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  • 51.
    Morville, Anne-Le
    et al.
    The Parker Institute, Hospital Fredriksberg, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark & Institute of Rehabilitation and Nutrition, Department of Occupational Therapy, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The Experience of Occupational Deprivation in an Asylum Centre: The Narratives of Three Men2013In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 212-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study of three asylum-seeking men from Iran and Afghanistan. It aimed to explore how and if they experienced occupations as occupations in a Danish asylum centre and how their life experience shaped their choice and value of current occupations. In-depth narrative interviews explored the participants’ occupational history and its influence on their occupations in the asylum centre. A thematic analysis showed that the participants had been subjected to occupational disruption and deprivation by politically oppressive systems even before their flight. Their occupations in Denmark were to a certain extent influenced by their earlier occupations and the current occupational deprivation they all experienced was due to limited possibilities in the centre. Although they tried their best to fill their days and create structure, there was a loss of valued occupations and a profound sense of occupational deprivation. One of the participants had been subjected to torture and he experienced occupational deprivation to a greater extent. The findings suggest that further research should include exposure to torture as a key component when examining the occupational deprivation of asylum seekers. © 2013 The Journal of Occupational Science Incorporated.

  • 52.
    Morville, Anne-Le
    et al.
    Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark & Metropolitan University College, Institute of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Department of Occupational Therapy, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Danneskiold-Samsoe, Bente
    Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Amris, Kirstine
    Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Satisfaction with daily occupations amongst asylum seekers in Denmark2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 207-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe asylum seekers' satisfaction with daily occupations and activity level while in a Danish asylum centre, and whether this changed over time. Another aim was to describe whether exposure to torture, self-rated health measures, and ADL ability were related to their satisfaction with daily occupations and activity level. Methods: A total of 43 asylum seekers at baseline and 17 at follow-up were included. The questionnaires Satisfaction with Daily Occupations, Major Depression Inventory, WHO-5 Wellbeing, Pain Detect, a questionnaire covering torture, and basic social information were used as well as Assessment of Motor and Process Skills. Results: The results showed a low level of satisfaction with daily occupations at both baseline and follow-up. There was no statistically significant change in satisfaction or activity level between baseline and the follow-up. Associations between AMPS process skills -education, worst pain and activity level -were present at baseline, as was a relationship between AMPS process skills and satisfaction. At follow-up, associations between WHO-5 and satisfaction and activity level and between MDI scores and activity level were found. Conclusion: Asylum seekers experience a low level of satisfaction with daily occupations, both at arrival and after 10 months in an asylum centre. There is a need for further research and development of occupation-focused rehabilitation methods for the asylum seeker population. © 2015 Informa Healthcare.

  • 53.
    Orban, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Vårdalinstitutet, Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    Vårdalinstitutet, Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden & Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Vårdalinstitutet, Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Using a time-geographical diary method in order to facilitate reflections on changes in patterns of daily occupations2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 249-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective and methods: Time-use methodologies have been proposed to be established research techniques when exploring aspects of daily occupations. In this study, two graphs illustrating the time arrangement of occupations as they appear in a continuous sequence were used in order to encourage individuals to reflect on their everyday life. The aim was to investigate the usefulness of a time-geographical diary method (using illustrative graphs) in combination with stimulated-recall interviews, to facilitate reflections on how patterns of daily occupations change over time and the causes that lie behind these changes. The study had a qualitative design. The participants were two working, married mothers, i.e. individuals considered to have highly complex patterns of daily occupations. The data analysis was performed by using thematic content analysis. Results: The results showed that the stimulated-recall interviews, based on the graphs, facilitated new insights that came to light concerning the scope of the participants' daily life. The method enabled the participants to reflect on their patterns of daily occupations and become aware of changes relevant to explain the causes for engaging in occupations the way they did. Conclusions: The method thus seems useful in research and practice for occupational therapists working with individuals with a need to change lifestyle. © 2012 Informa Healthcare.

  • 54.
    Orban, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Thorngren-Jerneck, Kristina
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Önnerfält, Jenny
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Changes in Parents' Time Use and Its Relationship to Child Obesity2014In: Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, ISSN 0194-2638, E-ISSN 1541-3144, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 44-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to explore any change in parents' time use together with their children, changes in their perceived occupational value, and its relationship to children's body mass index (BMI) over the course of a one-year occupation-focused family intervention. Method: The study sample consisted of participants in one arm of a randomized controlled trial, involving mothers and fathers (n = 30) of 17 children aged 4-6 years who were considered obese. Data were collected by time-geographical diaries during the intervention and by measuring the parents' occupational value and the children's BMI before and after the intervention. Results: At the end of the intervention, an increase was shown in the amount of time parents spent together with their children during weekdays (p = .042) and the parents perceived occupational value (p = .013). Children's BMI z-score changed with -0.11 units. Conclusion: Collaboration with parents may be useful in interventions aiming at facilitating a normal weight development among children. © 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

