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  • 51.
    Lahti, M.
    et al.
    Health and Well-being, Turku University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Elliä, H.
    Health and Well-being, Turku University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Doyle, L.
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Higgins, A.
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Keogh, B.
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Meade, O.
    Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Stickley, T.
    Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, J.
    Department of health care, University of Applied Sciences HU, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Kilkku, N.
    School of health care and social services, Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    The required knowledge for lifespan mental health promotion and prevention for Master’s level mental health nurse education – the eMenthe project2018In: International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, ISSN 1463-5240, E-ISSN 2164-9545, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 143-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we address the kind of knowledge that is required for Master’s level nurse education for lifespan mental health promotion and prevention. Data were collected through structured interviews (N = 109). The interviews were conducted across five European countries. The data were analysed using a thematic content analysis approach. The findings show that Master’s level nurse education needs knowledge related to lifespan issues. Needs were raised in several issues like importance of increasing skills and knowledge of mental health workers. We conclude that there is a need to emphasise the knowledge required for mental health promotion and prevention for Master’s level nursing education across Europe. © 2018 Institute of Health Promotion and Education.

  • 52.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Eriksson, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The Meaning of the Lived Experience of Lifestyle Changes for People with Severe Mental Illness2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of the lived experience of lifestyle changes as perceived by people with severe mental illness (SMI). People with SMI who have experience in managing lifestyle changes were interviewed (n = 10). The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. The findings reveal three themes: (1) struggling with inner and outer limitations, (2) on one's own but together with others and (3) longing for living a life in harmony. The meaning of lifestyle changes can be understood as a person's internal and external endeavors to make well-considered decisions about lifestyle changes. Support should focus on strengthening the person's self-efficacy and should be based on the person's experiences. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 53.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health-related lifestyle and perceived health among people with severe mental illness: Gender differences and degree of sense of coherence2019In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 182-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with severe mental illness (SMI) experience an increased risk of physical ill health and premature death, which appears to be partly related to unhealthy lifestyle habits. The aim of this study was to describe the distribution of health-related lifestyle habits and perceived health among people with severe mental illness. A further aim was to explore if there were any gender differences or differences based on degree of sense of coherence. The study adopted a cross-sectional design based on data from 65 people with SMI. The results show that degree of Sense of Coherence (SOC) does have relevance for perceived health and for dimensions of Quality of Life (QOL). Furthermore, among the participants with strong SOC, there were less daily smokers and they seemed to have less sedentary leisure time than those with low SOC. Men reported more anxiety/depression than women and women ate fruit more often than men, otherwise there were no gender differences. In comparison with the general population, people with SMI show a higher Body Mass Index are more sedentary, more often daily smokers, have lower SOC and perceive a lower QOL. This emphasizes the importance of health-promotion support that focuses on lifestyle changes, and support for strengthening SOC and QOL for people with SMI. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  • 54.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mental health nurses’ experience of physical health care and health promotion initiatives for people with severe mental illness2019In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health care for people with severe mental illness is often divided into physical health care and mental health care despite the importance of a holistic approach to caring for the whole person. Mental health nurses have an important role not only in preventing ill health, but also in promoting health, to improve the overall health among people with severe mental illness and to develop a more person-centred, integrated physical and mental health care. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe mental health nurses’ experiences of facilitating aspects that promote physical health and support a healthy lifestyle for people with severe mental illness. Interviews were conducted with mental health nurses (n = 15), and a qualitative content analysis was used to capture the nurse’s experiences. Analysis of the interviews generated three categories: (i) to have a health promotion focus in every encounter, (ii) to support with each person’s unique prerequisites in mind and (iii) to take responsibility for health promotion in every level of the organization. The results show the importance of a health promotion focus that permeates the entire organization of mental health care. Shared responsibility for health and health promotion activities should exist at all levels: in the person-centred care in the relation with the patient, embedded in a joint vision within the working unit, and in decisions at management level. © 2019 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  • 55.
    Melin, Karin
    et al.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, CAP Specialized unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skarphedinsson, Gudmundur
    University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Storm Mowatt Haugland, Bente
    Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Tord
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Eastern and Southern Norway, Oslo, Norway.
    A solid majority remit following evidence-based OCD treatments: a 3-year naturalistic outcome study in pediatric OCD2018In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 1373-1381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports follow-up 2 and 3 years after the initial assessment of a sample of youth with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Participants were 109 children and adolescents, aged 5-17 years, recruited from a specialized, outpatient OCD clinic in Sweden. Patients were treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), augmented when indicated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). In cases where SSRIs were insufficient, augmentation with a second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) was applied. Participants were assessed with the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS), Children's OCD Impact Scale (COIS), and Children's Depressive Inventory (CDI) at follow-ups 2 and 3 years after baseline assessment. Treatment response was defined as CY-BOCS total score ≤ 15, and remission was defined as CY-BOCS total score ≤ 10. Analyzing the outcomes with linear mixed-effects models (LME) showed a decrease in OCD symptom load from 23 to 6.9 at the 3-year follow-up. Moreover, two of three (66.1%) participants were in remission, and another 19.2% had responded to treatment at the 3-year follow-up. Thus, 85.3% of participants responded to treatment. Moreover, during the follow-up period, participants' psychosocial functioning had significantly improved, and depressive symptoms had significantly decreased. The results suggest that evidence-based treatment for pediatric OCD, following expert consensus guidelines, has long-term positive effects for most children and adolescents diagnosed with OCD. The results also indicate that improvements are maintained over a 3-year period, at least, and that improvement is also found with regard to psychosocial functioning and depressive symptoms. © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG

  • 56.
    Nordström, Monica
    et al.
    Gothenburg Univ, Inst Social Work, Dept Social Work, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björkman, Tommy
    Lund Univ, Dept Hlth Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Wijk, Helle
    Swedish Inst Hlth Sci, Vardal Inst, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The life circumstances of persons with a psychiatric disability: a survey in a region in southern Sweden2009In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 738-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the life circumstances of persons with a psychiatric disability living in one urban and six rural areas in a single region in Sweden. Furthermore, the life circumstances of persons with a psychiatric disability are discussed in relation to the aims of social policies in Sweden. Data were collected by means of a survey study exploring the formal support provided by local authorities to its citizens and the informal support given by family members and volunteers. The results reveal how the respondents themselves describe their life circumstances in terms of their living conditions, occupation and activities, health, and formal and informal support. The results indicate that persons with a psychiatric disability, regardless of where they live, need both formal and informal support in order to cope with their everyday lives. The family plays an important role in this, and it is essential for the formal and informal support systems to cooperate with each other. The lack of activities and opportunities for work experienced by persons with a psychiatric disability indicates that the sociopolitical goal of fostering access to employment and work and to earning a living for this group is far from having been attained.

