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  • 51.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Medicine, Central Hospital Halmstad, S-301 85 Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Conceptions of life situation among next-of-kin of haemodialysis patients2001In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of renal disease in a family is a strain on both the patient and the next-of-kin, affecting their life situations. Surprisingly, few studies dealing with the ways that the next-of-kin experience their situation are available. The aim of this study was to describe how the next-of-kin of haemodialysis patients conceive their life situation. Data were collected by interviewing 12 people who live with someone with dialysis-treated renal disease and analysed according to a qualitative method inspired by the phenomenographic approach. Six description categories of how the subjects construed their life situation emerged: a feeling of confinement; a feeling of social isolation; a feeling that the way of life has changed; a feeling of security in life; a feeling of a threatening future; and promoting health. The next-of-kin generally expressed a large degree of commitment to and concern for the sick person. In spite of their life situation having been dramatically changed, the next-of-kin described an ability to adapt. With the help of society the feelings of confinement and social isolation can be dispersed, enabling the next-of-kin to promote the health of the sick person. A suggestion for further research is to study what adaptation strategies next-of-kin use in their life situation.

  • 52.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health in everyday life among spouses of haemodialysis patients: a content analysis2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that haemodialysis requires that spouses support and assist their partner during the treatment period, little attention has been focused on their health. The aim of this study was to explore experiences of health in everyday life among spouses of haemodialysis patients. The study had an explorative and descriptive design based on content analysis. Thirteen participants were interviewed in their home without the presence of the patient. The results show that arduousness was experienced when that spouses' everyday life was taken up by caring for the patient at the expense of his/her own health. Spouses exhibited stamina and neglected their own health when focusing on the patient and minimising their own condition. Independence in everyday life revealed that spouses who cared about themselves and looked after their own health experienced relaxation and happiness, which protected their health. Clinical interventions should include an assessment of the spouses' health and everyday life in order to plan the care to ensure that it is directed towards increasing their independence. Instruments need to be developed that assess when and how spouses experience the greatest sense of well-being, if they have scope for relaxation and recovery, and what type of support they require in their everyday life.

  • 53.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Professional support for next of kin of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment: a content analysis study of nursing documentation2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 353-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives. The aim of this study was to examine the content of nursing documentation with a focus on professional support for next of kin (NoK) of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment. Background. Professional support in nursing focuses on promotion, maintenance and restoration of health and prevention of illness. Design. The study had a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used to search for themes based on descriptions contained in the collected nursing documentation. Methods. The total number of nursing records of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment (n = 50) for the 5-year period 1998–2002 was included. All nursing documentation was systematic in accordance with the VIPS-documentation model. Results. The professional support could be described within the framework of three themes: to explore NoK's supportive resources, to enable NoK' readiness in caring for the patient and to co-operate with NoK in the care of the patient in the home, captured by the core theme which described the professional support as a continuous process. Conclusions. Next of kin are a supportive resource in the nursing care of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment and professional support for NoK focuses on planning their participation in the care of patients in the home. Relevance to clinical practice. Professional support for NoK should be documented in family focused nursing diagnoses, which would make it possible to search for different types of support. Future research might explore nurses' or NoK's views on carer support.

  • 54.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    "Time for dialysis as time to live": Experiences of time in everyday life of the Swedish next of kin of hemodialysis patients2009In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 45-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the content of time in everyday life as experienced by the next of kin of patients on hemodialysis in Sweden. Chronic renal disease often requires hemodialysis, which is a time-consuming treatment that makes it necessary to carefully plan everyday life and involves the next of kin to a large degree. This study used a descriptive design with a content analysis approach. The analysis of the data from the twenty interviews revealed the experiences of time in the everyday lives of the next of kin of a patient on hemodialysis. The content of time in everyday life can be described as follows: fragmented time, vacuous time, and uninterrupted time. The findings show how everyday life time for the next of kin is minimized and that the common life space is contracted. The next of kin must be provided with supervision in order to provide them with more of their own time in everyday life, which can benefit their health.

  • 55.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Time in everyday life as experienced by next of kin of haemodialysis patientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to explore the content of time in everyday life as experienced by the next of kin of haemodialysis patients.

