and access to expert support. The philosophy of the DC support team was characterized by treating the student-athletes as "whole persons" and responsible grown-ups, meaning that no support was provided if the student-athletes did not request it. Implications of the approach taken by this DCDE are outlined at the conclusion of this presentation.

  • 71.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Lindahl, Kent
    The Swedish Sports Confederation.
    Support upon request”:Exploring a dual career development environment at a Swedish university2019Ingår i: Abstract book of the 15th European Congress of Sport and Exercise Psychology / [ed] B. Strauss et al., Muenster, Germany, 2019, s. 274-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation shares a case study of a dual career development environment (DCDE) at a Swedish university based on the holistic ecological approach (Henriksen & Stambulova, 2017). The study is part of the Erasmus+ project “Ecology of dual career (DC) – exploring dual career development environments across Europe”. The goal of the study was to explore the DCDE’s structure, DC processes, and philosophy of the DC support team. Data were collected through ten semi-structured interviews (with eight university and sports staff members and two collaborative partners) and two focus groups (with four student-athletes, and four coaches) about their perceptions of the environment, key relationships, philosophy and support. Observation of real life events (e.g., meetings, training sessions) including informal talks to 13 student-athletes and 21 staff members and stakeholders during eight full days and analysis of relevant documents (e.g., webpage) provided additional insights into the environment. To briefly sum up, the structure of the environment was characterized by a strong regional sports culture and collaboration between stakeholders with geographical and relational proximity, strong DC coordination, and the coach-athlete relationship as the key relationship for DC support. The central DC processes were a university regulation providing the student-athletes with the right to flexible studies, integrated DC planning between the coach and athlete, and access to expert support. The philosophy of the DC support team was characterized by treating the student-athletes as “whole persons” and responsible grown-ups, meaning that no support was provided if the student-athletes did not request it.

  • 72.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Lindahl, Kent
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wylleman, Paul
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussel, Belgium.
    Swedish university student-athletes’ dual career scenarios and competences2019Ingår i: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArtikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents the Swedish data on university student-athletes’ dual career (DC) competences and coping, from the European project “Gold in Education and Elite Sport” (GEES). A cross-sectional quantitative design was implemented with the objectives to explore: (a) the student-athletes’ perceived need to develop DC competences in order to successfully combine sport and study, (b) if the student-athletes experienced and how they coped with specific DC scenarios, and (c) the magnitude of the association between the student-athletes’ possession of prioritized DC competences for each scenario and their scenario-specific coping. Seventy-one university student-athletes with a mean age of 25.21 completed the DC competency questionnaires developed within the GEES. The student-athletes reported their perception of importance and possession of 38 DC competences (e.g., cope with stress, prioritizing), as well as coping with seven DC scenarios (e.g., miss significant days of study), and selected the five most important competences (from the list of 38) to cope with each scenario. The results revealed that the student-athletes: (a) perceived a need to develop more than 70% of the DC competences to successfully combine sport and studies, (b) had experienced and coped average-to-good with the DC scenarios, and (c) possession of the top five prioritized competences was moderately-to-strongly related to their coping in three scenarios. The study extends understanding of Swedish university student-athletes’ DC competences and has contributed to development of Swedish National Guidelines for elite athletes’ dual careers (2018). © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 73.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Parker, James
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Bio- och miljösystemforskning (BLESS).
    Ekengren, Johan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Dual Career Balance in Student-Athletes University Transition2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Balancing studies, a personal life and sports, that is, having a dual career, is considered as a challenge associated with transitional demands in athletic and non-athletic (psychological, psychosocial, academic/vocational, financial) domains (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013). The aim of this study was to investigate student-athletes’ university transition with a specific focus on how student-athletes balance different domains of their lives. Twenty-three Swedish university student-athletes (mean age= 21.52; 16 males and 7 females) representing six sports (equestrianism, golf, handball, ice hockey, soccer, table tennis) partook in the study. Participants completed the Dual Career Monitoring Survey (DCMS), weekly, over the first twelve weeks of their university education. The DCMS is developed by the authors and measures student-athletes perceptions of balance, time investments, demands, coping, satisfaction, resources and barriers in relation to sport, studies, private life, social life and financial situation. In exploring student-athletes’ perception of dual career balance throughout the twelve weeks, an intra-class correlation analysis revealed a between-person variance of 0.14 (14%). That is, with regards to balance in their dual careers 86% was due to within-person variance, suggesting that balance is idiosyncratic and that further analysis should investigate within-person change. Encouraged by these findings we continued with a person-centered analysis using the Dynamic P-technique for modeling patterns of data (Nelson, Aylward, & Rausch, 2011). The relationships between changes in balance (i.e., prioritizing sport, studies or other domains of life), demands, coping and satisfaction throughout the twelve weeks will be presented. Our findings contribute to the understanding of balance as a central tenet of athletes’ dual careers (Second author et al., 2015). From our findings we suggest practitioners to take into account the individual dynamics in dual career balance from a whole-person perspective.

