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  • 51.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kronholm, Johan
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Persson, Kenneth M.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Promoting innovation through a virtual incubator model: The Water Innovation Accelerator (WIN)2016In: Academy of Management: Proceedings, New York: Academy of Management , 2016, article id 16798Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we explore and analyse a virtual network-centred incubator model called the Water Innovation Accelerator (WIN). The incubator model has been designed and implemented in Sweden to enable and orchestrate water-related innovative solutions by connecting different players via organized networks. Framed by theory and research on open innovation, incubation models, and entrepreneurial networks we provide an overview of the overall design, management and organization of WIN. We also analyse and assess the working and performance of WIN with respect to its purpose to aid the development and market uptake of water related innovative solutions via its entrepreneurial network. Our findings offer theoretical and empirical insights to researchers, policy makers and incubation managers that may aid current and future efforts to accelerate water innovation. Copyright © 2016, Academy of Management

  • 52.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship (SKJCE), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindholm Dahlstrand, Åsa
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Categorization and analysis of academic patents: Developing a framework to examine differences in technology, opportunity and commercialization characteristics2014In: Academic Entrepreneurship: Creating An Entrepreneurial Ecosystem / [ed] Andrew C. Corbett, Donald S. Siegel & Jerome A. Katz, Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014, 1, p. 169-195Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a significant rise in the number of patents originating from academic environments. However, current conceptualizations of academic patents provide a largely homogenous approach to define this entrepreneurial form of technology transfer. In this study we develop a novel categorization framework that identifies three subsets of academic patents which are conceptually distinct from each other. By applying the categorization framework on a unique database of Swedish patents we furthermore find support for its usefulness in detecting underlying differences in technology, opportunity, and commercialization characteristics among the three subsets of academic patents.

  • 53.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindholm Dahlstrand, Åsa
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurship and technological innovation: The influence of uncertainty and entrepreneurial ability on innovation speed in new technology start-ups2014In: Entrepreneurship, People and Organisations: Frontiers in European Entrepreneurship Research / [ed] Robert Blackburn, Frédéric Delmar, Alain Fayolle & Friederike Walter, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 116-135Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the study we develop and test a novel theoretical framework that examine how innovation speed in technology start-ups are influenced by the uncertain character of the technologies and markets that underlie patented inventions. We rely in our framework on previous conceptual and empirical work to distinguish between perceived state, effect and response uncertainty and to hypothesize about their potential differential impact on innovation speed. In addition, our framework also seeks to explain how the ability of the technology entrepreneur to spot and seize new business opportunities influences the uncertainty-speed relationship in start-up settings. We tested our framework and hypotheses on a unique and comprehensive dataset with detailed information about patented inventions commercialized in start-ups by independent technology entrepreneurs in Sweden. Overall, our results show the value and importance of distinguishing between different kinds of perceived uncertainty when theorizing about the process of developing and commercializing patented inventions in new technology start-ups. Moreover, our empirical findings suggest that the ability to spot and seize new business opportunities can be both an asset and a liability in this process.

  • 54.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). CIRCLE, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Politis, Diamanto
    CIRCLE, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Lindholm Dahlstrand, Åsa
    CIRCLE, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Patents and entrepreneurship: The impact of opportunity, motivation and ability2013In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 142-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examine individual patent holders and the fate of their inventions. A unique database consisting of over 800 private individuals who have obtained decision rights over a new technology in Sweden is used to analyse how opportunity and individual level characteristics are related to the likelihood that patented inventions are commercialised in a new or existing small firm. Our findings show that the likelihood that patent holders commercialise inventions through such an entrepreneurial mode is influenced by opportunity novelty and the perceived entrepreneurial ability of the individual. © 2013 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 55.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Oxana, Shveykina
    Deloitte, London, UK.
    Early-stage finance and the role of external entrepreneurs in the commercialization of university-generated knowledge2012In: Venture Capital: an International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, ISSN 1369-1066, E-ISSN 1464-5343, Vol. 14, no 2-3, p. 175-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past decade has seen a plethora of policy initiatives that seek to bridge the chasm between investments in public R&D and its effective diffusion in society. This article uses a case study approach to explore and contrast the effectiveness of different entrepreneur models in financing and developing university spin-offs (USOs). The distinction between different entrepreneur models is based on whether the USOs are championed by university employees that seek to commercialize their own inventions or by external entrepreneurs who are not the original inventors but with acquired rights to develop and commercialize technology originating from university research. Our analysis show that external entrepreneurs have a different mind-set that makes them better equipped to deal with opportunities and obstacles related to financing and developing USOs. However, the development paths of USOs are embedded in a more complex web of path-dependent interactions, where the championship of the USO becomes interwoven with existing and emerging social relationships and opportunities, and challenges related to the technology that is commercialized. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 56.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Persson, Kenneth
    Lund Technical University, Lund, Sweden & Sweden Water Research AB, Ideon Science Park, Lund, Sweden.
    Kronholm, Johan
    WIN – Water Innovation Accelerator, Ideon Science Park, Lund, Sweden & Kronholm Development AB, Dalby, Sweden.
    Promoting water-related innovation through networked acceleration: Insights from the water innovation accelerator2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 171, no Supplement, p. 130-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current state of the water and sanitation sector has put water-related innovations high on the global policy agenda. However, the systemic complexity that typically surrounds such contexts call for actionable knowledge of how to enable and orchestrate innovative solutions by connecting different players via organized networks. In this study we explore and analyse the Water Innovation Accelerator, which is a virtual network-centred incubator model designed and implemented in Sweden. Framed by theory and research on open innovation, incubation models, and entrepreneurial networks we provide an analysis of the design, working and performance of the Water Innovation Accelerator. In sum, our findings provide empirical support for virtual accelerators as an effective means to aid the development and market uptake of water related innovative solutions. Its overall effectiveness builds on its ability to bring private and public actors with different assets and competencies together via its entrepreneurial network, where the incubator team play a critical role for identifying and encouraging network-embedded innovation opportunities. However, the perceived effectiveness of the acceleration process for SMEs seems to be contingent on whether they are positioned in later stages of the innovation process, as well as their proximity to the incubator network. In these respects, the study provides valuable insights that may aid researchers, incubation managers and policy makers in current and future efforts to accelerate water innovation.