    Background Chronic renal disease often requires haemodialysis which is a time-consuming treatment that necessitates careful planning of everyday life and involves next of kin to a large degree. Next of kin's time can be severely restricted when his/her life is devoted to the needs of the haemodialysis patient.

    Method This study used explorative and descriptive design with a qualitative content analysis approach. Twenty next of kin selected purposive with the criterion of having at least one year of experience as a next of kin of a patient on haemodialysis.

    Results Analysis of data from the interviews revealed experiences of time in everyday lives of the next of kin of haemodialysis patients. Their experiences were reflected in the concepts fragmented time, vacuous time and uninterrupted time.

    Conclusion The experience of time in the everyday lives of next of kin of haemodialysis patients demonstrated that time for themselves was minimised and that common life space contracted. The next of kin were also aware of the prognosis of renal disease and the fact that haemodialysis was a life-sustaining treatment, which forced them to live in the present. They afforded wellness when they experienced a break from everyday live and could use their time for their own needs. Attention should be focused on time in the nurse's assessment of the next of kin's everyday life and whether or not next of kin have sufficient time required for the patient's care. There is need for further research that focuses on a generalisation of the fmdings by means of the development of instruments that can contribute assessment of time in everyday life among next of kin of chronically ill patients.

  • 56.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hallberg, Ulrika
    Nordiska Högskolan för Folkhälsovetenskap.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Book review: "Developing grounded theory. The second generation"2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 5058-Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Developing Grounded Theory. The Second Generation is a very useful and clarifying book arisen from a one-day symposium on advances in qualitative methods in Alberta, 2007. The conference was sponsored by the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology (IIQM). For the first time, the students of Barney Glaser and Anselm Strauss, “the second generation” of grounded theory researchers, met to discuss grounded theory and its developments. With the exception of Janice Morse, the authors of this book worked directly with Anselm Strauss and Barney Glaser. In this volume they provide a description of the history, principles and practice of the grounded theory methods.

  • 57.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högstedt, Benkt
    Dept. of Development and Research, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden .
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Time distribution factors of hospital and home care among chronic haemodialysis patients2004In: EDTNA-ERCA journal, ISSN 1019-083X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, many studies are available that focus on haemodialysis; however studies on the time distribution factor involved are lacking. It is therefore important to study the distribution of time, taking into account outpatient care, inpatient care and home care. The aim of the study was to chart over a five-year period, the time distribution factors of hospital care and home care among chronic haemodialysis patients. The design of the study was descriptive, and the data material was drawn from a patient register (N = 61). The data analysis was performed by means of both descriptive and inferential statistics.

  • 58.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Larsson, Glenn
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Holmström, Madelaine
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Follow up study of Assessment by Ambulance and Triage Classification (RETTS) in Electronic Health Records2015In: ACENDIO 2015: eHealth and Nursing: Knowledge for Patient Care / [ed] Fintan Sheerin, Walter Sermeus & Anna Ehrenberg, Dublin: Association for Common European Nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes , 2015, p. 28-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The ordinary process for the ambulance nurse is to give prehospital care and transport all patients to the emergency ward regardless of the patients’ medical conditions. The Ambulance organisation south of Sweden has introduced a model of prehospital care for all adult patients with different severities of illness.

    Aim: The main focus of the study is to give a faster prehospital assessment in collaboration with the ambulance nurse and primary health care. The secondary focus is to investigate the use of RETTS (Rapid Emergency Triage, and Treatment System) while writing the information regarding the patient. If the patient’s condition turns out to be level GREEN by RETTS, the ambulance nurse contact with the primary care physicians for a dialogue and together they decide which level of care is the most appropriate for the patient’s condition. There are three levels of care; 1. The patient is able to stay at home with supervision from the primary health care. 2. The ambulance transporting the patient to the primary health care unit for assessment. 3. The ambulance transport the patient to the emergency ward.

    Method: The study design was to exploratory interventions study. The data was conducted in all Electronic Health Records during August – September 2014 (N=67). The ambulance nurse assess patients from 18 years and older with (RETTS). There are three levels of care; 1. The patient is able to stay at home with supervision from the primary health care. 2. The ambulance transporting the patient to the primary health care unit for assessment. 3. The ambulance transport the patient to the emergency ward. The data was analyzed by a descriptive method conducted by statistics from the nurses while using the clinical support systems (RETTS) for decision-making.