  • 57.
    Norell Pejner, Margaretha
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lundström, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Ourique de Morais, Wagner
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Laurell, Hélène
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Isaksson, Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Språk, kultur och samhälle.
    Stranne, Frida
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Smart medication organizer – one way to promote self-management and safety in drug administration in elderly people2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    The Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The portfolio method as management support for patients with major depression2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 11-12, p. 1639-1647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe how patients with major depression in psychiatric outpatient care use the portfolio method and whether the method helps the patients to understand their depression. Background. Major depressive disorder is an increasing problem in society. Learning about one's depression has been demonstrated to be important for recovery. If the goal is better understanding and management of depression, learning must proceed on the patient's own terms, based on the patient's previous understanding of their depression. Learning must be aligned with patient needs if it is to result in meaningful and useful understanding.Design Each patient's portfolio consisted of a binder. Inside the binder, there was a register with predetermined flaps and questions. The patients were asked to work with the questions in the sections that built the content in the portfolio. Methods. Individual interviews with patients (n = 5) suffering from major depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) (American Psychiatric Association 1994) were repeatedly conducted between April 2008 and August 2009 in two psychiatric outpatient clinics in western Sweden. Data were analysed using latent content analysis. Results. The results showed that the portfolio was used by patients as a management strategy for processing and analysis of their situation and that a portfolio's structure affects its usability. The patients use the portfolio for reflection on and confirmation of their progress, to create structure in their situation, as a management strategy for remembering situations and providing reminders of upcoming activities. Conclusions. Using a clearly structured care portfolio can enable participation and patient learning and help patients understand their depression. Relevance to clinical practice. The portfolio method could provide a tool in psychiatric nursing that may facilitate patient understanding and increase self-efficacy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 59.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    et al.
    University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Gustav Melins Gata 3, S-461 86 Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kylén, Sven
    Primary Care, Research and Evaluation Unit, Fyrbodal, Vänerparken, Vänersborg, Sweden.
    Experiences of major depression: individuals' perspectives on the ability to understand and handle the illness2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 272-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In all social groups, major depression is an increasingly serious problem in modern society. Important aspects of a person's capacity for recovery are the person's own understanding of the illness and the ability to use this understanding to manage the illness. The aim of this study is to describe how individuals with major depression understand their illness and use their understanding to handle it. Twenty participants treated in community care for major depression as determined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were interviewed between February and June, 2008. Content analysis of the interviews revealed three major themes: (1) awakening insight, (2) strategies for understanding and managing, and (3) making use of understanding, each with additional subthemes. Individual understandings of the illness varied and led to differences in the ways participants were able to handle their depression. In clinical care it is essential to support an individual's understanding of depression and his or her use of that understanding to handle the illness.

  • 60.
    Pejner, Norell Margaretha
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ourique de Morais, Wagner
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Lundström, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Laurell, Hélène
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    A Smart Home System for Information Sharing, Health Assessments, and Medication Self-Management for Older People: Protocol for a Mixed-Methods Study2019In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e12447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Older adults often want to stay in a familiar place, such as their home, as they get older. This so-called aging in place, which may involve support from relatives or care professionals, can promote older people’s independence and well-being. The combination of aging and disease, however, can lead to complex medication regimes, and difficulties for care providers in correctly assessing the older person's health. In addition, the organization of the health care is fragmented, which makes it difficult for health professionals to encourage older people to participate in their care. It is also a challenge to perform adequate health assessment and appropriate communication between health care professionals.

    Objective: The purpose of this paper is to describe the design for an integrated home-based system that can acquire and compile health-related evidence for guidance and information sharing among care providers and care receivers in order to support and promote medication self-management among older people.

    Methods: The authors used a participatory design (PD) approach for this mixed-method project, which was divided into four phases: Phase I, Conceptualization, consisted of the conceptualization of a system to support medication self- management, objective health assessments, and communication between health care professionals. Phase II, Development of a System, consisted of building and bringing together the conceptualized systems from phase I. Phases III (pilot study) and IV (a full-scale study) are described briefly.

    Results: Our participants in phase I were people who were involved in some way in the care of older adults, and included older adults themselves, relatives of older adults, care professionals, and industrial partners. With input from phase I participants, we identified two relevant concepts for promoting medication self-management, both of which related to systems that participants believed could provide guidance for the older adults themselves, relatives of older adults, and care professionals. The system will also encourage information sharing between care providers and care receivers. The first is the concept of the Intelligent Friendly Home (IAFH), defined as an integrated residential system that evolves to sense, reason and act in response to individual needs, preferences and behaviors as these change over time. The second concept is the MedOP system, a system that would be supported by the IAFH, and which consists of three related components: one that assess health behaviors, another that communicates health data, and a third that promotes medication self-management.

    Conclusions: The participants in this project were older adults, relatives of older adults, care professionals, and our industrial partners. With input from the participants, we identified two main concepts that could comprise a system for health assessment, communication and medication self-management: the Intelligent Friendly Home (IAFH), and the MedOP system. These concepts will be tested in this study to determine whether they can facilitate and promote medication self-management in older people. © The authors. All rights reserved. 

