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  • 51.
    Ingrell, Joakim
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Developmental changes in burnout perceptions among student-athletes: An achievement goal perspective2019In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 509-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined (a) the developmental trajectories of student-athlete burnout perceptions and (b) the within-person relationship between achievement goals and burnout perceptions. A three-year and six-wave longitudinal study was conducted with 78 student-athletes (30 young women and 48 young men, Mage at T1 = 12.7 years, SD = 0.44), attending a sport compulsory school. The Athlete Burnout Questionnaire and the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire were used. The results from multilevel growth models revealed that burnout perceptions increased for this age group over the three-year period. Furthermore, task orientation was significantly and negatively related to a reduced sense of accomplishment and sport devaluation. The results from this study underline the advantage of considering developmental processes when studying burnout. Furthermore, by focusing on the within-person effect of achievement goals, this study provides findings that support a motivational approach to the longitudinally study of burnout propensity among young student-athletes. The current study suggests that sport school staff should be aware of their student-athletes’ burnout perceptions and that these could change over time. Results also highlights that task-oriented goals might help decrease burnout perceptions, specifically reduced sense of accomplishment and sport devaluation. © 2018 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 52.
    Ingrell, Joakim
    et al.
    Department of Sport Sciences, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. Department of Sport Sciences, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Relationships between ego-oriented peer climate, perceived competence and worry about sport performance: A longitudinal study of student-athlete2016In: Sport Science Review, ISSN 2066-8732, E-ISSN 2069-7244, Vol. 25, no 3/4, p. 225-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a sample of student-athletes’ (N=64) first year (seventh grade) enrolled at a school with a sport profile, the aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate (a) levels and changes as regards to worry about sport performance, perception of peer climate, and perceived competence; and (b) the relationship in levels and changes between these studied variables. The primary results from latent growth models (LGMs) and parallel process LGMs revealed that, during their first year, the student-athletes’ level of worry and perceived ego-oriented peer climate increased, whereas perceived competence decreased. Further, the results showed that perceived competence was negatively associated with worry at the beginning of the students’ first year. The slope of perceived ego-oriented peer climate was positively associated with the slope of worry. Future research in relation to the findings is discussed, and recommendations for future actions are given.

  • 53.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The researcher in loving care: Inter-relatedness behind a mindfulness and sport injury prevention study2017In: Being Mindful in Sport and Exercise Psychology, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 215-229Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Psychosocial Factors and Sport Injuries: Meta-analyses for Prediction and Prevention2017In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies have suggested that psy- chosocial variables can increase the risk of becoming injured during sport participation.

    Objectives: The main objectives of these meta-analyses were to examine (i) the effect sizes of relationships between the psychosocial variables (suggested as injury predictors in the model of stress and athletic injury) and injury rates, and (ii) the effects of psychological interven- tions aimed at reducing injury occurrence (prevention).

    Methods: Electronic databases as well as specific sport and exercise psychology journals were searched. The literature review resulted in 48 published studies containing 161 effect sizes for injury prediction and seven effect sizes for injury prevention.

    Results: The results showed that stress responses (r = 0.27, 80 % CI [0.20, 0.33]) and history of stressors (r = 0.13, 80 % CI [0.11, 0.15]) had the strongest associations with injury rates. Also, the results from the path analysis showed that the stress response mediated the relationship between history of stressors and injury rates. For injury prevention studies, all studies included (N = 7) showed decreased injury rates in the treatment groups compared to control groups.

    Conclusion: The results support the model’s suggestion that psychosocial variables, as well as psychologically, based interventions, can influence injury risk among athletes. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016 

  • 55.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Karlsson, Jón
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden & Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden & Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Waldén, Markus
    Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden & Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden & Department of Orthopaedics, Hässleholm-Kristianstad-Ystad Hospitals, Sweden.
    Elite female footballers’ stories of sociocultural factors, emotions, and behaviours prior to anterior cruciate ligament injury2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to examine how players’ perceptions of sociocultural factors and intra- and interpersonal aspects of sporting experiences may have influenced the emotions, cognitions, and behaviours of elite female soccer players prior to the occurrence of ACL injuries. The research questions guiding the study were: (a) how did female elite soccer players perceive that their psychosocial experiences were related to their cognitive, physiological, and emotional states prior to their ACL injuries, and (b) how did the players feel their perceived states influenced their behaviours prior to injury occurrence. The participants consisted of the total population of female players (N = 18) competing in the Swedish women’s elite league, who incurred a total ACL tear during the 2012 season. Using a semi-structured interview guide, all players were interviewed post-season. We represented the data using a storytelling approach of aggregated creative nonfiction. The aggregated stories showed sociocultural rules and expectations of overtraining and placing pressure on athletes to play even if they were not physically or psychologically fit. Responding to pressures with potentially risk-increasing behaviours might raise the probability of becoming injured through a number of pathways. Team managers, coaches, and members of the medical team are recommended to develop environments that stimulate the players to engage in adaptive stress-recovery and risk-decreasing behaviours.

  • 56.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 365-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This single-subject case study adopted a narrative approach and focused on two objectives: (a) to explore an athlete’s career development, including the impact of injuries, and (b) to explore that athlete’s injury experiences in detail. The participant was a 26-year-old former elite handball player who had experienced two major anterior cruciate ligament injuries during his career. To guide the research process from the formulation of its objectives to the interpretation of the participant’s narratives, we followed the narrative-oriented inquiry framework. To collect the participant’s stories, a low-structured interview guide consisting of open questions and requests for information about the participant’s handball career and injury experiences was used. The holistic content analysis allowed us to conceptualise injuries as career transition processes embedded in the athlete’s career development. Moreover, the participant’s narratives made it possible to identify four phases of injury transition and the distinct psychological content (demands, resources, barriers, and coping strategies) relevant to each of the four phases. Based on the results of the study, we anticipate that athletes, sport psychology consultants, coaches, and members of sport medicine teams can benefit from greater awareness of the specific demands and barriers relevant to each phase of the injury transition process. This knowledge can be further used to facilitate the development of adequate resources and coping strategies to help injured athletes navigate the rehabilitation process and successfully return to active sport involvement. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 57.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden & University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Prediction of injury risk in sports2019In: Wiley StatsRef: Statistics Reference Online / [ed] N. Balakrishnan, Theodore Colton, Brian Everitt, Walter Piegorsch, Fabrizio Ruggeri & Jozef L. Teugels, John Wiley & Sons, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport injuries are a major problem associated with sport participation. To develop preventive strategies and programs, it is important to identify factors that will increase the likelihood of sport injuries. In most sport injury risk factor research, statistical analyses are performed; however, many of the most common statistical analyses provide limited information about predictors of sport injury risk. The common analyses used in previous studies do not acknowledge the complexity associated with investigating risk factors for sport injuries. To better capture this complexity, suggested in most theoretical frameworks, more appropriate of statistical approaches should be used. In this article we present how latent profile analysis, latent change score analysis, and latent growth curve analysis can be used to overcome some of the limitations with more traditional analyses. Lastly, we also elaborate on future directions for analyses in sport injury risk factor research. More specifically, we present how advanced statistical models, such as classification and regression trees (CART) analysis and random forest analysis, can be used to provide researchers and clinicians with results that are more clinically meaningful.

