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  • 51.
    Norell Pejner, Margaretha
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dealing with daily emotions – supportive activities for the elderly in a municipal care setting2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, no 9510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are diverse descriptions of supportive activities in nursing to be found in the literature. That which they have in common is their association with good care outcomes, but they may differ depending on the context in which the care is given. In a Swedish municipal elderly care setting registered nurses work in a consultative way and they describe a part of their tasks as being comprised of supportive activities without specifying what kind supportive activities they mean. The aim of the study was to explore the main concern of the support given by registered nurses to a group of patients in an elderly home care setting. The study was conducted using Grounded Theory (GT). Data was collected using non participant observations regarding the supportive activities of 12 registered nurses at the home of 36 patients between 80 and 102 years. The core category was about dealing with today's emotions. This was done by encouraging the situation and reducing patient's limitations, but situations also occurred in which there was a gap of support. Support was about capture the emotions that the patient expressed for the moment, but there were also situations in which registered nurses chose not to give support. In order to develop a holistic eldercare more knowledge is needed about the factors causing the registered nurses to choose not to provide support on some occasions. Copyright © 2012 N. Dauman & S. I. Erlandsson.

  • 52.
    Norell Pejner, Margaretha
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Kihlgren, Annica
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Trying to cope with everyday life - Emotional support in municipal elderly care setting2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, article id 19613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotional support is considered to be important to older patients because it is a contributing factor to experiencing goodhealth and it has been shown that it can prevent depression after a hip fracture. Opinions differ on whether emotionalsupport falls within the field of nursing, and studies also show that nurses in an elderly home care setting fail when it comesto giving emotional support. The aim of this study was to explore reasons for registered nurses to give emotional support toolder patients in a municipal home care setting. The study was conducted using Grounded Theory. Data collection wascarried out through interviews with 16 registered nurses. The inclusion criteria were emotional support given to patientsaged 80 years and above living in ordinary or sheltered housing and who were in need of help from both the home helpservice and registered nurses. The results show that the main concern of emotional support was ‘‘Trying to relieve thepatient from their emotions so they are able to cope with everyday life.’’ This core category illustrates how registered nursestried to support the patients’ own strength, so that they were able to move forward. Registered nurses consider that theycould support the patients because they give them access to, or could create access to, their emotions, but there were alsotimes when they felt helplessness and as a result, consciously opted out. The results also indicate that registered nurses werekeen to give emotional support. To develop patient-centered elderly care, more knowledge of emotional support and theelderly’s need for this support is required. © 2012 N. Dauman & S. I. Erlandsson.

  • 53.
    Pelters, Britta
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    On mountains and prophets: targeting majorities to support minorities by using norm-critics in health education2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no sup1: Equal Health, article id 1522203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This debate article advocates for norm-critics instead of empowering coping and pedagogy of tolerance as an educational approach to mitigate stigmatization as well as blame and guilt for health-deviant minorities within the field of health disparities. Norm-critics is a way of making members of the (presumably healthy) normative majority uncover and question their healthrelated norms and raise awareness for the processes by which members of that majority re/construct images of stereotypic figures (such as “the fatso” or “the couch-potato”) with certain personal character traits which are to be condemned and, in doing so, limit the acting space of those identified as examples of those figures. The approach, its theoretical background, arguments promoting norm-critics, and some suggestions for its practical application are presented. It is concluded that norm-critics render a valuable and much needed addition to the health intervention repertoire. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 54.
    Pelters, Britta
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). VID Specialized University, Bergen, Norway.
    “Don’t stop believing!” From health religiosity to an equality-enhancing hermeneutic of health promotion2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no sup1: Equal Health, article id 1555420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Health beliefs are usually regarded as subjective understandings of one’s health. They can, however, be re-interpreted by drawing on the understanding that the structural features of the health discourse resemble the characteristics of a religion and on the spiritual dimension of health with its possibly salutogenic influence. The applicability of the notion of“health religiosity” and its consequences for individual health promotion are explored.

    Method: Data consist of already existent semi-structured interviews. These have been reana- lyzed in a deductive-hermeneutical way by using a five-dimensional concept of religiosity as deductive template.

