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  • 51.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svensson, Bengt
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Lars
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The Boston Psychiatric rehabilitation approach – evaluation of an implementation project in Sweden2012In: Programme and Abstract Book, Horatio: 2nd European Festival of Psychiatric Nursing – in Stockholm 2012 / [ed] Patrik Dahlqvist Jönsson, Göteborg: Psykiatriska Riksföreningen för Sjuksköterskor , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on wellbeing and health, there is a lack of research regarding the model called Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University. To our knowledge no empirical studies have been made regarding the model in Sweden.

    Aim: The aims of the present study were to investigate outcome of the intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of health care services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment. Further aims were to investigate to what extent the personal rehabilitation goals were attained and clients’ experiences of the intervention.

    The intervention: Seven mental health services who worked according to the Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach in the county of Halland in Sweden were included. The purpose of the intervention was to support and guide the patient to formulate and achieve his/her own goals for various life areas such as work/occupation, housing, education and leisure time. All staff working in the chosen services had completed education in the methodology and supervised training in providing the different phases of the rehabilitation process.

    Methods: The study had a prospective longitudinal design and the data collection at baseline started in August 2007 and a 2-year follow-up data collection ended in December 2010. In total 71 patients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up data collection. Of these 49 clients, a sample of 10 clients was participated in interviews. Statistical analysis and qualitative content analysis were used.

    Results: The result showed a clear indication that Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach lead to a better life situation with respect to quality of life, health, empowerment and psychosocial functioning as well decreased utilization of psychiatric care. Thirty-two of the clients (65%) considered that they largely or almost completely had achieved their goals. Clients’ experiences of the intervention was summarized in the theme “Recovery ingredients” consisting of three interweaved categories: “Relationship”, “Structure” and “Participation”.

    Conclusion: The clients’ subjective experience of quality of the relationship to the staff do not seem to relate to goal attainment regarding exterior life situation concerning housing situation, work situation, education, leisure time and social relationships but rather between the clients’ goal attainment and other positive results of the rehabilitation as clients’ perceived.

  • 52.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Bengt
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hansson, Lars
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Dimensions and reliability of a questionnaire for the evaluation of subjective experiences of health among patients in mental health services2008In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 51-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though the concept of health and its importance has been widely discussed in health care during recent decades, mental health services have been criticised for adopting a biomedical perspective, which does not sufficiently consider the concept of health. The aim of the present study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Health Questionnaire, a newly developed questionnaire to measure patients' subjective experience of health in mental health services. A cross sectional study was performed using a sample of 139 outpatients in mental health services. A principal component analysis with varimax rotation was used to test the factor structure of the questionnaire. Cronbach's alpha was employed to test internal consistency and Cohen's Kappa assessed test-retest reliability. The final scale, which contained 22 items, derived from three factors (autonomy, social involvement, and comprehensibility) and showed a good reliability in terms of internal consistency. Test-retest reliability was moderate or better for 17 out of 22 items. The Health Questionnaire may enable further empirical studies on subjectively experienced health in mental health services and serve as a measure of outcome and to monitor quality of care.

  • 53.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Svensson, Bengt
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Lars
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Clients’ experiences of the Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach: A qualitative study2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 22916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach (PR) has been described as neither being a particular technique nor a single intervention but a service model within the mental health system aiming to promote recovery and the achievement of a meaningful life, rather than simply supporting adaptation or survival in the community. A qualitative approach was used to describe clients’ experiences of a BR implementation project in a county in Sweden. The findings from the interviews could be summarized in the theme “The process of rehabilitation” consisting of three categories: Structure, Participation and Relationship. The results suggest that clients do not often realize nor are able to verbalize their goals before they have been given the possibility to reflect their thoughts in collaboration with a trusted person. It is thus important that PR schedules its special structure to secure client participation by giving the clients opportunity to get their thoughts reflected to be able to participate in decision making regarding their own care. © 2014 H. Jormfeldt et al.