  • 57.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lunds university, Lund, Sweden.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    University professors and early stage research commercialization: An empirical test of the knowledge corridor theory2012In: International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, ISSN 1470-6075, E-ISSN 1741-5284, Vol. 11, no 3/4, p. 213-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we test the knowledge corridor theory as an explanation of university professors' involvement in the early stages of research commercialisation. A statistical analysis was made of a sample of full professors from the engineering, natural sciences and medical faculties at a large public university in Sweden. The analysis shows that not only entrepreneurial experience but also private sector work experience significantly influence the ability to identify and develop business ideas based on research. Moreover, the analysis shows that research–based business idea generation increases faster for professors with private sector work experience who as well have more time for research in their positions.

  • 58.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Knowledge Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Research (KEEN).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    University professors and research commercialization: An empirical test of the "knowledge corridor" thesis2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increasing interest in the determinants and outcomes of successful technology transfer and commercialization of research results. In this study we test the validity of the “knowledge corridor” thesis for explaining the involvement of university professors’ in the early stages of research commercialization. Statistical analysis on a sample of 86 respondents from engineering, natural science and medical faculties in a large Swedish university shows that both entrepreneurial and private industry experience significantly influence their ability to spot and generate business ideas in their research. Moreover, we find that research based business idea generation increase at a faster rate for professors with private sector work experience who have more time for research in their positions. The article ends with a discussion of our empirical findings together with its implications for support activities related to technology transfer and commercialization of research results.

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  • 59.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Managerial learning and development in small firms: implications based on observations of managerial work2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we set out to examine the conditions for managerial learning in small firms and the implications it gives for how to facilitate and support work-based management development in this context. Empirically, we conduct structured observations of the daily work activities performed by small business managers. A framework based on experiential learning theory is developed and used as an analytical tool to assess the extent to which these work activities provide them with opportunities for work-based learning and development. In short, the results show that small business managers experience a fragmented working day with frequent and different forms of interruptions and unexpected problems during the course of their working day. These interruptions and unexpected problems are something that leaves little time for engaging in reflective observation to effectively learn from their daily work practices. We discuss the implications of our results for theory and research on managerial learning in small firms as well as for the design of university-led management development programs aimed at supporting the experiential learning process of small business managers.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 60.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University.
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Business Simulation Exercises in Small Business Management Education: Using Principles and Ideas from Action Learning2010In: Action Learning: Research and Practice, ISSN 1476-7333, E-ISSN 1476-7341, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent calls to close the rigour-relevance gap in business school education have suggested incorporating principles and ideas from action learning in small business management education. In this paper we discuss how business simulation exercises can be used as a platform to trigger students' learning by providing them with a platform where they can merge theory with practice. We provide theoretical arguments accompanied by illustrations to show how such initiatives can create a more student-centred teaching structure than what is usually practised in contemporary business school education. This may in turn work as a potential bridge between the safe harbour of traditional classroom teaching and the more chaotic and complex world of managerial practice.

  • 61.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Winlund, Henrik
    Boards of directors in small and medium-sized industrial firms: examining the effects of the board's working style on board task performance2000In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 311-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased attention towards the role of the board makes demands on reforms in the boardroom. In many countries, even small and medium-sized firms are experiencing the challenges of creating well functioning boards. In this paper the authors examine the importance of structures and processes in the boardroom of 302 small and medium-sized industrial firms in Sweden. The contribution of the paper is not only that it tries to explore the relationship between processes in the board and board performance, but also that it pays attention to the working structures that exist to maximize the board's task performance. In this study board task performance is measured as the performance of various control and service roles. There are two main findings. (1) The board members' involvement, and (2) the board's formal structures are important for the board's ability to perform its tasks effectively. The findings empirically support the arguments about the importance of a good and clearly defined working style in the board.

  • 62.
    Holmquist, Mats
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nyman, Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Trolle-Schultz Jensen, Jette
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Samverkansinsatser inom Samordningsförbundet Halland: Slutrapport av följeforskningsuppdrag 2013-20172018Report (Other academic)
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  • 63.
    Huse, Morten
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Management (BI), Oslo, Norway.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Board leadership and value creation: An extended team production approach2012In: The SAGE Handbook of Corporate Governance / [ed] Thomas Clarke & Douglas Branson, London: Sage Publications, 2012, 1, p. 233-253Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Huse, Morten
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Management, BI, Oslo, Norway & Bocconi University, Milan, Italy.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Norwegian School of Management, BI, Oslo, Norway.
    Preface: Perspectives from Europe on Boards and Governance: Contingency, Behavioral, and Evolutionary2004In: International Studies of Management and Organization, ISSN 0020-8825, E-ISSN 1558-0911, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Huse, Morten
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Economics BI, Norway.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The effects of entrepreneurial posture on international activities in light of emerging globalization2004In: Crossroads of entrepreneurship / [ed] Guido Corbetta, Morten Huse & Davide Ravasi, Springer, 2004, p. 127-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusion:

    This paper has contributed to research on entrepreneurship and internationalization by conducting a study of the impact of a firm’s entrepreneurial posture on its international activities. The findings suggest that a firm’s entrepreneurial posture may have positive effects on its international activities, but also indicate that international activities are not as entrepreneurial as it used to be as markets have become increasingly integrated and global.