  • 74.
    Minniti, Antoinette
    et al.
    Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Life Skills for Junior Soccer Players2012Ingår i: 2nd Dubai International Symposium of Sport Psychology: Mental Training. Strategies and Methods: 19-20 September 2012, Dubai: Dubai Sports Council , 2012, s. 26-28Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 75.
    Pehrson, Sebastian
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Olsson, Kasper
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd. Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Revisiting the empirical model ‘Phases in the junior-to-senior transition of Swedish ice hockey players’: External validation through focus groups and interviews2017Ingår i: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 12, nr 6, s. 747-761Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we continue to explore the junior-to-senior transition (JST) process in Swedish ice hockey by validating the empirical model ‘Phases in the JST of Swedish Ice Hockey Players’ created in our previous study (Stambulova et al., 2017). More specifically, we collected opinions and critical reflections of fifteen senior professional players and expert coaches about the empirical model as a whole and about the content of each JST phase, and then converted the original empirical model into its validated version (further – the validated model). Professional ice hockey players and first league coaches formed three focus groups, while three senior coaches were interviewed individually. All were encouraged to critically reflect on the empirical model. The data from all sources were analysed following guidelines of the thematic (deductive) analysis, complemented by quantitative measurements of the participants’ agreement with the content of the empirical model. Results supported the sequence and designations of the JST phases (i.e., preparation, orientation, adaptation, and stabilization), as well duration of the JST (i.e., up to four seasons) outlined by the empirical model. We were also able to validate the psychological content (perceived demands, resources, barriers, coping strategies, and outcomes) of each transitional phase. Accordingly, five themes were reformulated, seventeen new themes were added and some themes were re-ordered during the conversion of the original empirical model into the validated model. To improve the readability of the validated model (from the bottom to the top) we also re-ordered sub-categories describing the psychological content of each JST phase. We conclude by discussing the validated model in relation to theoretical frameworks and previous research and providing some methodology, future research, and practice-oriented reflections addressed to researchers, coaches and sport psychology practitioners. © The Author(s) 2017