  • 61.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    et al.
    Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Koinberg, Ingalill
    Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margareta
    Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Role of Theories in the Design of Web-Based person-Centered Support: A Critical Analysis2014In: International Journal of Chronic Diseases, E-ISSN 2314-5749, Vol. 2014, article id 603047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The aim of this study was to provide a critical understanding of the role of theories and their compatibility with a person-centered approach in the design and evaluation of web-based support for the management of chronic illness. Methods. Exploration of web-based support research projects focusing on four cases: (1) preschool children aged 4–6 with bladder dysfunction and urogenital malformation; (2) young adults aged 16–25 living with mental illness; (3) women with type 1 diabetes who are pregnant or in early motherhood; and (4) women who have undergone surgery for breast cancer. Data comprised interviews with research leaders and documented plans. Analysis was performed by means of a cross-case methodology. Results. The used theories concerned design, learning, health and well-being, or transition. All web support products had been developed using a participatory design (PD). Fundamental to the technology design and evaluation of outcomes were theories focusing on learning and on health and well-being. All theories were compatible with a person-centered approach. However, a notable exception was the relatively collective character of PD and Communities of Practice. Conclusion. Our results illustrate multifaceted ways for theories to be used in the design and evaluation of web-based support.

  • 62.
    Sjöström, Nils
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Ångestsyndrom2014In: Omvårdnad vid psykisk ohälsa – på grundläggande nivå / [ed] Skärsäter, I., Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2014, 2:1, p. 77-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Evidenzbasierte Plegeinterventionen für Menschen mit schwerer Depression und Angst – Empfehlungen für die Praxis2010In: "Depressivität und Suizidalität": Prävention, Früherkennung, Pflegeinterventionen, Selbsthilfe : Vorträge und Posterpräsentationen 7. Dreiländerkongress Pflege in der Psychiatrie in Bielefeld / [ed] Sabine Hahn, Michael Schulz, Susanne Schoppmann, Christoph Abderhalden, Harald Stefan & Ian Needham, Unterostendorf: Ibicura, 2010, p. 316-338Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Förstämningssyndrom2010In: Omvårdnad vid psykisk ohälsa – på grundläggande nivå / [ed] Skärsäter, I., Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2010, 1, p. 67-93Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Förstämningssyndrom2014In: Omvårdnad vid psykisk ohälsa – på grundläggande nivå / [ed] Skärsäter, I., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2, p. 99-127Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nursing research on affective disorders: towards a paradigm of person-centred care2010In: Tidsskrift for Sygeplejeforskning, ISSN 0900-3002, Vol. 26, no 2 & 3, p. 29-34Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective disorders have not attracted as much attention or funding over the last decades as have mental illnesses that are considered to be more severe, such as psychosis and schizophrenia. Affective disorders were for example excluded from the 1995 Swedish reform of psychiatric care, because they were seen as less severe than other mental illnesses. The fact that they are often treated in primary care, with only long-term cases referred to specialized psychiatry, may contribute to the view, held predominately by health care organizations, that affective disorders are less severe or more easily treated than other psychiatric disorders. This view, however, does not reflect the patient's perspective, and convincing evidence shows that major depression and bipolar disorders create great suffering for the people having to live with them. For the last 10 years a nursing research group at the Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University has explored the lives and circumstances of people living with affective disorders. This paper presents recent research and an overview of the entire project with the aim of contributing towards the development of person-centred care for people living with affective disorders.

  • 67.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Omvårdnad vid psykisk ohälsa – på grundläggande nivå2010Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Parents with first time major depression: perceptions of social support for themselves and their children2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 308-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of parents, with first time major depression, regarding the social support for themselves and their children. Eighteen parents, with children under the age of 19, were interviewed on admission to an inpatient unit and of these 16 were followed up 1 year later. In addition, the severity of parents' depression and their functional status was measured. The results showed that although the parents did regain their mental health and functional capacity to a certain extent, they nevertheless remained in a vulnerable position, increasing the strain on the whole family. The parents' and their children's social support was low and came mostly from outside the family. The parents were worried about their children, due to problems related to the depressive episode as well as ordinary teenage rebellion. Important questions concerned practical problems such as whether there was someone to take care of the children if the parent is incapable of doing so. There were also concerns pertaining to how the changed family situation might interfere with the child's natural development or whether depression was a question of heredity. This highlights the need to investigate the importance of social support for the family as a whole when one of them suffers from depression. There is a need for improved treatment of parental depression to reduce symptoms such as decreased functional status that may impair parenting. The study also emphasises the need for healthcare practitioners to assess multiple aspects of social support so that care planning will target all relevant domains.

  • 69.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Psykisk ohälsa2014In: Omvårdnadens grunder. Hälsa och ohälsa / [ed] Anna-Karin Edberg & Helle Wijk, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2014, 2:1, p. 611-642Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sorg2014In: Vårdande vid psykisk ohälsa – på avancerad nivå / [ed] Wiklund Gustin, Lena, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2014, 2:1, p. 153-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Web-based support among young informal carers who support family members or close friends with mental illness2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 72.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ali, Lilas
    Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, SverigeVetenskaplig teori och metod.
    Att använda internet vid datainsamling2012In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod: Från idé till eximination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Maria Henricson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, 1, p. 251-267Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ali, Lilas
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Elf, Mikael
    Department of Psychology, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Young Adult Carers in the Risk Zone. Design of a Health-Promoting, Randomized Two-Armed Controlled Trial for Young Adults Who Support Persons with Mental Illness2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Akademin vid Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Högskolen i Gjøvik, Gjøvik, Norge.
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sverige.
    Kunskap och gemenskap främjar hälsa2009In: Nordisk geriatrik: äldremedicin i sluten och öppen vård, ISSN 1403-2082, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 26-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Fac Hlth & Caring Sci, Inst Nursing, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Baigi, Amir
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Primary Hlth Care, County Council Halland, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Neurosci & Locomot, Sect Occupat Therapy, Fac Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Functional status and quality of life in patients with first-episode major depression2006In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 205-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse the level of severity of major depression and its relation to functioning and health-related quality of life over time in patients treated for their first episode of major depression. Thirty-three adult patients who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria for major depression were included in the study. Semi-structured interviews and self-assessment questionnaires were used at baseline and at 6-monthly intervals in a 2-year follow-up, in order to measure the level of severity of depression, functioning and quality of life. The results showed that the first episode of major depression was rated as severe in 43% of cases. Multiple domains of functioning as well as quality of life were strongly affected in patients at baseline, although the level of functioning increased significantly over the study period, as did quality of life, but not concurrently with the decrease in the level of severity of the depression. Psychosocial functioning is an important outcome measure related to major depression, which underlines the importance of separate evaluations initiated and conducted by mental health nurses in order to determine whether or not patients have actually achieved a state of health.