    Results: The concept of religiosity proved to be productive and revealed that all health dimensions in the case are infused with spiritually ennobled ideas.

    Conclusion: We conclude that, irrespective of their factual accuracy, the salutogenic potential of ennobled ideas may best be utilized by understanding them hermeneutically. An explora- tion of a narrative hermeneutic approach to individual health promotion is suggested as the merging of meaning horizons in a hermeneutic dialogue is expected to increase awareness of spiritualized aspects of health beliefs. This may mitigate healthism and health disparities. Moreover, three challenges for individual health promotion are anticipated: realizing the situation, recognizing its complexity and resisting a simplistic practical approach. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 55.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Växjö University, Växjö , Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Växjö University, Växjö , Sweden.
    Stolt, Carl-Magnus
    Medical Humanities, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden & Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    In the midst of the unthinkable. A phenomenological life-world approach to the experiences of suffering and relieved suffering during the tsunami catastrophe, 2004.2009In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to highlight the instantaneous experience of suffering and relieved suffering that was presented on the Swedish Television (SVT) by those who experienced the tsunami wave in Thailand, 26 December 2004. The selected TV-interviews were watched, transcribed and conducted with an empirical phenomenological analysis. A phenomenological lifeworld approach, inspired by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, was chosen for the theoretical framework. The findings showed three main features: the motion, the stillness and the shift in perspective. The motion comprised both the motion of the wave and the motion it caused the victims in terms of external as well as internal disorder. When the tsunami waves withdrew, it was followed by stillness. The feeling of being unreal was prominent, triggered by lack of information and endless waiting. Another prominent feature was the victims’ incapacity to answer ‘‘how long’’ they had suffered before being rescued. The tsunami catastrophe seemed to be a timeless event. Caring for other victims meant a shift in perspective in one’s own devastated world to that of another person. The shift between focus and comprehension, contributed to the making of life-saving decisions, for the victims themselves and for other victims. The findings were mainly reflected on from the perspective of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, for example the experience of time as an embedded and lived now. It was also reflected on from the perspective of the German philosopher Karl Jaspers as a limit-experience and as a fulfilment of love. A suggestion for further research is to investigate how suffering and relieved suffering is experienced and encountered when further time has passed.

  • 56.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden & University College of Haraldsplass, Bergen, Norway.
    Sameby, Jessica
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Brodin, Sandra
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden & Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Barbosa da Silva, António
    Psykisk helsearbeid, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Out of the wave: The meaning of suffering and relief from suffering as described in autobiographies by survivors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 5323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of suffering and relief from suffering as described in autobiographies by tourists who experienced the tsunami on 26 December 2004 and lost loved ones. A lifeworld approach, inspired by the French philosopher Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of perception, was chosen for the theoretical framework. This catastrophe totally changed the survivors' world within a moment. In this new world, there were three main phases: the power of remaining focused, a life of despair, and the unbearable becoming bearable. Life turns into a matter of making the unbearable bearable. Such challenging experiences are discussed in terms of the philosophy of Weil, Jaspers, and Merleau-Ponty. The survivors of the tsunami catastrophe were facing a boundary situation and "le malheur," the unthinkable misfortune. Even at this lowest level of misfortune, joy is possible to experience. This is part of the survivors' ambivalent experiences of their lifeworld. In this world of the uttermost despair there are also rays of hope, joy, and new life possibilities. © 2010 Å. Roxberg et al.

  • 57.
    Schön, Ulla-karin
    et al.
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Grim, Katarina
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden & Institution for Social Work, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wallin, Lars
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, David
    Department of Social Work, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychiatric service staff perceptions of implementing a shared decision-making tool: a process evaluation study2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1421352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Shared decision making, SDM, in psychiatric services, supports users to experience a greater sense of involvement in treatment, self-efficacy, autonomy and reduced coercion. Decision tools adapted to the needs of users have the potential to support SDM and restructure how users and staff work together to arrive at shared decisions.

    The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the implementation process of an SDM intervention for users of psychiatric services in Sweden. 

    Method: The implementation was studied through a process evaluation utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods. In designing the process evaluation for the intervention, three evaluation components were emphasized: contextual factors, implementation issues and mechanisms of impact.

