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  • 51.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Norwegian School of Management BI, Oslo, Norway.
    The role of informal investors in the entrepreneurial process: An empirical study of opportunity, motivation and ability2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to advance the understanding of the role of informal investors in the entrepreneurial process, something that up to date has received very limited attention. By analysing the life experience and career background of four informal investors the study explore their motivation for being involved in entrepreneurial opportunities, and the personal resources these individuals build up and develop during their careers that facilitate this involvement. The overall results suggest that their careers can be described as an experien- tial learning process that has facilitated the development of valuable skills and knowledge that is of critical importance for the entrepreneurial projects they become involved in. The paper ends with a discussion of its findings and implications for future research.

  • 52.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Galan, Nataliya
    School of Business, Economics and IT, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Abebe, Solomon Akele
    Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Entrepreneurial learning in venture acceleration programs2019In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 588-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aims to better understand entrepreneurial learning in the context of venture acceleration programs.

    Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research strategy was used based on multiple in-depth interviews with 21 lead entrepreneurs complemented with participatory observations and secondary sources. The data were inductively analysed following the Gioia methodology (Gioia et al., 2012).

    Findings: The authors build on experiential learning theory to generate a process-focussed model exploring the learning dynamics that venture acceleration programs can facilitate. In this model, the authors identify three catalysts that trigger processes of experiential learning and two contingencies that alleviate the effects of the catalysts on learning outcomes. The findings suggest that the potential of venture acceleration programs to be effective learning environments pends on the presence and quality of these catalysts and contingencies.

    Originality/value: The findings provide novel insights on how venture acceleration programs trigger entrepreneurial learning, thereby offering a deeper understanding of the learning dynamics in this setting. 

    © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited

  • 53.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindholm Dahlstrand, Åsa
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Academic entrepreneurship: Multi-level factors associated with female-led incubator projects2014In: Women’s Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century: An International Multi-Level Research Analysis / [ed] Kate V. Lewis; Colette Henry; Elizabeth J. Gatewood; John Watson, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, 1, p. 32-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we examine how institutional factors in and around university incubators are associated with the likelihood that a female will engage in the commercialization of university science by championing an incubator project. Our empirical data comes from a unique database consisting of over 1400 venture projects in 19 Swedish incubators that are part of a nationally financed incubator program. Our findings suggest that women’s engagement in academic entrepreneurship is related to a number of institutional factors operating at multiple levels in and around incubators. We find systematic differences related to 1) the proportion of female faculty in senior positions at the associated university, 2) the presence of women on incubator boards; and 3) the technological sector of the project itself. In all, our findings largely support the notion that university incubators can be seen as embedded in gendered structures, where socially and culturally constructed roles and relationships between men and women create imbalances in their prospective career opportunities.

  • 54.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Landström, Hans
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Informal investors as entrepreneurs: The development of an entrepreneurial career2002In: Venture Capital: an International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, ISSN 1369-1066, E-ISSN 1464-5343, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 78-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informal investors have proved to be highly valuable for the growth of the firms in which they have invested. Therefore, it is important to understand what motivates potential informal investors to make their initial investment as well as how already active investors develop their entrepreneurial careers. Such an understanding may prove helpful in directing efforts to locate and attract potential and existing informal investors. This paper investigates the entrepreneurial career of four informal investors. Based on the personal stories of these individuals, we explore their career patterns and present the central concepts of the different career phases they have progressed through. The results indicate that informal investors have experienced three overall career phases: (1) the corporate career phase; (2) the entrepreneurial learning phase; and (3) the integrated investment career phase. Each career phase provides informal investors with possibilities for learning and developing valuable competencies in order to advance in their entrepreneurial career. During the corporate career phase, the investors learn a 'managerial logic' and create a platform on which they can build up their managerial competence, establish a network, and legitimize their reputation. In the following entrepreneurial learning phase, the investors make use of this platform in varying entrepreneurial projects, mainly as consultants, which in turn provides them with the possibilities for learning the 'logic' behind entrepreneurial processes. During the integrated investment career phase, informal investors extend the platform by making use of their managerial and entrepreneurial competence in the firms in which they invest, and thus act as both entrepreneurs and informal investors in the firms in which they are involved.