  • 58.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    Performance and Training Unit, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), 3Musculoskeletal & Sports Injury Epidemiology Center, IMM, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Negative psychological responses of injury and rehabilitation adherence effects on return to play in competitive athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis2017In: Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1179-1543, E-ISSN 1179-1543, Vol. 8, p. 27-32Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research offers evidence that psychological factors influence an injured athlete during the rehabilitation process. Our first objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the results from all published studies that examined the relationships among negative affective responses after sport injuries, rehabilitation adherence, and return to play (RTP). The second objective was to use a meta-analytic path analysis to investigate whether an indirect effect existed between negative affective responses and RTP through rehabilitation adherence. This literature review resulted in seven studies providing 14 effect sizes. The results from the meta-analysis showed that negative affective responses had a negative effect on successful RTP, whereas rehabilitation adherence had a positive effect on RTP. The results from the meta-analytic path analysis showed a weak and nonsignificant indirect effect of negative affective responses on RTP via rehabilitation adherence. These results underline the importance of providing supportive environments for injured athletes to increase the chances of successful RTP via a decrease in negative affective responses and increase in rehabilitation adherence.

  • 59.
    Johansson, Susanne
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kenttä, Göran
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Desires and taboos: Sexual relationships between coaches and athletes2016In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 589-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coach-athlete sexual relationships constitute ethical, behavioral, social, and emotional quandaries that are rarely addressed openly. Most of the current body of research in this area focuses on coaches' sexual harassment and abuse of children and female athletes. In the present article, we discuss legal coach-athlete sexual relationships and adopt a coach perspective. As dual relationships, coach-athlete sexual relationships blur the boundaries between professional roles circumscribed (usually) by ethical codes of conduct and private spheres of love and desire. We explore the problems associated with the limitations of dichotomous right/wrong ethical decision making and discuss additional ways to understand these relationships, accounting for coaches' and athletes' well-being, performance, gendered sexual agency, power, ethical dilemmas, sport policy, and legal implications. Our discussion raises questions about how to open up dialogue and transparency regarding coach-athlete sexual relationships and how to facilitate functional, healthy coach-athlete relationships. Finally, we provide implications for future research that include legal and consensual coach-athlete sexual relationships and advocate transparency, open discussion, and coach education about coach-athlete sexual relationship dilemmas. © The Author(s) 2016.

  • 60.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Managing injuries among young athletes2017In: Sport Psychology for young athletes / [ed] Camilla J. Knight, Chris G. Harwood, Daniel Gould, Abingdon: Routledge, 2017, p. 174-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Psychosocial factors and sport injuries: prediction, prevention and future research directions2017In: Current Opinion in Psychology, ISSN 2352-250X, Vol. 16, p. 89-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review provides an overview of recent theoretical and empirical developments regarding psychosocial factors related to the prediction and prevention of sport injuries, and highlights some of the most interesting areas of investigation that have been carried out in the past few years. For instance, a systematic review of the most cited and used theoretical framework in the field has recently been performed, which supports the model's suggestion that psychosocial variables, as well as psychologically based interventions, can influence injury risk among athletes. Based on substantial empirical evidence it is also shown that changes in stress and perceived recovery appear to predict injury occurrence in sport. Current studies, focusing on overuse injuries, also suggest that cultural norms and rules can be seen as factors that can indirectly influence the risk of becoming injured. Future research directions are presented such as the need for interdisciplinary injury prevention programs based on a combination of physiological and psychological interventions. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  • 62.
    Jordalen, Gro
    et al.
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Lemyre, Pierre-Nicolas
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Solstad, Bård E.
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The Role of Self-Control and Motivation on Exhaustion in Youth Athletes: A Longitudinal Perspective2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 2449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The depletion of self-control competencies has been explained by an external shift in motivation, and recent research has emphasized that controlled types of motivation and self-control competencies are positively associated with exhaustion in youth athletes. Using the self-determination theory and self-control theories, this study examined associations between athletes’ motivation, self-control competencies, and exhaustion experiences throughout a competitive season. A total of 321 winter sport youth athletes (173 males, 98 females, and 50 unknown gender; aged 16 to 20 years, M = 17.98, SD = 0.89) participated in this 10-week longitudinal study, including three time points. Using Bayesian structural equation modeling, associations between athletes’ reported level of motivation regulations, self-control, and exhaustion throughout their competitive season were examined in two mediation models. Constructs were associated in a conceptual and consistent manner. Simple mediation models showed credible indirect and direct effects of motivation on exhaustion via self-control within amotivation, and intrinsic, integrated, identified, and external regulation analyses. These credible effects were not replicated in the focused mediation model, when controlling for self-control and exhaustion autoregressive effects. However, direction of effects in both models was consistent and congruent. Findings consistently supported the interplay between motivation and exhaustion via self-control in youth athletes over an important competition period of the year. Autonomous and controlled motivation interacted with self-control and respectively predicted perceived exhaustion negatively and positively. Thus, autonomous self-control motives are important in preventing negative sport participation development over time. However, simple and focused mediation models showed different results, suggesting a necessity for accurate considerations of analytical methods chosen to investigate longitudinal mediation. Specifically, future studies need to carefully consider the time interval between measurement time points when investigating changes in dynamic psychological constructs, and include autoregressive longitudinal effects in order to predict change in levels of the outcome over time. © 2018 Jordalen, Lemyre, Solstad and Ivarsson.

  • 63.
    Josefsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tornberg, Rasmus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Böröy, Jan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Effects of Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) on Sport-Specific Dispositional Mindfulness, Emotion Regulation, and Self-Rated Athletic Performance in a Multiple-Sport Population: an RCT Study2019In: Mindfulness, ISSN 1868-8527, E-ISSN 1868-8535, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 1518-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of the study was to examine mediating effects of emotion regulation and sport-specific dispositional mindfulness on self-rated athletic training performance, following the Mindfulness-Acceptance-Commitment (MAC) intervention, compared to a Psychological Skills Training (PST) control group.

    Methods

    Sixty-nine competitive elite athletes who did not have any prior experience with mindfulness- and acceptance-based exercises, were recruited and randomly assigned into either a MAC group or a traditional PST group. Latent growth curve analyses were performed to examine longitudinal relationships among the study variables. Mediation analyses were conducted to test if the growth trajectory of each of the proposed mediators mediated the relationship between the intervention and perceived performance (measured at T3).

    Results

    Findings showed that the MAC intervention had an indirect effect on self-rated athletic training performance through changes in dispositional mindfulness and emotion regulation respectively. Further, the MAC-group obtained greater post-test improvements in athletic mindfulness, emotion regulation abilities, and perceived performance compared to the PST group.

    Conclusions

    Overall, findings suggest that dispositional athletic mindfulness and emotion regulation may function as important mechanisms in MAC, and that the MAC approach is a more effective intervention compared to the PST condition in reducing emotion regulation difficulties, as well as enhancing sport-relevant mindfulness skills and perceived athletic training performance in elite sport.