    Results: The study addresses critical implementation issues related to decision-making authority, the perceived decision-making ability of users and the readiness of the service to increase influence and participation. It also emphasizes the importance of facilitation, as well as suggesting contextual adaptations that may be relevant for the local organizations.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that staff perceived the decision support tool as user-friendly and useful in supporting participation in decision-making, and suggest that such concrete supports to participation can be a factor in implementation if adequate attention is paid to organizational contexts and structures. © 2018 The Author(s).

  • 58.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nilsén, Åke
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Perspectives on health and well-being in social sciences2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31468Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Staveborg Kerkelä, Ellen
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Linus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strand, Jennifer
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Individual experiences following a 6-month exercise intervention: A qualitative study2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 26376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Dropout is a common problem in various exercise interventions. The individual’s experience is believed to greatly impact dropout, yet little is known about the individual experiences of taking part in exercise interventions. The aim of this study was to examine individuals’ experiences following a self-determination theory based exercise intervention in order to gain understanding of how standardized interventions can be adjusted to fit individuals’ specific needs, capacities, and circumstances.

    Methods: A qualitative approach with semi-structured interviews was conducted with eight informants (three male and five female) aged between 26 and 47 years, whom all had participated in a 6-month exercise intervention with individual coaching based on self-determination theory and motivational interviewing. The interviews were analyzed thematically with an inductive approach.

    Results: Aspects that influenced the informants’ motivation and participation in the exercise intervention were linked to three themes: the frames of the intervention, measurable changes, and the individual’s context. The themes present information about the process and to what extent the informants felt that the intervention was adapted to fit their lives and needs.

    Conclusions: This study emphasizes the importance of individualizing exercise interventions to support individuals’ diverse capacities and psychological needs.

  • 60.
    Stenberg, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    How is the artist role affected when artists are participating in projects in work life?2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, during the last decade, the artist has come to function as a creative resource in workplaces. There are two organisations, Skiss (Contemporary Artist in the Contemporary Society) and Airis (Artist in Residence), that organise projects for artists and coworkers. These projects are intended to have a positive effect on the well-being of organisations and their employees through artistic means, and the artist often focuses on the social interaction between the employees in their work. The artists’ work involves frequent interaction with coworkers. The aim of this article was to describe how visual artists’ roles as artists are affected by their engagement in artistic and social projects at workplaces in Sweden. The focus in the article is on the social interaction between artists and employees. The study is a qualitative narrative interview study with fine artists participating in different projects in work life. Since the artist’s intervention is usually directed towards social relations in the workplaces, a social perspective on well-being is from a micro-sociological point of view. The categories in the interviews were how the artists worked with the projects, how the social interaction between artists and coworkers worked out, and how the artists evaluated the projects in relation to their ambitions. The results show that, many times, the artistic projects promote well-being in organisations and to some extent benefit the artist, but that the ability of the artists to actually function as artists can be problematic. ©2016 H. Stenberg et al.

  • 61.
    Sturesson, Anna
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Prepare the patient for future challenges when facing hemodialysis: nurses´ experiences2014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 22952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic kidney disease is a major health problem due to the significant financial burden for the healthcare system and likewise for the patient who needs the treatment. The patient’s whole life situation is turned upside down with chronic kidney disease when they are confronted with the forced change to start treatment with hemodialysis. Patients with chronic kidney disease experience a lack of adequate emotional support from nurses during the transition to hemodialysis. The purpose of this study was to explore nurses’ experiences of giving support to patients during the transition to hospital-bound hemodialysis. The study had a qualitative descriptive design with a content analysis approach; eight nurses from four hospitals in the south of Sweden participated. The results showed that the nurses gave threshold support with an openness and awareness of the patient’s individual needs during the transition, except that there seemed to be a lack of knowledge and ability to provide emotional support. Patient support during the transition could therefore be absent. Education, at local and national levels, is needed for the nurse to be able to give professional emotional support. Further research is also desired in order to provide nurses with the tools they need to give emotional support, which is of utmost importance. © 2014 A. Sturesson & K. Ziegert.