    Results: Preliminary results will be presented with focus on clinical decision-making, clinical support systems by RETTS, and how ambulance nurse administrated their decision in Electronic Health Records.  

  • 59.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Pham, Lotta
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ways of promoting health to patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease from a nursing perspective in Vietnam: A phenomenographic study2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health promotion plays an important role in the management of diabetes and chronic kidney disease, especially when the prevalence of the disease is rising in Vietnam. Nurses have been identified to be the front figure in health promotion; however, little is written about how nurses in Vietnam work with these issues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurses’ conceptions about how health is promoted, with special focus on physically activity, for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and/or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Individual interviews were done with 25 nurses working at two major hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. A phenomenographic approach was used to analyse the interviews. Nurses described how creating positive relationships and supporting patients to take part in their social context promoted health. Health was also promoted by educating patients and relatives about health and disease and by supporting patients to be physically active. The findings indicate that the Vietnamese nursing knowledge about health promotion needs to be gathered, and health promotion needs to be further integrated in the education. Further research is necessary to examine patients’ knowledge and attitudes about health and the efficiency of various health-promoting strategies in the Vietnamese context. © 2016 L. Pham & K. Ziegert

  • 60.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mapping family and social space in caring: a metamethod study2008In: Parallel presentations: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, Taylor&Francis , 2008, p. 29-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social relations are about how we treat each other. They imply explicit and tacit knowledge, rules of behaviour, and values inherent in specific social spaces. When a family is struck by a life-threatening illness, the individual’s ‘‘life space’’ tends to shrink. This impacts the mutual relationships in the family, as well as the situation in the home. Therefore, there are obvious dialectics between spatial and social dimensions, when close relatives are afflicted by serious illness. This paper explores how research on homecare involves space in analysing social issues.Meta-method analysis was chosen, in order to extend the review format and analyse meta-questions. Meta-synthesis in different research areas and fora involved the examina- tion of a set of qualitative studies. Material was collected using the Cinahl, PubMed and Academic Search data- bases. These were supplemented by the Social Science Index, Sociological Abstract and Science Direct, to explore if aspects of care and space are treated in social science. The sample consisted of 38 articles, displaying a wide variety of methods. Findings suggest that in the fields of caring and sociological research, spatial factors are only implicitly described, and the dynamics of the social and spatial dialectics in home caring relationships seem to be rare. The concept of space in caring is found in a few studies in human geography. The observed absence of a spatial perspective in caring is problematic, since it neglects the fact that relationship and caring are situated in context.

  • 61.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Schjetlein, Anne-Marie
    Halmstad County Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Learning of simulated cardiac arrests in hospital environments to support performance of the multidisciplinary team2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Survival after cardiac arrest in hospital environments has in various studies reported to be between 15-39%. In Swedish hospitals 30% of patients who suffer cardiac arrest survive to discharge. There are significant opportunities for improvement in cardiac arrests in hospitals, especially those on general wards. There are few studies of the multidisciplinary team performance regarding both technical and non-technical skills in simulated cardiac arrest on general wards.

    Summary of Work: The focus of this study was to observe the multidisciplinary team performance in simulated cardiac arrest on general wards to gain knowledge about existing methods and thus be able to identify areas for improvement. The study design was an exploratory observational study. There were 33 participants in a total of three wards. The simulated cardiac arrest was videotaped, and a patient simulator was used.

    Summary of Results: The results suggest that guidelines not always were adhered to cooperation. In the order for the guidelines to work in the multidisciplinary team, background knowledge is required. However, the team leader did not coordinated to the multidisciplinary team work, and did not use effective communication.

    Conclusions: Finally, the result suggested suboptimal performance regarding leadership and communication, which in turn affected resources and working environment. The opportunity with simulation is to train together in a situation without any risk for the patients.

    Take home Messages: Simulated cardiac arrests will give the opportunity to train the multidisciplinary team technical and non-technical skills.

     

12 51 - 61 of 61
CiteExportLink to result list
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  • harvard1
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  • vancouver
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