  • 64.
    Junggren, Stephan E.
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Elbæk, Lars
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Examining coaching practices and philosophy through the lens of organizational culture in a Danish high-performance swimming environment2018In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1108-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in coaching and coaches, as well as coach–athlete relationships, has for a long time been a traditional and solid part of talent development literature. In recent times, talent development research has employed a holistic ecological approach and emphasized the important role of a broader athletic environment in athletes’ development and a constitutive role of organizational culture in the success of such an environment. This case study uses the holistic ecological perspective to examine coaching practices and philosophy through the lens of organizational culture in a Danish high performance swimming environment. The environment was selected based on its performance success but also because of its nontraditional organization compared to typical Danish swimming clubs. Data were generated from in-depth interviews with six coaches, 30 h of participant observation of training and meetings, and analysis of related documents. Thematic data analysis was guided by Schein’s model of organizational culture. The findings revealed the organizational culture that incorporates specific features of coaching practices and philosophy through cultural artifacts, espoused values, and basic assumptions. In the artifacts, coaching practices were explicit (e.g. flexible training groups and schedules) and philosophy implicit (e.g. ongoing flow of feedback), while in the espoused values, coaching philosophy was explicit (e.g. swimmers as whole persons, long-term development focus) and consistent with basic cultural assumptions(e.g. swimmers’ autonomy as a basis for progress). The study revealed that the cultural lens was helpful in exploring consistency between what coaches communicate about what they do (and how and why they do it) and what they actually did (and how they did it). © The Author(s) 2018.

  • 65.
    Kilic, Ozgur
    et al.
    Academic Center for Evidence based Sports medicine (ACES), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Aoki, Haruhito
    St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan.
    Haagensen, Rasmus
    4Player, København, Denmark.
    Jensen, Claus
    Department of Sport Management, University College Nordjylland, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.
    Academic Center for Evidence based Sports medicine (ACES), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands & Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands & Amsterdam Collaboration for Health & Safety in Sports (ACHSS), Academic Medical Center/VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Gouttebarge, Vincent
    Academic Center for Evidence based Sports medicine (ACES), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands & Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands & Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa & World Players’ Union (FIFPro), Hoofddorp, Netherlands.
    Symptoms of common mental disorders and related stressors in Danish professional football and handball2017In: European Journal of Sport Science, ISSN 1746-1391, E-ISSN 1536-7290, Vol. 17, no 10, p. 1328-1334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was twofold, namely (i) to determine the prevalence of symptoms of common mental disorders (CMDs) among current and retired professional football and handball players and (ii) to explore the relationship of psychosocial stressors with the outcome measures under study. A total of 1155 players were enrolled in an observational study based on a cross-sectional design. Questionnaires based on validated scales were set up and distributed among current and retired professional football and handball players by the Danish football and handball players’ union. In professional football, the highest prevalence (4 weeks) of symptoms of CMDs was 18% and 19% for anxiety/depression among current and retired players, respectively. In professional handball, the highest prevalence (4 weeks) of symptoms of CMDs was 26% and 16% for anxiety/depression among current and retired players, respectively. For both the current and retired professional football and handball players, a higher number of severe injuries and recent adverse life events (LE) were related to the presence of symptoms of CMD. Players exposed to severe injuries and/or recent adverse LE were 20–50% times more likely to report symptoms of CMD. The results suggest that it is possible to recognize the population of professional athletes that are more likely to develop symptoms of CMD. This could create the opportunity to intervene preventively on athletes that suffered from severe injury and/or recent adverse LE that could lead to a faster and safer recovery and psychological readiness to return to play. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 66.
    Kilic, Ö.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Rosier, P.
    Royal Belgian Football Association, Brussels, Belgium.
    Gouttebarge, V.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Exposure to physical and psychosocial stressors in relation to symptoms of common mental disorders among European professional football referees: A prospective cohort study2018In: BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine, E-ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e000306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The study aim was to explore the association of physical and psychosocial stressors (severe injuries, surgeries, recent life events, social support) with one-season onset of symptoms of common mental disorders (CMDs) among European professional football referees. Methods An observational prospective cohort study over a follow-up period of one season (2015-2016) was conducted among professional football referees from Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Norway, Russia, Scotland and Sweden. Based on physical and psychosocial stressors as well as symptoms of CMD, an electronic questionnaire in English and French was set up and distributed by eight football federations involved. Results The prevalence of symptoms of CMD ranged from 5.9% for distress to 19.2% for eating disorders. A higher number of severe injuries and a lower degree of satisfaction about social support were significantly related to the occurrence of symptoms of CMD with an OR of 2.63 and an OR of 1.10, respectively. Conclusion A higher number of severe injuries and a lower degree on satisfaction about social support were found to be significantly associated with the onset of symptoms of CMD among European professional football referees. Referees suffering from severe injuries were nearly three times more likely to report symptoms of anxiety and depression. Referees who reported a low satisfaction of social support were significantly more likely to report symptoms of eating disorder. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved.

  • 67.
    Kiuppis, Florian
    et al.
    Catholic University of Applied Sciences Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Special issue of Sport in Society: Transitions in Sport Life2017In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1485-1486Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Kristiansen, Elsa
    et al.
    University of South-Eastern Norway, Notodden, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Solstad, Bård
    The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Roberts, Glyn
    The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Motivational processes affecting the perception of organizational and media stressors among professional football players: A longitudinal mixed methods research study2019In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 43, p. 172-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine professional football players’ perceptions of organizational and media stressors over a season using Achievement Goal Theory (AGT) as the overarching motivational framework. We elaborated upon the experience of the extant motivational climate and how playersperceived and coped with a number of organizational and media stressors during the season.

    Design: A mixed-methods approach was used in this longitudinal investigation with the quantitative testing of hypotheses (strand 1) complemented with interviews (strand II) exploring the perceptions of players of the target variables within their role in the team (captains, starters, and marginal players).

    Method: 27 players from one men's team in a Scandinavian Premier Division completed a series of questionnaires at ten occasions during the season. We used the Bayesian dynamic p-technique analysis to investigate the relationships between AGT constructs and stressors. At the end of the season, 11 players were interviewed. The qualitative data were coded and narratives were used when presenting the findings.

    Results: The quantitative results showed that a perceived mastery climate created by the coach was associated with low perceived magnitude of organizational stressors. The qualitative results revealed the main categories of organizational stressors were the selected line-up for games, injuries, and losing games. The results for media stressorsrevealed that task orientation was associated with low perceived magnitude of media stressors the following month, while ego orientation had the opposite relationship. The qualitative findings revealed that injured and marginal players were more sensitive to media questioning in a season where the team was acknowledged for their team performance.

    Conclusions: There are benefits of being task-involved through task orientation and perception of a mastery climate to combat the quantity, frequency, and/or intensity of the perception of organizational and media stressors in professional football. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 69.
    Kristén, Lars
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Klingvall, Bodil
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Jonasson, Mikael
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Open norm critical innovation for relational inclusion (ONCIRI).- “Nya idrottsredskap för barn med och utan funktionsnedsättningar”.2016In: SVEBI-konferensen 2016: Idrott-Skola-Samhälle: Program, 2016, p. 31-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion

    Inom samhällets och skolans värld råder en rad normer som kan kopplas till genus, etnicitet, ålder och funktionshinder. Projektets målsättning är att, tillsammans med företag inom industrin för redskapsproduktion och produktutveckling utveckla innovativa idrottsredskap som gör det möjligt att förändra och utmana normer som påverkar delaktighet inom ämnet idrott och hälsa i skolan. Trots att skolan idag har ett uppdrag att inkludera alla elever oavsett etnicitet, genus eller funktionshinder är många uteslutna från deltagande, beroende på normer och det faktum att möjligheten att använda och utveckla redskapen för undervisningen inte ses som prioriterad. Barn med funktionsnedsättning skulle vinna mer på ökade förutsättningar att få röra sig, jämfört med barn utan funktionsnedsättning. Barn med funktionsnedsättning har i utgångsläget en mer sårbar hälso- och välbefinnandesituation, vilken dramatiskt kan förbättras genom en ökad delaktighet. Hindren för en inkluderande idrottsundervisning har hitintills betonat barriärer som sociala, personliga, motoriska eller materiella aspekter. Med ett normkritiskt perspektiv, har detta projekt som utgångspunkt att utmana sådana aspekter och istället testa och utveckla befintliga och framtagna redskap för en inkluderande idrottsundervisning i skolan och under hela skoldagen.

