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  • 51.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    CIRCLE, Lunds universitet.
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Born Globals' foreign market channel strategies2006In: International Journal of Globalisation and Small Business, ISSN 1479-3059, E-ISSN 1479-3067, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 356-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foreign entry mode choices are decisions of paramount importance for the long-term survival and growth of companies that are in a process of rapid international expansion. In this paper we seek to understand the foreign market channel strategies of Born Globals. We examine whether these companies develop a similar strategy regarding foreign entry mode choices and whether their market channel strategies differ from contemporary theories treating this problem. A comparative case study conducted on four companies meeting the criteria of Born Globals suggests that they do not show a common foreign entry mode. Instead, the companies seem to have very different market channel strategies even if they all have internationalised very rapidly. These findings are discussed against the current range of theoretical models that seek to explain the companies' foreign entry mode choice. We conclude the paper with some implications and suggestions for future research.

  • 52.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Born Globals' market channel strategies2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    International activities in small firms: Examining factors influencing the internationalization and export growth of small firms2004In: Canadian Journal of the Administrative Sciences, ISSN 0825-0383, E-ISSN 1936-4490, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 22-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore internationalization and export growth over time in a sample of 135 small manufacturing firms. By using concepts and arguments from literature on international business and small firms, the paper identifies six situational, or contingency, factors that are expected to influence the international activities of small firms. Our results show that a dynamic and fast-changing environment may push small firms to go abroad, while it seems to be the experiences built up in the organization and a younger generation of CEOs that can explain why some small firms continue to expand their international activities. The findings suggest that the factors influencing small firms to go abroad and become international differ from the factors that influence them to continue and grow once they are on the international marketplace. The paper ends with a discussion of the findings, together with suggestions for further research.

  • 54.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    International activities in small firms: Examining factors influencing the internationalization and export growth of SMEs2009In: Entrepreneurship and Globalization / [ed] Rob B. McNaughton and Jim Bell, London: Sage Publications, 2009, p. 288-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    International activities in small firms: Examining factors influencing the internationalization and export growth of SMEs2002In: McGill Conference on International Entrepreneurship, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Servais, Per
    Department of Marketing and Management, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Combining industrial buyer and seller strategies for international supply and marketing management2010In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 64-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review international industrial purchasing and marketing literature with a focus on portfolio models, to develop portfolio models for buyers' and sellers' international strategies, and to combine the models so that both the buyer and seller perspectives are dealt with simultaneously. Design/methodology/approach: Literature on international industrial purchasing and marketing is discussed. Dimensions that are important for the buyers' and sellers' strategies are identified. Portfolio models for buyers and sellers are developed and the two perspectives are matched together. Findings: The paper contributes a specification of features that are important for industrial buyers' and sellers' international purchasing and marketing strategies. These dimensions are used to develop a model of supplier relationship management and a marketing management model for supplier strategies. The consequences for the firm's international activities are discussed. A model combining industrial buyers' and sellers' international supply and marketing management strategies is developed. Research limitations/implications: This paper provides a deeper understanding of international exchange processes by combining literature on international industrial purchasing and international marketing. Situations are identified where different areas of theory are applicable. The paper also contributes to the discussion on what should be the conceptual domain of international business. Here, it is argued that international exchange is the product of joint decisions made by two or more actors based in different countries. Earlier academic literature reveals a striking imbalance: while one side of the coin - the exporter side - has been extensively studied, the importer side has largely been neglected. In this paper, it is tried to present a balanced view of both sides. Practical implications: This paper introduces portfolio management models that can be used for both industrial purchasing and marketing management. The paper stresses the importance of finding a fit between the marketing and purchasing strategies within a relationship. If both parties have positioned the relationship in a similar way, there are much greater possibilities for the relationship to create value for both parties. Originality/value: The paper combines international industrial purchasing and international marketing perspectives as few studies have done before. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 57.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Servais, Per
    Combining Industrial Buyer's and Sellers International Strategies2005In: EIBA Conference, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Sundermeier, Janina
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Firms’ use of networks to get access to resources for internationalization2013In: The 16th Annual McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference: Researching New Frontiers: The Conference Program and Collection of Short Summaries, 2013, p. 18-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To get access to resources for internationalization many studies have acknowledged the importance of different types of networks. Therefore, this study intends to explore how different types of networks are beneficial for firms’ international growth. Three types of networks are identified in this study: Self established business networks, business networks established by a third party and social networks. A web-based survey is conducted among companies operating in the health technology industry in order to gain additional insights related to the accessibility of resources through different types of networks. The participating companies consists of members of the non-profit organization Health Technology Alliance (HTA) located in Southwest Sweden as well as several companies that are closely related to and take part in the activities of the HTA. Questionnaires have been sent out to 89 respondents of which 13 returned because of ambiguous or non-existing email addresses. Of the 76 firms that have received the questionnaire, 21 participated in the survey what equals a response rate of 36%. The findings reveal which resources are accessed through different types of networks. It is found that self-established business networks offer most access to resources whereas third-party founded business networks and social networks provide only limited access. Financial resources are not provided through any of the discussed networks. 

