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  • 51.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborg universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Thernlund, Gunilla
    Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken, Lund, Sverige.
    Wieselgren, Ing-Marie
    Sveriges Kommuner och Landsting (SKL), Stockholm, Sverige.
    Systematisk litteraturöversikt – Organisation inom psykiatrin med fokus på autismspektrumtillstånd2013In: Autismspektrumtillstånd: Diagnostik och insatser, vårdens organisation och patientens delaktighet – en systematisk litteraturöversikt, Stockholm: Statens Beredning för Medicinsk Utvärdering (SBU) , 2013, p. 281-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Staland Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nilsén, Åke
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Perspectives on health and well-being in social sciences2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 31468Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Group for Research on health promotion and disease prevention.
    In what direction should we go to promote health in mental health care?2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 7118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing recognition of the need for health promotion interventions in all health care today. In spite of this, health promotion interventions among patients with mental illnesses have been scarce in research, practice, and policies. There is also an ambiguous interpretation of the definition of health promotion in the literature. The emphasis in this paper is thus to (1) discuss why we should pay attention to the interpretations of the concept of health promotion and (2) present a possible model for what nurses do when they intend to promote health in mental health care. This paper was presented at the Nordic Conference of Mental Health Nursing in Helsinki, Finland in 2010.

  • 54.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Barriers and Enablers Affecting Successful Implementation of the Electronic Health Service Sisom: Multicenter Study of Child Participation in Pediatric Care2019In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1-15, article id 14271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Children's participation in health care is one of the most important components in the management of their disease. Electronic health (eHealth) services that are adapted to the needs of children have the potential for restructuring how children and professionals work together. Therefore, a digital interactive assessment and communication tool, Sisom, was developed to give children aged between 6 and 12 years a voice in their own health care. However, the implementation of eHealth services such as Sisom in daily practice in pediatric health care is rarely investigated. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the process of implementing Sisom for children in pediatric care in Sweden. More specifically, the study aimed to (1) evaluate whether the implementation strategy was conducted as planned, (2) understand the barriers and facilitators of the implementation strategy in pediatric care settings, (3) gain insight into how professionals work with the specific intervention, and (4) gain insight into the usefulness and effects of the intervention from the professionals' perspectives. METHODS: A process evaluation design was used to study the implementation of Sisom at 4 pediatric care centers in Sweden. An extensive amount of qualitative and quantitative data was collected before, during, and after the intervention through self-report checklists, memos, and interviews with professionals. In total, 46 children, aged between 6 and 13 years, participated. The children used Sisom on two occasions during 6 months. When they used Sisom, a printed report formed the basis for a forthcoming dialogue between professionals, children, and their parents. RESULTS: To our knowledge, this is the first implementation study of an eHealth communication tool aimed at strengthening children's participation in pediatric health care. Key factors for successful implementation were alignment of the solution with the values and goals of the organization, health care professionals' beliefs in the usefulness and usability of the solution, and health care professionals' willingness to change their professional roles guided by the solution. CONCLUSIONS: The results from the study show that it is possible to restructure health care delivery toward a child-centered approach, if there is a willingness and preparedness in the organization to implement an eHealth solution with the aim of restructuring the way of working with children's participation. ©Petra Svedberg, Susann Arvidsson, Ingrid Larsson, Ing-Marie Carlsson, Jens M Nygren.

  • 55.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Arvidsson, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Barriers And Enablers for Successful Implementation of the eHealth Service Sisom for Improved Child Participation in Paediatric Care - A Multi-Centre Study2019In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Pediatric blood and cancer, Vol. 66, no S4, p. S112-S112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Patientdelaktighet och medverkan hos barn och unga2018In: Delaktighet och patientmedverkan / [ed] Ann Catrine Eldh, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 1, p. 59-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Svensson, Ove
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR). Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Hallberg, Lillemor
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hunting for health, well-being, and quality of life2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 7137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health, well-being, quality of life, and lifestyle are central concepts within health science, although generally accepted definitions are still lacking. Lifestyle can either be seen as an independent variable and the cause of unhealthy behaviour or as a dependent variable, which is affected by conditions in the society. In the first case, the attention is directed on each individual case: maintaining or improving health requires changes in lifestyle and living habits. In this perspective, diet and physical activity are important features for health promotion. In the second case the attention is rather directed on structural conditions in society, for example the food industry, the lunches for children at school, and the "fast food" industry should be influenced to protect human health. The structural perspective has, so far, received restricted impact when it concerns prevention and promotion of health. Processes of individualisation in the society have to an increasing extent viewed health as an affair for the individual. The benefits of physical activity, healthy food and beverage, social support, and joy are documented scientifically. In general, the trend towards increasing responsibility for one's lifestyle and health is positive, but might reinforce the inequality in health. With an even harder climate in society there might be a risk that individual health projects undermine the solidarity and the will to accept costs for medical treatment and care for people who risk their health through an unhealthy and risk-taking lifestyle. However, we argue that peoples' well-being and quality of life presupposes a society that stands up for all people.