    Syfte & teoretisk ram

    Syftet med forskningsprojektet är dels att testa och utveckla produkter och tjänster som gör det möjligt för en inkluderande undervisning i idrott och hälsa i skolan. Dels är syftet att studera hur barnen uppfattar de produkter som finns och utvecklas inom ramen för projektet. Projektet kommer att fokusera på barn med och utan funktionsnedsättningar och deras användning av olika befintliga och framtagna idrottsredskap för undervisning i idrott och hälsa i skolan.

    Tanken är att inte bara utveckla redskap för idrottsundervisningen som beskrivs som betydelsefulla och ges mening genom att barn med funktionsnedsättning kan använda dem. Tanken är också att redskapen som tas fram ska kunna vara användbara för alla barn, oavsett funktion, genus, etnicitet eller liknande och ska kunna utgöra en ny norm för användandet av idrottsredskap inom ämnet idrott och hälsa i skolan. I det hänseendet är barn med funktionsnedsättning utmanare av gamla normer och skapande av nya normer inom ämnet idrott och hälsa. Som utmanare och skapare av nya normer har barn med funktionsnedsättning möjlighet att öka välbefinnandet, genom ökad delaktighet. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) är centralt för hälsa och välbefinnande. Det normkritiska perspektivet och lärandet med focus på ”Hur vi lär” står i centrum.

    Metod

    Projektet kommer att använda sig av kvalitativa ansatser genom deltagande observationer, intervjuer och filmande av sekvenser på lektioner i idrott och hälsa så att resultatet så småningom kan bilda utgångspunkt för utveckling och utvärdering av idrottsredskap i ämnet idrott och hälsa i skolan. Projektet genomförs på 3-4 grundskolorskolor med ca 10-15 barn med och utan funktionsnedsättningar, totalt ca 50 barn i åldrarna 10-15 år.

    Förväntade resultat

    På kort och längre sikt:

    - utveckling och verifiering av metoder, verktyg och processer för normkritisk innovation.

    - utveckling av idrottsredskap till stöd för lärande och delaktighet för barn med och utan funktionsned­sättningar i idrott och hälsa.

    - projektet kommer att mynna ut i prototyper och nya sätt att använda

    idrottsutrustning och idrottsmaterial för testning och utvärdering.

    Diskussion

    Föreliggande studie och utvecklingsarbete kommer att bidra med kunskap och redskap som gör det möjligt för alla att inkluderas i undervisningen om idrott och hälsa i skolan. Tidigare forskning har många gånger fokuserat på funktionsnedsattas rättigheter och har haft en utvärderande roll. Många tidigare utvecklingsprojekt har fokuserat på anpassade idrottsredskap som inte varit tillgängliga för alla. Målsättningen är att utmana befintliga normer och att barn med funktionsnedsättning ska utgöra normen för utveckling av idrottsredskap för alla. Delaktighet i idrott och hälsoundervisningen kommer att göra en skillnad i framtiden för barnen med funktionsnedsättning, dels genom en förbättrad hälsa, och dels utifrån förändrade självförväntningar och en större tilltro till den egna kapaciteten under hela skoldagen.

  • 70.
    Kristén, Lars
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Klingvall-Arvidsson, Bodil
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ring, Mikael
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Ericsson, Anders
    Eleiko Sport AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Schough, Camilla
    Eleiko Sport AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bohman, Anders
    Rantzows Sport AB, Hjärnarp, Sweden.
    Havdrup, Lotta
    Rantzows Sport AB, Hjärnarp, Sweden.
    Open norm critical innovation for relational inclusion (ONCIRI).- “New Sports material for children with and without disabilities”2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’: Halmstad University, 22-23 November / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 26-26Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Kristén, Lars
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Lydell, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Physical activity for children in need of support: views from coaches from local sports clubs2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 29-29Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Larsson, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    A correlation study between vertical jump height and sprint in young female teamgymnasts2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Teamgym is a relatively new and emerging sport that originating comes from Scandinavia. Teamgym differs a lot from the most known form of gymnastics, artistic gymnastic. For example artistic gymnastics is an individual sport, while teamgym is performed by 6-12 members in each team. In general gymnasts have to acquire many skills at a very young age like jumping, bouncing and twisting in different directions. A good jumping ability has been linked to a successful performance for gymnasts and is defined by a gymnast’s capacity to jump upwards and then perform series of forward and backward rotations in a successful way. Plyometric is a type of training based on the stretch- shortening cycle (SSC) and is often used to improve an athletes sprint and vertical jump ability. Studies indicate that these two components have been linked to a successful performance in gymnastics but there are no studies that are looking at this correlation in teamgym. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate how strong the correlation is between the vertical jump height in counter movement jump with arm swing, drop-jump and 20, 25- meters sprint in young female teamgymnasts. Methods: Seventeen (17) female teamgymnasts participated to test their vertical jump ability by using countermovement jump with arm swing (CMJa) and drop-jump (DJ). Their sprint ability was tested through 20 and 25 meter sprint. The highest CMJa and DJ were correlated with the fastest time on 20 and 25 meter sprint. To study the relationship between the vertical jumps and the sprints, Spearman’s rank order correlation (rs) was used in SPSS version 20.0. If the correlation is between 0.30 to 0.49 (-0.30 to -0.49) it is considered as a medium correlation. Anything under these values is a weak correlation and everything above it is strong correlation. Result: CMJa showed a strong significant correlation with both 20 and 25 meter sprint and DJ showed a moderate non-significant correlation with both 20 and 25 meter sprint. When the weight was set as a control variable the CMJa showed a moderate non-significant correlation with both the sprints but DJ showed a strong significant correlation with both 20 and 25 meter sprint. Conclusion: No other studies have looked at the relationship between vertical jump and sprint ability in teamgym but the result of this study somehow reflects findings in studies looking at the same variables. The findings in this study can be useful for gymnastic coaches when they create training programs for their athletes. Coaches and gymnasts will know the value of a good jumping- and sprinting ability and that plyometric- and sprint training can improve the gymnasts skills. More research is needed on this type of gymnastics and future studies should look at these variables in a larger sample size and with more experienced test subjects.