  • 59.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    A Glocal marketing model2009In: Glocal Marketing: think globally and act locally / [ed] Svante Andersson & Göran Svensson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, 1, p. 391-396Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Anti-climate Change Management in Marketing2009In: Glocal Marketing: think globally and act locally / [ed] Svante Andersson & Göran Svensson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, 1, p. 373-390Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Early Internationalizing Firms2009In: Glocal marketing: think globally and act locally / [ed] Svante Andersson & Göran Svensson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, 1, p. 45-64Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Global versus Glocal strategy and Marketing Think2009In: Glocal marketing: think globally and act locally / [ed] Svante Andersson & Göran Svensson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, 1, p. 27-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Svensson, GöranHalmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Glocal Marketing: think globally and act locally2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The International Entrepreneur2009In: Glocal Marketing: think globally and act locally / [ed] Svante Andersson & Göran Svensson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, 1, p. 257-276Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Think Globally and Act Locally2009In: Glocal Marketing: think globally and act locally / [ed] Svante Andersson and Göran Svensson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, 1, p. 13-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Wood, Greg
    Deakin University, Australia .
    International Corporate and Business Ethics2009In: Glocal Marketing: think globally and act locally / [ed] Svante Andersson, Göran Svensson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009, p. 319-338Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Tell, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The relationship between the manager and growth in small firms2009In: Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, ISSN 1462-6004, E-ISSN 1758-7840, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 586-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the relationship between the manager and growth in small firms, through a review of earlier research.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A review of articles published during the last 25 years is carried out in order to answer the question: How does the top manager influence growth in small firms?

    Findings

    Three key relationships are identified: between growth and, respectively, managerial traits and characteristics, managerial intentions, and managerial behavior or roles. The diverse findings in the literature are contradictory and give a paradoxical picture of the impact of the manager. A deeper analysis of the results from the review, supplemented with leadership theory, yields a better understanding of small-firm growth with a special focus on the behavior of the manager.

    Research limitations/implications

    This paper problematizes the complexity in managing small-firm growth, and can be further empirically validated by using multiple methods including qualitative ones such as observational studies.

    Practical implications

    The findings have a bearing on education and policy implications. If a behavior can be identified that promotes small firms' growth, education and policy implications can be developed in line with these results.

    Originality/value

    In small firms there seems to be a general consensus that managers do influence the performance of small firms, but so far there has not been a systematic review of earlier empirical research, that is done in this paper. From this review, a more complete picture of how managers influence growth in small firms is presented.

  • 68.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Innovative international strategies in new firms - born globals2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Innovative Internationalisation in New firms: Born Globals–the Swedish Case2003In: Journal of International Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1570-7385, E-ISSN 1573-7349, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 249-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past few years, the phenomenon of Born Globals has been highlighted in many studies. Such firms adopt a global approach right from their inception or very shortly thereafter. This behaviour challenges the traditional internationalisation models of slow and gradual development with respect to geographical markets and market entry modes. In this paper a conceptual framework is developed from earlier research and includes the factors: globalisation, entrepreneurs, networks, and industry. A survey showed that Born Globals were still very uncommon in Sweden. However, four Born Global firms were identified and analysed with the framework. It was concluded that the ongoing globalisation has made it easier to conduct Born Global strategies. However, active entrepreneurs, who recognised the global opportunities, were crucial for the implementation of these strategies, in which personal networks were used as tools.