  • 76.
    Poczwardowski, Artur
    et al.
    University of Denver, Denver, USA.
    Haberl, Peter
    United States Olympic Committee (USOC), Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA.
    Diehl, Robert
    Mental Health Partners, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    O'Neil, Adam
    Sport Concussion Institute, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA.
    Transitions of Young Swedish Athletes and American Olympians to Elite Training Settings2012Ingår i: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, s. 132-133Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 77.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Jyvaskyla, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Elbe, Anne-Mari
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    ISSP position stand: Transnationalism, mobility, and acculturation in and through sport2018Ingår i: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, nr 5, s. 520-534Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The historically unprecedented pace of internationalising sport industry and transnational movement of athletic talent in the last 20 years has heightened the need for developing new competencies in research and daily practice of sport psychology professionals. While academic literature in cultural sport psychology and praxis has been increasing, sport professionals and local organisations seem to give scant time and resources to stay abreast of complex social changes in transnational industry and to the development of cultural competencies. Stemming from the continuing need for qualified athletic personnel to support transitioning athletes and to achieve intercultural effectiveness in daily practices, our objectives in this position statement are to critically review and analyse the growing scholarship pertinent to various forms of transnational mobility and acculturation of athletic migrants, and subsequently provide recommendations for further use in research and applied contexts. © 2017 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 78.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Athletes' careers across cultures2012Ingår i: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, s. 117-117Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 79.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Challenges and strategies to develop athletic migrationresearch and practice2017Ingår i: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, s. 214-214Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s sport is “on the move” in a sense that athletes, coaches, sport psychology practitioners and other sporting people are internationally highly mobile. In response, there is a growing interest and the need for sport psychology researchers and practitioners to understand athletic migration processes and develop strategies to effectively help both migrants and hosts to mutually adjust in the shared context. The ISSP Position Stand on transnationalism, mobility, and acculturation in and through sport (Ryba et al., 2017) provides a set of aids to interested scholars. First, the authors clarify migration terminology (e.g., mobility and migration, cultural transition and acculturation, immigrant and transnational athletes) to facilitate international/intercultural collaboration that is inevitable when professionals want to study or help migrants. Second, cultural transition and acculturation frameworks with examples of high quality qualitative and quantitative research on migrants and hosts are introduced, and relevant methodological tips are provided. Third, the authors analyze different forms of mobile practice and highlight strategies used by experienced mobile practitioners as materials for the readers’ cultural reflexivity. Finally, they outline major challenges and potential solutions to further develop athletic migration research and mobile practice. The authors suggest an idea of cultural praxis of athletic migration as an approach that blends analyses of migrants’ destination and home environmental contexts, studying adaptation process of both migrants and hosts, and identifying strategies facilitating mutual adjustment, athletes’ performance and well-being. Among practical recommendations the authors promote shared acculturation approaches, sharing experiences between mobile practitioners from different countries, education of applied sport psychology students on mobile practices and education of coaches aimed at helping them to become cultural leaders in.

  • 80.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark .
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    In a Different Voice: Women’s Careers in Sport and Exercise Psychology2013Ingår i: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, s. 55-55Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Invoking Carol Gilligan’s feminist classic in the title of this symposium, we seek to refute the silenced place of women in the written history of our field. The invisibility of formal recognition of women’s contribution to the development of international sport psychology is especially ironic because female trailblazers “were highly visible during their careers due to their extreme underrepresentation” (Krane & Whaley, 2010, p. 349). Challenging a common sense assumption that research and professional structures are gender neutral, this symposium foregrounds female narratives and experiences in, and of, sport psychology to highlight the fundamentally gendered underpinnings of such common concepts as career, success, and science. The female career paths in sport psychology academic discipline and profession will be shared by five remarkable women who contextualize their life stories within the sociocultural and historical forces that shaped their careers in the North America, Africa, Asia, and Western and Eastern Europe.

  • 81.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland & Research Institute for Olympic Sports, Muurame, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Russia2016Ingår i: Routledge International Handbook of Sport Psychology / [ed] Robert J. Schinke, Kerry R. McGannon & Brett Smith, New York. NY: Routledge, 2016, s. 9-19Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 82.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    The turn towards a culturally informed approach to career research and assistance in sport psychology2013Ingår i: Athletes' careers across cultures / [ed] N. Stambulova and T. Ryba, London: Routledge, 2013, s. 1-16Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 83.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    The wind has changed: Culture in athletes’ career research2013Ingår i: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, s. 56-57Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The area of athlete career development and transitions has traditionally been dominated by a Western perspective, an imbalance which has had a considerable influence on shaping career studies in sport psychology more generally. This presentation is based on our edited book “Athletes’ Careers across Cultures”, in which we employ theoretical tenants of the cultural turn to approach career as a socially and culturally constituted context in which the development of athletes occurs. Briefly outlining how culture has been studied in career transition research, we position our discussion within the metaphor of waves. The cross-cultural wave is representative of the universalist approach to career in the study of similarities and differences in cognitive, emotional and behavioral functions of athletes in different countries. Cross-cultural career studies are typically carried out within the positivist epistemology, using different questionnaires about athletes’ beliefs and attitudes (e.g., Dimoula, Torregrosa, Psychountaki, &González, 2012; Alfermann, Stambulova, & Zemaityte, 2004; Stambulova, Stephan, & Jäphag, 2007). The wave of cultural mindset is located within a constructivist paradigm of cultural psychology. Cultural researchers have challenged the extant career models, which suggest that athletes across cultures undertake similar career pathways and experience comparable career transitions (e.g., Carless, & Douglas, 2009; Douglas, & Carless, 2009; Schinke, Ryba, Danielson, Michel, Peltier, Enosse, et al., 2007). In our discussion, we focus on the emerging ‘third wave’ to explicate how culture functions as discourse in the context of athletes’ careers. Culture as discourse operates through common sense assumptions embedded in social institutions, such as national sport federations and academic institutes, enabling athletes to access certain contextually contained skills and practices whilst simultaneously restricting, even denying, the development of others. We therefore argue for the need to open sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse intellectual traditions, perspectives and concerns, which will allow researchers and practitioners to better understand local problems within the dynamics of cultural diversity in athlete career development and assistance.