  • 54.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Svensson, Bengt
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Lars
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Relatives’ experiences of the Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach: A qualitative study2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 22918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation approach (BPR) is individualized and characterized by being based entirely on the individual´s unique needs and preferences in the areas of working, learning, social contacts, and living environment. Relatives of clients in mental health services influence the client’s possibilities to recovery by their everyday relationship. Nonetheless traditionally relatives have had a subordinated role in the care of their mentally ill family member. The perspective of relatives is an importance aspect in the development of new approaches to psychiatric rehabilitation. Thus the purpose of the present study was to describe and explore relatives’ experiences of the Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach. Ten relatives to clients in mental health services approached with the BPR were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed with a qualitative content analysis method to explore relatives’ experiences of the BPR intervention in a county of Sweden. The findings from the interviews could be summarized in the theme “To meet the clients’ needs” consisting of three categories: “Dependence in staffs’ competence”, “Responsibility of participation and self-determination” and “The necessity of coordination between authorities and care-givers”.  The findings suggest that relatives may contribute with important information about clients’ needs related to outcome of care. Relatives’ perspectives may be of importance in further development of BPR. Further research about relatives’ role in psychiatric rehabilitation is needed as well as studies comparing different kinds of psychiatric rehabilitation from the perspective of relatives.

  • 55.
    Keogh, Brian
    et al.
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Lahti, Mari
    University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Meade, Oonagh
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stickley, Theodor
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Kilkku, Nina
    University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Developing e-learning materials in mental health: the eMenthe Project2017In: Mental Health Practice, ISSN 1465-8720, E-ISSN 2047-895X, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 36-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a European collaborative project that developed master’s degree level e-learning materials for mental health nurses. The e-learning materials are freely available online at www.ementhe.eu

  • 56.
    Keogh, Brian
    et al.
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Killku, Nina
    Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Turku University, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Kalevo, Camilla
    Läksy, Marja-Liisa
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Stickley, Theodore
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Päivi
    Diaconia University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Developing Master’s level eLearning material in mental health – Phase one, consulting with key stakeholders2014In: Book of Abstracts, 2014, p. 116-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The need to develop education programmes for mental health nurses that are responsive to the needs of key stakeholders is essential to ensuring that mental health nursing practices remain contemporary and consistent with national and international mental health policy. To this end, a group of mental health nursing faculty from seven European countries came together to develop transferable eLearning materials for Masters Levels mental health nursing students focusing on a three of key areas; 1)recovery and social inclusion, 2) mental health promotion and prevention and 3) working with families and caregivers. This poster provides details of how the European partners will conduct the first phase of the project which is consultation with the key stakeholders (MSc Students, senior and expert mental health nurses, family and carer organisations and mental health service users).

    Aim and objectives: The aim of this project is to develop e-learning materials for Masters level mental health nursing education programmes based on the identified needs of key stakeholders.

    Methods: This research follows an action research design and this first phase will involve consultation with key stake holders using a qualitative approach. Data will be collected in three phases: 1. One focus group will be conducted with current MSc in Mental Health Nursing Students. 2. The participants (MSc Students) involved in phase one will be required to return to their areas of practice and gather information from 2 senior and expert mental health nurses using a prepared data collection template. 3. The researchers will collect data from the family carer organisations and mental health service users using telephone interviews using a prepared data collection template. This process will be repeated in all the European universities involved and will form the basis for the eLearning content.

    Analysis and Results: Data collection is due to start in December 2013.

    Recommendations: This collaborative approach to postgraduate mental health nursing education will ensure that a consistent, contemporary and needs driven eLearning package will be developed. 