  • 70.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Knowledge transfer in Born Globals2004In: McGill Conference on International Entrepreneurship, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The Internationalization of Born Globals: the Swedish case2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Principal Topic

    Born Global firms adopt an international approach right from their birth or very shortly thereafter. This behavior challenges the traditional models of internationalization that propose that internationalization is developed in a slow and gradual manner with respect to geographical markets and market entry modes. The “slow and gradual view” of internationalization is very strong in Scandinavia as the creator of one of the most well known models in this area, the Uppsala Internationalization model, is developed in Sweden. The aim of the study is to explore the Born Global phenomena, and to compare it with earlier studies from other nations to further enhance the theory development in this area. Do the already developed framework fit on Swedish Born Globals? Do the framework have to be adopted according to the Swedish environment and culture? Can the general framework be further developed?

    Method

    To be able to compare our results with earlier studies in the USA, Denmark and Australia the same definitions and methods are used. Born Globals are defined as firms that have reached a share of foreign sales of at least 25% after having started export activities within three years after their birth. Data from a survey is used, followed by qualitative case studies. The database is used to present descriptive statistics and to identify Swedish Born Globals. The case studies are built mainly on personal interviews, but secondary data, such as such as business magazines, annual reports and internal documents have also been used to complement our primary data source. The cases are confronted with each other and with theories used in the framework but also compared with traditional internationalization theory. The framework includes institutional, network, resource-based and entrepreneurship theory.

    Results and Implications

    The results show that, although still a relatively uncommon phenomenon, the ongoing globalization has made it easier for small firms to conduct Born Global strategies. Active entrepreneurs and personal networks were important tools for implementing these strategies. The findings may have implications for practice as well as policy. Maybe can successful behaviors, found in the Born Global firms, be transferred to other firms? Can policy-makers change the firms institutional environment so it will be easier for firms to became Born Globals?

  • 72.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Born Globals - the Swedish case2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Acting in a Globalized World: Marketing Perspective2012In: Globalization: Education and Management Agendas, Croatia: INTECH, 2012, p. 153-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Internationalization processes of firms as a challenge to handle exchange relationships2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Researchers have mostly focused on entry processes and entry forms. What happens to a firm that has been in a foreign market for a long time would be an issue of its ability to handle important exchange relationships. This paper aims to increase our knowledge of what it takes to establish and handle exchange relationships with some actors so as to achieve a win-win and stable exchange in a foreign market.

    Design/methodology/approach – An in-depth case study was used to study the phenomenon, where the conceptual framework, interconnected networks in value creation, was used to analyze the case.

     Findings – It was found out that the multinational company (MNC) has been able to prioritize and/or invest time and resources to closely co-operate with some important customers that have brought about ‘win-win’ and stable exchange relationships between them. It was also found out that mutual orientation and adaptations have helped them to overcome any mismatch resulting from cultural influences.

    Research limitations/implications – The in-depth study with only one case is a stark limitation. Future research should explore the same phenomenon by studying several cases; every effort should be made to also interview customers and not only suppliers.

    Practical implication – Despite limitations, this study’s results have significant implication for a firm in that its internationalization process would also be the ability to establish and handle relationships that enhance the development of competitive capabilities that enable it to compete in any market.

    Originality/value – The major contribution of this study is to emphasize the managerial problems associated with the establishment and handling of business relationships with some important actors (e.g. suppliers and customers) in foreign markets.

  • 75.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The search for foreign direct investment (FDI): The case of Ghana2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    That foreign direct investment (FDI) is a valuable undertaking that all nations strive to attract and sustain is well known and well discussed in the literature. However, a systematic study and/or analysis of how some countries invest much in attracting FDI, but with poor results, is lacking. This paper contributes by analyzing the incessant efforts which countries make to attract FDI with very dissatisfying results. One important conclusion from this study is that while a country uses numerous incentives and alleged macro and micro policies as means to bring in much FDI, potential investors might not respond because they might be thinking about areas where they could profitably and securely put their resources to use. Ghana is a case in point when looking at a country that has not succeeded well, in spite of investments in attracting FDI.