    Research and literature on internationalization predict an acceleration of international business activities in the 21st century as firms increasingly seem to pursue more active strategies that involve international activities (McDougall and Oviatt, 2000; OECD, 1997; Reynolds, 1997). The near future consequently provides rich opportunities for continued studies in the intersection between entrepreneurship and a firm’s international activities.

  • 66.
    Huse, Morten
    et al.
    Norwegian Business School, Nydalen, Norway.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Value-creating boards in SMEs: Team production efforts2023In: Journal of International Doctoral Research, ISSN 2328-0832, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 87-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study theoretically and practically contributes to show how boards in SMEs can contribute to value-creation. Furthermore, a value-creating conceptual framework is developed integrating an extended team production theory. Team production theory has its roots in law and economics, and it is an alternative to agency theory (Blair & Stout, 2001). The extended team production theory has a focus on leadership and managerial behavior, and it integrates core strategy perspectives from both industrial organization and resource approaches. We were honored that an extended version of this article recently accepted for publication in the Handbook of Research in Corporate Governance and Business Ethics (Gabrielsson & Huse, 2023). In this present article, we specifically showcase to what degree boards in practice may create or destroy values within the organization and we apply a novel lens of extended team production theory to do this.© 2013 by International Doctoral Research Centre

  • 67.
    Huse, Morten
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Management BI, Oslo, Norway.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University.
    Minichilli, Alessandro
    Bocconi University, Milan, Italy.
    How boards contribute to value creation2009In: The value creating board: Corporate governance and organizational behaviour / [ed] Morten Huse, Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2009, p. 523-532Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research about boards and governance has generally had limited practical implications. In this article we present some of the practical implications from the 'value creating board' research programme. Challenges for practice and organizational behaviour include how boards may contribute to value creation throughout the whole chain, the importance of board leadership and how systems for board evaluations can be developed. We indicate that the emphasis on the 'value creating boards' may have some of the features of a new research stream or field of research.

  • 68.
    Huse, Morten
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    School of Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Minichilli, Alessandro
    School of Business, Bocconi University, Italy.
    Improving corporate governance practices2008In: The Peak Performing Organization / [ed] Ronald J. Burke & Cary L. Cooper, New York: Routledge, 2008, p. 318-337Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Huse, Morten
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Management BI, Oslo, Norway & Bocconi University, Milan, Italy.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Minichilli, Alessandro
    Bocconi University, Milan, Italy.
    Knowledge and Accountability: Outside Directors' Contribution in the Corporate Value Chain2009In: Board Members and Management Consultants: Redefining the Boundaries of Consulting and Corporate Governance / [ed] Pierre-Yves Gomez & Rickie Moore, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, 2009, p. 137-153Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we position outside directors ́ contribution in the corporate value chain. Our objective is to show how outside board members may contribute to value creation through knowledge and accountability. We will also provide tools for outside board members to make contributions. The directors are accountable to balance the interest of various sets of stakeholders. It is their responsibility to use their knowledge to create values throughout the whole corporate value chain. Novel heuristic approaches to board accountability are presented. Accountability is discussed in relation to board role expectations, and we introduce a board role taxonomy. This taxonomy is related to the various parts of the corporate value chain. The value chain approach shows various requirements to the knowledge and competency of the outside directors, and to the inner working of boards. The article also presents frameworks for evaluating and analysing actual board behaviour. Board evaluations are tools that may help develop board knowledge and accountability to fulfil outside directors ́ value creative potential.

  • 70.
    Huse, Morten
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Management, BI, Oslo, Norway & Bocconi University, Milan, Italy.
    Neubaum, Donald O.
    Oregon State University, College of Business, Corvallis, OR, USA.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    CIRCLE, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Corporate Innovation and Competitive Environment2005In: The International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, ISSN 1554-7191, E-ISSN 1555-1938, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 313-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical studies have shown that the characteristics of the competitive environment influence the corporate innovation activities of U.S. firms. This study attempts to internationalize these studies in two ways. First, it examines the environment-corporate innovation relationship in Norwegian manufacturing firms. Second, it examines how the firms’ corporate innovation activities are influenced by their international activities. Results indicate that environment and internationalization are positively related to corporate innovation, but models developed using U.S. firms may not be generalizable to firms from other countries.

  • 71.
    Hägg, Gustav
    et al.
    Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    A systematic literature review of the evolution of pedagogy in entrepreneurial education research2020In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 829-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to create a better understanding of how entrepreneurial education research has evolved with regard to pedagogy over the past decades. Design/methodology/approach: The authors employed systematic review methodology to enable an in-depth analysis of the literature in a process that was both replicable and transparent. Guided by the research purpose, the systematic review of 395 articles published between January 1980 and December 2018 was influenced by a configurative approach aimed at interpreting and understanding the phenomenon under study. Findings: The analysis suggests that the scholarly discourse on pedagogy in entrepreneurial education research has developed over time from teacher-guided instructional models to more constructivist perspectives. A shift in the literature was also observed, where scholarly discussions moved from addressing the issue of teachability to a greater emphasis on learnability. Contemporary discussions centre on the theoretical and philosophical foundations of experience-based teaching and learning. Originality/value: The study illustrates how entrepreneurial education has evolved into a distinct research theme, characterized by a practice-oriented research agenda that emphasizes the need to connect teaching to “real-world” environments. The practice-oriented agenda has led to continued societal interest in promoting entrepreneurial education, while at the same time creating low academic legitimacy. © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 72.
    Hägg, Gustav
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    From action to ACTION: A systematic review of research on pedagogy in entrepreneurship education2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we conduct a systematic literature review to create a theoretical understanding of how research on entrepreneurship education has emerged and developed from 1980 to 2012. We identify and review 173 articles published and reported in peer-reviewed scholarly outlets to analyse how pedagogy in entrepreneurship education has developed with respect to who is involved as instructors, what content are included, to whom entrepreneurship education is targeted, and how teaching is conducted in terms of pedagogical methods. Overall, our findings illustrate how the field has evolved from the 1980s, with a heavy emphasis on didactics and how to teach entrepreneurship, through the 1990s, where the individual learner was put at the centre stage of the discussion, and finally to the 2000s and onwards, where action and experience has become increasingly emphasized as the key to effective learning in entrepreneurship education.