  • 84.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Centrum för idrott och hälsoforskning (CIHF).
    Gucciardi, Daniel
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Gordon, Sandy
    University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Will we know mental toughness when we see it?2007Ingår i: 2007 Conference Proceedings, AASP , 2007, s. 3-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 85.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland & Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Ronkainen, Noora
    Exercise, Health and Technology Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
    The work of cultural transition: an emerging model2016Ingår i: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, nr 427Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s uncertain, fluid job market, transnational mobility has intensified. Though the concept of cultural transition is increasingly used in sport and career research, insight into the processes of how individuals produce their own development through work and relationships in shifting cultural patterns of meaning remains limited. The transnational industry of sports, in which athletes’ psychological adjustment to cultural transitions has implications for both performance and meaningful life, serves as a backdrop for this article. This study applied the life story method to interviews with 15 professional and semi-professional athletes, focusing particularly on the cultural transition aspect of their transnational athletic careers. The aims of the study were to identify the developmental tasks of cultural transitions and strategies/mechanisms through which cultural transitions were enacted. Three underlying mechanisms of the transition process that assisted athletic career adaptability were social repositioning, negotiation of cultural practices, and meaning reconstruction. Based on the data analyses, a temporal model of cultural transition is proposed. The results of this research provide professionals working in the fields of career counseling and migrant support with a content framework for enhancing migrant workers’ adaptabilities and psychological wellbeing. © 2016 Ryba, Stambulova and Ronkainen

  • 86.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Ronkainen, Noora
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China & Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Transnational mobility and cultural transition2017Ingår i: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, s. 215-216Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of sport participants migrate within and between nations for a variety of reasons, such as athletic career development, sport tourism, and international assignments. During 2013, the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) estimated that 214 million individuals were considered to be migrants, which is one in every 33 persons worldwide. This presentation builds on the ISSP Position Stand on transnationalism, mobility, and acculturation in and through sport (Ryba et al., 2017) to introduce a transnational conceptual framework used in recent studies of athletic migrants’ career and life transitions. First, migration terminology will be reviewed to facilitate the attendees’ understanding of the experiential layers of athletes’ experiences discussed in the presentations comprising this symposium. Next, we focus on a study of transnational elite athletes’ careers to clarify the processes activated in cultural transition that produce psychosocial development through work, sport, and relationships in shifting cultural patterns of meaning. Having positioned the migrants’ experiences in critical acculturation literature (Bhatia & Ram, 2009; Ryba et al., 2015; Schinke et al., 2016), we derived at a temporal model of the cultural transition process consisting of three phases: pre-transition, acute acculturation, and sociocultural adaptation. The empirical model and three underlying mechanisms of cultural transition that assisted athletic career adaptability of transnational migrants will be discussed. We conclude with practical implications of this research for professionals working in the fields of career counseling and migrant support. 