  • 57.
    Keogh, Brian
    et al.
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    University of Applied Science Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Lahti, Mari
    University of Applied Science Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Meade, Oonagh
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Sciences HU, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Stickley, Theodor
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Working with Families Affected by Mental Distress: Stakeholders' Perceptions of Mental Health Nurses Educational Needs2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 822-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Family and informal caregivers provide a substantial amount of care and support to people who experience mental health problems. The aim of this study was to explore mental health nurses', students' and service users' perceptions of the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are required by mental health nurses to work with families and carers using a qualitative methodology. Three themes emerged from the data: Knowledge of the family and how mental distress affects the family; working with the family - support and education; and valuing the role of the family. The three themes demonstrate the complexity of preparing mental health nurses to work with families and carers, and the article offers recommendations about how this might be achieved. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 58.
    Kilkku, Nina
    et al.
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Callaghan, Patrick
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Van Dommelen, Riet
    Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Henrika.Jormfeldt@hh.se.
    Keogh, Brian
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Van De Sande, Roland
    , Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stickley, Theodore
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Päivi
    Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Helsinki, Finland.
    eMenthe: a European co-operation project to enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice with eLearning materials2013In: Horatio, European Psychiatric Nursing Congress 2013: Abstract book / [ed] Neslihan Keser Özcan & Hülya Bilgin, 2013, p. 152-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are wide differences in the quality and content of mental health nurse education throughout Europe. These are evident in the course structures, emphasis and specific content. This diversity between programmes creates possibilities for countries to learn from one another and to share and benefit from the diverse approaches. As the concerns and development needs regarding mental health practices are shared, it is wise to identify best practices and to share these for mutual benefit to ensure the highest quality education and practice. To this end, seven European universities from Finland, Ireland, Sweden, United Kingdom and the Netherlands have commenced a collaboration to enhance  Master’s level education in mental health practice. The project’s aim is to develop eLearning materials with an action research approach in collaboration with Master’s level students from these universities and associated partners from clinical practice. eLearning materials on three central themes: recovery, mental health promotion and prevention, the role of families and caregivers will be launched for students in Master’s level and clinical practice to use.  International co-operation is seen as a quality assurance process; each of the partners are highly esteemed universities with extensive experience in mental health education, research and strong links with practice. With this kind of co-operation it is possible to enhance the quality of Master’s level education in Europe in the future. Funding for the project has been applied for from the Erasmus LLP-programme. At the time of the conference the project will have commenced if the funding decision is positive.

  • 59.
    Killku, Nina
    et al.
    Tampere University.
    Callaghan, Patrick
    University of Nottingham.
    van Dommelen, Riet
    University of Utrecht.
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Turku University.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Kalevo, Camilla
    Keogh, Brian
    Trinity College.
    Läksy, Marja-Liisa
    van de Sande, Roland
    University of Utrecht.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Utrecht.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Stickley, Theodore
    University of Nottigham.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Päivi
    Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Finland.
    Developing eLearning materials to support professional competencies and clinical careers on Master's level mental health practice in Europe2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are wide differences in the quality of mental health nurse education at Bachelor and Master’s level throughout Europe. Furthermore, there are wide variations in content. However the concerns, challenges and development needs of mental health practice are shared in many countries. These issues form the basis for the EU-funded eMenthe-project (2013-2016) which aims to enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice by developing eLearning materials through a European co-operation.

    The co-operation includes seven European universities from Finland, Ireland, Sweden, United Kingdom and the Netherlands. These organizations and their respective Master’s students are associated partners of the project. International co-operation is seen as a quality assurance process; each of the partners is a highly esteemed university with extensive experience in mental health education, research and strong links with practice.

    ELearning –materials will be developed during this co-operation on three different themes. The themes include: mental health promotion and prevention, recovery and social inclusion and engaging with families and caregivers. These themes were agreed as common issues of concern for all partners prior to the application process. During the final year of the project (2016) eLearning materials will be made available to students undertaking Master’s level education and those working in clinical practice. This dual approach to dissemination will support the professional competencies of practitioners as well as academic progression. 