  • 76.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Barkström, Magdalena
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dahlqvist Jönsson, Patrik
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Halila, Fawzi
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Hertz, Anne-Christine
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sant'Anna, Anita
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Tylenius, Andreas
    Theme Health Innovation at Halmstad University  - research, education and collaboration for welfare technology2015In: Abstracts: 19th International Philosophy of Nursing Society (IPONS) conference August 24-26, 2015 Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden: Technology, Health Care and Person-centeredness: Beyond Utopia and Dystopia. Thinking the Future., Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet , 2015, p. 41-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In face of escalating health care costs, new technology holds great promise for innovative solutions and new more sustainable health care model. Welfare technology around a person allowing for greater autonomy and control in health issues and access to tailored information and personalized health behavior interventions. While this offers good opportunities for both public health impact, it also emphasizes the need for properly knowledge base and organizational structure to support a person- centred approach in the development of welfare technology in society. 

    Halmstad University initiated in 2014 a thematic research and educational initiative that has been named Theme Health Innovation. The initiative includes research, education and interaction with the community, region and industry, which in collaboration can contribute with innovative and sustainable solutions to social challenges in the health field. The starting point for the work is action based on societal and individual needs and development of venues for collaboration between different actors and levels of organization. 

    Theme Health Innovation aims to develop and affect people's ability to maintain and promote their health and prevent ill health. Health Innovations developed in encounters between different knowledge, skills and experiences, both within the university's research and education in collaboration with industry and the public sector. Health Innovations that are developed should be based on the needs from the people who will use the innovation, thus have an end user perspective. 

    At the conference, the Theme Health Innovation will be presented including the organizational structure, research as well as training in higher education that support the welfare technical development.

  • 77.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellström, Anna-Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Koinberg, Ingalill
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margareta
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ulrika
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Web-based Support in Long-term Illness – a Person-centred Care Approach2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The abstract outlines a research project that aims to develop and evaluate a person-centred model of web-based learning and support for people with long-term illness. Departing from the widespread use of the internet in modern society and the emerging use of web applications in healthcare the multi-case project captures persons’ needs and expectations in order to develop highly usable web recourses. To support the underlying idea to move beyond the illness, we approach the development of web support from the perspective of the emergent area of person-centred care (PCC).

    Methods: The research design uses a meta-analytical approach through its focus on synthesizing experiences from four Swedish regional and national cases of design and use of web-based support in long-term illness. The cases include children (bladder dysfunction and uro-genital malformation), young adults (living close to persons with mental illness), and two different cases of adults (women with breast cancer and childbearing women with type 1 diabetes). All of the cases are ongoing, though in different stages of design, implementa-tion, and analysis. An inductive approach characterizes the analysis of the results of the cases. By means of a step-wise analysis a shared knowledge and understanding of each separate case is created followed by the development of central categories (such as types of needs and expectations, types of theories, conceptual framework, etc).

    Results: To allow valid comparisons between the four cases we explore and problematize them in relation to four main aspects: 1) The use of people’s experiences and needs; 2) The role of use of theories in the design of person-centred web-based supports; 3) The evaluation of the effects of health outcomes for the informants involved and 4) The development of a generic person-centred model for learning and social support for people with long-term illness and their significant others.

    Discussion and Conclusion: Person-centred web-based support is a new area and no available study focus on how web-based interventions can contribute to the further development of PCC. In the four cases within this project the evaluation model is characterized by evaluation of web support in real settings, and data will be analysed using both within-case and across-case statistical analyses. Therefore, our multiple-case method, in which overlapping results from different contexts will provide comprehensive experiences, will contribute to the design of a more generally applicable, individually modifiable model. However, the multiple case method is also a challenge of validity, as the use of different case experiences and environments, involves an endeavor to understand what types of experiences are actually being captured in the process of developing a web-based support and what this means in relation to PCC. In summary, the main intention of the project outlined here is to contribute with both a synthesis of results on meta-level from four cases and a substantial contribution to the field person centred care.

  • 78.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dencker, K.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ågren, H.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The experience of social support in patients suffering from treatment-refractory major depression1998In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 52, no 41, p. 183-183Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Dencker, Karina
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Häggström, Lars
    Department of Psychiatry, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Women's conceptions of coping with major depression in daily life: a qualitative, salutogenic approach2003In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 419-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experience of having a severe disease such as major depression affects all aspects of the individual's life, including family, work, and social functioning. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe, from a salutogenic approach, women's conceptions of coping with major depression in daily life with the help of professional and lay support. Thirteen women, previously hospitalized for major depression, were included in the study. The women were selected by strategic sampling, and data were analyzed by application of a phenomenographic approach. Four descriptive categories emerged: Self-Healing, Managing, Receiving Social Support, and Finding Meaning. While working their way out of the depression, the women needed to undergo a process of transition, involving both a cognitive and an emotional understanding, which they subsequently translated into health-related actions. The task of psychiatric mental health nurses is to provide care that empowers patients. Future nursing research should explore the circumstances that empower these women to start the transition process, as this process appears to be vital for recovery from major depression.