  • 62.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Group for Research on health promotion and disease prevention.
    In what direction should we go to promote health in mental health care?2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 7118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing recognition of the need for health promotion interventions in all health care today. In spite of this, health promotion interventions among patients with mental illnesses have been scarce in research, practice, and policies. There is also an ambiguous interpretation of the definition of health promotion in the literature. The emphasis in this paper is thus to (1) discuss why we should pay attention to the interpretations of the concept of health promotion and (2) present a possible model for what nurses do when they intend to promote health in mental health care. This paper was presented at the Nordic Conference of Mental Health Nursing in Helsinki, Finland in 2010.

  • 63.
    Svenningsson, Irene
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care FyrBoDal, Vänersborg, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Gedda, Birgitta
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care FyrBoDal, Vänersborg, Sweden.
    Health care professionals meeting with individuals with Type 2 diabetes and obesity: Balancing coaching and caution2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 7129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The burden of diabetes and obesity is increasing worldwide, indicating a need to find the best standard for diabetes care. The aim of this study was to generate a theory grounded in empirical data derived from a deeper understanding of health care professionals’ main concerns when they consult with individuals with diabetes and obesity and how they handle these concerns. Tape-recorded interviews were conducted with seven groups and three individual members of a diabetes team in an area of western Sweden. The grounded theory (GT) method was used to analyse the transcribed interviews. A core category, labelled Balancing coaching and caution and three categories (Coaching and supporting, Ambivalence and uncertainty, and Adjusting intentions) emerged. The core category and the three categories formed a substantive theory that explained and illuminated how health care professionals manage their main concern; their ambition to give professional individualised care; and find the right strategy for each individual with diabetes and obesity. The theory generated by this study can improve our understanding of how a lack of workable strategies limits caregivers’ abilities to reach their goals. It also helps identify the factors that contribute to the complexity of meetings between caregivers and individuals with diabetes. © 2011 I. Svenningsson et al.

  • 64.
    Svensson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    HIV/AIDS and Islamic religious education in Kisumu, Kenya2007In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, E-ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 179-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe and critically discuss the discourse on HIV/AIDS within the framework of Islamic Religious Education (IRE) in Kisumu, Kenya. It is based on data collected mainly through participant observation and interviews during five fieldwork sessions in the period 2003-2006. The context is the research project Islamic education and social development in Kisumu, Kenya, financed by the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA). The article describes how the issue of HIV/AIDS is present in the context of IRE, mainly in secondary schools in Kisumu, an area heavily affected by the pandemic. The framework in which teachers and students address the issue is one conditioned by notions of religiously correct and incorrect sexual behaviour and gender, and by the fact that Muslims constitute a religious minority in Kisumu. The article argues that the main role of the local discourse on HIV/AIDS and Islam in the context of IRE is to strengthen notions of religious and moral superiority, and hence boost the self-esteem of the Muslim students. Furthermore, it provides support for dominant views and norms relating to Islam, gender and sexuality.

  • 65.
    Svensson, Ove
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Gambling: Electronic friends or a threat to one's health and personal development?2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 7207-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gambling has become quite common in Sweden. The Swedish National Institute of Public Health (2010) has reported that about 70% of the Swedish population has gambled at least once during the last 12 months. Half of the population had gambled with money by 18 years of age and about 11% had gambled for the first time when they were 12-years-old or younger. In the report from the Swedish National Institute of Public Health, gambling problems are related to health problems and risky alcohol consumption. The highest problem rate is found among men aged 18 to 24; almost 1 in 10 had some gambling problems. The share of problem gamblers is found to be twice as high among the under-age gamblers as it is among the population as a whole. Young people gamble less but develop gambling problems to a larger extent than adult gamblers. In this article young people's gambling and their gambling careers are analysed as a natural part of their internalisation of other adult habits.