  • 60.
    Lahti, M.
    et al.
    Health and Well-being, Turku University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Elliä, H.
    Health and Well-being, Turku University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Doyle, L.
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Higgins, A.
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Keogh, B.
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Meade, O.
    Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Stickley, T.
    Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, J.
    Department of health care, University of Applied Sciences HU, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Kilkku, N.
    School of health care and social services, Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    The required knowledge for lifespan mental health promotion and prevention for Master’s level mental health nurse education – the eMenthe project2018In: International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, ISSN 1463-5240, E-ISSN 2164-9545, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 143-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we address the kind of knowledge that is required for Master’s level nurse education for lifespan mental health promotion and prevention. Data were collected through structured interviews (N = 109). The interviews were conducted across five European countries. The data were analysed using a thematic content analysis approach. The findings show that Master’s level nurse education needs knowledge related to lifespan issues. Needs were raised in several issues like importance of increasing skills and knowledge of mental health workers. We conclude that there is a need to emphasise the knowledge required for mental health promotion and prevention for Master’s level nursing education across Europe. © 2018 Institute of Health Promotion and Education.

  • 61.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Perspectives on power relations in human health and well-being2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no Suppl. 2, article id 1358581Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Liljeqvist, Mattias
    et al.
    Psychiatry of Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Kling, Sara
    Psychiatry of Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Hallén, Malin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Swedish Mental Health Nurses’ Experiences of Portrayals of Mental Illness in Public Media2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    News reporting about mental illness lack perspectives of the mentally ill themselves and it isalmost exclusively psychiatrists who are accessed when healthcare staff is consulted. The perspectiveof mental health nurses might contribute to the public understanding of mental illness. Thepurpose of this study was to describe mental health nurses’ experiences of how mental illness isportrayed in media. Eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with qualified mental healthnurses. A qualitative content analysis resulted in three categories: Negative portrayals of mental illness,Inconclusive images of mental illness and Biased dissemination of different perspectives. Theconclusion of this study is that mental health nurses experience media portrayals of mental illnessas negative and misleading with too much emphasis on the medical perspective while a holisticmental health nursing perspective is heavily obscured. Mental health nurses need to take a moreprominent role in public reporting on mental health to resolve the current lack of relevant factsregarding mental illness. Further research is needed regarding portrayals of mental illness in socialmedia and how the current lack of perspectives affects public perceptions of mental illness. Inaddition, further studies regarding the viewpoints of journalists reporting on mental illnessare required. © 2019 The Author(s).

  • 63.
    Lindberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Bergquist, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Unlocking design potential: Design with people diagnosed with schizophrenia2019In: Informatics for Health and Social Care, ISSN 1753-8157, E-ISSN 1753-8165, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 31-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the expansion of e-health systems to more diverse and heterogeneous contexts and user groups, it is increasingly important to include users in design. Designers recognize the benefits of user participation, but including users with lowered cognitive and social abilities can be difficult. This paper intends to answer how these users can participate in the design of e-health systems. We conducted a case study with stakeholder interviews and design workshops with users diagnosed with schizophrenia to identify and overcome the challenges for participation. From the stakeholder interviews, we identified challenges relating to social interaction, technical experience, cognitive ability, and loss of individuality. We designed workshops that addressed these challenges and identify five strategies for unlocking the design potential of the participants: (1) work together with concrete materials and examples; (2) maintain a positive focus; (3) accept all ideas; (4) maintain and require realism; and (5) use previous interaction. We conclude that, when supported appropriately, it is possible to involve people diagnosed with schizophrenia. We also highlight the difficulty for someone not self-experienced to understand contexts as challenging and sensitive as this, and thus the value of user participation.