  • 73.
    Jasna, Pocek
    et al.
    Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Entrepreneurial learning in extra-curricular start-up programs for students2022In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 325-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study focuses on extra-curricular start-up programs for students at higher educational institutions. It explores the social and situated learning experiences of students who participate in start-up programs, as well as how the processes and outcomes of entrepreneurial learning are potentially shaped by this context.

    Design/methodology/approach: The study follows multiple cohorts of students who have participated in an extra-curricular start-up program managed by three collaborating universities in Greater Copenhagen. The data have been inductively analyzed using semi-structured interviews with students and project managers during and after the start-up program, complemented with project progress reports, observation notes and survey data.

    Findings: The analysis generates a grounded, theoretically informed process model of entrepreneurial learning situated in extra-curricular start-up programs. The model depicts how the immersion, comprehension and co-participation in entrepreneurship as social practice subsequently enables students to expand knowledge structures and develop greater self-confidence in performing entrepreneurship. The model identifies three interconnected components that trigger entrepreneurial learning among students, which allow them to acquire two set of competencies: venture creation competencies and enterprising competencies.

    Originality/value: The findings offer unique insights into how the social and relational environment influence and shape the learning experience of students, hence filling the research void on entrepreneurial learning in the situated context of extra-curricular enterprise activities. The findings also elucidate how individual learning experiences of students are potentially shaped by the immersion, comprehension and co-participation in entrepreneurship as social practice. © 2021, Jasna Pocek, Diamanto Politis and Jonas Gabrielsson

  • 74.
    Johansson, Jörgen
    et al.
    School of Public Administration, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Public Policy for Social Innovations and Social Enterprise—What’s the Problem Represented to Be?2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 14, article id 7972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social innovations and social enterprise have been seen as innovative measures to achieve sustainable development. Drawing on an evaluation of a development project on creating social enterprises in Sweden, this article analyzes social innovations as a policy area. The policy area is often described as loaded with ideological contradictions. The aim of the article is to explore underlying premises and discourses in policy implementation aimed at creating social innovations in a comparison between two ideal types on social sustainability—(1) an individual activation strategy (responsibilization of the individual) and (2) a societal equilibrium strategy (balancing social values). The research question is inspired by Carol Bacchi’s policy theory and asks what is the problem represented to be? The analysis is carried out at the micro-level as a context-sensitive approach to explore articulations made among actors creating the policy and entrepreneurs participating in a locally organized project. The article contribute with a better understanding of how societal problems and their solutions are discursively determined, with implications for policy makers and project managers active in this policy area. The analysis and findings indicate a significant policy shift during the implementation process. Initially, the policy idea consisted of well-considered ambitions to create a long-term sustainable development. During the implementation of the project, the problem’s representation changes gradually in the direction towards individual activation. This transition is driven by pragmatic difficulties of defining the policy area, problems of separating means from ends, and the need to make decisions based on a limited range of information. We conclude by emphasizing the need for reflection on how the social dimension is defined when implementing social innovation strategies. Furthermore, there is a lack of studies of how this policy area can be linked to policies for social sustainability. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 75.
    Johansson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Holmquist, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Sociala innovationer i Halland - forskningsstöd till utvecklingsprojekt för sociala innovationer och samhällsentreprenörskap2017Report (Other academic)
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  • 76.
    Judge, William Q.
    et al.
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA.
    Hu, Helen
    University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Talaulicar, Till
    University of Erfurt, Erfurt, Germany.
    Witt, Michael A.
    INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France.
    Zattoni, Alessandro
    University LUISS Guido Carli, Rome, Italy.
    López-Iturriaga, Félix
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
    Chen, Jean Jingham
    University of Southampton, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Shukla, Dhirendra
    University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada.
    Quttainah, Majdi
    University of Kuwait, Safat, Kuwait.
    Adegbite, Emmanuel
    Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom.
    Luis Rivas, José
    ITAM School of Business, Mexico City, Mexico.
    Kibler, Bruce
    Gannon University, Erie, PA, USA.
    Configurations of Capacity for Change in Entrepreneurial Threshold Firms: Imprinting and Strategic Choice Perspectives2015In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 506-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imprinting theory suggests that founding conditions are ‘stamped’ on organizations, and these imprinted routines often resist change. In contrast, strategic choice theory suggests that the firm can overcome organizational inertia and deliberately choose its future. Both theories offer dramatically different explanations behind an organization's capacity for change. IPO firms provide a unique context for exploring how imprinting forces interact with strategic choice factors to address organizational capacity for change as a firm moves from private to public firm status. Juxtaposing imprinting and strategic choice perspectives, we employ fuzzy set analysis to examine the multi-level determinants of organizational capacity for change. Our cross-national data reveal three effective configurations of organizational capacity for change within IPOs, and two ineffective configurations. Our results suggest that the antecedents of organizational capacity for change in entrepreneurial threshold firms are non-linear, interdependent, and equifinal. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for the Advancement of Management Studies.

