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  • 51.
    Weisner, Stefan E.B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Strand, John A.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Ehde, Per Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Svensson, Jonas M.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Combating eutrophication and biodiversity loss in Sweden: importance of constructed wetlands in the agricultural landscape2007In: Multifunctions of wetland systems, Padua: PAN , 2007, p. 60-61Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The results of this evaluation show that constructed wetlands in the agricultural landscape are capable of a substantial reduction of the nutrient transport to downstream recipients, but only if properly located. These wetlands will also contribute to an increased biodiversity even if not planned primarily for this purpose. The use of wetlands for multiple functions needs to be developed to motivate large-scale wetland construction.

  • 52.
    Weisner, Stefan E.B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Effects of vegetation state on biodiversity and nitrogen retention in created wetlands: a test of the biodiversity–ecosystem functioning hypothesis2010In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 387-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Nitrogen retention in wetlands provides an example of an ecosystem function that is desired by human society, and is a rationale for the creation of wetlands to decrease nitrogen fluxes from nitrate-loaded river catchments to coastal waters.

    2. Here, we tested the impact of different vegetation states on species diversity and nitrogen retention during 4 years in surface-flow wetlands receiving nitrate-rich water. Tall emergent vegetation or submerged vegetation was introduced to six experimental wetlands each and six wetlands were left as unplanted controls for free development of vegetation. This resulted in three vegetation states dominated by emergent vegetation, by a mixture of submerged vegetation and filamentous green algae or by filamentous green algae.

    3. Species diversity (species richness and Shannon diversity) of plants was initially lowest in free development wetlands, but during the study became lower in the emergent vegetation wetlands than in the other wetlands. Diversity of macroinvertebrates was initially lower in the submerged vegetation wetlands than in the other wetlands, but this difference disappeared during the study. Nitrogen retention was consistently higher in emergent vegetation wetlands than in the other wetlands throughout the study.

    4. We conclude that plant diversity in wetlands dominated by tall emergent vegetation gradually became lower than in other wetlands, due to dominant species competitively excluding other plants. However, these wetlands were more efficient at removing nitrogen than those dominated by filamentous algae or submerged macrophytes.

    5. Management of wetlands often aims to decrease the dominance of tall emergent vegetation for the benefit of plant species diversity and habitat heterogeneity. Our results demonstrate a biodiversity benefit, but also show that this strategy may decrease the ability of wetlands to remove nitrogen. In this case, there is no support for the hypothesis that biodiversity enhances ecosystem function.

  • 53.
    Weisner, Stefan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Environmental Science, Wetland Research Centre.
    Johannesson, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Tonderski, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Näringsavskiljning i anlagda våtmarker i jordbruket: Analys av mätresultat och effekter av landsbygdsprogrammet2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurements of removal of phosphorus and nitrogen in created wetlands in agricultural areas in Sweden have been compiled and analysed. The results indicate the level of phosphorus and nitrogen removal that can be achieved in created wetlands in agricultural areas in Sweden. The results have also been used to develop new models for calculating removal of phosphorus and nitrogen in created wetlands in which measurements have not been done. Finally, these models have been used to estimate the removal effects that can be expected in the wetlands that have received financial support within the Swedish Rural Develop­ ment Programme in 2007–2013, and how much the transport of phosphorus and nitrogen to the sea will decrease due to the creation of these wetlands.

    The new results show that phosphorus removal has been underestimated in earlier measurements as well as in models used in previous evaluations. In individual well designed and located wetlands, a removal of 100 kilo phosphorus and 1 000 kilo nitrogen per hectare wetland area and year can be obtained. The new results also indicate that it should be possible to achieve a removal of 50 kilo phosphorus and 500 kilo nitrogen per hectare wetland area and year in wetland creation programs prioritizing wetlands that are located and designed primarily for nutrient removal. The costs are estimated to 100 SEK per kilo phosphorus and 10 SEK per kilo nitrogen, if 50 percent of the costs are allocated to biodiversity and other ecosystem services.