  • 64.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Eriksson, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The Meaning of the Lived Experience of Lifestyle Changes for People with Severe Mental Illness2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of the lived experience of lifestyle changes as perceived by people with severe mental illness (SMI). People with SMI who have experience in managing lifestyle changes were interviewed (n = 10). The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. The findings reveal three themes: (1) struggling with inner and outer limitations, (2) on one's own but together with others and (3) longing for living a life in harmony. The meaning of lifestyle changes can be understood as a person's internal and external endeavors to make well-considered decisions about lifestyle changes. Support should focus on strengthening the person's self-efficacy and should be based on the person's experiences. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 65.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Department of Health Sciences, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health-related lifestyle and perceived health among people with severe mental illness: Gender differences and degree of sense of coherence2019In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 182-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with severe mental illness (SMI) experience an increased risk of physical ill health and premature death, which appears to be partly related to unhealthy lifestyle habits. The aim of this study was to describe the distribution of health-related lifestyle habits and perceived health among people with severe mental illness. A further aim was to explore if there were any gender differences or differences based on degree of sense of coherence. The study adopted a cross-sectional design based on data from 65 people with SMI. The results show that degree of Sense of Coherence (SOC) does have relevance for perceived health and for dimensions of Quality of Life (QOL). Furthermore, among the participants with strong SOC, there were less daily smokers and they seemed to have less sedentary leisure time than those with low SOC. Men reported more anxiety/depression than women and women ate fruit more often than men, otherwise there were no gender differences. In comparison with the general population, people with SMI show a higher Body Mass Index are more sedentary, more often daily smokers, have lower SOC and perceive a lower QOL. This emphasizes the importance of health-promotion support that focuses on lifestyle changes, and support for strengthening SOC and QOL for people with SMI. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  • 66.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    Department of Health Sciences, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mental health nurses’ experience of physical health care and health promotion initiatives for people with severe mental illness2019In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health care for people with severe mental illness is often divided into physical health care and mental health care despite the importance of a holistic approach to caring for the whole person. Mental health nurses have an important role not only in preventing ill health, but also in promoting health, to improve the overall health among people with severe mental illness and to develop a more person-centred, integrated physical and mental health care. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe mental health nurses’ experiences of facilitating aspects that promote physical health and support a healthy lifestyle for people with severe mental illness. Interviews were conducted with mental health nurses (n = 15), and a qualitative content analysis was used to capture the nurse’s experiences. Analysis of the interviews generated three categories: (i) to have a health promotion focus in every encounter, (ii) to support with each person’s unique prerequisites in mind and (iii) to take responsibility for health promotion in every level of the organization. The results show the importance of a health promotion focus that permeates the entire organization of mental health care. Shared responsibility for health and health promotion activities should exist at all levels: in the person-centred care in the relation with the patient, embedded in a joint vision within the working unit, and in decisions at management level. © 2019 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  • 67.
    Regber, Susann
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Foster homes for neglected children with severe obesity— Debated but rarely studied2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 11, p. 1955-1964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore current research and theoretical articles on foster home placement of children with severe obesity.

    Methods: An integrative literature review. Literature searches in six electronic databases included theoretical, quantitative and qualitative articles and case reports published in English (2008‐2018) on the topic of severe childhood obesity and foster home placement.

    Results: Seventeen selected papers included six theoretical articles, nine quantitative studies, one qualitative study and one case report. Eight of the nine quantitative studies did not specify the grading of obesity in children in foster care. The case report and the qualitative study showed distinct and sustainable body mass index (BMI) reductions after a child had been placed in foster care. Five theoretical articles justified foster care placement when chronic parental neglect led to severe obesity in the child, while one article emphasised the opposite.

    Conclusion: Parental and societal neglect of children with severe obesity placed in a foster home is rarely studied or the exclusive aim of research. The views of the chil‐dren themselves are lacking in research articles, as well as the child’s right to health obligations concerning children with severe obesity. © 2019 Foundation Acta Pædiatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 68.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Irland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Irland.
    Keogh, Brian
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Irland.
    Lahti, Marie
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Meade, Oona
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Science, Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Stickley, Theodore
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Päivi
    Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Tampere University of Applied Science, Tampere, Finland.
    To enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice with eLearning materials - eMenthe: an European project2015In: Abstracts: 19th International Philosophy of Nursing Society (IPONS) conference August 24-26, 2015 Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden: Technology, Health Care and Person-centeredness: Beyond Utopia and Dystopia. Thinking the Future., Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet , 2015, p. 42-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are wide differences in the quality and content of mental health nurse education throughout Europe. These are evident in the course structures, emphasis and specific content. This diversity between programmes creates possibilities for countries to learn from one another and to share and benefit from the diverse approaches. These concerns, challenges and development needs of mental health practice form the basis for the EU- funded eMenthe-project (2013-2016) which aims to enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice by developing eLearning materials through a European co- operation. To this end, seven European universities from Finland, Ireland, Sweden, United Kingdom and the Netherlands have commenced a collaboration to enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice - eMenthe.