  • 73.
    Li, Chunxiao
    et al.
    The Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Umeå Universitet, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wu, Yandan
    Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, China.
    The dynamic interplay between burnout and sleep among elite blind soccer players2018In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 37, p. 164-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic pattern between burnout and sleep among athletes is unknown. This longitudinal survey examined the interplay between burnout and sleep among blind elite soccer players. China national blind soccer team players (n = 10) completed measures on burnout and sleep quality through interview at baseline (month 1), and followed at months 2, 3, 4, and 5. The results of dynamic p-technique analysis, using Bayesian estimation, showed a credible relationship between burnout and sleep quality. Also, burnout had a credible lagged effect on subsequent sleep quality whereas sleep quality did not have a credible lagged effect on burnout. The results suggest that burnout and sleep are not reciprocally related and burnout may be a risk factor of sleep problems among athletes. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 74.
    Lilja, Josefine L.
    et al.
    Gothenburg Univ, Dept Psychol, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lundh, Lars-Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Dept Psychol, Lund, Sweden..
    Josefsson, Torbjörn
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Observing as an Essential Facet of Mindfulness: A Comparison of FFMQ Patterns in Meditating and Non-Meditating Individuals2013In: Mindfulness, ISSN 1868-8527, E-ISSN 1868-8535, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 203-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most comprehensive measures of mindfulness is the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) with five factors-Observing, Describing, Acting with awareness, Non-judging, and Non-reactivity. Hierarchical confirmatory factor analyses, however, have suggested that only four of the FFMQ factors (i.e. all except Observing) were components of "an overall mindfulness construct"-which is puzzling because Observing represents a core aspect of all definitions of mindfulness. The purpose of the present study was to approach this problem by a person-oriented approach, focusing on patterns on the FFMQ scales, rather than linear associations between them. Data on the FFMQ were collected on 817 individuals. Cluster analysis according to the LICUR procedure was used to group these participants in 13 clusters, according to their profiles of scores on the five FFMQ scales. Of the participants, 325 were categorized as meditators and 317 as non-meditators. To test hypotheses about the relation between Observing and mindfulness (which we assumed should be higher among meditators), the meditators/non-meditators categorization was cross-tabulated with the FFMQ clusters. The results showed that all clusters in which meditators were over-represented had high scores on Observing, and all clusters in which meditators were under-represented had low scores on Observing-which supports the hypothesis that mindfulness is related to high levels of Observing. The relationship between Observing and Non-judging, however, was found to be more complex than expected. The results are discussed in terms of mindfulness seen as a multidimensional skill, which may develop differently in various subgroups of individuals.

  • 75.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Profiles of Dual Career Competences of Swedish University Student-Athletes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining sport and education (or work) is termed as athletes ‘dual careers’ (DC) and it is an evolving area of research in Europe, guided by the European Union Guidelines on Dual Careers of Athletes (2012). In this presentation, results from a Swedish national study will be presented. The aim of the study was to investigate university student-athletes’ DC competences (i.e., knowledge, skills, experience and attitudes) for a successful DC. The study is part of the European project ‘Gold in Education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) involving eight other European countries. Seventy-one Swedish university student-athletes (mean age= 25.2) representing various sports completed the DC Competence Survey. The survey measured student-athletes’ perceptions (i.e., importance and possession) of 38 DC competences (e.g., ability to prioritize, dedication to succeed, self-discipline, ability to cope with stress), and student-athletes’ experience of, coping with, and use of competences in seven challenging DC scenarios (e.g., missing important days in school, moving away from home, injury). The Latent profile analysis on student-athletes’ possession of competences indicated that the model with a 3-profile solution provided the best fit (entropy = 0.876; Parametric Bootstrapped likelihood ratio test =.01). Profile-1 (P1: n=7) corresponded to student-athletes with an average level of competence; Profile-2 (P2: n=42) to an average-to-good level of competence, and Profile-3 (P3: n=22) to a good competence level. Profile-3 outscored the two other profiles in terms of mean coping with all seven DC scenarios (P1: M=3.39; P2: M=3.58; P3: M=4.15), indicating that the more competences student-athletes possessed the better they coped. However, the pattern of coping between profiles was not consistent across all scenarios, suggesting that some competences were more important for some scenarios and less important for others. Further analysis aims to reveal scenario-specific competences to guide practitioners helping student-athletes in specific DC scenarios.

  • 76.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Facilitating Student-Athletes’ Development in Sport and Life through Optimizing their Dual Career Development Environment2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 30-31Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Holistic approach to understanding a dual career environment at a Swedish university2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 243-244Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dual career (DC; combination of sport and studies) research is traditionally focused on student-athletes’ developmental demands and coping resources. To support athletes’ talent development in combination with education, sport federations and universities (and others) co-create high performance centers or DC hubs. Research into these environments is limited. Inspired by the holistic ecological approach, and particularly by the athletic talent development environment model (Henriksen, 2010), we created the dual career development environment (DCDE) working model and then used this model to explore a ‘golf and study’ environment at a Swedish university. The DCDE model is structured into three levels (micro, meso, and macro) and three domains (study, sport, and private) taking into account societal institutions, sport and education systems. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with nine university elite golf-students about perceived support during their transition to, and first year within the environment, and with four stakeholders (e.g., coach, study director) to discover their perspective on the environment and the support they provided. Observations and documents collected from the environment web-page also supported the analysis. Key features of the investigated DCDE related mainly to the micro and meso levels and included: collaborative arrangements between sport and academic stakeholders aimed at facilitating the student-athletes’ DCs, high quality coaching and facilities, stakeholders’ shared focus on a ‘whole person’ including, for example, student- athletes’ physical and psychological well-being. It was also found that the daily life of the student-athletes was concentrated around the campus gym as a place to meet and discuss various sport, study and personal life issues with each other and with their physical coach (also a university teacher). Further study is planned to target the macro level of the environment to advance these findings. 

  • 78.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Lindahl, Kent
    Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Promoting dual career support services: Swedish perspectives and actions taken2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 47-47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation we share: (a) key findings on experiences and competences of Swedish dual career support providers (DCSP) from the European Project “Gold in Education and Elite Sport”, and (b) insights into the actions derived from the Project and taken to advance the dual career (DC) support services in Sweden. Across the country, 31 DCSPs (mean age= 47.4) completed the DCSP survey that measured perceptions of 35 competences to facilitate student-athletes’ development (e.g., be an active and supportive listener) and explored experiences of, and coping with, six DCSP’s scenarios (e.g., supporting a student-athlete when missing days in school). Additionally, six DCSPs took part in a focus group discussion on how they work and what methods they use to support their student-athletes. Overall, the results revealed that the DCSPs demonstrated high awareness of DC and related challenges, possessed necessary competences, managed the relevant scenarios, and reflected on their work in congruence with a whole person perspective. Results also indicated that the DCSPs worked mainly part time, held higher education degrees, but lacked specific DC education and networks. When positioning the findings within the Swedish DC context two major actions were initiated. First, as a DCSP is a new job profile in Sweden that should be developed, planning efforts for a national DCSP education system and a complementary national digital DC support service are currently in progress. Second, with the recent expansion of the Swedish DC system to include the higher education level, a shared basis is needed for sustainable development. Therefore, the Swedish Sport Confederation initiated the action of developing Swedish national DC Guidelines. The Guidelines will be briefly outlined with strategies to facilitate student-athletes’ DC development including different transitions and their search for optimal balance between sport, studies, and private life.