  • 66.
    Svensson, Ove
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR). Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Hallberg, Lillemor
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hunting for health, well-being, and quality of life2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 7137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health, well-being, quality of life, and lifestyle are central concepts within health science, although generally accepted definitions are still lacking. Lifestyle can either be seen as an independent variable and the cause of unhealthy behaviour or as a dependent variable, which is affected by conditions in the society. In the first case, the attention is directed on each individual case: maintaining or improving health requires changes in lifestyle and living habits. In this perspective, diet and physical activity are important features for health promotion. In the second case the attention is rather directed on structural conditions in society, for example the food industry, the lunches for children at school, and the "fast food" industry should be influenced to protect human health. The structural perspective has, so far, received restricted impact when it concerns prevention and promotion of health. Processes of individualisation in the society have to an increasing extent viewed health as an affair for the individual. The benefits of physical activity, healthy food and beverage, social support, and joy are documented scientifically. In general, the trend towards increasing responsibility for one's lifestyle and health is positive, but might reinforce the inequality in health. With an even harder climate in society there might be a risk that individual health projects undermine the solidarity and the will to accept costs for medical treatment and care for people who risk their health through an unhealthy and risk-taking lifestyle. However, we argue that peoples' well-being and quality of life presupposes a society that stands up for all people.

  • 67.
    Sällfors, Christina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fitting into the prevailing teenage culture: A grounded theory on female adolescents with chronic arthritis2009In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, E-ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 106-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to deepen the understanding of female adolescents' daily living with chronic arthritis. Tape-recorded open interviews were conducted once with six teenage girls (14-17 years), who also wrote diaries for a 12-month period. In addition, 12 interviews of female adolescents diagnosed with chronic arthritis selected from another sample in an earlier study by the authors were included in the data. The Grounded Theory (GT) method was used for analysing the diaries and the transcribed interviews. A core category, labelled Fitting into the prevailing teenage culture, and four related categories labelled (1) mastering a body in pain; (2) living one day at time; (3) using social support; and (4) fighting for health emerged. The categories formed a substantive theory illuminating living with chronic arthritis during adolescence. The theory explains and provides a deeper understanding of the main concern of these female adolescents and their strategies in managing their situation.

  • 68.
    Tideman, Magnus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group. La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Svensson, Ove
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Young people with intellectual disability – The role of self-advocacy in a transformed Swedish welfare system2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 25100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of young people in Sweden with intellectual disability have organized themselves during the last 15 years in self-advocacy groups for socializing, empowerment, and expressing opposition to the norms and attitudes in a society that labels them as disabled. At the same time, the Swedish welfare system has transformed dramatically with processes of far-reaching individualization, closure of the major institutions, decentralization of responsibility from the state to local governments, and an emerging welfare market where service users are turned into customers. The aim of this article is to analyse and discuss the significance of self-advocacy in the new welfare context. Data were collected over a period of more than 10 years using repeated interviews with members of two self-advocacy groups and participation observations. Findings suggest that participation in self-advocacy groups opens up members for increasing health and well-being through new roles and identities, and it strengthens their control over everyday life. Support is still needed, however, but in new ways; otherwise, the restrictions of the institutions will simply be reconstructed in the new welfare system.

  • 69.
    Wieslander, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Women’s experiences of how their recovery process is promoted after a first myocardial infarction: Implications for cardiac rehabilitation care2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A rapid improvement in the care of myocardial infarction (MI) in the emergency services has been witnessed in recent years. There is, however, a lack of understanding of the factors involved in a successful recovery process, after the initial stages of emergency care among patients, and in particular those who are women. Both preventive and promotive perspectives should be taken into consideration for facilitating the recovery process of women after a MI.

    Aim: To explore how women’s recovery processes are promoted after a first MI.

    Methods: A qualitative content analysis was used.

    Findings: The women’s recovery process is a multidirectional process with a desire to develop and approach a new perspective on life. The women’s possibility to approach new perspectives on life incorporates how they handle the three dimensions: behaviour, that is, women’s acting and engaging in various activities; social, that is, how women receive and give support in their social environment; and psychological, that is, their way of thinking, reflecting, and appreciating life.

    Conclusions: The personal recovery of women is a multidirectional process with a desire to develop and approach a new perspective on life. It is important for cardiac rehabilitation nurses to not only focus on lifestyle changes and social support but also on working actively with the women’s inner strength in order to promote the recovery of the women.

  • 70.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Journal club - a forum of discussion for scientific dialectics2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 4652-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the sometimes hectic routines of daily academic work, it can be difficult to find opportunities for naturally creative encounters with our colleagues, where we can jointly focus methodological issues in research. Where do we find the time and place for constructive discussions on published research? And how can we foster such meetings?

