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  • 51.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Athletes' careers across cultures2012In: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, p. 117-117Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark .
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    In a Different Voice: Women’s Careers in Sport and Exercise Psychology2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 55-55Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Invoking Carol Gilligan’s feminist classic in the title of this symposium, we seek to refute the silenced place of women in the written history of our field. The invisibility of formal recognition of women’s contribution to the development of international sport psychology is especially ironic because female trailblazers “were highly visible during their careers due to their extreme underrepresentation” (Krane & Whaley, 2010, p. 349). Challenging a common sense assumption that research and professional structures are gender neutral, this symposium foregrounds female narratives and experiences in, and of, sport psychology to highlight the fundamentally gendered underpinnings of such common concepts as career, success, and science. The female career paths in sport psychology academic discipline and profession will be shared by five remarkable women who contextualize their life stories within the sociocultural and historical forces that shaped their careers in the North America, Africa, Asia, and Western and Eastern Europe.

  • 53.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland & Research Institute for Olympic Sports, Muurame, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Russia2016In: Routledge International Handbook of Sport Psychology / [ed] Robert J. Schinke, Kerry R. McGannon & Brett Smith, New York. NY: Routledge, 2016, p. 9-19Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    The wind has changed: Culture in athletes’ career research2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 56-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The area of athlete career development and transitions has traditionally been dominated by a Western perspective, an imbalance which has had a considerable influence on shaping career studies in sport psychology more generally. This presentation is based on our edited book “Athletes’ Careers across Cultures”, in which we employ theoretical tenants of the cultural turn to approach career as a socially and culturally constituted context in which the development of athletes occurs. Briefly outlining how culture has been studied in career transition research, we position our discussion within the metaphor of waves. The cross-cultural wave is representative of the universalist approach to career in the study of similarities and differences in cognitive, emotional and behavioral functions of athletes in different countries. Cross-cultural career studies are typically carried out within the positivist epistemology, using different questionnaires about athletes’ beliefs and attitudes (e.g., Dimoula, Torregrosa, Psychountaki, &González, 2012; Alfermann, Stambulova, & Zemaityte, 2004; Stambulova, Stephan, & Jäphag, 2007). The wave of cultural mindset is located within a constructivist paradigm of cultural psychology. Cultural researchers have challenged the extant career models, which suggest that athletes across cultures undertake similar career pathways and experience comparable career transitions (e.g., Carless, & Douglas, 2009; Douglas, & Carless, 2009; Schinke, Ryba, Danielson, Michel, Peltier, Enosse, et al., 2007). In our discussion, we focus on the emerging ‘third wave’ to explicate how culture functions as discourse in the context of athletes’ careers. Culture as discourse operates through common sense assumptions embedded in social institutions, such as national sport federations and academic institutes, enabling athletes to access certain contextually contained skills and practices whilst simultaneously restricting, even denying, the development of others. We therefore argue for the need to open sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse intellectual traditions, perspectives and concerns, which will allow researchers and practitioners to better understand local problems within the dynamics of cultural diversity in athlete career development and assistance.

  • 55.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland & Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ronkainen, Noora
    Exercise, Health and Technology Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.
    The work of cultural transition: an emerging model2016In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, no 427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s uncertain, fluid job market, transnational mobility has intensified. Though the concept of cultural transition is increasingly used in sport and career research, insight into the processes of how individuals produce their own development through work and relationships in shifting cultural patterns of meaning remains limited. The transnational industry of sports, in which athletes’ psychological adjustment to cultural transitions has implications for both performance and meaningful life, serves as a backdrop for this article. This study applied the life story method to interviews with 15 professional and semi-professional athletes, focusing particularly on the cultural transition aspect of their transnational athletic careers. The aims of the study were to identify the developmental tasks of cultural transitions and strategies/mechanisms through which cultural transitions were enacted. Three underlying mechanisms of the transition process that assisted athletic career adaptability were social repositioning, negotiation of cultural practices, and meaning reconstruction. Based on the data analyses, a temporal model of cultural transition is proposed. The results of this research provide professionals working in the fields of career counseling and migrant support with a content framework for enhancing migrant workers’ adaptabilities and psychological wellbeing. © 2016 Ryba, Stambulova and Ronkainen