  • 80.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Göteborg University, Fac. of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Dencker, Karina
    Göteborg University, Fac. of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Häggström, Lars
    Department of Psychiatry, Central Hospital, S-301 85 Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    A salutogenetic perspective on how men cope with major depression in daily life, with the help of professional and lay support2003In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 153-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide, major depression is one of the main causes of premature death and lowered functional capacity, and its importance will increase in the coming years. At the same time, there is a gap in service provision, and the needs of depressed patients are often not met. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe how men (N = 12) with major depression (DSM-IV) cope with daily life with the help of professional and lay support. The men were selected by strategic sampling and analysed with an approach inspired by phenomenography. Four descriptive categories emerged: being unburdened, restoring one's health, feeling involved, and finding a meaning. A man receives help and support from health care in,restoring his health but his own path to getting well is to resume his place in the public domain. To help him do so, lay support is vital, and an important task for the nurse is, therefore, to support him in maintaining his existing social network or in building a new one. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 81.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Central Hospital, S-301 85 Halmstad, Sweden.
    Dencker, Karina
    Göteborg University, Fac. of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Häggström, Lars
    Department of Psychiatry, Central Hospital, S-301 85 Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    How men with depression cope with daily life through professional and lay support2002In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 134-134Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, The Institute of Health and Care Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Elf, Mikael
    The Institution for Psychology, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ali, Lilas
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, The Institute of Health and Care Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Health and lifestyle among young informal carers who support family members or close friends with mental illness2013In: Horatio, European Psychiatric Nursing Congress 2013: Abstract Book / [ed] Neslihan Keser Özcan & Hülya Bilgin, 2013, p. 135-135Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decades it has been stated that the mental health of young people has deteriorated. Young persons’ report depressive feelings, anxiety and sleep-disturbance. The tendency is most pronounced for young women in the ages 16-24 years. Nowadays, the main parts of the psychiatric care are out-patient care. Family, relatives and close friends get involved and need to take great responsibility for their relative or friend with mental illness, which has consequences for their own health. This study will explore health situation among young persons’, age 16-25 years, who are identifying themselves as supporting a family member or a friend with mental illness. The collected data in this study is based on baseline data from the research project “Ps Young Support”. That research project aimed to develop and evaluate web-based health efforts for young persons’ who were close to people who suffered from mental illness. Data was collected by means of questionnaires in June 2010, which the informants (N=241, 170 females and 71 males) responded. Sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics were obtained and self-rated health questions were asked about their general health, well-being, physical and mental illnesses. The results revealed high levels of stress, as well as different psychosomatic symptoms, such as sleeping problems, and head- or stomach ache. Over half of the young persons stated that they used some kind of non-prescriptive pharmacological treatments against pain. This is alarming and preventive health care resources should be offered to these young informal carers.

  • 83.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Irland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Irland.
    Keogh, Brian
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Irland.
    Lahti, Marie
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Meade, Oona
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Science, Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Stickley, Theodore
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Päivi
    Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Tampere University of Applied Science, Tampere, Finland.
    To enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice with eLearning materials - eMenthe: an European project2015In: Abstracts: 19th International Philosophy of Nursing Society (IPONS) conference August 24-26, 2015 Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden: Technology, Health Care and Person-centeredness: Beyond Utopia and Dystopia. Thinking the Future., Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet , 2015, p. 42-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are wide differences in the quality and content of mental health nurse education throughout Europe. These are evident in the course structures, emphasis and specific content. This diversity between programmes creates possibilities for countries to learn from one another and to share and benefit from the diverse approaches. These concerns, challenges and development needs of mental health practice form the basis for the EU- funded eMenthe-project (2013-2016) which aims to enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice by developing eLearning materials through a European co- operation. To this end, seven European universities from Finland, Ireland, Sweden, United Kingdom and the Netherlands have commenced a collaboration to enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice - eMenthe.

    The project’s aim is to develop eLearning materials with an action research approach in collaboration with Master’s level students from these universities and associated partners from clinical practice. eLearning materials on three central themes: recovery, mental health promotion and prevention, the role of families and caregivers will be launched for students in Master’s level and clinical practice to use. These themes were agreed as common issues of concern for all partners prior to the application process.

    During first phase, stakeholders were interviewed (N=139), including master level students, experienced psychiatric nurses, managements persons working in psychiatric care, service users and next of kins. The data was structured from a general point and also from a lifespan perspective, such as child and adolescence, adults and elderly. The analysis used a qualitative and descriptive design, using a brief manifest content analysis to examine patterns, themes and subthemes to achieve an understanding of the meaningful content focusing on nursing master levels. During the final year of the project (2016) eLearning materials will be made available to students undertaking Master’s level education and professional nurses working in clinical practice. This dual approach to dissemination will support the professional competencies of practitioners as well as academic progression.

  • 84.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Keogh, Brian
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Doyle, Louise
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    University of Applied Science Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Lahti, Mari
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Institute of Mental Health Building, Triumph Road, Innovation Park, United Kingdom.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Meade, Oonagh
    School of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Sciences HU, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Stickley, Theodore
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Institute of Mental Health Building, Triumph Road, Innovation Park, United Kingdom.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Advancing the knowledge, skills and attitudes of mental health nurses working with families and caregivers: A critical review of the literature2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 32, p. 138-146Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving and supporting the family members and caregivers of people with mental illness is essential to high-quality mental health services. However, literature suggests that there is a lack of engagement between family members and mental health nurses (MHNs). Lack of knowledge among MHNs is often cited as one of the main reasons for this lack of engagement. The aim of this review was to explore the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are required by MHNs to enable to them to work more effectively with families affected by mental illness. A literature based critical review was used to access and review 35 papers in order to extract concepts that could inform the design of eLearning materials to assist MHNs advance their knowledge in this area. Two overarching themes were identified; ‘Mental health problems and the family’ and ‘Working with the family’. From these themes, the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to work more effectively with families are described. The findings from this review provide a descriptive account of the knowledge skills and attitudes that are required for effective family work. In addition, the review provides an empirical foundation for education programmes in the area. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

  • 85.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Klang, Mathias
    Bibliotekshögskolan, Högskolan i Borås, Borås, Sverige.
    Sociala medier och den kapabla patienten2014In: Personcentrering inom hälso- och sjukvård: från filosofi till praktik / [ed] Ekman, Inger, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, 1, p. 245-261Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Fac Hlth & Caring Sci, Inst Nursing, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Langius, Ann
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Agren, Hans
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Div Psychiat, Neurotec Dept, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Häggström, Lars
    Psychiat Serv Halland, Halland, Sweden.
    Dencker, Karina
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Fac Hlth & Caring Sci, Inst Nursing, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Sense of coherence and social support in relation to recovery in first-episode patients with major depression: a one-year prospective study2005In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 258-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depression is a common illness, with a lifetime prevalence rate of 10-13% for men and 21-24% for women. The experience of having a serious illness such as major depression affects the individual's quality of life and requires significant adaptation in order to cope. The aim of this study was to explore sense of coherence and social support in patients treated for a first episode of major depression in a 1-year follow up. The study design was prospective and longitudinal. A total of 24 patients, aged 18 years or over, with a first episode of major depression were included. Semi-structured interviews and self-assessment questionnaires were used at baseline as well as in a 1-year follow up in order to measure the level of severity of the depression, social support, and sense of coherence. The result showed that 71% of the patients had recovered at follow up. The sense of coherence scores were low at baseline, although the patients who recovered increased their sense of coherence scores significantly. Another factor of importance for recovery was a significant increase in social support. Social support is an important cornerstone in the restoration of a person's sense of coherence. It can be used in interventions that include the patient's family or close social network in combination with support to assist the patient to view his/her situation as comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful, thereby promoting or improving health. Mental health nurses are in a key position to identify patients' strengths and weaknesses so that the support and interventions provided can be tailored to meet the needs of each patient.