  • 79.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Parker, James
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Dual Career Balance in Student-Athletes University Transition2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Balancing studies, a personal life and sports, that is, having a dual career, is considered as a challenge associated with transitional demands in athletic and non-athletic (psychological, psychosocial, academic/vocational, financial) domains (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013). The aim of this study was to investigate student-athletes’ university transition with a specific focus on how student-athletes balance different domains of their lives. Twenty-three Swedish university student-athletes (mean age= 21.52; 16 males and 7 females) representing six sports (equestrianism, golf, handball, ice hockey, soccer, table tennis) partook in the study. Participants completed the Dual Career Monitoring Survey (DCMS), weekly, over the first twelve weeks of their university education. The DCMS is developed by the authors and measures student-athletes perceptions of balance, time investments, demands, coping, satisfaction, resources and barriers in relation to sport, studies, private life, social life and financial situation. In exploring student-athletes’ perception of dual career balance throughout the twelve weeks, an intra-class correlation analysis revealed a between-person variance of 0.14 (14%). That is, with regards to balance in their dual careers 86% was due to within-person variance, suggesting that balance is idiosyncratic and that further analysis should investigate within-person change. Encouraged by these findings we continued with a person-centered analysis using the Dynamic P-technique for modeling patterns of data (Nelson, Aylward, & Rausch, 2011). The relationships between changes in balance (i.e., prioritizing sport, studies or other domains of life), demands, coping and satisfaction throughout the twelve weeks will be presented. Our findings contribute to the understanding of balance as a central tenet of athletes’ dual careers (Second author et al., 2015). From our findings we suggest practitioners to take into account the individual dynamics in dual career balance from a whole-person perspective.

  • 80.
    Little, Guy C. D.
    et al.
    University of Canberra, Bruce, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Brainy conversations: Mindfully using the language of neuroscience in sport and exercise psychology service2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 155-177Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Lundkvist, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom & Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Davis, Paul
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Holmström, Stefan
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lemyre, Nicolas
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The temporal relations across burnout dimensions in athletes2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 1215-1226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burnout is a construct that has garnered considerable attention in sport psychology within recent years. Several hypothesized models regarding how the three dimen-sions (exhaustion, devaluation, and reduced sense of accomplishment) temporally relate to each other have been advanced. One proposal outlined by Maslach and Leiter suggests that exhaustion predicts devaluation which predicts reduced sense of accomplishment. However, there is no consensus among researchers as it has been argued that exhaustion predicts devaluation and reduced accomplishment separately. The aim of this study was to test multiple alternative hypotheses regarding the rela-tionships of the burnout dimensions in athletes. Two samples of Swedish youth elite athletes with differing time spans between measurements were used. Specifically, one sample involved time- intensive measures collected every week over an eight- week period, and the other sample included four measurement points across an 18- month period. Results showed that none of the previously proposed models outlining the temporal relations of burnout dimensions were supported. Statistical analysis of the models including the cross- lagged predictions of dimensions did not have any statistically significant impact except when exhaustion negatively predicted devalu-ation between time 1 (month 0) and time 2 (month 6) in the 18- month sample; this relation faded in the following time points. Further, issues regarding the stability of devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment emerged as their autocorrelation were very weak in the time- intensive sample. These findings raise a number of points for further theoretical and practical discussions about the athlete burnout construct. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 82.
    Maasing, Jacob
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Hansson, Caroline
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    En undersökning av relationen mellan grit, inre motivation och att uppnå motionsmål2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to (a) investigate the predictive ability of grit and intrinsic motivation to achieve exercise goals and (b) examine whether intrinsic motivation had an indirect effect on exercise goals through grit in a mediation analysis. The study was a longitudinal study with two measurement cases where Grit-s, BREQ-4 and GLTEQ were answered two times between a five-week interval. 53 exercisers, 23 men and 30 women aged 18-81 (M = 36.97 SD = 18.90) participated. The result showed that both grit and intrinsic motivation predicted achieved exercise goals. Intrinsic motivation predicted achieved exercise goals to a greater extent. Furthermore, the mediation analysis showed no significant indirect effect. To sum up, the study's results show that active exercisers with intrinsic motivation exercise more frequently and achieve exercise goals to a greater extent than exercisers with grit. The result can be considered useful for understanding the importance of intrinsic motivation related to exercise and how intrinsic motivation can be related to grit.

  • 83.
    Mannion, Joe
    et al.
    Pepperdine University, Malibu, USA.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Interpersonal mindfulness for athletic coaches and other performance professionals2016In: Mindfulness and performance: Current perspectives in social and behavioral sciences / [ed] Amy L. Baltzell, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016, p. 439-463Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Mannion, Joe
    et al.
    Pepperdine University, Los Angeles, USA.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Mindfulness, therapeutic relationships, and neuroscience in applied exercise psychology2015In: Doing exercise psychology / [ed] Mark B. Andersen & Stephanie J. Hanrahan, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2015, p. 3-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Nylandsted Jensen, Stine
    et al.
    Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Fallby, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dankers, Silke
    Copenhagen Centre of Team Sport and Health, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Depression in Danish and Swedish elite football players and its relation to perfectionism and anxiety2018In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 36, p. 147-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the relation of perfectionism and anxiety to depressive symptoms in Danish and Swedish male elite football players. Additionally, the relationship between age and the study variables, and differences between elite junior and professional players were examined. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional design was used to survey 323 A-squad and U19 players (M age = 22.08 years, SD = 5.15). The survey included biographical information as well as measures of depressive symptoms, perfectionism (strivings and concerns), competitive anxiety, and social phobia. Results. Results revealed an overall prevalence rate for depressive symptoms among the participants of 16.7%. Moreover, correlation analyses showed evidence of the relationships between depression and perfectionistic concerns, competitive anxiety and social phobia. The results of a mediation analysis demonstrated that there was a positive indirect effect of perfectionistic concerns on depression via competitive anxiety. Significant negative correlations between age and anxiety, social phobia, and perfectionistic concerns were found. Depression, however, was not significantly correlated with age even though elite junior players’ depression levels were significantly higher than those of professional players and they showed higher levels in competitive anxiety and social phobia. Conclusions. Findings of the study indicate that more awareness of mental health in elite football is needed, and that the investigated psychological factors may be a starting point for establishing preventive programs and supportive interventions for footballers suffering from depressive symptoms. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

  • 86.
    Nylandsted Jensen, Stine
    et al.
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Fallby, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gambling behaviours among Danish and Swedish elite football players2019In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated gambling among Danish and Swedish male elite football players. A cross-sectional design was used to survey 323 players (Mage = 22.08, SD = 5.15). The survey included a screening tool for gambling, as well as measures for depression and sport anxiety. The overall rate of players identified as at-risk gamblers was 16.1%. Linear regression analyses revealed that depression and sport anxiety significantly predicted gambling behaviours, and explained 2% and 6% of variance, respectively. The age of the players and the age at which they specialize did not moderate these relationships. Further research on gambling in football and its relation to mental disorders is needed.

  • 87.
    Parker, James
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Schough, Camilla
    Eleiko Sports AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Erik
    Eleiko Sports AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Viberg, Erik
    Swedish Adrenaline, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bärwald, Anton
    Swedish Adrenaline, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Warpman, Sofia
    Halmstad Municipality, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Is self-determined motivation associated with the effects of an intervention aimed to increase physical activity and exercise levels? An 80-day follow-up2019In: Abstract book for the ISBNPA 2019 Annual Meeting in Prague, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity , 2019, p. 488-488Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: State-of-the-art technologies, for instance smart watches and smartphones, have the potential to positively influence physical activity and exercise in sedentary populations. Psychological factors, such as self-determined (SD) motivation, might influence the impact state-of-the-art technologies have on level of physical activity and exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate if self-determined motivation influences an intervention on both physical activity (PA) and exercise in a sedentary population.