  • 55.
    Orban, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Vårdalinstitutet and the Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Ellegård, Kajsa
    Department of Technology and Social Change, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thorngren-Jerneck, Kristina
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Shared patterns of daily occupations among parents of children Aged 4-6 years old with obesity2012In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 241-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing and is associated with how families manage their daily occupations. Previous studies suggest that it should be possible to identify patterns of daily occupations that promote health and prevent illness. However, it is unknown how family members' patterns are shared. This study aimed at gaining knowledge about parents' shared patterns of daily occupations. Thirty parents enrolled in a randomized controlled trial involving parents of children aged 4–6 years old with obesity, were included. The study used a mixed methods design. Data from time-geographical diaries describing daily occupations on one ordinary weekday were collected. A sequential exploratory strategy design was used, with qualitative and quantitative data analysis. Four main groups of family types were identified: the togetherness focused family, the child focused family, the individual focused family and the parent-child focused family. These groups' shared patterns of daily occupations differed in terms of divisions of household work, paid work and the amount of time spent together as a family. The results highlight and generate a new understanding of how parents' shared patterns of daily occupations are shaped in families. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

  • 56.
    Orban, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Edberg, Anna-Karin
    School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Önnerfält, Jenny
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Vardal institutet, Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Thorngren-Jerneck, Kristina
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Effect of an Occupation-Focused Family Intervention on Change in Parents' Time Use and Children's Body Mass Index2014In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 68, no 6, p. e217-e226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. This study explored factors related to changes in the time parents spent with their children with obesity and associated decreases in children's body mass index (BMI) z-scores after an occupation-focused intervention. METHOD. Parents participated in a 1-yr occupation-focused intervention to promote healthy family lifestyles. Data on 40 parents of 22 children with obesity ages 4-6 yr were collected before and after intervention and analyzed using linear and multiple regression methods. RESULTS. Parents increased time spent with their children by an average of 91 min/day. Parents' finances, perceived satisfaction in daily occupations, low BMI, and mastery at inclusion were associated with increased time spent with their children. Mothers' subjective health and high mastery and fathers' perceived occupational value and education explained 67% of the variance in children's BMI z-scores. CONCLUSION. The results indicate important factors to consider in developing interventions that facilitate occupational engagement and health among children with obesity and their families.

  • 57.
    Persson, Dennis
    et al.
    Health Sciences Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Health Sciences Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ecopation: connecting sustainability, glocalisation and well-being2014In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 12-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the current perspective of sustainability and explores its relation to occupation. An elaborated version of the concept of ecopation, originally developed in 2002, which melds together eco-ethics and knowledge about occupation, is used as a tool to address sustainability issues in relation to future occupations for well-being. The concept of glocalisation is introduced as a means by which to capture the interconnectedness of personal, local and global perspectives. A core proposition in the article is that doing, if guided by ecopation, could start promoting well-being on individual and population levels if it takes into account the personal as well as the local and global contexts. Current planetary economic and ecological crises and the increasing call for humane global solutions are discussed in relation to how ecopation and a deepened knowledge of the human as an occupational being, might contribute to such solutions. © 2013 The Journal of Occupational Science Incorporated.

  • 58.
    Persson, Dennis
    et al.
    The Vårdal Institute [Swedish Institute for Health Sciences], Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    The Vårdal Institute [Swedish Institute for Health Sciences], Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Evaluating OVal-9, An Instrument for Detecting Experiences of Value in Daily Occupations2010In: Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, ISSN 0164-212X, E-ISSN 1541-3101, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The drastic increase of psychosocial ill health may point to the fact that current lifestyles produce longer lives, but with increased chronic disorders rather than greater health. Focus on current lifestyles, that is, on peoples' daily environments, are thereby warranted to develop models and methods for tracing health promoting factors inherent in people's daily participation and experiences. This study tests the content validity of OVal-9, an instrument based on the new concept; Occupational Value, among a sample of experts, students and clients. The result shows a good ability to assess the value that people experience in their daily occupations. We are convinced that measuring Occupational Value might be of importance in developing future strategies for intervention and prevention needed for the increasing incidence of mental ill-health. Copyright © 2019 Informa UK Limited.