  • 87.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & Psychiatric Services in Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Rayens, Mary Kay
    The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & University of Kentucky, College of Nursing, Lexington, KY, USA.
    Peden, Ann
    The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & University of Kentucky, College of Nursing, Lexington, KY, USA.
    Hall, Lynne
    The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & University of Kentucky, College of Nursing, Lexington, KY, USA.
    Zhang, Mai
    The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & University of Kentucky, College of Nursing, Lexington, KY, USA.
    Ågren, Hans
    The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Defence Medicine, Swedish Armed Forces, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Prochazka, Helena
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden & The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sense of coherence and recovery from majordepression: A four-year follow-up2008In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 107, no Suppl. 1, p. S54-S54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this exploratory study was to identify and follow persons with a first episode of major depression to determine whether sense of coherence changes over time. An additional purpose was to assess whether sense of coherence relates to depressive symptoms, aggression, and functional status either immediately following diagnosis or at four years post-diagnosis.

    Methods

    The study design was longitudinal; subjects participated in semi-structured interviews and completed surveys every 6 months starting at diagnosis and concluding 4 years later. The sample consisted of thirty-three adult patients who were being treated for first episode of major depression (DSM-IV). Sense of coherence was measured using Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), depressive symptoms using the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, aggression, including a total score and subscales of anger and hostility, using the AQ Aggression Questionnaire — revised Swedish Version, and functional status using Global Assessment of Functioning scale and SF-36 Health Survey. The data were analyzed using Pearson's product moment correlation and repeated measures analysis of variance.

    Results

    At baseline, SOC was significantly correlated with total aggression (r = − 45) and the hostility subscale (r = − .73); baseline SOC was unrelated to depressive symptoms or functional status. SOC increased significantly over the time (p < .0001). At the four-year follow-up, SOC was significantly related to depressive symptoms (r = − .60), the aggression summary score (r = − .65), the anger subscale (r = − .52), the hostility subscale (r = − .77), the GAF (r = .64), and the physical and mental health components of the SF-36 (r = .74 and .72, respectively).

    Conclusion

    The finding that SOC increases as patients recover from MD suggests that treatment for depression may also bolster the patient's ability to cope, in addition to lowering depressive symptoms. The relationship between SOC and aggression in MD, with higher SOC correlated with lower aggression, needs to be examined further. © 2008 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 88.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Gothenburg Univ, Fac Hlth & Caring Sci, Inst Nursing, Sahlgrenska Acad, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Rayens, Mary Kay
    Univ Kentucky, Coll Nursing, Lexington, KY USA.
    Peden, Ann
    Univ Kentucky, Coll Nursing, Lexington, KY USA.
    Hall, Lynne
    Univ Kentucky, Coll Nursing, Lexington, KY USA.
    Zhang, Mei
    Univ Kentucky, Coll Nursing, Lexington, KY USA.
    Agren, Hans
    Gothenburg Univ, Fac Hlth & Caring Sci, Inst Nursing, Sahlgrenska Acad, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Prochazka, Helena
    Gothenburg Univ, Fac Hlth & Caring Sci, Inst Nursing, Sahlgrenska Acad, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Sense of coherence and recovery from major depression: a 4-year follow-up2009In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 119-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this longitudinal exploratory study was to identify and follow persons with the first episode of major depression (MD) to determine whether sense of coherence (SOC) changes over time. An additional purpose was to assess whether SOC is associated with depressive symptoms, aggression, and functional status either immediately after diagnosis or at 4 years postdiagnosis. The study design was longitudinal; participants participated in semistructured interviews and completed surveys every 6 months starting at diagnosis and concluding 4 years later. The sample consisted of 33 adult patients who were being treated for the first episode of MD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Twenty-two participants completed all nine sessions. SOC was measured using the SOC scale; depressive symptoms using the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale; aggression, including the total score and subscales of anger and hostility, using the Aggression Questionnaire-revised Swedish version; and functional status using the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). At baseline, SOC was significantly correlated with total aggression (r = -45) and the hostility subscale (r = -.73); baseline SOC was unrelated to depressive symptoms or functional status. SOC increased significantly over time (P < .0001). At the 4-year follow-up, SOC was significantly related to depressive symptoms (r = -.60), the aggression summary score (r = -.65), the anger subscale (r = -.52), the hostility subscale (r = -.77), the GAF (r = .64), and the physical and mental health components of the SF-36 (r = .74 and .72, respectively). The finding that SOC increases as patients recover from MD suggests that treatment of depression may also bolster the patient's ability to cope, in addition to lowering depressive symptoms. The relationship between SOC and aggression in MD, with higher SOC correlated with lower aggression, needs to be examined further. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 89.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborg universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Thernlund, Gunilla
    Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken, Lund, Sverige.
    Wieselgren, Ing-Marie
    Sveriges Kommuner och Landsting (SKL), Stockholm, Sverige.
    Systematisk litteraturöversikt – Organisation inom psykiatrin med fokus på autismspektrumtillstånd2013In: Autismspektrumtillstånd: Diagnostik och insatser, vårdens organisation och patientens delaktighet – en systematisk litteraturöversikt, Stockholm: Statens Beredning för Medicinsk Utvärdering (SBU) , 2013, p. 281-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Göteborg University, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Willman, Ania
    School of Health Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    The recovery process in major depression: an analysis employing Meleis' transition framework for deeper understanding as a foundation for nursing interventions2006In: Advances in Nursing Science, ISSN 0161-9268, E-ISSN 1550-5014, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 245-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of persons with mental illness is increasing globally; despite this fact, nursing research on research-based interventions to prevent or minimize illness and increase quality of life is sparse. The purpose of this secondary analysis of men and women recovering from major depression (N = 25) was to gain a deeper understanding of the concept of transition in the recovery process associated with major depression as well as to develop and suggest nursing interventions that support the recovery process. The transition framework was useful, as it was describing the transition process as fluid, going back and forth, which was confirmed by the respondents' statements. Transition planning is a feasible way of supporting both the recovery process and health promotion, thus laying the foundations for a good quality of life. © 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 91.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Ågren, H
    Karolinska Institutet, NEUROTEC, Division of Psychiatry, Huddinge Hospital, M 56, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Dencker, K
    Division of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Subjective lack of social support and presence of dependent stressful life events characterize patients suffering from major depression compared with healthy volunteers2001In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 107-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to characterize and compare patients with major depression and healthy volunteers concerning stressful negative life events, social support and social network occurring during a 12-month period. Forty outpatients who fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for major depression and 19 healthy volunteers were included in the study. The results showed no significant differences between the patients and the volunteers concerning the number of independent life events, perceived sufficient persons in the network, the number of family members, having a partner, and perceiving family members as offering the best support. Thus, there were differences in the number of both dependent stressful life events, especially increased arguments with partner and family members, and life events including personal illness. The patient group had experienced a greater number of these events compared with the volunteer group. Comparisons between the two groups revealed differences concerning social support and social network. Fewer patients, especially women, felt they had sufficient social support, had fewer persons in the network, less contact with persons in the network, and fewer confidants compared with the volunteers.