  • 87.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    KIHU – Research Institute for Olympic Sports Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Ronkainen, Noora
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
    Bundgaard, Jens
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Selänne, Harri
    LIKES - Center for Sport and Health Sciences Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Cultural transitions and adaptation in a transnational athletic career2015Ingår i: / [ed] O. Schmid and R. Seiler, 2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rising globalization of the sports economy, athletic careers have become increasingly transnational. In comparison with an international career, a transnational athletic career is more open-ended regarding the countries of one’s origin, settlement, and retirement. The production of mobility and adaptation to a cultural transition are critical phases for initiating and maintaining the transnational career. In this paper, we conceptualize cultural transition as a quasi-normative career transition, typically coinciding with other within-career transitions and career termination. In other words, cultural transitions are normative or predictable in the course of transnational athletic careers. The paper is based on data gathered for the research of transnational athletes’ career development and transitions in Nordic countries—that is, participants had at least one migration to or from Finland, Sweden, Norway, or Denmark during the duration of their career. The participants were both male and female, either professional or amateur in various sports, and their ages varied from 18 to 37. Narrative inquiry from the life story perspective (Atkinson, 1998) was used to elicit and analyze 15 athletes’ narrations of the ways in which their careers were negotiated in a complex sociocultural space spanning physical and discursive borders (i.e., geographic, linguistic and socio-political). Through narrative analysis, we discerned several interconnected storylines related to elite sporting (sub)cultures, gender and ethnicity discourses embedded in a particular sociocultural context, and transformative life transitions in and through which personal meanings were reconstructed. We suggest that (1) meaning reconstruction and (2) repositioning in social networks constitute the key psychological processes associated with the cultural transition. The results moreover empirically substantiated the concepts of cultural transition and adaptation, which are the focus of this presentation. The present research also contributes to clarifying the emerging concepts and establishing a common language in career transitions literature.

  • 88.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Schinke, Robert
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Si, Gangyan
    Hong Kong Sports Institute, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Selanne, Harri
    LIKES Research Center, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Ronkainen, Noora
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    McGannon, Kerry
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Cultural Competence and Ethics of Difference in Sport Psychology Research and Practice2013Ingår i: Lifelong Physical and Mental Well-Being through Sport and Exercise: 2013 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2013, s. 139-139Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 89.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Selänne, Harri
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Aunola, Kaisa
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Nurmi, Jan-Erik
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    ”Sport has always been first for me” but “all my free time is spent doing homework”: Dual career styles in late adolescence2017Ingår i: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 33, s. 131-140Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    In adolescence, personally meaningful autobiographical memories begin to integrate into cultural narrative structures to form a life story. We examined how and to what extent adolescent Finnish athletes narrate and integrate significant life events in sport and education into their identities and future narratives in order to delineate the different styles of athletes’ career construction.

    Design

    Longitudinal qualitative study.

    Method

    Ten female and eight male, elite junior athletes, aged 15–16 at baseline, participated in individual conversational interviews. The resulting interview data were analyzed using narrative analysis.

    Results

    Thirteen of 18 adolescent athletes drew primarily on the performance narrative plot to construct their life story and five of 18 athletes could not project into the future beyond their athletic selves. We identified three styles of athletes’ career construction. Employing musical terminology as a metaphor, the contrapuntal style entwines sport and education as harmonically related life-themes; monophonic style draws on a prominent athletic life-theme; and dissonant style is underpinned by discord of sport and education. We did not detect direct associations between narrative types (performance, discovery and relational) and career construction styles. We show the dominant style development within an exemplary story.

    Conclusion

    Exploration of the future and possible selves are critical for developing meaningful (dis)continuity of a dual career pathway from adolescence to adulthood. We conclude that dual career discourse is gaining traction in directing young athletes’ future thinking; however, a broader repertoire of exemplary success stories which allow athletes to imagine achieving excellence in diverse ways would enable them to channel action. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  • 90.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Si, Gangyan
    Hong Kong Sports Institute, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Robert, Schinke
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Toward Culturally Competent Research and Practice in Sport and Exercise Psychology2013Ingår i: Lifelong Physical and Mental Well-Being through Sport and Exercise: 2013 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2013, s. 139-139Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 91.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Wrisberg, Craig
    The University of Tennessee, USA.
    Forward to the Past: Puni’s Model of Volitional Preparation in Sport2009Ingår i: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 7, nr 3, s. 275-291Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we examine the Soviet notion of volitional preparation through the lens used by the prominent sport psychologist Avksenty Cezarevich Puni (1898 – 1986). First, we provide an English translation of Puni’s theoretical and practical tutorial on volitional preparation in sport. Then we discuss how Puni’s model was grounded in the socio-political and cultural particularities of his era and suggest some ways it might be used to stimulate future research and theorizing on the development of mental toughness. Finally, we offer some possible applications of the model for practitioners in preparing athletes for the rigors of competition.