    The project’s aim is to develop eLearning materials with an action research approach in collaboration with Master’s level students from these universities and associated partners from clinical practice. eLearning materials on three central themes: recovery, mental health promotion and prevention, the role of families and caregivers will be launched for students in Master’s level and clinical practice to use. These themes were agreed as common issues of concern for all partners prior to the application process.

    During first phase, stakeholders were interviewed (N=139), including master level students, experienced psychiatric nurses, managements persons working in psychiatric care, service users and next of kins. The data was structured from a general point and also from a lifespan perspective, such as child and adolescence, adults and elderly. The analysis used a qualitative and descriptive design, using a brief manifest content analysis to examine patterns, themes and subthemes to achieve an understanding of the meaningful content focusing on nursing master levels. During the final year of the project (2016) eLearning materials will be made available to students undertaking Master’s level education and professional nurses working in clinical practice. This dual approach to dissemination will support the professional competencies of practitioners as well as academic progression.

  • 69.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Keogh, Brian
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Doyle, Louise
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    University of Applied Science Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Lahti, Mari
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Institute of Mental Health Building, Triumph Road, Innovation Park, United Kingdom.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Meade, Oonagh
    School of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Sciences HU, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Stickley, Theodore
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Institute of Mental Health Building, Triumph Road, Innovation Park, United Kingdom.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Advancing the knowledge, skills and attitudes of mental health nurses working with families and caregivers: A critical review of the literature2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 32, p. 138-146Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving and supporting the family members and caregivers of people with mental illness is essential to high-quality mental health services. However, literature suggests that there is a lack of engagement between family members and mental health nurses (MHNs). Lack of knowledge among MHNs is often cited as one of the main reasons for this lack of engagement. The aim of this review was to explore the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are required by MHNs to enable to them to work more effectively with families affected by mental illness. A literature based critical review was used to access and review 35 papers in order to extract concepts that could inform the design of eLearning materials to assist MHNs advance their knowledge in this area. Two overarching themes were identified; ‘Mental health problems and the family’ and ‘Working with the family’. From these themes, the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to work more effectively with families are described. The findings from this review provide a descriptive account of the knowledge skills and attitudes that are required for effective family work. In addition, the review provides an empirical foundation for education programmes in the area. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

  • 70.
    Stickley, Theodore
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Institute of Mental Health Building, Triumph Road, Innovation Park, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Higgins, Agnes
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Meade, Oonagh
    School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Sciences HU, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Doyle, Louise
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Dep. Health and Wellbeing, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Keogh, Brian
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin 2, Dublin, Ireland.
    Lahti, Mari
    University of Applied Science Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Paivi
    Diaconia University of Applied Sciences Uusikatu, Oulu, Finland.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    From the rhetoric to the real: A critical review of how the concepts of recovery and social inclusion may inform mental health nurse advanced level curricula – the eMenthe project2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 37, p. 155-163Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This critical review addresses the question of how the concepts of recovery and social inclusion may inform mental health nurse education curricula at Master's level in order to bring about significant and positive change to practice.

    Design

    This is a literature-based critical review incorporating a rapid review. It has been said that if done well, this approach can be highly relevant to health care studies and social interventions, and has substantial claims to be as rigorous and enlightening as other, more conventional approaches to literature (Rolfe, 2008).

    Data sources

    In this review, we have accessed contemporary literature directly related to the concepts of recovery and social inclusion in mental health.

    Review methods

    We have firstly surveyed the international literature directly related to the concepts of recovery and social inclusion in mental health and used the concept of emotional intelligence to help consider educational outcomes in terms of the required knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to promote these values-based approaches in practice.