  • 76.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Abraha, Desalegn
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Interactive (Networked) Internationalization: The Case of Swedish Firms2007In: Bringing the country back in: the importance of local knowledge in a global economy : proceedings of the 49th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business, Indianapolis, June 25-28, 2007, Indianapolis: Academy of International Business , 2007, p. 139-139Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extant literature stresses that having foreign market presence is imperative for most firms these days. However, how firms conceive of which foreign markets to enter, the entry mode to take and the resource commitments to make are not information or decision-making processes solely confined to a firm that internationalizes its activities. The purpose of this study is to provide deeper insights into the extent to which an independent actor (s) actively collaborates with the internationalizing firm so as to jointly determine the choice of market, the mode of entry and the level of investment committed in the market to be entered and even after the entry (i.e. the on-going activities). Based on two multiple case studies, one major finding of the study shows that independent actors, with their interconnected networks, have played and are still playing a major role in influencing the internationalization processes of each of the two firms in this study.

  • 77.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Amal, Mohamed
    Universidade Regional de Blumenau – FURB, Blumenau, Brazil.
    Impact of globalization: The ability of less developed countries' (LDCs') firms to cope with opportunities and challenges2011In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 120-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to contribute to the debate on the impact of globalization on the competitiveness of firms in least developed countries (LDCs). Two main research questions will be addressed. How does globalization affect the competitiveness of small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in LDCs? How can SMEs handle opportunities and challenges emerging from globalization?

    Design/methodology/approach – The methodology for this study is a conceptual attempt to review the existing literature and make some propositions about how SMEs can handle the opportunities and challenges emerging from globalization.

    Findings – Building on a developed operational framework affecting the competitiveness of firms, some of the expected results are that firms' capabilities with regards to innovation, learning, and internationalization, which increase their competitiveness, are enhanced by institutional setups. Second, establishing relationships with governmental and non-governmental institutions is crucial in terms of accessing resources, innovating, and entering into foreign markets.

    Originality/value – The paper represents a contribution to the debate on the impact of globalization on the competitiveness of firms, particularly SMEs, in LDCs. Although globalization has brought considerable benefits to many actors worldwide, its impact on competitiveness of (SMEs) are controversial. We suggest that globalization's effects depend on the capability of firms to learning, to innovate, and also on the institutional setup in LDCs.

  • 78.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Amal, Mohamed
    Raboch, Henrique
    The Internationalization of Multinational Companies (MNCs): An intra-sector comparison among firms from developing and developed countries2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the international statistic data of the United Nations Conference of Trade and Development (Unctad, 2008), the majority of Multinational Companies (MNCs) are from developed countries. However, in the last decade the participation of MNCs from emerging economies in the international flows of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) increased significantly, making them important global players. Although several scholars have addressed the internationalization process of emerging MNCs, no attempt has been made in the sense of directly comparing the internationalization process of firms from both developed and developing countries. To fill this gap, the aim of the present paper is to highlight the differences and similarities of the determinants and patterns of their internationalization. The integrated analytical model used in this study, which draws on insights from the Eclectic Paradigm and the Uppsala Internationalization approaches, has proved useful by helping to shed some light on the literature about MNCs’ internationalization process. The model in question has been structured in order to explore the differences and similarities of the internationalization processes of MNC from a developed and a developing country. This research uses a qualitative method with an exploratory nature, which allows deeper cross- cultural understanding. Multiple case studies of MNCs from countries with different levels of development (Brazil and Sweden) were carried out; this type of research allows addressing questions related to the determinants and patterns of internationalization. The results of the study show that there are strong evidences, which point out differences in term of ownership advantage development. However, the firms did not show substantial differences regarding internalization advantages. On the other hand, learning and experience of internationalization have been factors that have influenced the pattern and structure of the MNCs in both contexts. However, as the MNC from the developed country is more international and has longer experience, location decisions are no longer heavily influenced by these factors. The international network the MNC is part of and access to technology and knowledge partners are nowadays influencing the MNCs internationalization processes more. These findings are in line with earlier research that has pointed out that learning is most important in the early phases of MNCs international development while networks and location advantages are more important in later stages.

  • 79.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    A professional services firm's competence development2007In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1068-1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conceptualization of a firm's competence development has undergone some developments, as seen from the extant literature. However, studies or explanations of a firm's competence development over time seem to concentrate on firms that manufacture physical goods. The literature is devoid of studies on the competence development of professional services firms (PSFs). With two in-depth case studies, this paper seeks to shed light on factors that impinge on PSFs' competence development over time. An important finding of this study is that all the two PSFs' competence development over time has been influenced, in large measure, by their close and regular interaction with their respective immediate customers as well as with some significant third parties in their network of exchange relationships, where the actors mutually adapt to each other and also learn from each other. Evidences in all the two cases show that each of the firms has won and kept important customers that give them the most and frequent assignments per year, thanks to the factors that have affected their competence to meet customers' demand over time.