  • 58.
    Telemo Nilsson, Sara
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Rexha, Laurinda
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    When the physical patient becomes digital: A study of the innovation “digital health care center” on the Swedish market2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Object of study: The innovation “Digital health care center” from a multi-level stakeholder’s perspective.

    Problem: A new technology era has opened up for new kind of innovations. Digital health care centers are a service that recently has been introduced on the Swedish market, which needs further investigation. To be able to better understand, explain and predict future behavior of an innovation the innovation could be theoretical conceptualized and classified. In the specific area of health care, new innovation should preferable be investigated in from a multilevel perspective, including different stakeholders opinions. One if the stakeholders are the customers. If new innovative products and services want to be successful, it required consumers to adopt the product or service, but relatively few studies have focused on the adoption of technology services among customers.

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to gain a better understanding of the innovation “digital health care center” in Sweden.

    Research question: How can the innovation “digital health care center” be described through a stakeholder perspective?

    Method: The empirical data were collected through qualitative semi-structured interviews and a structured quantitative questionnaire.

    Conclusions: The innovation digital health care center can from a multi-level perspective be described as an innovation that contributes and have an impact on the market and the healthcare industry in many ways. The innovation could be described as a complement to traditional health care. The innovation has influences from different theoretical classes of innovation which means that the innovation cannot be categorized in a specific class. The innovation can be considered successful because it facilitates for the patient.. According to the stakeholder group potential patients, a majority of the respondents thinks that increased availability and time-efficiency would be facilitating factors and reasons for using the service. The innovation is described by the various stakeholders as contributing to a better society. The care becomes more productive, cost effective, more available, and in the broader perspective, the innovation contributes to increased digitalization of the healthcare sector as a whole. There are many new possible fields of application which in the healthcare industry which could develop the innovation further. Strengths and opportunities with the innovation can be considering outweighing weaknesses with the innovation and potential threats of the innovation. 

  • 59.
    Thorén, Ann Britt
    et al.
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Åsa B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Stig
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan D.
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Measurement of skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation-do professionals follow given guidelines?2001In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 169-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since it is suggested that only effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival rates, quality control of training outcomes is important and comparisons between different training methods are desirable. The aim of this study was to test a model of quality assurance, consisting of a computer program combined with the Brennan et al. checklist, for evaluation of CPR performance. A small group of trained medical professionals (cardiac care unit nurses) (n = 10) was used in this pilot study. The result points out several points of concern: half of the participants did not open the airway prior to breathing control. Over 90% of all inflations were ‘too fast’ and 71% were ‘too much’. Only 6.5% of the inflations were correct. On average, the participants made 5.4 inflations per minute. Concerning chest compressions, 40% were ‘too deep’ while only 4% were ‘too shallow’. In spite of the fact that the participants had an average rate at 95 compressions per minute the number of compressions varied between 32 and 51 during 1 minute. When new guidelines are discussed, it would be beneficial if they were tested by a number of people to investigate if following the guidelines is at all possible. © 2001 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 60.
    Van der Elst, Kristien
    et al.
    University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Bremander, Ann
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    De Groef, Ann
    University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Grønning, Kjerstin
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing. Spenshult Research and Development Center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Mathijssen, Elke
    Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Vriezekolk, Joke
    Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Westhovens, René
    University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne
    Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    European Qualitative Research Project on Patient-preferred Outcomes in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (EQPERA): Rationale, Design and Methods of a Multi-country, Multi-center, Multi-language, Longitudinal Qualitative Study2017In: European Congress of Qualitative Inquiry: Abstracts, 2017, p. 117-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A successful medical outcome is no guarantee for patient perception of treatment success. Unraveling the patient’s perspective on outcome preferences is therefore crucial to deliver patient-centered, high-quality chronic illness care. Furthermore, the earliest stage of a chronic disease, such as in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), can be considered as a critical phase in the patient pathway for achieving optimal long-term outcomes. A Belgian qualitative study provided a first glimpse on what matters most to patients with recently diagnosed RA (1). However, there was a need for an international data set to better understand this complex phenomenon being studied, and to investigate whether the Belgian findings could be transferred to contexts with different national healthcare systems, practices and values. To this end, EQPERA –European Qualitative research collaboration on Patient-preferred outcomes in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis– was founded.