  • 92.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margareta
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Koinberg, Ingalill
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Promoting learning in web-based support for persons with long-term illness challenges and opportunities2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    et al.
    Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Koinberg, Inga-lill
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jenholt-Nolbris, Margareta
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Use of theories in web based support as a health oriented service for persons with chronic illness2013In: 21st International Conference on Health Promoting Hospitals and Health Services: Abstract book, Copenhagen: WHO-CC , 2013, p. 229-230Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    et al.
    Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ulrika
    Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellström, Anna-Lena
    Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Koinberg, Ingalill
    Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margareta
    Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    Division of Informatics, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Use of participatory design in the development of person-centred web-based support for persons with long-term illness2015In: Abstracts: 19th International Philosophy of Nursing Society (IPONS) conference August 24-26, 2015 Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden: Technology, Health Care and Person-centeredness: Beyond Utopia and Dystopia. Thinking the Future., Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet , 2015, p. 43-43Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: E-health solutions are increasingly developed to meet patients’ preferences and promote their participation in their health care. This has led to increased interest in person-centred technology developed by means of participatory approaches. However, few studies explore the participatory design process from the perspective of person-centeredness including how it becomes materialized in the informational technology. This paper explores how applied participatory approaches and the design of four web based supports correspond to key areas of person-centeredness.

    Aim and method: The purpose was to create shared knowledge and understanding of each separate case and to generate relevant categories. Data was collected from four Swedish research projects. The analysis followed an inductive approach involving a step-wise cross-case analysis.

    Results: A number of question areas describe the dialogue with the participants in the cases. The areas cover individual, social, and practical issues. The results of the dialogue are categorized into four support areas; psychological/emotional, personal, information, technical. By means of common as well as specifically developed technical solutions the support areas becomes visible in the design. Person-centredness will appear in the participatory design (PD) process as the approach promotes the development of a holistic view of the person and the illness and a partnership between patients and carers.

    Conclusions: Our results contribute to a central development area within eHealth involving greater opportunities for the patient to actively contribute in real time, getting access to and add information, and sometimes interact directly with carers. However, it is concluded that neither participatory approaches nor technology for online information and communication can guarantee personcenteredness by itself. Instead, it is the design of the PD process and the forming of the actual use of technology together with the particular purpose of the web based support that shape person-centred online support.

  • 95.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ulrika
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellström, Anna-Lena
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Koinberg, Ingalill
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margareta
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    Department of Applied IT, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Use of participatory design in the development of person-centred web-based support for persons with long-term illness2013In: European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, ISSN 2052-5648, E-ISSN 2052-5656, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 369-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: E-health solutions are increasingly being developed to meet patients’ preferences and promote their participation in healthcare. Few studies have explored the participatory design process from the perspective of person-centeredness, including how it becomes materialized in technology. This paper explores how applied participatory approaches and the design of 4 web-based interventions directed towards long-term illness correspond to key areas of person-centeredness. 

    Methods: Data were collected during 2009 to 2012, from 4 Swedish research projects. The analysis followed an inductive approach involving a step-wise cross-case analysis. The purpose was to create shared knowledge and understanding of each separate case and to generate relevant categories.

    Results: A number of question areas describe the dialogue with the case participants. Results of the dialogue are categorized into 4 support areas: psychological/emotional, personal, information and technical. Person-centeredness becomes visible in the participatory design process as the approach promotes the development of a holistic view of the person and the illness and a partnership between patients and carers. The use of communication technology exemplifies concrete materialization of person-centeredness in the design of the web-based supports. The purpose of the web supports and the shaping of the actual use of the functionalities are more abstract forms of materialization.

    Conclusions: Our results contribute to a central development area within eHealth involving increased opportunities for patients to contribute actively in real time, obtaining access to information and sometimes interacting with carers. However, neither participatory approaches nor technology for online information and communication, can guarantee person-centeredness in isolation.

  • 96.
    Stickley, Theodore
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Institute of Mental Health Building, Triumph Road, Innovation Park, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Higgins, Agnes
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Meade, Oonagh
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Sciences HU, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Doyle, Louise
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Dep. Health and Wellbeing, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Keogh, Brian
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin 2, Dublin, Ireland.
    Lahti, Mari
    University of Applied Science Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Paivi
    Diaconia University of Applied Sciences Uusikatu, Oulu, Finland.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    From the rhetoric to the real: A critical review of how the concepts of recovery and social inclusion may inform mental health nurse advanced level curricula – the eMenthe project2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 37, p. 155-163Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This critical review addresses the question of how the concepts of recovery and social inclusion may inform mental health nurse education curricula at Master's level in order to bring about significant and positive change to practice.