  • 92.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    The University of Tennessee, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Centrum för idrott och hälsoforskning (CIHF).
    Wrisberg, Craig
    The University of Tennessee, USA.
    The Russian Origins of Sport Psychology: A Translation of an Early Work of A. C.Puni2005Ingår i: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 17, nr 2, s. 157-169Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport psychology today is a vibrant and thriving field with well-developed theory and increased opportunities for applied consulting. However, when the field is historicized, it is often done so with an emphasis on its North American roots (c.f., Williams & Straub, 2001). While the development of sport psychology in other parts of the world, particularly Eastern Europe, is acknowledged, less is known about the contributions of individuals in those countries. One such person, who was one of the earliest contributing figures to the field, is the Russian practitioner and scholar Avksenty Tcezarevich Puni (1898 – 1986). To date, English-speaking audiences have been unaware of the profound influence of Puni’s work because his papers were published in Russian. Though some of Puni’s work was translated into various languages of the European socialist countries, only glimpses of his work exist in English in the form of a few published abstracts of papers Puni presented at international conferences.  

                          In this paper, we offer the first of two essays designed to acquaint English-speaking readers with the work of this patriarch of Russian sport psychology. The second essay (Stambulova, Wrisberg, & Ryba, 2004) entitled “A Tale of Two Traditions in Applied Sport Psychology: The Heyday of Soviet Sport and a Wake-Up Call for North America,” is currently in preparation. Both papers represent our attempt to disrupt the established linear flow of the North American narrative by juxtaposing Russian and English historical texts, original Puni’s writings (including documents from his personal archives), and oral history.[i] This first essay begins with a short biographical sketch of Puni, followed by an English translation of one of his most influential early works. It concludes with a brief discussion of some of the parallel events transpiring in North American sport psychology during Puni’s era.

  • 93.
    Ryba, Tatiana V.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia B.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Cultural Sport Psychology: Special Measurement Considerations2012Ingår i: Measurement in sport and exercise psychology / [ed] Gershon Tenenbaum, Robert C. Eklund, Akihito Kamata, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics , 2012, s. 143-152Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 94.
    Ryba, Tatiana V.
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Ronkainen, Noora J.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Bundgaard, Jens
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Selänne, Harry
    LIKES - Research Center for Sport and Health Sciences, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Dual career pathways of transnational athletes2015Ingår i: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 21, s. 125-134Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Transnationalism, as part of the globalization processes, has transformed the lifestyle and the course of athletes' careers. This presents previously unexplored challenges encountered by student-athletes in combining athletic and academic pursuits. In this article, we propose a conceptual framework for the taxonomy of transnational dual careers (DC).

    Design and method

    Narrative inquiry from the life story perspective was used to elicit and analyze career narratives of six transnational athletes (3 male and 3 female), generating about five interview hours per athlete. The developmental transition from secondary to higher education was chosen as a key transition to classify the DC pathways. Additional insights into DC mobilization across international borders were gleaned by employing the typologies of sport migrants developed in the sport labor migration research.

    Results

    Three patterns of transnational DC were discerned from the narratives based on the direction of geographic mobility and the core migration motive underpinning the storyline. Within the present dataset, the taxonomies are: (1) Within EU mobility: the sport exile DC pathway; (2) Mobility to the U.S.A.: the sport mercenary DC pathway; and (3) Mobility to the U.S.A.: the nomadic cosmopolitan DC pathway.