    Objectives: The overall research objective of EQPERA is to unravel longitudinally preferences for treatment and health outcomes among patients with early RA across Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden and Norway, placing findings in a context broader than Belgium. Furthermore, EQPERA aims to add to qualitative methodology research.

    Methods: EQPERA applies a qualitative, explorative, longitudinal research design, which was developed in collaboration with patient research partners and the patient perspective in mind. In each country, a purposive sample of patients with early RA will be individually interviewed between 3-6 months after start of the initial RA treatment and subsequently, the same participants will be invited to take part in a focus group about 1 year after RA treatment initiation. Interviews will be analyzed using the constant comparison method as described in Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. The longitudinal analysis will be guided by Saldaña’s steps for analyzing change through time in longitudinal qualitative research. To study the multinational findings, we will carry out a meta-synthesis of all locally gathered and interpreted data. The local research teams will independently employ a qualitative study, while the project leader will monitor the research as it unfolds and evolves. Moreover, to support consistency in data collection and the inter-coder reliability across countries, we will implement a detailed research protocol, a structured cultural translation and validation process of the interview guides, data collection templates, a quality assurance reporting tool and specific training sessions.

    Added value: Our innovative, qualitative, longitudinal research design goes beyond the abilities of the frequently used cross-sectional designs in qualitative research. A European research context allows to uncover subtle cultural differences in patient-preferred outcomes across more or less similar organized countries. This project is thus a first step in gathering widely applicable findings in a research area where evidence-based knowledge is lacking, yet, highly needed to tailor care processes and optimize patient outcomes. Various data management strategies are applied to ensure quality and trustworthiness of our findings, and to promote a smooth European collaboration.

  • 61.
    Weman-Josefsson, Karin Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    "e" som i engagemang?: Bilaga till etappen ”Framtidens friskvård, egenvård och jobbhälsa” inom Opinion Hälsa, april 20132013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 62.
    Weman-Josefsson, Karin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Halila, Fawzi
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Wickström, Nicholas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    An interdisciplinary project plan on Digital Innovations and Self-determined Exercise Motivation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Wikander, Robert
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Biomechanics and Biomedicine.
    Augustsson, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Biomechanics and Biomedicine.
    Kan ett nyutvecklat handledsstöd förbättra möjligheterna för funktionell träning av övre extremiteten för reumatiker?: En SEMG-studie2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In a general rehabilitation phase weight training is an important part because of muscle weakness may contribute lower functional ability and could lead to decreasing movement patterns. Limited range of motion (ROM) in the upper extremity is a contributing factor to individuals unable to perform everyday activities. Several studies have documented that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have impaired hand function due to reduced grip strength and limitations in ROM. Functional training is designed to strengthen the weak muscles that cause imbalance or pain while your body becomes more mobile. Using everyday movements and implement them with training will make the training more functional. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a new wrist support that increases the possibilities to functional training of upper extremities for rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    The study involved 27 women, 8 were diagnosed with RA and 19 healthy subjects. The average age was 38 year (20-73year). Muscle activity in m. trapezius and m. rhomboideus was measured using surface electromyography (sEMG) in three exercises to compare the differences between both RA and healthy, and with and without a developed product.

    The results showed that it was possible to perform functional training of upper extremities without using the hand grip strength. There were no significant differences in muscle activity in m. trapezius and m. rhomboideii with or without the product. The results also showed that rheumatic muscles are not different from healthy muscles. The participants' subjective opinions were very positive there 24 of 27 participants found it easier to carry out the exercise

    with the product and 9 of 27 felt it was easier to focus on exercise.