    Design

    This is a literature-based critical review incorporating a rapid review. It has been said that if done well, this approach can be highly relevant to health care studies and social interventions, and has substantial claims to be as rigorous and enlightening as other, more conventional approaches to literature (Rolfe, 2008).

    Data sources

    In this review, we have accessed contemporary literature directly related to the concepts of recovery and social inclusion in mental health.

    Review methods

    We have firstly surveyed the international literature directly related to the concepts of recovery and social inclusion in mental health and used the concept of emotional intelligence to help consider educational outcomes in terms of the required knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to promote these values-based approaches in practice.

    Results

    A number of themes have been identified that lend themselves to educational application. International frameworks exist that provide some basis for the developments of recovery and social inclusion approaches in mental health practice, however the review identifies specific areas for future development.

    Conclusions

    This is the first article that attempts to scope the knowledge, attitudes and skills required to deliver education for Master's level mental health nurses based upon the principles of recovery and social inclusion. Emotional intelligence theory may help to identify desired outcomes especially in terms of attitudinal development to promote the philosophy of recovery and social inclusive approaches in advanced practice. Whilst recovery is becoming enshrined in policy, there is a need in higher education to ensure that mental health nurse leaders are able to discern the difference between the rhetoric and the reality. © Elsevier Ltd. 2015

  • 97.
    Stoltz, Peter
    et al.
    Studentlitteratur AB, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Fac Hlth & Caring Sci, Inst Nursing, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Willman, Ania
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Sch Hlth Sci, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    "Insufficient evidence of effectiveness" is not "evidence of no effectiveness": evaluating computer-based education for patients with severe mental illness2009In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 190-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE: This article reports on commissioned research funded by the Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) and the Swedish Nursing Society (SSF). The objective was to review computer-based education programs. However, as the review produced insufficient evidence of effectiveness, the publication was withheld due to a previous incident where such evidence was misunderstood by Swedish policy and health care decision makers.

    AIMS: This article highlights the concept of evidence with regard to the consequences of insufficient evidence of effectiveness being mistaken for evidence of no effectiveness. The aim is also to present a systematic review evaluating a computer-based education program for patients suffering from severe mental illness.

    METHODS: Systematic database searches in Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library identified a total of 131 potentially relevant references. Thereafter, 27 references were retrieved as full-text documents, of which 5 were finally included and co-reviewed by two independent researchers.

    FINDINGS: The review found no decisive evidence of effectiveness regarding computer-based education programs designed to assist persons suffering from severe mental illness. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE AND POLICY: Failing to see the difference between insufficient evidence and evidence of no effectiveness may have unexpected consequences. As a result, practice may be misguided and treatments withheld, which at worse may have harmful consequences for patients. In the end, it is of utmost importance that researchers do good quality research by ensuring statistical power and quality of outcome measurement. For example, this review of computer-based education programs could have revealed effective ways of dealing with severe mental illness if the studies included had been conducted using more sophisticated designs.

  • 98.
    Wadell, Katheleen
    et al.
    Institute of Nursing, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Vårdal Institute Göteborg, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, and Psychiatric Services, Halland, Sweden.
    Nurses' experiences of caring for patients with a dual diagnosis of depression and alcohol abuse in a general psychiatric setting2007In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 1125-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe mental psychiatric health nurses' experiences of caring for persons with the dual disorders of major depression and alcohol abuse. The study was conducted in 2003 on three psychiatric wards located in two general hospitals in Sweden. The study group comprised 11 registered nurses with experience of caring for patients with dual disorders. The data were analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. The findings revealed three categories: Enabling a good level of cooperation with patients; Facilitating continued care and treatment; and Understanding barriers to cooperation with patients. Building a trusting relationship in order to enable cooperation with patients was the basis for continued care and treatment. The nurses needed more training and multidisciplinary knowledge in order to meet the particular clinical needs of this patient group. Nurses have an important obligation to utilize the best available evidence, including research findings and other scientific sources.

  • 99.
    Warrén Stomberg, Margareta
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sahlgrenska Academy, the Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Knudsen, Kai
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stomberg, Henrik
    Police Department in Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Symptoms and Signs in Interpreting Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Intoxication – An Explorative Study2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, article id 27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Acute poisoning with gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has been a serious medical and social problem in different parts of the world including Sweden. GHB is a drug of abuse which acts primarily as central nervous system (CNS) depressants. GHB has serious toxicity, although many young users do not recognise GHB as a dangerous drug. The aim of this pilot study was to explore how symptoms with risk of failure in vital functions would be valued among professionals that encounter GHB intoxication in the emergency phase.

    Methods

    A web-based survey focusing on the assessment of vital clinical signs for possible GHB intoxication using a numeric scale was carried out during April and May 2011. The participants, n 105, are all professionals who encounter GHB intoxicated in the emergency phase, but have different levels of training in GHB intoxication, mainly Registered Nurses (RNs) in southwest Sweden, employed in pre-hospital or emergency departments at somatic and most psychiatric health care facilities, as well as police officers who in their work come into contact with drug users. Responses in the survey were scored according to risk of GHB intoxication with serious failure of vital functions. The score value was then referred to a so-called evidence based priority (EBP) scale and analysed using descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test.

    Results

    Cardiac arrest, coma, hypoxia, general convulsions, slow respiratory and heart rate and pale skin are symptoms with the highest risk of serious failure in vital physical functions and were predominantly recognised as such.

    Conclusion

    Despite the professionals' different levels of training in GHB intoxication, all of them were relatively well aware of and in accordance regarding the most risky symptoms. The interpretation score for the less risky symptoms and signs of GHB intoxication varied depending on their degree of training. The results should be viewed cautiously, as the size of the professional groups and their general knowledge of critical symptoms of GHB poisoning varied. © 2014 Stomberg et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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