  • 77.
    Judge, William Q.
    et al.
    Department of Management, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, U.S.A..
    Witt, Michael A.
    Economics & Political Science Area, INSEAD, Singapore, Singapore.
    Zattoni, Alessandro
    Strategic and Entrepreneurial Management Department, SDA Bocconi School of Management, Milan, Italy.
    Talaulicar, Till
    Department of Organization and Management, University of Erfurt, Erfurt, Germany.
    Jinghan Chen, Jean
    Centre of Accounting, Finance and International Banking, University of Southampton, Southampton, U.K..
    Lewellyn, Krista
    Department of Management & Marketing, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, U.S.A..
    Wei Hu, Helen
    Department of Management & Marketing, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Shukra, Dhirendra
    Management and Entrepreneurship Department, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.
    Bell, Robert Greg
    Department of Management, University of Dallas, Irving, Texas, U.S.A..
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lopez, Felix
    Department of Finance & Accounting, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
    Yamak, Sibel
    Department of Management, Galatasaray University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Fassin, Yves
    Entrepreneurship, Governance & Strategy Area, Vlerick Business School, Gent, Belgium.
    McCarthy, Daniel
    Department of Management, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A..
    Rivas, Jose Luis
    ITAM School of Business, Mexico City, Mexico.
    Fainshmidt, Stav
    Department of Management & International Business, Florida International University, Miami, Florida, U.S.A..
    Van Ees, Hans
    Faculty of Economics & Business, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Corporate governance and IPO underpricing in a cross-national sample: A multilevel knowledge-based view2015In: Strategic Management Journal, ISSN 0143-2095, E-ISSN 1097-0266, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1174-1185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior studies of IPO underpricing, mostly using agency theory and single-country samples, have generally fallen short. In this study, we employ the knowledge-based view (KBV) to explore underpricing across 17 countries. We find that agency indicators are insignificant predictors, board of director knowledge limits underpricing, and external knowledge both substitutes for and complements internal board knowledge. This third finding suggests that future KBV studies should consider how internal and external knowledge states interact with each other. Our study offers new insights into the antecedents of underpricing and extends our understanding of comparative governance and the KBV of the firm. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 78.
    Landström, Hans
    et al.
    Lund University School Of Economics And Management, Lund, Sweden; Norwegian University Of Science And Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University School Of Economics And Management, Lund, Sweden; Norwegian University Of Science And Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Sørheim, Roger
    Norwegian University Of Science And Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    What's interesting in entrepreneurial education research? Identifying conversants sharing common interests in the field2022In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 104-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In this study, the authors develop knowledge and insights on how the perception of interestingness influences the structure and focus of conversations in entrepreneurial education (EE) research. In particular, the authors elaborate on what is perceived as interesting among different subgroups of EE researchers, and not least, how EE researchers can identify and engage in scholarly conversation within the field. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a unique database with web-based responses from 465 EE researchers from around the world. The authors conduct analyses of both open-ended and closed questions. The open-ended questions are analyzed by inductive categorization. The closed questions are subject to factor and cluster analyses. Findings: The findings suggest that EE research is a topic-oriented field, characterized by a strong focus on novel and challenging research issues. In addition, the field is individualistic and fragmented, and the perception of interestingness differs between five subgroups of EE researchers, whose members have a somewhat different perception of interestingness. Accordingly, the authors also find different core conversations going on within the field. Obviously, these conversations tend to be triggered by the field's obsession with novelty and challenging research, but several conversations are related to practically relevant research, as well as methodological and theoretical discussions. Originality/value: This is the first study to elaborate on the perception of interestingness among EE researchers and the conversations going on within the field. In the study the authors have explored the characteristics of EE research based on the perception of interestingness among the researchers within the field. In this respect, this study contributes insights on how current and aspiring EE researchers can find and build scholarly conversations embedded in passionate interest, while concurrently disseminating and accumulating knowledge on EE together with like-minded peers. © 2022, Hans Landström, Jonas Gabrielsson, Diamanto Politis and Roger Sørheim.

  • 79.
    Landström, Hans
    et al.
    Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University School of Economics and Management, Lund, Sweden.
    Sørheim, Roger
    Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, NTNU School of Entrepreneurship, Trondheim, Norway.
    Djupdal, Kari
    Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet (NTNU), Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Trondheim, Norway.
    The Social Structure of Entrepreneurial Education as a Scientific Field2022In: Academy of Management Learning & Education, ISSN 1537-260X, E-ISSN 1944-9585, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 61-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurial education as a scientific field can be regarded as an emerging and growing area of research. In this study we pay particular attention to the community of scholars involved in entrepreneurial education. The aim of the paper is to explore how scholars within the field have integrated into larger scholarly communities. Based on a unique database and web-based responses from 313 entrepreneurial education scholars, we demonstrate that scholars within the field exhibit great variety in their scientific outlooks and appreciation of communication systems. However, we find that the field consists of four scholarly communities characterized by a specific combination of scholarly inspirations, favorite meeting places, and publication channels, of which three clusters are anchored in the field of entrepreneurship, and only one cluster shows a strong entrepreneurial education research identity. Finally, the results indicate a low consolidation across the scholarly communities, which highlights the need for reflections on how the field can achieve increased integration and cohesion in the future.

  • 80.
    Laurell, Hélène
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Knowledge Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Research (KEEN).
    A Revised Model of Factors Influencing Internationalization Speed in the Medical Technology Sector Through an Institutional Lens2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Laurell, Hélène
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Adapting the theory of international new ventures to institutionally heterogeneous healthcare markets: Implications for international sales of medical technology innovations2017In: Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship (ACE) Research Exchange Conference 2017, 2017, p. 24-25Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Laurell, Hélène
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Internationalization speed and performance outcomes of international new ventures in the medical technology sector2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demand for medical technology innovations for improving and managing human health is global. Many players in markets for medical technology are new ventures operating in relatively small niches (Altenstetter, 2003) and struggling to build capabilities and develop internationalization strategies to scale up production and sales. However, the regulation and financing of the healthcare sector are to a large extent country specific. For example, the healthcare sector in the UK is financed through taxes, while US healthcare is primarily financed through insurance systems (Donaldson et al., 2004). Such differences affect the processes of valuing, buying and paying for medical technology innovations across the different healthcare systems and complicate procurement and reimbursement procedures for new ventures engaged in the commercialization of medical technology innovations. 