  • 56.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Schinke, Robert
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Si, Gangyan
    Hong Kong Sports Institute, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Selanne, Harri
    LIKES Research Center, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Ronkainen, Noora
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    McGannon, Kerry
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Cultural Competence and Ethics of Difference in Sport Psychology Research and Practice2013In: Lifelong Physical and Mental Well-Being through Sport and Exercise: 2013 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2013, p. 139-139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Si, Gangyan
    Hong Kong Sports Institute, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Robert, Schinke
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Toward Culturally Competent Research and Practice in Sport and Exercise Psychology2013In: Lifelong Physical and Mental Well-Being through Sport and Exercise: 2013 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2013, p. 139-139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Ryba, Tatiana V.
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ronkainen, Noora J.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Bundgaard, Jens
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Selänne, Harry
    LIKES - Research Center for Sport and Health Sciences, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Dual career pathways of transnational athletes2015In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 21, p. 125-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Transnationalism, as part of the globalization processes, has transformed the lifestyle and the course of athletes' careers. This presents previously unexplored challenges encountered by student-athletes in combining athletic and academic pursuits. In this article, we propose a conceptual framework for the taxonomy of transnational dual careers (DC).

    Design and method

    Narrative inquiry from the life story perspective was used to elicit and analyze career narratives of six transnational athletes (3 male and 3 female), generating about five interview hours per athlete. The developmental transition from secondary to higher education was chosen as a key transition to classify the DC pathways. Additional insights into DC mobilization across international borders were gleaned by employing the typologies of sport migrants developed in the sport labor migration research.

    Results

    Three patterns of transnational DC were discerned from the narratives based on the direction of geographic mobility and the core migration motive underpinning the storyline. Within the present dataset, the taxonomies are: (1) Within EU mobility: the sport exile DC pathway; (2) Mobility to the U.S.A.: the sport mercenary DC pathway; and (3) Mobility to the U.S.A.: the nomadic cosmopolitan DC pathway.

    Conclusions

    The identified transnational DC paths are not exhaustive, and highlight possibilities of individual development, unfolding through the matrices of social structures in a given location. Further research with a diverse set of transnational athletes is needed to test and expand the proposed taxonomy. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 59.
    Ryba, Tatiana V.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Si, Gangyan
    Sport Psychology and Monitoring Centre, Hong Kong Sports Institute, Fo Tan, Sha Tin, Hong Kong.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    ISSP Position Stand: Culturally competent research and practice in sport and exercise psychology2013In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 123-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multicultural landscape of contemporary sport sets a challenge to rethink sport and exercise psychology research and practice through a culturally reflexive lens. This ISSP Position Stand provides a rigorous synthesis and engagement with existing scholarship to outline a roadmap for future work in the field. The shift to culturally competent sport and exercise psychology implies: (a) recognizing hidden ethnocentric philosophical assumptions permeating much of the current theory, research, and practice; (b) transitioning to professional ethics in which difference is seen as not inherent and fixed but as relational and fluid; and (c) focusing on meaning (instead of cause) in cross-cultural and cultural research projects, and cultural praxis work. In the paper, we first provide an overview of the concepts of cultural competence and ethics of difference. Second, we present a step-by-step approach for developing a culturally competent project rooted either within cross-cultural or cultural research. Third, we focus on cultural praxis as a project that blends theory, research, and lived culture of practice. Finally, we summarize main points in nine postulates and provide recommendations for enhancing cultural competence in the field of sport and exercise psychology. © 2013 Copyright International Society of Sport Psychology.