  • 80.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Analyzing Customer-Orientation Practices of Firms from a Wider Perspective2008In: Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, ISSN 1051-712X, E-ISSN 1547-0628, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 45-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to deepen our understanding of the extent to which a firm's customer orientation practice, and the outcome thereof, is affected by its network of exchange relationships.

    METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Building on a network approach, multiple case studies are used to highlight firms' customer-orientation and the effects thereof.

    FINDINGS: Close, regular and extensive interaction and exchanges with customers and third parties have enabled each of the firms in this study to win and retain important customers over the years.

    Research Implications/Limitations : Each of the PSFs' (professional services firms) customer orientation, with its concomitant result, has been facilitated by mutual value creation by the sellers and the buyers plus the sellers' exchange relationships with third parties. However, customers' interconnected relationships and a broader quantitative study incorporating several services firms need be explored in further studies.

    ORIGINALITY/VALUE/CONTRIBUTION: The study provides insights into how a PSF utilizes its own capabilities and complementary capabilities from third parties to create superior value and satisfaction to customers.

  • 81.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    As I Journey Along: A Ghanaian's Perception Of Life In The Diaspora2005Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The book gives accounts of the forces that drive many young people to migrate from the less Developed World, especially Ghana, to come and live in the Diaspora. Coming to live, work or pursue some goals in the Diaspora is for many young Ghanaians, for example, the ultimate goal worth striving after. In Ghana and in most Third World Countries, many people's perception of better life in the Diaspora is shared by many parents and some respectable people, a fact that also reinforces the drive to migrate to the Diaspora. That alone can help them develop their potentialities. But the journey is tough, full of adventure for all. How many have experienced the life in the Diaspora and how many feel detached from their place of birth, Ghana, are among the major themes discussed in this book. People that have migrated from their countries to seek fortunes or whatever in the Diaspora, Potential travellers and politicians in poor countries stand to gain from the experiences shared in this book.

    (Editorial review from Amazon)

  • 82.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Development of a Country is a Collective Effort: The Case of Ghana2008Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our case country Ghana, like many others in Africa, is characterized by, for example, mass poverty, huge foreign debts, poor socio-economic infrasturcture and entrepreneurial base, inability to meet the challenges of the forces of globalization, and heavy reliance on foreign loans and aid. Often times the development of the country has been the sole responsibility of a single entity, a government or a few ruling elites. It is argued in this book that to overcome the problems mentioned above, involving many actors (e.g. industry, government, universities, and the general public)will produce a collective effort, which will enable the actors to leverage their complementary capabilities to bring about a sustainable economic development. In this book we emphasize areas in which Ghana should invest now in order to effect sustainable development, which will translate into, example, poverty reduction, enabling environment for firms to emerge, grow and be competitive.

  • 83.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Small firms' use of their business relationships to cope with increased competition2012In: International Academy of Business and Economics (IABE) 2012 Venice Summer Conference, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The Impact of Globalization and Trade Liberalization on Competitiveness of Firms in Less Developed Countries: A Longitudinal Study2009In: International Journal of Business Research, ISSN 1555-1296, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 7-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Abraha, Desalegn Gebrekidan
    School of Technology and Society, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Networked (interactive) position: a new view of developing and sustaining competitive advantage2008In: Competitiveness Review: an international business journal, ISSN 1059-5422, E-ISSN 2051-3143, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 333-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – In the extant literature a firm's development of its competitive advantage is seen to be the task of the firm alone. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new and a broader approach of how competitive advantage can be developed and maintained in today's highly competitive and dynamic markets. To this end, how a firm handles its relationships with significant actors in its network becomes very decisive for the development of its competitive advantage.

    Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on a network approach, case studies have been used to shed lights on the extent to which the development of competitive advantage of firms affect and are affected by their interaction with some actors in a network of exchange relationships.

    Findings – An important conclusion of this study is that a firm's highly valued performance, an indication of its strong position or competitive strength, has its roots in its regular and intensive interaction with some significant actors in its network.