    Model calculations based on a selection of representative wetlands within the Rural Development Programme were scaled up to the 5 261 hectare wetland area that have been granted financial support during 2007–2013. The evaluation show that the Rural Development Programme will result in a reduced transport to local waters­ heds of about 25 tons of phosphorus and 200 tons of nitrogen per year. Therefore, the transport to the sea will decrease with about 18 tons of phosphorus per year and about 170 tons of nitrogen per year, corresponding to 1.9 and 0.5 percent, respectively, of the transport to the sea from agricultural land.

    Creation of wetlands within the Rural Development Programme has thus resulted in significant decreases of transports of phosphorus and nitrogen to inland waters and the coastal sea. However, a comparison of removal per hectare wetland area and year between what has been achieved within the Rural Development Programme and in individual wetlands suggests that the effect could be substantially increased with a better location and design of wetlands.

  • 54.
    Weisner, Stefan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Mietto, Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Ehde, Per Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Persson, Jesper
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, SWEDEN.
    Influence of vegetation on hydraulics in experimental surface-flow wetlands2009In: 3rd Wetland Pollutant Dynamics and Control - WETPOL 2009 - Barcelona / [ed] Josep M. Bayona & Joan García, 2009, p. 179-180Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Weisner, Stefan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Svensson, Jonas M.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Strand, John A.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Svengren, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Combating eutrophication in Sweden: Importance of constructed wetlands in agricultural landscapes2005In: Is living water possible in agricultural areas?: Seminar on ecological engineering tools to combat diffuse pollution: June 20-22, 2005, Norway: Proceedings from NJF seminar no. 374 / [ed] Bent C. Braskerud, Ås, Norway: Jordforsk , 2005, p. 66-69Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Wetland Centre at Halmstad University was commissioned by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and the Swedish Board of Agriculture to evaluate the effects of artificially created wetlands in Sweden between the years 1996 and 2002 with regard to nutrient retention and biodiversity. The creation of these wetlands has been financed either by Rural Development Support (RDS: Miva, Project support or Lmiva without Project support) or by Local Investment Programmes (LIP). The results are presented separately for the four different categories of constructed wetlands:

    • Constructed wetlands financed by LIP (Local Investment Programmes) (1998-2002).
    • Constructed wetlands financed by PS (Project Support) (2000-2002).
    • Constructed wetlands financed by Miva (Restoration and Establishment of Wetlands and Ponds on Arable land and Semi-natural Grazing land) (1996-1999).
    • Constructed wetlands financed by Lmiva (RDS wetlands that only get management support) (2000-2002).

    The main purpose of this study has been to evaluate the extent to which wetlands created by means of these different support systems have contributed to reduced eutrophication and increased biodiversity. The purpose has not been to evaluate individual wetlands but to give an overview of the differences in efficiency between the various support systems and, to some extent, the difference in results between various geographical regions within Sweden. It has therefore been necessary to include a large number of wetlands in the evaluation, which means that extensive field sampling in the individual wetlands has not been possible. The estimates concerning nutrient retention has therefore been based on modelling, and the biodiversity has been assessed by using dragonflies (Odonata) as indicator organisms.

    Information on 908 wetlands with a total area of 2860 hectares financed by RDS has been compiled and registered. In terms of area, these wetlands divide into 1815 ha financed by Miva, 920 ha financed by PS and 125 ha by Lmiva. In addition, 274 wetlands created by means of LIP, with a total area of 439 ha, have been registered. Field surveys and sampling has been conducted in more than 100 wetlands randomly selected from this register. It is mainly the results from these selected wetlands that are presented here.