    Methods: 16 participants (men = 5, women = 11) with a self-reported low level of PA over the last year and predominantly sedentary jobs volunteered to participate in the study. PA data (steps and exercise time) were collected over an 80-day period using a wrist-worn accelerometer (Apple-watch and iPhone). Motivation was measured with the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. At the start of the study, each participant completed the questionnaire and received their Apple-watches. Data analysis: All PA and exercise data were recorded through the Apple-watch and via Health App. Data for PA (steps) and exercise time were then extracted and aggregated to daily totals. Statistical analysis: Group means and standard deviations were calculated. A linear regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between exercise time, PA, and SD, the R2 value effect size (ES) was used to estimate the magnitude of the differences. All data analyses were performed in MatLab (software, R2016b).

    Results/findings: SD motivation (3.9±0.9) had a medium (R2 = 0.09) but not statistically significant (p = .26) effect on the amount of moderate to high-intensity exercise time (33.3±39.6 minutes) during the 80-day period. There was no statistically significant effect (R2 = 0.003, p = .84) of SD on PA (12953±7717 steps).

    Conclusions: Given the small sample size, achieving a medium effect size has meaningful significance despite not achieving statistical significance. This result suggests that self-determined motivation effects the amount of daily exercise but not PA in a sedentary population. Combining technology and other strategies (e.g., motivational interviewing, coaching) to promote behavior change is promising, and these interventions should include theoretically derived behavior change techniques and take level of SD motivation into account.

  • 88.
    Pehrson, Sebastian
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Olsson, Kasper
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Revisiting the empirical model ‘Phases in the junior-to-senior transition of Swedish ice hockey players’: External validation through focus groups and interviews2017In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 747-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we continue to explore the junior-to-senior transition (JST) process in Swedish ice hockey by validating the empirical model ‘Phases in the JST of Swedish Ice Hockey Players’ created in our previous study (Stambulova et al., 2017). More specifically, we collected opinions and critical reflections of fifteen senior professional players and expert coaches about the empirical model as a whole and about the content of each JST phase, and then converted the original empirical model into its validated version (further – the validated model). Professional ice hockey players and first league coaches formed three focus groups, while three senior coaches were interviewed individually. All were encouraged to critically reflect on the empirical model. The data from all sources were analysed following guidelines of the thematic (deductive) analysis, complemented by quantitative measurements of the participants’ agreement with the content of the empirical model. Results supported the sequence and designations of the JST phases (i.e., preparation, orientation, adaptation, and stabilization), as well duration of the JST (i.e., up to four seasons) outlined by the empirical model. We were also able to validate the psychological content (perceived demands, resources, barriers, coping strategies, and outcomes) of each transitional phase. Accordingly, five themes were reformulated, seventeen new themes were added and some themes were re-ordered during the conversion of the original empirical model into the validated model. To improve the readability of the validated model (from the bottom to the top) we also re-ordered sub-categories describing the psychological content of each JST phase. We conclude by discussing the validated model in relation to theoretical frameworks and previous research and providing some methodology, future research, and practice-oriented reflections addressed to researchers, coaches and sport psychology practitioners. © The Author(s) 2017

  • 89.
    Pelters, Britta
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    On mountains and prophets: targeting majorities to support minorities by using norm-critics in health education2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no sup1: Equal Health, article id 1522203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This debate article advocates for norm-critics instead of empowering coping and pedagogy of tolerance as an educational approach to mitigate stigmatization as well as blame and guilt for health-deviant minorities within the field of health disparities. Norm-critics is a way of making members of the (presumably healthy) normative majority uncover and question their healthrelated norms and raise awareness for the processes by which members of that majority re/construct images of stereotypic figures (such as “the fatso” or “the couch-potato”) with certain personal character traits which are to be condemned and, in doing so, limit the acting space of those identified as examples of those figures. The approach, its theoretical background, arguments promoting norm-critics, and some suggestions for its practical application are presented. It is concluded that norm-critics render a valuable and much needed addition to the health intervention repertoire. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 90.
    Pelters, Britta
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). VID Specialized University, Bergen, Norway.
    “Don’t stop believing!” From health religiosity to an equality-enhancing hermeneutic of health promotion2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no sup1: Equal Health, article id 1555420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Health beliefs are usually regarded as subjective understandings of one’s health. They can, however, be re-interpreted by drawing on the understanding that the structural features of the health discourse resemble the characteristics of a religion and on the spiritual dimension of health with its possibly salutogenic influence. The applicability of the notion of“health religiosity” and its consequences for individual health promotion are explored.

    Method: Data consist of already existent semi-structured interviews. These have been reana- lyzed in a deductive-hermeneutical way by using a five-dimensional concept of religiosity as deductive template.

    Results: The concept of religiosity proved to be productive and revealed that all health dimensions in the case are infused with spiritually ennobled ideas.

    Conclusion: We conclude that, irrespective of their factual accuracy, the salutogenic potential of ennobled ideas may best be utilized by understanding them hermeneutically. An explora- tion of a narrative hermeneutic approach to individual health promotion is suggested as the merging of meaning horizons in a hermeneutic dialogue is expected to increase awareness of spiritualized aspects of health beliefs. This may mitigate healthism and health disparities. Moreover, three challenges for individual health promotion are anticipated: realizing the situation, recognizing its complexity and resisting a simplistic practical approach. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 91.
    Pensgaard, Anne Marte
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Nilstad, Agnethe
    Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Solstad, Bård
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Steffen, Kathrin
    Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Psychosocial stress factors, including the relationship with the coach, and their influence on acute and overuse injury risk in elite female football players2018In: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e000317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The relationship between specific types of stressors (eg, teammates, coach) and acute versus overuse injuries is not well understood.

    Objective: To examine the roles of different types of stressors as well as the effect of motivational climate on the occurrence of acute and overuse injuries.

    Methods: Players in the Norwegian elite female football league (n=193 players from 12 teams) participated in baseline screening tests prior to the 2009 competitive football season. As part of the screening, we included the Life Event Survey for Collegiate Athletes and the Perceived Motivational Climate in Sport Questionnaire (Norwegian short version). Acute and overuse time-loss injuries and exposure to training and matches were recorded prospectively in the football season using weekly text messaging. Data were analysed with Bayesian logistic regression analyses.

    Results: Using Bayesian logistic regression analyses, we showed that perceived negative life event stress from teammates was associated with an increased risk of acute injuries (OR=1.23, 95% credibility interval (1.01 to 1.48)). There was a credible positive association between perceived negative life event stress from the coach and the risk of overuse injuries (OR=1.21, 95% credibility interval (1.01 to 1.45)).

    Conclusions: Players who report teammates as a source of stress have a greater risk of sustaining an acute injury, while players reporting the coach as a source of stress are at greater risk of sustaining an overuse injury. Motivational climate did not relate to increased injury occurrence. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved.