    Research limitations/implications – All firms in this study have demonstrated that competitive advantage can be achieved by building up a strong position through interaction, learning and adaptation with some significant actors in the marketplace. Since the study is based on one setting, extending a similar study to several settings will be very useful.

    Originality/value – The paper provides insights into how a firm, in the effort to build its competitive advantage, draws on its own capabilities and complementary capabilities of its partners in a network.

  • 86.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Abraha, Desalegn Gebrekidan
    University of Skövde, P.O. Box 408, SE-541 28, Skövde, Sweden.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    University of Gävle, SE-801 76, Gävle, Sweden.
    Relationships and Networks in the Processes of Establishment of Firms in Transition Economies: Scandinavian Firms in Central and Eastern Europe2008In: International Journal of Strategic Management, ISSN 1555-2411, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus on the particular entry mode a firm uses to enter a new market, rather than on the process of establishment, dominates in extant literature. To fill this void, we apply an establishment process model developed from the network approach to illuminate the web of relationship forms embedded in the establishment process of two Scandinavian firms as they attempt to establish themselves in transition economies. In one case, the results show that Statoil's process of establishment in Estonia was both less time-consuming and less resource-consuming because the firm drew support from significant actors in their network of exchange relationships. In the second case, a lack of home and host country support for Scania in Croatia resulted in an arduous and costly process and less stable position in the market, with the firm's position changing several times as different problems cropped up. In light of the findings from the two cases, theoretical and practical implications for managing the establishment process are discussed.

  • 87.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Abraha Gebrekidan, Desalegn
    University of Skövde.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    University of Gävle.
    Relationships and networks in the processes of establishment of firms in transition economies: The case of Scandinavian firms in Central and Eastern Europe2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Gebrekidan, Desalegn Abraha
    School of Technology and Society, University of Skövde.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    Department of Business Studies, University of Gävle.
    Interactive (networked) internationalization: The case of Swedish firms2011In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 45, no 7/8, p. 1112-1129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to provide deeper insights into the extent to which an  independent actor(s) actively collaborates with the internationalizing firm so as to jointly determine the choice of market, the mode of entry and the level of investment committed in the market to be entered and even after the entry (i.e. the ongoing activities). Design/methodology/approach – Against the previous purpose section, a qualitative research approach is selected to guide the exploratory nature of this study. Thus qualitative data are used to build the two case studies because case studies are generally a more appropriate approach when “how” and “why” questions are being posed and when the investigator has little control over events. Findings – Based on two multiple case studies, one major finding of the study shows that independent actors, with their interconnected networks, have played and are still playing a major role in influencing the internationalization processes of each of the two firms in this study. Originality/value – This is an original paper developed based on two case studies which have not been published in any journal before. The paper highlights the role of external independent actors in internationalization, which is not mentioned at all or stressed in the extant literature.

  • 89.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Univ of Blumenau, Brazil.
    A communicacäo com consumidores através da Internet: Um estudo da communicacäo - online de hotéls (Brasil, Gana e Suecia)2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Univ. of Blumenau, Brazil.
    Place marketing: a cross-country study os a place marketer's use of its network of relationships - Brazil and Sweden2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Univ. of Blumenau, Brazil.
    Place marketing: A study of a place marketer's use of its networks of relationships2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Universidade Regional de Blumenau.
    Potential tourists’ image of a tourist destination: The case of Brazil2011In: Research on Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management 2009‐2011: Introducing the Research Area of Innovation Science / [ed] Sven-Åke Hörte, Halmstad: Högskolan i Halmstad , 2011, p. 135-148Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research deals with the image, which potential tourists may have about a tourist destination.Using a quantitative approach and a marketing and communication perspective, we tried to investigate how Brazil is seen by potential tourists who happened to be European students studying at the Halmstad University, Sweden. The research highlighted six categories, upon which the tourists’ image of Brazil is based, namely hospitality of the population, sexuality, tourism infrastructure, environment, economy, protection and safety. The results show that the image held by the studied target group about Brazil as a tourist destination, is an exotic country with a friendly population with an exuberant nature; the main identity icons are football and carnival events. Entertainment and fun are some other positive attributes mentioned by the respondents. However, violence and fragile security are the main concerns for the respondents.