    The development and commercialization of medical technology innovations are embedded in institutionally complex markets, in which layers of regulative, normative and cultural-cognitive elements (e.g. Scott, 2014) vary significantly across countries. Research that investigates the institutional environment is a promising direction to build theoretical explanations of the impact of heterogeneous markets on international entrepreneurial activities (Etemad, 2013; Jones et al., 2011a, 2011b). However, the international entrepreneurship literature has largely failed to address how institutional cross-country heterogeneity affects the sales and marketing strategies of new ventures (cf. Coeurderoy and Murray, 2008). In addition, only recently has the literature begun developing frameworks that shed better light on the impact of different customer and product types when penetrating new markets (Hennart, 2014; Onetti et al., 2012). 

    The global demand for medical technology innovationscalls for better understanding of how differences across national healthcare organizations influence the international performance of medical technology ventures.Against this, in this paper we aim to develop a theoretical framework that explains the relationship between internationalization speed and performance outcomes of international new ventures (INVs) when commercializing medical technology innovations across institutionally heterogeneous markets. Our theory and logic emphasizes factors such as industry conditions, foreign market knowledge and network intensity (Oviatt and McDougall, 2005).In this vein, we acknowledge that it is critical to understand how different actors in the healthcare value chain influence INVs’ choice of countries to enter and whether their existing knowledge bases and networks are aligned with industry- and/or country-specific requirements (e.g. regulations, health economics, clinical trials). However, we also complement and extend general models of international entrepreneurship by identifying institutional healthcare dimensions (i.e. regulative, normative and cultural-cognitive) as moderating forces that explain either the acceleration or deceleration of international sales of medical technology innovations, depending on each country’s institutional healthcare setting. Thus, we suggest that a country’s healthcare setting also affects the sales process of INVs and how quickly they can get medical technology innovations adopted in the healthcare system. Building on our theory and logic, we formulate propositions and illustrate relationships among different constructs. 

    This paper contributes to theory and research on international entrepreneurship field. Its main contribution is to better understand the relationship between internationalization speed and performance outcomes for INVs when operating in institutionally heterogeneous healthcaremarkets. Informed by this reasoning, we therefore introduce a conceptual model that specifies different factors that influence internationalization speed and subsequent performance outcomes.

  • 83.
    Martina, Richard
    et al.
    University of Curaçao, Willemstad, Curaçao & The United Nations University – Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (UNU-MERIT)/Maastricht Graduate School of Governance (MG-SoG), Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Yar Hamidi, Daniel
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurial Strategies in University Spin-offs: Coping with Uncertainties in the Process of Market Creation2014In: Advancing European Entrepreneurship Research: Entrepreneurship as a Working Attitude, a Mode of Thinking and an Everyday Practice / [ed] Brady Wagoner & Nandita Chaudhary, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, 2014, 1, p. 251-278Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective with the chapter is to develop theoretical and empirical insights into how university spin-offs use inter-organizational networks to cope with the uncertainties that surround the entrepreneurial process of market creation. We rely on effectuation theory to contrast between the use of predictive and emerging approaches to network strategies during early stages of venture development. In the chapter, we first employ a case study of a single university spin-off originating from Lund University. This inductive approach is followed by a questionnaire survey to university spin-offs in incubators across Sweden, where we test our tentative findings from the case study on a broader sample of fi rms. In all, we find that the use of predictive or emerging approaches is influenced by the entrepreneurial experience of the founder but also that it shifts depending on the network position of the spin-off firm during different stages of development. Moreover, the use of emerging approaches decreases over time when the spin-off ventures beyond the post-commercialization stage and when facing uncertainty about likely responses from competitors.

  • 84.
    Minichilli, Alessandro
    et al.
    Strategic Management Department, Bocconi University, Milan, Italy.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    CIRCLE, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Huse, Morten
    Norwegian School of Mangement, Oslo, Norway & Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy.
    Board Evaluations: making a fit between the purpose and the system2007In: Corporate governance: An International Review, ISSN 0964-8410, E-ISSN 1467-8683, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 609-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Board evaluations can contribute to effective boards and improved corporate financial performance. The increasing interest in the practice of board evaluations, however, calls for a more systematic and careful approach than has been employed in the past. While most attention has primarily been focused on the content of board evaluations, this article outlines the features of various possible board evaluation systems. Based on state-of-the-art research on boards and governance, we contend that a comprehensive board evaluation system needs to include decisions about: (a) the agent who evaluates the board; (b) the content, or what the evaluation should deal with; (c) the addressee and other stakeholders for whom the board is evaluated; and (d) how the board is evaluated. These key decisions should not be seen as independent of each other as they have consequences for the kind of system that will be adopted. Following this argument, we present four different board evaluation systems: (i) board-to-board, (ii) board-to-market, (iii) market-to-board and (iv) market-to-market. The key message we communicate in this article is that there must be a fit between the purpose and the system of board evaluations. There is no universal or "one best way" to evaluate boards of directors. Board evaluations will not meet their purpose unless there is a fit between the agents, the addressees, the content and the modalities of the evaluation. It is important to know who is doing what for whom and how. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 85.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Configurations of proximities in collaborative R&D projects as drivers of radical innovation2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to advance the scholarly understanding of how different combinations of proximities in collaborative R&D projects drive radical innovation. We use fuzzy set Qualitative Comparative Analysis to explore how configurations of geographical, cognitive, social and institutional proximity lead to radical innovations in collaborative R&D projects. The analysis generates three solutions. Each solution includes either cognitive, organizational or geographical distance, and all include social proximity. Thus, our results indicate that social proximity is central but not sufficient for radical innovation in R&D projects as it must be combined with a distance in another dimension. This shows that even though distance is a necessity to achieve radical innovation it seems difficult to cope with distance in more than one dimension at a time. The results contribute to novel insights in an area where previous research has generated contradictory and ambiguous results.