    Results

    A number of themes have been identified that lend themselves to educational application. International frameworks exist that provide some basis for the developments of recovery and social inclusion approaches in mental health practice, however the review identifies specific areas for future development.

    Conclusions

    This is the first article that attempts to scope the knowledge, attitudes and skills required to deliver education for Master's level mental health nurses based upon the principles of recovery and social inclusion. Emotional intelligence theory may help to identify desired outcomes especially in terms of attitudinal development to promote the philosophy of recovery and social inclusive approaches in advanced practice. Whilst recovery is becoming enshrined in policy, there is a need in higher education to ensure that mental health nurse leaders are able to discern the difference between the rhetoric and the reality. © Elsevier Ltd. 2015

  • 71.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Defining and assessing dimensions of health and health promotion intervention in mental health services2007In: : Joining forces across Europe for Prevention and Promotion in Mental Health, Imhpa - European Network for Mental Health Promotion and Mental Disorder Prevention , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in the area of health promotion usually focuses on disease prevention, and people with mental health problems are seldom included. Development of methods to assess perceived health promoting interventions and health in a broader perspective among patients in mental health services are needed. In order to properly evaluate health promoting interventions and health outcomes, the concepts of health and health promotion related to validation mesures must bee investigated. The aim was to investigate the construct validity of two newly developed questionnaires; Health Promotion Intervention Questionnaire (HPIQ), intended to measure patients’ subjective experinces of health promoting interventions and the Health Questionnaire (HQ) to measure subjectively experienced health among patients within mental health services. A cross sectional study was performed and one- hundred and forty – one participants in contact with outpatient mental health services responded to the questionnaires and to validation measures assessing psychiatric symptoms, empowerment, helping alliance and satisfaction with care, self-esteem, quality of life, and experiences of stigmatization. Health promoting interventions include alliance, empowerment, educational support and practical support and were positively correlated to alliance, client satisfaction with care and empowerment. Strong relationships were found between perceived health promotion intervention and helping alliance. Perceived health showed positive associations with self-esteem, empowerment and quality of life and negative associations with psychiatric symptoms, discrimination and rejection experiences. Self- esteem explained 60% of perceived health while psychiatric symptoms only explained about 6% of perceived health. Interventions focusing on respect, participation and empowerment are essential parts of mental health care delivery, supporting good health, including autonomy, social involvement and comprehensibility, The Health Promotion Intervention Questionnaire and the Health Questionnaire measures meaningful and valid constructs, useful in clinical mental health care and research. These questionnaires support an enhanced focus on mental health resources among patients and reinforce the perspective of health within mental health care practice and research.

  • 72.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Patients' conceptions of how health processes are promoted in mental health nursing: A qualitative study2003In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 448-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most important goal of nursing care is to promote the subjective experience of health. The health promoting efforts of mental health care nurses must be aimed at creating encounters where the patient will be confirmed both existentially and as an individual worthy of dignity. The patient in mental health care is often viewed by the nurse as nothing more than a passive recipient of care and the belief in the patient's potential is minimal. This can lead to a situation where the patient loses control in the caring situation and feels unable to improve his/her health, which conflicts with the goal of the nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe patients' conceptions of how health processes are promoted in mental health nursing. Twelve patients with experience of mental health nursing were interviewed, and the data material was analysed using a phenomenographic approach. The results show 13 different conceptions of the phenomenon, and these were summarized into four descriptive categories: interaction, attention, development and dignity. The conceptions described show that the patients need to be treated as equals and that the nurse must trust the patient's ability to make decisions and to promote his/her health process. It is suggested that mental health nursing should be built on humanistic science and its view that every individual has the ability to grow and develop. This view is one of the most important preconditions for the promotion of health processes in mental health nursing.