  • 93.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    University of Blumenau, Brazil.
    Small firms' use of their business relationships to cope with increased competition2012In: International Journal of Business Strategy, ISSN 1553-9563, E-ISSN 2378-8585, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 36-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to explore the effect of how small firms draw on their limited networks to develop their markets and serve them well, a performance that will guarantee their survival and success. Drawing on a business relationship approach, two case studies have been used to highlight the extent to which exchange relationships have impacted on the performance of the small firms in this study. As an important finding, the study highlights the extent to which regular and intensive interactions between the case companies and the limited actors in their network have enabled each of the case companies to develop their respective niche markets and serve them well, something which also explains their survival and ability to win and retain loyal customers.

  • 94.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    University of Blumenau, Brazil.
    Place Marketing: A Study of a Place Marketer's use of its Network of Relationships2010In: Journal of International Management Studies, ISSN 1690-2140, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 14-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of winning and retaining investors who establish businesses in a particular place is under-researched. The purpose of this study is to analyze the extent to which place marketers (seller) and potential investors interact in order to establish, develop and maintain a win- win exchange relationships. A cross-country study, with multiple case studies, was used as method. The result shows that the seller has been able to win and maintain clients. The seller-client exchange relationships have been influenced by interaction with third parties. The seller-client interactions have been going on before, during, and after clients’ location of operations.

  • 95.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Universidade Regional de Blumenau, Brazil.
    The use of Internet as a marketing strategy in hotel market: A comparison between Brazil, Ghana, and Sweden2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new information technologies (NIT), especially the Internet, have created opportunities for companies. NIT can be used as a tool to execute marketing activities on three levels: (1) a firm can convey information about its products and services, using various communications tools, (2) conduct transactions by means of e-commerce and deliver its products/services online or (3) by the help of the conventional delivering way. In the tourism market, which is an information-oriented phenomenon, the NIT has had strong influence because people use the Internet to search for information to better plan their trips. In the hotel business, for example, the customers search for the company’s core service and support services, which can fulfill their basic and secondary needs. In this perspective, this study analyzed how hotels presented their services, prices, and communicated with their customers on the Internet. The main objective was to analyze the presentation of the marketing mix strategies in the hotels’ websites. The methodology used was first an exploratory research and then a descriptive study. The method was a qualitative and the population was hotels from three countries, Ghana, Sweden and Brazil. The results showed that the information aired in the hotels’ web pages were clearly directed to their respective target audience. To promote their services, the companies studied used, as their main communication tools, advertising, Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and public relations. It can be inferred that the companies uniformly used marketing and communication tools in their websites. Thus, to market their services, no difference was found among the three firms’ use of those tools.

  • 96.
    Callaghan, Michael
    et al.
    Deakin University, Geelong, Vic, Australia.
    Wood, Greg
    Deakin University, Geelong, Vic, Australia.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Singh, Jang
    University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada.
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Codes of ethics artifacts in Australia, Canada and Sweden: A longitudinal study2013In: Looking Forward, Looking Back: Drawing on the Past to Shape the Future of Marketing: Proceedings of The 16th Biennial World Marketing Congress / [ed] Colin Campbell & Junzhao (Jonathon) Ma, Ruston, LA: Academy of Marketing Science , 2013, p. 108-108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the Partnership Model of Corporate Ethics (Wood 2002), this longitudinal study examined the measures in place to communicate the ethos of the corporate codes of ethics to internal stakeholders in three countries: Australia, Canada and Sweden. This paper reports the comparative codification of ethics amongst the top companies in these countries over three time periods: 2001-2002, 2005-2006 and 2010-2011.

  • 97.
    Campbell, Derek
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Halila, Fawzi
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The Clash of Business Models in Emerging Economies: The Case of Wind Energy Industry in Africa2013In: The International Journal of Management Science and Information Technology, ISSN 1923-0265, no 10, p. 10-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise of emerging economy EE as main engine of global growth, the intensified competition in the wind energy industry and internationalization to EE, enterprises need to rethink and innovate their business models in order to succeed. The overall purpose of this article is to increase our understanding of the drivers of business model innovation (BMI) in EE, particularly in the wind energy industry. Qualitative, multi-case design is applied, where three cases within the wind energy industry in Africa are studied - Siemens (Germany), Suzlon (India) and Goldwind (China). The results show that there is a difference between “Developed-country Multinational Enterprises” (DMNEs), such as Siemens, and “Emerging-country Multinational Enterprises”, such as Suzlon and Goldwind, in the way they approach BMI in EE. To gain a competitive advantage in EE requires capabilities to deal with the specific EE-related drivers of change: 1) fast growth and high demand combined with high uncertainty; 2) lower level of market-oriented socioeconomic development; 3) stronger governmental influence on the market; and 4) the need for simple, cheap and easy to maintain technologies. Therefore, it is important that managers position their enterprises in the EE first as local players and only then as multinationals. Our study indicates that future research should focus on the main elements and the drivers of change that would shape BMI by adding new variables, specifically related to EE.