  • 92.
    Ring, Mikael
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Kristén, Lars
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Klingvall-Arvidsson, Bodil
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Norms and materialities in Physical Education and Health: - ”I feel that I cannot contribute enough in sport”2019In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 349-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many understandings about norms and norm criticism are based on imaginations of inclusion and exclusion, as if values about right and wrong, and acceptable and non-acceptable behaviors belong to a world of relations that can be separated from embodied and physical things and practices. Norm confirming or norm critical imaginations are difficult to judge and even more difficult to change if they are separated from the physical performance reflecting these imaginations. This preparatory study is based on interviews conducted with children with and without varied forms of disabilities. The aim of the study was to investigate how children describe their ability in relation to collaboration, materialities, disability and norms within Physical Education and Health (PEH). The results from this study show that embodied and collaborative goal-oriented practices generate imaginations of community and belonging through a notion of contributing. The results indicate that informing, teaching, and learning about inclusion and exclusion do not naturally produce physical and embodied practices. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 93.
    Rogerson, Michelle
    et al.
    Heart Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Moving for your heart's sake: Physical activity and exercise for people with cardiac disease2015In: Doing exercise psychology / [ed] Mark Andersen and Stephanie Hanrahan, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2015, p. 161-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Rosenberg, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Grim, Katarina
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Shared decision making in community mental health services - an evaluation of three self-reporting instruments2017In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 142-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the potential impact of shared decision making on users satisfaction with care and quality in health care decisions, there is a lack of knowledge and skills regarding how to work with shared decision making among health care providers.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of three instruments that measure varied dimensions of shared decision making, based on self-reports by clients, in a Swedish community mental health context.

    Method: The study sample consisted of 121 clients with experience of community mental health care, and involved in a wide range of decisions regarding both social support and treatment. The questionnaires were examined for face and content validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct validity.

    Results: The instruments displayed good face and content validity, satisfactory internal consistency and a moderate to good level of stability in test-retest reliability with fair to moderate construct correlations, in a sample of clients with serious mental illness and experience of community mental health services in Sweden.

    Conclusions: The questionnaires are considered to be relevant to the decision making process, user-friendly and appropriate in a Swedish community mental health care context. They functioned well in settings where non-medical decisions, regarding social and support services, are the primary focus. The use of instruments that measure various dimensions of the self-reported experience of clients, can be a key factor in developing knowledge of how best to implement shared decision making in mental health services. © Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 95.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Challenges and strategies to develop athletic migrationresearch and practice2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 214-214Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s sport is “on the move” in a sense that athletes, coaches, sport psychology practitioners and other sporting people are internationally highly mobile. In response, there is a growing interest and the need for sport psychology researchers and practitioners to understand athletic migration processes and develop strategies to effectively help both migrants and hosts to mutually adjust in the shared context. The ISSP Position Stand on transnationalism, mobility, and acculturation in and through sport (Ryba et al., 2017) provides a set of aids to interested scholars. First, the authors clarify migration terminology (e.g., mobility and migration, cultural transition and acculturation, immigrant and transnational athletes) to facilitate international/intercultural collaboration that is inevitable when professionals want to study or help migrants. Second, cultural transition and acculturation frameworks with examples of high quality qualitative and quantitative research on migrants and hosts are introduced, and relevant methodological tips are provided. Third, the authors analyze different forms of mobile practice and highlight strategies used by experienced mobile practitioners as materials for the readers’ cultural reflexivity. Finally, they outline major challenges and potential solutions to further develop athletic migration research and mobile practice. The authors suggest an idea of cultural praxis of athletic migration as an approach that blends analyses of migrants’ destination and home environmental contexts, studying adaptation process of both migrants and hosts, and identifying strategies facilitating mutual adjustment, athletes’ performance and well-being. Among practical recommendations the authors promote shared acculturation approaches, sharing experiences between mobile practitioners from different countries, education of applied sport psychology students on mobile practices and education of coaches aimed at helping them to become cultural leaders in.

  • 96.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ronkainen, Noora
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China & Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Transnational mobility and cultural transition2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 215-216Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of sport participants migrate within and between nations for a variety of reasons, such as athletic career development, sport tourism, and international assignments. During 2013, the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) estimated that 214 million individuals were considered to be migrants, which is one in every 33 persons worldwide. This presentation builds on the ISSP Position Stand on transnationalism, mobility, and acculturation in and through sport (Ryba et al., 2017) to introduce a transnational conceptual framework used in recent studies of athletic migrants’ career and life transitions. First, migration terminology will be reviewed to facilitate the attendees’ understanding of the experiential layers of athletes’ experiences discussed in the presentations comprising this symposium. Next, we focus on a study of transnational elite athletes’ careers to clarify the processes activated in cultural transition that produce psychosocial development through work, sport, and relationships in shifting cultural patterns of meaning. Having positioned the migrants’ experiences in critical acculturation literature (Bhatia & Ram, 2009; Ryba et al., 2015; Schinke et al., 2016), we derived at a temporal model of the cultural transition process consisting of three phases: pre-transition, acute acculturation, and sociocultural adaptation. The empirical model and three underlying mechanisms of cultural transition that assisted athletic career adaptability of transnational migrants will be discussed. We conclude with practical implications of this research for professionals working in the fields of career counseling and migrant support. 

  • 97.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Selänne, Harri
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Aunola, Kaisa
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Nurmi, Jan-Erik
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    ”Sport has always been first for me” but “all my free time is spent doing homework”: Dual career styles in late adolescence2017In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 33, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    In adolescence, personally meaningful autobiographical memories begin to integrate into cultural narrative structures to form a life story. We examined how and to what extent adolescent Finnish athletes narrate and integrate significant life events in sport and education into their identities and future narratives in order to delineate the different styles of athletes’ career construction.

    Design

    Longitudinal qualitative study.

    Method

    Ten female and eight male, elite junior athletes, aged 15–16 at baseline, participated in individual conversational interviews. The resulting interview data were analyzed using narrative analysis.

    Results

    Thirteen of 18 adolescent athletes drew primarily on the performance narrative plot to construct their life story and five of 18 athletes could not project into the future beyond their athletic selves. We identified three styles of athletes’ career construction. Employing musical terminology as a metaphor, the contrapuntal style entwines sport and education as harmonically related life-themes; monophonic style draws on a prominent athletic life-theme; and dissonant style is underpinned by discord of sport and education. We did not detect direct associations between narrative types (performance, discovery and relational) and career construction styles. We show the dominant style development within an exemplary story.

    Conclusion

    Exploration of the future and possible selves are critical for developing meaningful (dis)continuity of a dual career pathway from adolescence to adulthood. We conclude that dual career discourse is gaining traction in directing young athletes’ future thinking; however, a broader repertoire of exemplary success stories which allow athletes to imagine achieving excellence in diverse ways would enable them to channel action. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  • 98.
    Samuel, Roy D.
    et al.
    Department of Physical Education and Movement, Kibbutzim College of Education Technology and the Arts, Tel Aviv, Israel; ; School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ashkenazi, Yaniv
    Elite Sport Department, the Olympic Committee of Israel, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel.
    Cultural transition of the Israeli men’s U18 National handball team migrated to Germany: a case study2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study describes the cultural transition of the Israeli men’s U18 national handball team to train and compete in Germany for a competitive season. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected longitudinally as part of sport psychology services provided to the team. Data analysis was guided by an integrated career change and transition framework (ICCT). Results indicated that the transition demands covered on-court (e.g., increased training load) and off-court (e.g., residing at a hotel) issues. Players perceived this transition as significant and positive. In response to selection for this program, most players relied on consulting with others. The transition barriers were also related to on-court (e.g., injuries) and off-court (e.g., cultural differences) issues. Players varied in their conscious decision to change (i.e., apply all necessary adjustments) and coping effectiveness. Players exhibited several transition pathways, as suggested by the ICCT. Findings illustrate the dynamics and multifaceted nature of the cultural transition. © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 99.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Stambulova, NataliaHalmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Context-driven sport and exercise psychology practice: Special Issue2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Context-driven sport and exercise psychology practice: Widening our lens beyond the athlete2017In: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 71-75Article in journal (Refereed)
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