  • 86.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University.
    Entrepreneurial decision making: Examining preferences for causual and effectual reasoning in the new venture creation process2006Report (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    CIRCLE. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurs' attitudes towards failure: An experiential learning approach2007In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2007: Proceedings of the Twenty-seventh Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference / [ed] Zacharakis, Andrew [et al.], Wellesley, Mass.: Babson College , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we employ theories of experiential learning to examine why some entrepreneurs have developed a more positive attitude towards failures compared to others. The empirical findings support our guiding proposition that more favourable attitudes towards failing can be learned through entrepreneurs' life and work. Our results suggest that previous start up experience is strongly associated with a more positive attitude towards failure. Moreover, we also find that experience from closing down a business is associated with a more positive attitude towards failure. In sum, our findings add to our knowledge of why some entrepreneurs have a more positive attitude towards failures compared to others. It also provides some general implications for our understanding of entrepreneurial learning as an experiential process.

  • 88.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurs' attitudes towards failure: An experiential learning approach2009In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 364-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – This paper employs theories of experiential learning to examine why some entrepreneurs have developed a more positive attitude towards failures compared to others.Design/methodology/approach – The paper conducts statistical analysis on a sample of 231 Swedish entrepreneurs that have started new independent firms in 2004.

    Findings

    – The empirical findings support the guiding proposition that more favourable attitudes towards failure could be learned through entrepreneurs' life and work. The results suggest that previous start up experience is strongly associated with a more positive attitude towards failure. The paper also finds that experience from closing down a business is associated with a more positive attitude towards failure. In addition, a more fine‐grained analysis suggests that experience from closing down a business due to reasons of poor performance is a highly valuable source of learning while closure due to more personal reasons does not lead to the same result.

    Research limitations/implications

    – In sum, the findings add to the knowledge of why some entrepreneurs have a more positive attitude towards failure compared to others. It also provides some general implications for the understanding of entrepreneurial learning as an experiential process.

    Practical implications

    – A positive attitude toward failure might be a significant asset for entrepreneurs as it might help them to deal with and learn from their mistakes and to move forward. The results indicate that the attitudes toward failure are not homogeneous among entrepreneurs. Rather, this attitude can, at least to some degree, be influenced due to new experiences and new information.

    Originality/value

    – The paper provides novel insights with regard to the role that critical career experiences can play for the development of entrepreneurs' attitudes towards failure. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 89.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University.
    Exploring the role of experience in the process of entrepreneurial learning2005Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have recently showed an increasing interest in understanding entrepreneurship as an experiential learning process. In this article, we investigate the role of prior career experience for the development of entrepreneurial knowledge, i.e., knowledge that facilitates for individuals to recognize and act on opportunities as well as to organize and manage new ventures. Based on an analysis of 291 Swedish entrepreneurs we find links between various career experiences and the development of entrepreneurial knowledge. In addition we also find evidence that the entrepreneurs’ preference for exploring new possibilities vs. exploiting pre-existing knowledge are important to consider to explain this process. The study ends with a discussion of the findings, together with suggestions for future research.

  • 90.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Informal investors and value added: the contribution of investors' experientially acquired resources in the entrepreneurial process2006Report (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    CIRCLE, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Informal investors' governance of their portfolio firms: A board perspective2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University School of Economics and Management, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Modes of learning and entrepreneurial knowledge2015In: International Journal of Innovation and Learning, ISSN 1471-8197, E-ISSN 1741-8089, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 101-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examine how entrepreneurs differ in their modes of learning and whether variations in modes of learning have any influence on their possession of entrepreneurial knowledge that increase their ability to recognise and exploit new business opportunities. Based on statistical analysis of 291 entrepreneurs we find that a learning mode that favours exploration is positively associated with the ability to recognise a higher number of business opportunities. A learning mode that favours exploitation is on the other hand negatively associated with the ability to cope with liabilities of newness. Adding to this, we find that the positive association between career experience and entrepreneurial knowledge is stronger with a learning mode that favours exploration. Copyright © 2015 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 93.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Norwegian School of Management BI, Oslo, Norway.
    The role of informal investors in the entrepreneurial process: An empirical study of opportunity, motivation and ability2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to advance the understanding of the role of informal investors in the entrepreneurial process, something that up to date has received very limited attention. By analysing the life experience and career background of four informal investors the study explore their motivation for being involved in entrepreneurial opportunities, and the personal resources these individuals build up and develop during their careers that facilitate this involvement. The overall results suggest that their careers can be described as an experien- tial learning process that has facilitated the development of valuable skills and knowledge that is of critical importance for the entrepreneurial projects they become involved in. The paper ends with a discussion of its findings and implications for future research.

  • 94.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Galan, Nataliya
    School of Business, Economics and IT, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Abebe, Solomon Akele
    Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurial learning in venture acceleration programs2019In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 588-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to better understand entrepreneurial learning in the context of venture acceleration programs.

    Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research strategy was used based on multiple in-depth interviews with 21 lead entrepreneurs complemented with participatory observations and secondary sources. The data were inductively analysed following the Gioia methodology (Gioia et al., 2012).

    Findings: The authors build on experiential learning theory to generate a process-focussed model exploring the learning dynamics that venture acceleration programs can facilitate. In this model, the authors identify three catalysts that trigger processes of experiential learning and two contingencies that alleviate the effects of the catalysts on learning outcomes. The findings suggest that the potential of venture acceleration programs to be effective learning environments pends on the presence and quality of these catalysts and contingencies.