  • 55.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Winborg, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Knowledge Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Research (KEEN).
    Lindholm Dahlstrand, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Knowledge Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Research (KEEN).
    Exploring the mindset of university entrepreneurs: Do they have a different resource logic?2008In: Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, ISSN 0740-7416, Vol. 28, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Principal Topic: Universities are today increasingly acknowledged as powerful drivers of innovation, job creation and economic growth. To promote and support university-based entrepreneurship there has been a tremendous increase in the supply of entrepreneurship courses and the creation of business incubators. As a result of this development there is an increasing group of entrepreneurs that have been educated or fostered in the university context, and who often continue to develop their new ventures in close interaction with the university. The principal research question we ask in this paper is whether university entrepreneurs have a different resource logic compared to entrepreneurs that start up their ventures independently of the university and its surrounding innovation system. Resource logic is in the paper defined as a set of ideas for how to secure and use resources in the start-up process, and we link this concept to three streams of research that can be related to the resource logic of entrepreneurs; effectual decision making, bootstrapping orientation; and personal networking.

    Method: The empirical study was designed as a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire was sent out to two groups of entrepreneurs resulting in responses from 182 university entrepreneurs and 209 non- university entrepreneurs. The hypotheses are tested using parametric and non-parametric tests in SPSS.

    Results and Implications: In line with our hypotheses the results suggest that university entrepreneurs to a larger extent have a mindset that favours both effectual reasoning and the use of bootstrapping. When it comes to use of network contacts the results were however contrary to our hypothesis. In sum, our findings add to our knowledge about the extent to which the close connection to the university has any significant influence on the resource acquisition behaviour of university entrepreneurs once they start an entrepreneurial career. The paper develops and uses the concept of “resource logic”. On the basis of this concept the paper provides general implications for our understanding of differences in the mindset of entrepreneurs in the start-up process.

  • 56.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Winborg, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Lindholm Dahlstrand, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Exploring the resource logic of student entrepreneurs2012In: International Small Business Journal, ISSN 0266-2426, E-ISSN 1741-2870, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 659-683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study responds to the call in recent research for comparative studies examining whether student entrepreneurs are different to other kinds of entrepreneurs. Based on institutional theory, the specific question we ask in this study is whether student entrepreneurs who start up their firms in close relation to the university have a different resource logic compared to entrepreneurs who start their firms outside the university context. We define resource logic as the individual's set of ideas for how to secure and use resources, and we link this concept to theories of effectual reasoning and bootstrapping to develop our argument. Moreover, we identify two different viewpoints about the effects of the university milieu on the resource logic of student entrepreneurs and we develop hypotheses to test the different viewpoints. The findings give overall support for the view that student entrepreneurs have developed a resource logic that favours both effectual reasoning and the use of bootstrapping methods.

  • 57.
    Voordeckers, Wim
    et al.
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    van Gils, Anita
    Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Lund University.
    Huse, Morten
    Norwegian School of Management BI.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University.
    Structures and behaviour: A cross-country comparison of boards of directors in SMEs2008In: Proceedings of EURAM Annual Conference 2008, 2008, p. 1-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior cross-country governance studies mainly built on agency theory’s governance model. Recently, the use of this theoretical perspective has been criticized from both institutional theory as well as the behavioural perspective. Institutional theory would predict that a significant part of the variation in board behaviour could be attributed to the institutional context of a country. In contrast, the behavioural perspective follows the reasoning that board behaviour is expected to be determined by firm-specific challenges and needs rather than the broader institutional context and hence, predicts that the institutional context of a country does not explain variation in actual board behaviour. The aim of this study is to examine the empirical validity of these opposing predictions about board behaviour. Using a database of SMEs of three countries with a different governance system (Belgium, the Netherlands and Norway), our statistical analyses mainly support the predictions of the behavioural perspective.

  • 58.
    Voordeckers, Wim
    et al.
    Hasselt University, Hasselt, Belgium.
    Van Gils, Anita
    Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Huse, Morten
    University of Witten/Herdecke, Germany & Department of Communication and Culture, Norwegian School of Management BI, Oslo, Norway.
    Board structures and board behaviour: A cross-country comparison of privately held SMEs in Belgium, the Netherlands and Norway2014In: International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics, ISSN 1477-9048, E-ISSN 1741-802X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 197-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examine and compare formal board structures and actual board behaviour in privately held SMEs. We integrate and build on ideas from institutional theory and the behavioural theory of the firm to propose that privately held firms have specific governance needs that 'decouple' formal board structures from actual board behaviour. Following this logic, we expect board structures to vary across countries while board behaviour does not. We test this in a cross-country sample of SMEs in Belgium, the Netherlands and Norway. The empirical results support the proposition that board structures are largely decoupled from actual board behaviour in privately held SMEs. Overall, the findings imply that it is possible to coordinate and disseminate board development research and practice across countries despite national differences in formal board structures. Copyright © 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 59.
    Winborg, Joakim
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Knowledge Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Research (KEEN).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Knowledge Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Research (KEEN).
    Can bootstrapping be learnt from experience?: the role of human capital for explaining bootstrapping orientation in new businesses2009Conference paper (Other academic)
12 51 - 59 of 59
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