  • 60.
    Sandberg, Sandra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ultege, Jennifer
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Gisselman, Suzana
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Internet som hälsopromotivt informationsverktyg för att främja psykisk hälsa bland unga vuxna: En Litteraturstudie2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Förhållandet mellan sjukvården och målgruppen är problematiskt och yrkeskunniga inom området efterfrågar arenor för att underlätta förmedlandet av kunskapsbaserade  hälsofrämjande åtgärder till unga vuxna. Studier pekar på att internet kan lösa mycket av problematiken. Frågan hur yrkespersoner och dess målgrupp ställer sig till brukandet av internet som hälsopromotivt informationsverktyg kvarstår. Syftet med studien var att utreda huruvida den psykiska ohälsan bland unga vuxna kunde motverkas genom inkorporerande av ett mer salutogent perspektiv med internet som informationsverktyg. Vi ville undersöka vilka fördelar respektive nackdelar det fanns med ett sådant tillvägagångssätt. Utöver detta önskade vi utforska attityderna till Internet som hälsofrämjande verktyg hos yrkesutövare samt målgruppen som bestod av unga vuxna. Studien är gjord utifrån riktlinjer för en litteraturstudie där kvalitativt respektive kvantitativt underlag från vetenskapliga databaser sammanställts. Resultatet pekade på att den största fördelen med användande av internet var kostnadseffektiva insatser samt lättheten i anpassning och publicering av information mot både yrkespersoner och målgrupp. Nämnd enkelhet var också nackdelen med internet som informationsverktyg på grund av bristande informationsgranskning tillsammans med otillräcklig säkerhet kring personuppgifter. Attityderna till internet som informationsverktyg skiljde sig markant åt mellan yrkesutövare inom hälsa och sjukvård och de individer som berördes av deras arbete. Inom yrkeskåren existerade internetkritisk kultur medan det i målgruppen återfanns övervägande positiva attityder till Internetbaserad information. Vi uppmuntrar till ytterligare forskning på området, gärna utförliga kohortstudier eftersom att det råder brist på sådana. Resultaten av flertalet sådana studier skulle ge en stabil grund av evidensbaserad forskning vilket kliniker i dagsläget efterfrågar.

  • 61. Sandström, Elin
    et al.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Career profiles of athlete-coach relationships: Descriptions and interpretations2016In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 395-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore athlete-coach relationships from an athletic career perspective with the objectives: 1) to create individual career profiles of athlete-coach relationships, 2) to illustrate the career profiles describing athletes’ subjective experiences of working with all the coaches involved in their careers, and (c) to summarize athletes’ views on the dynamics of athlete-coach relationships in the course of their careers. Two case studies using narrative interviews with one team and one individual sport athlete (both Swedish) were made. The Narrative Oriented Inquiry model was used to guide the data collection, treatment and interpretation. The results representing over 20 relationships in total are presented as individual career profiles of athlete-coach relationships followed by interpretive narratives exploring more in detail the different athlete-coach relationships throughout their careers. Poems summarizing the athletes’ perceived dynamics of their relationships with coaches are then presented using only the athletes own words.

  • 62.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    et al.
    School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lidor, Ronnie
    The Zinman College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel.
    Papaioannou, Athanasios
    Physical Education and Sport Science Department, University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Research Institute for Olympic Sports, Muurame, Finland.
    ISSP Position Stand: Social missions through sport and exercise psychology2016In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 4-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport psychology is expanding in how it might be utilised to benefit human activity and social life. Performance enhancement remains central to the field; however, there is growing interest in how sport psychology practices and sport contexts can be crafted to enable social missions. The classification of social missions through the context of sports might vary from one sport development agency or scholar to the next, and could relate to health and well-being, sport for peace, social development, disease prevention, and positive youth development. This position stand has been conceived to situate the International Society of Sport Psychology within sport for development for the betterment of people in communities, countries, and regions. This ISSP Position Stand is structured into a historical overview of sports as social missions, sport for cultural exchange and social justice, sport for health and well-being, sport for positive youth development, sport for peace, and postulations and recommendations. © 2015 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 63.
    Schinke, Robert
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    McGannon, Kerry
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Blodgett, Amy
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Athlete Acculturation and Acute Cultural Adaptation: Expanding Knowledge from the Conceptual, through the Empirical, to the Practical2013In: Lifelong Physical and Mental Well-Being through Sport and Exercise: 2013 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2013, p. 116-116Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Schinke, Robert
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Trepanier, Daniel
    Boxing Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
    Oghene, Odirin
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Psychological support for the Canadian Olympic Boxing Team in meta-transitions through the National Team Program2015In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 74-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Canadian Olympic Men's Boxing Team was once among the most successful contingents in the world in its sport discipline but then lost this prominent status. At present, Canada's Boxing Team has begun preparation for the 2016 Olympics with the “Own the Podium” (OTP) Program providing financial support to the National Boxing Team and targeted Olympic candidates expected to podium at the 2016 Olympic Games. The authors reveal in this paper the first step of the project “Psychological Support for the Canadian Olympic Boxing Team in Meta-Transitions through the National Team Program” aimed at planning for the boxers' progressions through the 2013–2016 Olympic cycle. Integral to this program, the athletes' progressions are supported through the development of a system of National Team Psychological Support Services (NT-PSS). Within this submission, the authors further develop a vision of the 2016 Olympic Games as a career transition and consider how the Canadian Men's Boxing Team's staff, located within a broader national sport system, proactively map six meta-transitions for the boxers throughout the 2013–2016 Olympic cycle and plan the NT-PSS' content accordingly. The forthcoming meta-transitions are seen as turns between the phases of progressing Olympic cycle: (A) entering the National Team Program, (B) entering major international tournaments, (C) Olympic qualification, (D) focused preparation for the Olympics, (E) to the Olympic podium, and (F) to the post-Games. © 2014 International Society of Sport Psychology.