    Originality/value: The findings provide novel insights on how venture acceleration programs trigger entrepreneurial learning, thereby offering a deeper understanding of the learning dynamics in this setting. 

    © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited

  • 95.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindholm Dahlstrand, Åsa
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Academic entrepreneurship: Multi-level factors associated with female-led incubator projects2014In: Women’s Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century: An International Multi-Level Research Analysis / [ed] Kate V. Lewis; Colette Henry; Elizabeth J. Gatewood; John Watson, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, 1, p. 32-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we examine how institutional factors in and around university incubators are associated with the likelihood that a female will engage in the commercialization of university science by championing an incubator project. Our empirical data comes from a unique database consisting of over 1400 venture projects in 19 Swedish incubators that are part of a nationally financed incubator program. Our findings suggest that women’s engagement in academic entrepreneurship is related to a number of institutional factors operating at multiple levels in and around incubators. We find systematic differences related to 1) the proportion of female faculty in senior positions at the associated university, 2) the presence of women on incubator boards; and 3) the technological sector of the project itself. In all, our findings largely support the notion that university incubators can be seen as embedded in gendered structures, where socially and culturally constructed roles and relationships between men and women create imbalances in their prospective career opportunities.

  • 96.
    Rigolini, Alessandra
    et al.
    University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. European Academy of Management (EURAM), Brussels, Belgium.
    Barriuso, Mirian Izquierdo
    Comerciando Global, Madrid, Spain; Woman Forward Foundation, Madrid, Spain.
    Huse, Morten
    NHH, Bergen, Norway; BI Norwegian Business School, Department of Communication and Culture, Oslo, Norway.
    Rethinking boards and governance in the digital era: Implications for practice and research2019In: Research Handbook on Boards of Directors / [ed] Gabrielsson, Jonas; Khlif, Wafac; Yamak, Sibeld, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, p. 444-454Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Rodgers, Waymond
    et al.
    University of Texas, El Paso USA & University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom.
    Simon, Jon
    University of Hull, Hull, United Kingdom.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Combining experiential and conceptual learning in accounting education: A review with implications2017In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 187-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within accounting education, both conceptual and experiential learning have been important learning approaches. However, while experiential learning has been extensively studied in accounting education, the critical role of conceptual learning has received considerably less attention. In this article, we review theory and research to develop a framework involving the Throughput Model that relates to both conceptual and experiential learning. Based on our review and combination, we suggest implications for the design and implementation of accounting education. © The Author(s) 2016.

  • 98.
    Tell, Joakim
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University.
    Management Development in Small Firms: Understanding the Learning Dilemma for Small Business Managers2013In: International journal of Innovation Science, ISSN 1757-2223, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 143-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we link discussions about management development in small firms to the work environment of small business managers. In particular, our aim is to examine management development as an experiential process carried out in daily managerial practice. Using structured observations of managerial work, we found that small business managers operate in work environments with rich opportunities for learning. However, we also found that various and unexpected interruptions and problems typically fragment their workdays. In addition, such managers lack peer support and guidance and have few external interactions and little internal communication. As a result, small business managers find themselves in a learning dilemma that, in the long run, may limit their creativity and innovation. Based on these empirical findings, we draw conclusions about support for work-based management development in small firms.

  • 99.
    van Ees, Hans
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Huse, Morten
    BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway & Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy.
    Toward a Behavioral Theory of Boards and Corporate Governance2009In: Corporate governance: An International Review, ISSN 0964-8410, E-ISSN 1467-8683, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 307-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manuscript Type: Review

    Research Question/Issue: A coherent alternative to an economic approach of corporate governance is missing. In this paper we take steps towards developing a behavioral theory of boards and corporate governance.

    Research Findings/Results: Building upon concepts such as political bargaining, routinization of decision making, satisficing, and problemistic search, a behavioral theory of boards and corporate governance will focus more on (1) interactions and processes inside and outside the boardroom; (2) the fact that decision making is made by coalitions of actors and objectives are results of political bargaining; and (3) the notion that not only conflicting, but also cooperating, interests are parts of the boards' decision making and control over firm resources.

    Theoretical Implications: The consequences are a new research agenda for boards and corporate governance. The agenda will focus on actual instead of stylized descriptions of board behavior. In a behavioral perspective the emphasis on problems of coordination, exploration, and knowledge creation may dominate over problems of conflict of interest, exploitation, and the distribution of value. A future research agenda based on a behavioral framework calls for novel and adventurous research designs.

    Practical Implications: A behavioral theory of boards and corporate governance will be closer to actual board behavior than the traditional economic approach and research about boards and corporate governance may thus become more actionable for practitioners. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 100.
    Voordeckers, Wim
    et al.
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    van Gils, Anita
    Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University.
    Huse, Morten
    Norwegian School of Management BI.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University.
    Structures and behaviour: A cross-country comparison of boards of directors in SMEs2008In: Proceedings of EURAM Annual Conference 2008, 2008, p. 1-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior cross-country governance studies mainly built on agency theory’s governance model. Recently, the use of this theoretical perspective has been criticized from both institutional theory as well as the behavioural perspective. Institutional theory would predict that a significant part of the variation in board behaviour could be attributed to the institutional context of a country. In contrast, the behavioural perspective follows the reasoning that board behaviour is expected to be determined by firm-specific challenges and needs rather than the broader institutional context and hence, predicts that the institutional context of a country does not explain variation in actual board behaviour. The aim of this study is to examine the empirical validity of these opposing predictions about board behaviour. Using a database of SMEs of three countries with a different governance system (Belgium, the Netherlands and Norway), our statistical analyses mainly support the predictions of the behavioural perspective.

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