  • 73.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Perceptions of the concept of health among patients in mental health nursing2004In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 723-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health has been a central concept in nursing science since the 18th century but the holistic concept of health that includes both the body and the soul, still has to be clarified. The concept of health is often unclear and represents an unreachable ideal state that can be hard to use as a realistic goal in nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe how the patient perceives the concept of health in mental health nursing. Twelve patients with experience of mental health nursing were interviewed and the data were analyzed with a phenomenographic approach. The patients described nine different perceptions that were divided into three descriptive categories: autonomy, meaningfulness, and community. All of these are important to achieve health. There is ambiguity about the possibility to influence the concept of health. Health is described, on the one, hand as a prerequisite to experiencing freedom and finding meaning in life and, on the other hand, it is believed that the search for meaning and the courage to fight and try in spite of the disease is what leads to health. The patients' descriptions are mostly about things that they need in the present time to achieve health, but health as a process with growth and potential for development does not appear that clearly. One conclusion is that mental health nursing must deliver a more process-focused nursing care where the concept of health is visibly used as a goal for all nursing interventions.

  • 74.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Centrum för evidensbaserade psykosociala insatser för personer med psykiska funktionshinder (CEPI), Lund, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Centrum för evidensbaserade psykosociala insatser för personer med psykiska funktionshinder (CEPI), Lund, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    Hansson, Lars
    Centrum för evidensbaserade psykosociala insatser för personer med psykiska funktionshinder (CEPI), Lund, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    Svensson, Bengt
    Centrum för evidensbaserade psykosociala insatser för personer med psykiska funktionshinder (CEPI), Lund, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    Utvärdering av rehabiliteringsprojektet i psykiatrin i Halland: Rapport del 1. Uppföljning av klienter och närstående2011Report (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Svensson, Bengt
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Lars
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation2014In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 68, no 6, p. 401-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Backgrounds. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR). Aim: The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment. Methods: The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments. Results: The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients’ health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning. © 2014 Informa Healthcare.

  • 76.
    Öijervall, Jörgen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Främjande faktorer för professionell utveckling i processorienterad omvårdnadshandledning i grupp: Sjuksköterskors erfarenheter ett år efter avslutad sjuksköterskeutbildning2013In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 9-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of factors enhancing professional development trough process-oriented group super- vision, one year after completed nursing education. The objective of process-oriented group supervision in nursing care is to support students’ development of their ability to manage complex care situations. The attitude of the supervisor and the students’ willingness to reflect on them- selves have been described as playing key roles in process-oriented group supervision during nursing education. The link to nursing science has also been described as significant by several researchers, but some supervisors are not using nursing science as a foundation in group supervision for nurses. The analysis was completed using a qualitative content analysis method based on interviews with 18 nurses resulting in the general theme “Process oriented pedagogy” which is presented in three categories: Supervisor’s character, Pedagogical strategy and Reflective communication. The findings suggest that the supervisor's personal qualities in combination with an inspiring structure are impor- tant to promote the participants’ reflective communication during the group supervision sessions. Reflective communication supports the students’ development towards a deeper professional knowledge. Further research should focus on the use of nursing science as a foundation in clinical process-oriented group supervision.

  • 77.
    Öijervall, Jörgen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Promoting factors for professional development in process oriented group supervision. Nurses experiences one year after completed nursing degree2013In: Breaking Barriers 2013, 2013, p. 43-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of factors enhancing professional development trough process-oriented group supervision, one year after completed nursing education. The objective of process-oriented group supervision in nursing care is to support students’ development of their ability to manage complex care situations. The attitude of the supervisor and the students’willingness to reflect on themselves have been described as playing key roles in process-oriented group supervision during nursing education. The link to nursing science has also been described as significant by several researchers, but some supervisors are not using nursing science as a foundation in group supervision for nurses. The analysis was completed using a qualitative content analysis method based on interviews with 18 nurses resulting in the general theme “Process oriented pedagogy” which is presented in three categories: Supervisor’s character, Pedagogical strategy and Reflective communication. The findings suggest that the supervisor's personal qualities in combination with an inspiring structure are important to promote the participants’ reflective ommunication during the group supervision sessions. Reflective communication supports the students’ development towards a deeper professional knowledge. Further research should focus on the use of nursing science as a foundation in clinical process-oriented group supervision.

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