    As a senior lecturer and researcher, I have a strong interest in research seminars in the field of clinical activity, as well as long-standing experience of coordinating and leading such seminars. I also gained extensive knowledge of seminar dynamics from my doctoral studies at the University of Linköping.

    Over the years, I have developed a particular way of working with seminars, aiming to contribute to the establishment of interdisciplinary research groups at the School of Health and Social Science, at Halmstad University. One of my ideas was to take advantage of the privileged position of our university, and the fact that it hosts a scientific journal and its Editor-in-Chief, Professor Lillemor Hallberg. This is why I started the Journal Club in 2006—the same year that the International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being was launched.

    Initially, I simply sent an invitation to my fellow researchers at the School of Health and Social Science, explaining the purpose of the meetings. The idea was to use the Journal Club to discuss selected articles from the International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, and critically examine them.

    It is essential that the articles are distributed to participants well in advance, and that participants have had time to read the contents, so they are prepared to critically examine the aims, methods and results of the discussed articles.

    My vision with the meetings at the Journal Club was to give added impetus to scientific dialectics at the School, to develop a critical approach and deepen methodological understanding. We need a continuous reflection concerning qualitative research approaches and various standpoints with respect to research ethics, in order to increase methodological awareness in our research. In this way, the monthly seminars contribute to developing our competencies as researchers, as well as keeping our knowledge up-to-date.

    Another aim of the Journal Club is to be a discussion forum for interdisciplinary research issues, relating to health, life-styles, well-being and the quality of life. Uniting a critical mass at our school, and bringing about an engaging discussion, allows us to test our ideas in a stimulating dialogue with colleagues. It also provides an opportunity to widen and deepen our understanding of current issues.

    The Journal Club has met since the autumn term 2006, always on the same day of the week, at the same time and place, at the School of Health and Social Science. The objective is to give these encounters a “club feeling”, and to shape a tradition of a recurrent event at the School. Before each seminar at the Journal Club, an invitation is sent to all teaching and research staff at the School.

    The availability of the most recent articles from the International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, combined with the Editor-in-Chief's contribution to the seminars, gives the meetings an additional dimension, and strengthens the impact that the Journal Club has at Halmstad University. The role of the Club is also strengthened by the important position that the International Journal of Qualitative Studies occupies on our own nursing programmes, both at junior and senior levels. The articles are widely used and discussed on our Nursing science and Methods courses.

  • 71.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Maintaining families´well-being in everyday life2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 7206-7211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to discuss how everyday life changes for the family in the event of chronic illness or disability. It changes physically due to loss of body function and socially due to time and other constraints related to treatment or lack of mobility. Equally important, there is a psychological impact due to the uncertainty of the future. The article will explore how family participation can help to maintain well-being in everyday life. The family should therefore focus on their own needs as much as on the needs of the family members who are ill. In order to maintain well-being in everyday life, it is crucial for the family to create routines and spend time doing things that they enjoy. By doing this, the family will create a rhythm of well-being regardless of the critical family situation. Family members and professional caregivers also need to come together at the beginning and during the illness or disability event to discuss changes that could be made day-to-day for all those involved, thereby making for an easier transition into care giving.

  • 72.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Pham, Lotta
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ways of promoting health to patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease from a nursing perspective in Vietnam: A phenomenographic study2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health promotion plays an important role in the management of diabetes and chronic kidney disease, especially when the prevalence of the disease is rising in Vietnam. Nurses have been identified to be the front figure in health promotion; however, little is written about how nurses in Vietnam work with these issues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurses’ conceptions about how health is promoted, with special focus on physically activity, for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and/or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Individual interviews were done with 25 nurses working at two major hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. A phenomenographic approach was used to analyse the interviews. Nurses described how creating positive relationships and supporting patients to take part in their social context promoted health. Health was also promoted by educating patients and relatives about health and disease and by supporting patients to be physically active. The findings indicate that the Vietnamese nursing knowledge about health promotion needs to be gathered, and health promotion needs to be further integrated in the education. Further research is necessary to examine patients’ knowledge and attitudes about health and the efficiency of various health-promoting strategies in the Vietnamese context. © 2016 L. Pham & K. Ziegert

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