  • 98.
    Chibba, Aron
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK).
    Rundquist, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Effective Information Flow in the Internal Supply Chain: Results from a snowball method to map information flows2009In: Journal of Information & Knowledge Management, ISSN 0219-6492, E-ISSN 1793-6926, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 331-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information sharing is an important factor for effectiveness within the internal supply chain. In this paper we use a methodology for mapping information flows in an internal supply chain, and case studies in two Swedish multinational organizations. Eight retrospective cases were used to map, describe and analyze the information flow that supports the physical material flow from the receipt of an order to point of delivery. Every involved person was interviewed on at least one occasion each. The interviews were conducted to map and describe the information and physical material flow. The aim was to identify factors that could improve and rationalise information flows and generate a better flow within the organization.

    The study shows the importance of an integrated information system, but also clearly indicates the importance of a collaborative culture and an awareness of the human-technology interface. The study also shows that three factors of interface distortions are most frequent in the cases: (1) changes registered in the database trigger no action among the staff, (2) new knowledge to staff is stored only orally and not in the database, and (3) interface between the paper system and the database, and between the old and the new information storage culture.

  • 99.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2). Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai, China.
    Halila, Fawzi
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Lihua Liu, Jasmine
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2). Shanghai Dianji University, School of Business, Shanghai, China.
    Business Model Innovation for the Internationalization of Chinese Wind Power Industry2014In: Global Business Model Innovation: An International Conference, Shanghai: Shanghai Dianji University , 2014, p. 48-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy consumption, pollutions and sustainable approaches to energy is one of the most important issues today. The transformation of energy from old to renewable has been in focus for many years and wind power energy production is one important source of energy that is renewable. With the rise of emerging economy (EEs) as main engine of global growth, the intensified competition in the wind energy industry and internationalization to EEs, enterprises need to rethink and innovate their business models in order to succeed in innovative technologies and commercializing their innovative technologies to customers. The overall purpose of this article is to explore the drivers of business model innovation (BMI) in emerging-country multinational enterprises (EMNEs) in the context of an EE markets particularly Chinese wind energy industry and with special focus on inclusive business activities in Africa. For this purpose a single case study of Goldwind (China), one of the most important actors in the wind power industry, was applied. The results of this research show that to gain a competitive advantage in EEs requires capabilities to deal with the specific EEs related drivers of change: 1) fast growth and high demand combined with high uncertainty; 2) lower level of market-oriented socioeconomic development; 3) stronger governmental influence on the market; and 4) the need for simple, cheap and easy to maintain technologies. Therefore, it is important that managers position their enterprises in the EEs first as local players and only then as multinationals. Our research identifies a symbiotic business model in which industry and political actors on national, province and city level collaborate intensively for mutual benefits and for commercializing wind power technology. Our study indicates that future research should focus on the main elements and the drivers of change that would shape BMI by adding new variables, specifically related to EE.

  • 100.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Hensbergen, Marleen
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Zadayannaya, Liudmila
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Exploring Diffusion and Dynamics of Corporate Social Responsibility2015In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 129-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the evolution of the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in academia. The process of evolution is conceptualised to consist of diffusion and dynamics. Bibliometrics were applied for data collection and visualisation of the evolution of CSR. The findings show increasing complexity and progression in the research on the concept of CSR fuelled not only by the efforts for intellectual refinement in the field but also reflecting the changing priorities of society and businesses. The growth of this field of research both in number of publications (i.e. diffusion) and in terms of different fields in academic usage (i.e. dynamics), is an indicator for growing complexity and widening acceptance of the CSR concept across various academic disciplines in the future. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

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