  • 65.
    Selanne, Harri
    et al.
    LIKES Research Center, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ronkainen, Noora
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Transnational Athletes’ Lifestories: Reflexivity in Research2013In: Lifelong Physical and Mental Well-Being through Sport and Exercise: 2013 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2013, p. 139-140Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    A look at the future of qualitative methodology through the prism of athlete career research2016In: Routledge handbook of qualitative research in sport and exercise / [ed] Brett Smith & Andrew C. Sparkes, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 450-461Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Acculturation as a Transition: Mutual Insights for Career Transition and Acculturation Research in Sport Psychology2013In: Lifelong Physical and Mental Well-Being through Sport and Exercise: 2013 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2013, p. 116-116Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Athletes’ Careers through the Lens of Different Research Methodologies2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 57-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade in more than ten review papers (e.g., Alfermann & Stambulova, 2007; Gordon, Lavallee, & Grove, 2005; Hackfort & Huang, 2005; Petitpas, Brewer, & Van Raalte, 2009; Stambulova, Alfermann, Statler, & Côté, 2009; Taylor & Ogilvie, 2001; Wylleman, Alfermann, & Lavallee, 2004), one meta-review (Stambulova, 2012), and the book “Athletes’ careers across cultures” (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013) methodological issues related to the career topic in sport psychology were outlined and discussed. The aim of this symposium is to demonstrate paradigmatic and methodological diversity in contemporary career research around the world but also to discuss complementarity between different ways of acquiring knowledge about athletes’ careers. The first presenter will focus on lessons learned from analyzing career research in 19 countries based on “Athletes’ careers across cultures” book and further emphasize that better future for the career topic is relevant not only to an increase in methodological diversity but also to an increase in methodological and cultural congruence of career projects. The second presenter will demonstrate advantages and limitations of a longitudinal quantitative (positivist) approach in studying the transition from junior to senior sports in Swedish context. The third presenter will acknowledge mixed-method (positivist/post-positivist) approach in exploring dual career experiences of junior elite German athletes and their premature athletic dropouts after graduation from elite sport schools. The fourth presenter will shift discussion to a qualitative (constructivist) approach and using an Indigenous philosophy known as Dadirri to guide an investigation of athletic retirement experiences of Indigenous Australian athletes. The fifth presenter will provide insights in how existential-narrative (constructivist) approach opens new possibilities in exploration of meanings that Finnish athletes attach to their career experiences on different career stages and during athletic retirement. 