    Conclusions

    The identified transnational DC paths are not exhaustive, and highlight possibilities of individual development, unfolding through the matrices of social structures in a given location. Further research with a diverse set of transnational athletes is needed to test and expand the proposed taxonomy. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 95.
    Ryba, Tatiana V.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle (HOS), Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Si, Gangyan
    Sport Psychology and Monitoring Centre, Hong Kong Sports Institute, Fo Tan, Sha Tin, Hong Kong.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    ISSP Position Stand: Culturally competent research and practice in sport and exercise psychology2013Ingår i: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 11, nr 2, s. 123-142Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The multicultural landscape of contemporary sport sets a challenge to rethink sport and exercise psychology research and practice through a culturally reflexive lens. This ISSP Position Stand provides a rigorous synthesis and engagement with existing scholarship to outline a roadmap for future work in the field. The shift to culturally competent sport and exercise psychology implies: (a) recognizing hidden ethnocentric philosophical assumptions permeating much of the current theory, research, and practice; (b) transitioning to professional ethics in which difference is seen as not inherent and fixed but as relational and fluid; and (c) focusing on meaning (instead of cause) in cross-cultural and cultural research projects, and cultural praxis work. In the paper, we first provide an overview of the concepts of cultural competence and ethics of difference. Second, we present a step-by-step approach for developing a culturally competent project rooted either within cross-cultural or cultural research. Third, we focus on cultural praxis as a project that blends theory, research, and lived culture of practice. Finally, we summarize main points in nine postulates and provide recommendations for enhancing cultural competence in the field of sport and exercise psychology. © 2013 Copyright International Society of Sport Psychology.

  • 96.
    Samuel, Roy D.
    et al.
    Kibbutzim college of education technology and the Arts, Tel Aviv, Israel; School of psychology, interdisciplinary center (iDc), Herzliya, Israel.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Ashkenazi, Yaniv
    Elite Sport Department, the Olympic Committee of Israel, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel.
    Cultural transition forprofessional development: Case study of the Israeli men’s U18 national handballteam migrated to Germany.2019Ingår i: Abstract book of the 15th European Congressof Sport and Exercise Psychology / [ed] B. Strauss et al., Muenster, Germany, 2019, s. 104-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 97.
    Samuel, Roy D.
    et al.
    Department of Physical Education and Movement, Kibbutzim College of Education Technology and the Arts, Tel Aviv, Israel; ; School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Ashkenazi, Yaniv
    Elite Sport Department, the Olympic Committee of Israel, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel.
    Cultural transition of the Israeli men’s U18 National handball team migrated to Germany: a case study2019Ingår i: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study describes the cultural transition of the Israeli men’s U18 national handball team to train and compete in Germany for a competitive season. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected longitudinally as part of sport psychology services provided to the team. Data analysis was guided by an integrated career change and transition framework (ICCT). Results indicated that the transition demands covered on-court (e.g., increased training load) and off-court (e.g., residing at a hotel) issues. Players perceived this transition as significant and positive. In response to selection for this program, most players relied on consulting with others. The transition barriers were also related to on-court (e.g., injuries) and off-court (e.g., cultural differences) issues. Players varied in their conscious decision to change (i.e., apply all necessary adjustments) and coping effectiveness. Players exhibited several transition pathways, as suggested by the ICCT. Findings illustrate the dynamics and multifaceted nature of the cultural transition. © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 98. Sandström, Elin
    et al.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Career profiles of athlete-coach relationships: Descriptions and interpretations2016Ingår i: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 11, nr 3, s. 395-409Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore athlete-coach relationships from an athletic career perspective with the objectives: 1) to create individual career profiles of athlete-coach relationships, 2) to illustrate the career profiles describing athletes’ subjective experiences of working with all the coaches involved in their careers, and (c) to summarize athletes’ views on the dynamics of athlete-coach relationships in the course of their careers. Two case studies using narrative interviews with one team and one individual sport athlete (both Swedish) were made. The Narrative Oriented Inquiry model was used to guide the data collection, treatment and interpretation. The results representing over 20 relationships in total are presented as individual career profiles of athlete-coach relationships followed by interpretive narratives exploring more in detail the different athlete-coach relationships throughout their careers. Poems summarizing the athletes’ perceived dynamics of their relationships with coaches are then presented using only the athletes own words.

  • 99.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Stambulova, NataliaHögskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Context-driven sport and exercise psychology practice: Special Issue2017Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
  • 100.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Context-driven sport and exercise psychology practice: Widening our lens beyond the athlete2017Ingår i: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712, Vol. 8, nr 2, s. 71-75Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
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