    The study resulted in a new wrist support that allows functional training of m.trapezius and m.rhomboideus for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  • 64.
    Wiman, Virginia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lydell, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Views of the workplace as a health promotion arena among managers of small companies2016In: Health Education Journal, ISSN 0017-8969, E-ISSN 1748-8176, Vol. 75, no 8, p. 950-960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several studies have shown that workplace health promotion leads to better health, increased productivity, as well as reduced absenteeism and presenteeism among employees. The objective of this study was to describe how managers in small companies (10–19 employees) perceive their company as an arena for promoting employees’ health.

    Method: A sample of 10 managers (four women) was strategically selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with each person. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis focused on both manifest and latent content.

    Results: Three main categories emerged from the analysis: the potential to promote employees’ health, responsibility as an employer and the need for external support. An arena for workplace health promotion is created when managers prioritise health at the workplace.

    Conclusion: Small companies often lack the knowledge and resources to manage health and safety problems and also have less access to occupational health services. This paper highlights the importance of the views of small company managers as resources for the development of health promotion. © 2016 by Health Education Journal

  • 65.
    Wubker, Ansgar
    et al.
    University of Witten/Herdecke, Essen, Germany & Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Health Devision, Essen, Germany.
    Zwakhalen, Sandra
    Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Challis, David
    The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Suhonen, Riita
    University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, Turku, Finland.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Lund University, The Swedish Institute of Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Zabalegui, Adelaida
    School of Health Sciences, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Mataró (Barcelona), Spain.
    Soto, Maria
    Gérontopôle de Toulouse, Department of Geriatric Medicine, University Hospital de Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Saks, Kai
    University of Tartu, Department of Internal Medicine, Tartu, Estonia.
    Sauerland, Dirk
    University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Institutional Economics and Health Systems Management, Witten, Germany.
    Costs of care for people with dementia just before and after nursing home placement: primary data from eight European countries2015In: European Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 1618-7598, E-ISSN 1618-7601, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 689-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dementia is the most common cause of functional decline among elderly people and is associated with high costs of national healthcare in European countries. With increasing functional and cognitive decline, it is likely that many people suffering from dementia will receive institutional care in their lifetime. To delay entry to institutional care, many European countries invest in home and community based care services.

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare costs for people with dementia (PwD) at risk for institutionalization receiving professional home care (HC) with cost for PwD recently admitted to institutional long-term nursing care (ILTC) in eight European countries. Special emphasis was placed on differences in cost patterns across settings and countries, on the main predictors of costs and on a comprehensive assessment of costs from a societal perspective.

    Methods: Interviews using structured questionnaires were conducted with 2,014 people with dementia and their primary informal caregivers living at home or in an ILTC facility. Costs of care were assessed with the resource utilization in dementia instrument. Dementia severity was measured with the standardized mini mental state examination. ADL dependence was assessed using the Katz index, neuropsychiatric symptoms using the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI) and comorbidities using the Charlson. Descriptive analysis and multivariate regression models were used to estimate mean costs in both settings. A log link generalized linear model assuming gamma distributed costs was applied to identify the most important cost drivers of dementia care.

    Results: In all countries costs for PwD in the HC setting were significantly lower in comparison to ILTC costs. On average ILTC costs amounted to 4,491 Euro per month and were 1.8 fold higher than HC costs (2,491 Euro). The relation of costs between settings ranged from 2.4 (Sweden) to 1.4 (UK). Costs in the ILTC setting were dominated by nursing home costs (on average 94 %). In the HC setting, informal care giving was the most important cost contributor (on average 52 %). In all countries costs in the HC setting increased strongly with disease severity. The most important predictor of cost was ADL independence in all countries, except Spain and France where NPI severity was the most important cost driver. A standard deviation increase in ADL independence translated on average into a cost decrease of about 22 %.

    Conclusion: Transition into ILTC seems to increase total costs of dementia care from a societal perspective. The prevention of long-term care placement might be cost reducing for European health systems. However, this conclusion depends on the country, on the valuation method for informal caregiving and on the degree of impairment.

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