  • 56.
    Weisner, Stefan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Mindre fosfor och kväve från jordbrukslandskapet: Utvärdering av anlagda våtmarker inom miljö- och landsbygdsprogrammet och det nya landsbygdsprogrammet2010Report (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Weisner, Stefan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Tonderski, Karin
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Biomassa kan produceras och näring återvinnas: Ett framtidsperspektiv2002In: Våtmarksboken: Skapande och nyttjande av värdefulla våtmarker / [ed] Karin Tonderski , Stefan Weisner, Jan Landin, Hans Oscarsson, Göteborg: Vattenstrategiska forskningsprogrammet (VASTRA) , 2002, p. 123-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Wiborg, Irene
    et al.
    Knowledge Centre for Agriculture, Denmark.
    Sørensen Langvad, Anne Mette
    Knowledge Centre for Agriculture and Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Hansson, Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Wetland Research Centre.
    Balskilde Stoltenborg, Trine
    Bridging the gaps between science, regulation and practice in water environment management2011In: Science for the environment - environment for society: Bridging the gap between scientists and practitioners in environmental science, Aarhus: Aarhus University , 2011, p. 31-31Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    AQUARIUS is an interreg North Sea Programme project carried out by 15 partners from 6 countries (Norway, Sweden, Germany, Holland, Scotland, and Denmark) all dealing with the implementation of the Water Frame Directive. A primary objective of the project is to find ways for sustainable water environment management which by AQUARIUS is defined as management that in respect of the rules both leads to “good water environment”, enables continued viable agricultural production, and is cost efficient in the interest of society. AQUARIUS works from social-ecological management perspective emphasizing the intricate linkages between ecological and social systems and the interdependent relationships among humans, that are mediated through interactions with biophysical and non-human biological units. As a project AQUARIUS copies the presently ongoing struggle by all EU member countries to create a public participatory approach to water management planning and implementation such as is launched by the EU Water Water Frame directive. it does so by engaging central water authorities, representatives from agriculture including agricultural advisors as well as research institutions in carrying out localized pilot studies in 7 pilot areas. Drawing on localized experiments with and locally founded experiences with different measures the project derives recommendations that may contribute to an EU policy approach. The special session aims at discussing the preliminary findings of the ongoing project. It includes the presentation of a heuristic tool consisting of relevant considerations to beware of when engaging in stakeholder collaboration on specific measurements whilst acknowledging the farmer as the central water management practitioner. The session also discusses some of the different pilot approaches to bridging the gaps between science, regulation and practice i.e. the concrete challenges faced by the approaches in trying to create outcomes that are mutually beneficial to various stakeholder interests. How can different stakeholders challenges be solved in cooperation creating a win-win situation for all? How can stakeholders (landowners) willingness to participate increase by seeing them as professional providers of eco-system services? When do stakeholders’ overlapping interests allow for collaborative action and when do they hinder it? These questions are among the issues to be addressed. One legal recommendation that may be derived from project experiences is a need to further to take the precautionary principle in public administration into account. In order to make sustainable solutions in an ever changing complexity, authorities need to make room for dynamic collaboration between science and practice.

  • 59.
    Widenfalk, Anneli
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7050, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svensson, Jonas M.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Environmental Science, Wetland Research Centre.
    Goedkoop, Willem
    Department of Environmental Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7050, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effects of the pesticides captan, deltamethrin, isoproturon, and pirimicarb on the microbial community of a freshwater sediment2004In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 1920-1927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In three microcosm experiments, we exposed microbial communities of a natural sediment to environmentally relevant concentrations of the fungicide captan, the herbicide isoproturon, and the insecticides deltamethrin and pirimicarb. Exposure concentrations were estimated negligible concentrations (NCs), maximum permissible concentrations (MPCs), and 100 times MPC (100MPC). Experimental endpoints were microbial community respiration and biomass, bacterial activity, and denitrification. All four pesticides inhibited bacterial activity by 20 to 24% at MPC, which corresponded to concentrations in the range of μg/kg dry-weight sediment. Treatments with deltamethrin and isoproturon showed inhibiting effects on bacterial activity at NC exposures. Surprisingly, for captan, deltamethrin, and isoproturon, this inhibiting effect was not observed at 100MPC treatments. Microbial biomass was negatively effected in MPC treatments with deltamethrin and in NC treatments with isoproturon. The tested pesticides did not affect community respiration and denitrification rates. These results show that exposure to the tested pesticides may induce toxic responses in sediment microbial communities at concentrations that are predicted to be environmentally safe.

12 51 - 59 of 59
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