  • 59.
    Persson, Dennis
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Time to Reevaluate the Machine Society: Post‐industrial Ethics from an Occupational Perspective2002In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 93-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the ethics underlying the occupational repertoire of the post-industrial citizen, giving attention to lifestyle phenomena such as increased tempo and quantity of occupations; manipulation of time, organisms and environments; decreases in sleep, rest and play etc. In trying to understand human behavior in the 21st century, an ethical perspective is delineated and some starting points for a discussion of ethics from an everyday occupational perspective are investigated. Using examples from contemporary Western society, human occupational behavior is described as imprinted by machine-ethical values. It is argued that since behavior arising from such values has been little formulated or observed, it constitutes a substantial risk factor for ill health and stress. An alternative eco-ethical perspective of occupation, inspired by Skolimowski the Polish professor of eco-philosophy, is proposed. The concept of “ecopation” is introduced as an optional choice denoting occupations that are performed with concern for the ecological context at a pace that gives room for reflection and experience of meaning. The questions raised in this paper may be important for occupational scientists to more fully understand the implicit guidelines of contemporary and future occupation and for occupational therapists taking an active part in future healthcare. © 2002 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 60.
    Persson, Dennis
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Iwarsson, Susanne
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Value Dimensions, Meaning, and Complexity in Human Occupation – A Tentative Structure for Analysis2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 7-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In occupational therapy and occupational science, it is important to clarify the perspective from which the analysis of occupation is addressed. The purpose of this paper is to present a tentative structure for describing occupation, allowing for analysis in a lifelong panorama as well as for the immediate experience a person acquires from performing a single occupation. The concept of occupational value is introduced as a prerequisite for meaning, defining three different dimensions: concrete, symbolic, and self-reward value. A dynamic categorisation of single occupations is presented, considering each unique occupational performance viewed from a macro, meso, and a micro perspective, inspired by dynamic systems theory. It is proposed that all occupations are meaningful if they are integrated parts of a person's occupational continuity, and that it is the interaction between the mentioned three perspectives that determines their meaningfulness. With an explicit focus on value and meaning as perceived by the unique person, occupational therapists will become more skilled in designing meaningful occupational therapy interventions. This paper is a contribution to the development of occupational science as well as to occupational therapy, but the theoretical framework presented must be empirically tested in order to demonstrate its validity. Copyright © 2019 Informa UK Limited.

  • 61.
    Wallstedt-Paulsson, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Heath Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Heath Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Heath Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Client experiences in work rehabilitation in Sweden: a one-year follow-up study2007In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, E-ISSN 1557-0703, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 28-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study, carried out in a work rehabilitation unit in Sweden, investigated how clients perceived their work experiences after a one-year follow up. A semi-structured interview was administered to 14 former clients and a content analysis was applied. Seven categories were derived from the results: 'Expectations of the rehabilitation process'; 'Social relationships'; 'Client influences on the rehabilitation process'; 'Occupations engaged in during the rehabilitation programme'; 'Perceived outcome'; 'Current occupations'; and 'Future aspirations'. The dominating expectations were to find a job, with an overall desire for change. The social relationships with the staff and other clients were of great importance. The positive outcome of the rehabilitation was described as feeling better or having new skills. The perceived negative outcome was that the rehabilitation programme had not turned out as the client expected. The clients reported varying daily occupations after the rehabilitation experience and a majority were contented and optimistic about their future. The main conclusions of the study are that when planning a work rehabilitation programme, efforts have to be made to examine clients' interests and skills, and to develop a dialogue between clients and staff. Further research is needed to evaluate the work rehabilitation experience from the clients' perspective. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 62.
    Wästberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Client perceptions of a work rehabilitation programme for women: The Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO) project2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 118-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The Redesigning Daily Occupations programme (ReDO) is a Swedish work rehabilitation programme for women on sick leave due to stress-related disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate the participants' perceptions of taking part in the work rehabilitation programme. Methods: Seven of the 38 women who completed ReDO were interviewed during and after the programme. The interviews were analysed by manifest and latent content analysis. Results: The informants were satisfied with the content of the programme and the support they received in the programme and when returning to work. The women thought they had become more aware of what they did during a day and how they performed their daily activities, which helped them to change their ways of performing them. The result highlighted different parts of their rehabilitation process which constituted four sub-themes: "Perceptions of the ReDO", "The intrinsic process", "Person-related changes", and "Perceptions of returning to work", and formed the core theme "Critical parts of the rehabilitation process". Conclusions: The findings may not be generalized to other settings and future research should further investigate work rehabilitation for the target group. © 2013 Informa Healthcare.

  • 63.
    Wästberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Skåne University Hospital, Malmö-Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Women's perceived work environment after stress-related rehabilitation: Experiences from the ReDO project2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 528-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The study aimed to investigate (a) if womens perceptions of their work environment changed during a 16-week rehabilitation period and at a 12-month follow-up; (b) whether such changes were related to outcomes in terms of return to work, well-being and valued occupations. Methods: Eighty-four gainfully employed women on sick-leave due to stress-related disorders responded to instruments assessing perceptions of the work environment, well-being (self-esteem, self-mastery, quality of life, perceived stress, self-rated health) and perceived occupational value. Data about return to work were collected from registers. Non-parametric statistics were used. Results: The increase in the womens ratings of their work environmentwas non-significant between baseline and completed rehabilitation but was statistically significant between baseline and the 12-month follow-up. No relationships were found between changes in perceptions of the work environment and outcomes after the rehabilitation. At the follow-up, however, there were associations between perceived work environment changes in a positive direction and return to work; improved self-esteem, self-mastery, quality of life, perceived occupational value and self-rated health; and reduced stress. Conclusion: It seems important to consider the work environment in rehabilitation for stress-related problems, and a follow-up appears warranted to detect changes and associations not visible immediately after rehabilitation.Implications for RehabilitationWork environmentPerceptions of the work environment seem important for return to work, although other factors are likely to contribute as well.Perceptions of the work environment are associated with several aspects of well-being.When developing rehabilitation interventions a focus on the clients' perceptions of their work environment seems vital. © 2015 Informa UK Ltd.

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