  • 69.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Athletes' Dual Careers: From European Guidelines to National Dual Career Models2012In: Youth Sport: Abstract book of the 6th Conference for youth sport in Bled, 6-9 December 2012 / [ed] Mojca Doupona Topič & Tanja Kajtna, Ljubljana: University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Sport , 2012, p. 44-44Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Athletes’ transitions in sport and life: positioning new research trends within the existing system of athlete career knowledge2016In: Routledge International Handbook of Sport Psychology / [ed] Robert J. Schinke, Kerry R. McGannon & Brett Smith, New York, NY: Routledge, 2016, p. 519-534Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Career assistance to athletes: a look through contrasting lenses of career metaphors2009In: Congrès International de Psychologie du Sport, Vincennes, 1-3 juillet 2009: Actes, Paris: Institut National du Sport, de l'Expertise et de la Performance (INSEP) , 2009, p. 117-118Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Career Research in Flux: To a Better Future Based on Lessons Learned from the Past and the Present2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 58-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade several attempts were undertaken to overview and structure the career development and transition topic in sport psychology. For example, several conceptual and methodological shifts were traced in a meta-review of the topic (Stambulova, 2012), and major scientific (cultural) traditions in career research and assistance (North American, Australian, West European and East European) were identified in the relevant ISSP Position Stand paper (Stambulova, Alfermann, Statler, & Côté, 2009). Within the ISSP new project, that is “Athletes’ careers across cultures” book (Stambulova & Ryba (eds.), 2013), contributors have reviewed the career development contexts, career research and career assistance in 19 countries around the world. The book well illuminated not only complexity and diversity of athletes’ careers in different socio-cultural contexts but also limitations of existing career research (e.g., predominance of the positivist and post-positivist epistemological paradigms, adopting theoretical frameworks from dominant discourses without a critical analysis of their fit to the relevant culture/context, lack of longitudinal and intervention studies, and others). This presentation will focus on lessons learned from analyzing the international research presented in the book proceeding from limitations of the past and current research to the future challenges relevant to more diverse but better contextualized and positioned research projects. A need to use various research methodologies producing complementary knowledge to reflect complexity and diversity of athletes’ careers around the world will be emphasized. Another emphasis will be on the message that better future for the topic is relevant not only to an increase in methodological diversity but also to an increase in methodological and cultural congruence of career projects as it is articulated, for example, in the new paradigm termed cultural praxis of athletes’ careers (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013). According to the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers approach a career relevant project should be well positioned: (a) in socio-cultural context(s) involved, (b) within a scientific discipline (e.g., sport psychology) or in the inter/trans-disciplinary space to match the research problem, (c) in terms of theoretical and methodological approaches used in the research program, (d) in regard of existing applied discourses in sport psychology and beyond. Besides, the research group members are expected to reflect upon their cultural, professional, athletic and living backgrounds as factors permeating and influencing the research planning, actual process and interpretation of results.  

  • 73.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Career transitions2014In: Encyclopedia of Sport and Exercise Psychology: 1 / [ed] Robert C. Eklund & Gershon Tenenbaum, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2014, 1, p. 110-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Conceptual model for assistance in career transitions2011In: The Joseph Lau Luen Hung Charitable Trust International Scientific Symposium: Sport Psychology Application: 6-7 November 2011: Hong Kong Sports Institute, Hong Kong, Hong Kong: Hong Kong Sports Institute , 2011, p. 19-19Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Conceptual model for assistance in career transitions: Basic tenets and application2011In: 2011 6th Taipei ASPASP International Congress on Sport Psychology: Turning a New Page – A Refreshing Look at Sport and Exercise Psychology from Asian-Pacific Perspectives: Proceedings, Taipei, Taiwan: National Chung Cheng University & Society for Sport and Exercise Psychology of Taiwan , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    New trends in career transition research and practice2015In: Sport psychology theories and applications to performance, health and humanity: Proceedings of 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] O. Schmid and R. Seiler, Bern, Switzerland: FEPSAC, University of Bern , 2015, p. 239-240Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    New trends in career transition research: Contribution of the ISSP Projects2015In: Movimento: rivista di psicologia dello sport e dell'educazione fisica ; organo ufficiale dell'Associazione italiana psicologia dello sport, ISSN 0393-9340, Vol. 31, no 1-2, p. 19-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation I am going to focus on the role of two ISSP projects in stimulating new trends in career transition research in sport psychology. The first was the ISSP Position Stand on Athletes’ Career Development and Transitions (Stambulova, Alfermann, Statler & Côté, 2009). This paper was innovative in a sense that it initiated a dialogue about various cultural discourses in career transition research all over the world. The authors emphasized that career researchers internalize their objectives from the socio-cultural contexts they belong to, and therefore, this context (usually hidden) should become visible, and moreover its constitutive role in the transition process should be revealed. The second project was the ISSP monograph “Athletes’ careers across cultures” (Stambulova & Ryba, Eds., 2013) that collected experts’ reviews of national career/transition research and career assistance programs in 19 countries across five continents. The monograph continued the dialogue about various cultural discourses in career transition research (see also Stambulova & Ryba, 2014) and introduced a new paradigm termed cultural praxis of athletes’ careers (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013; 2014). In this paradigm well established approaches in career transition research (e.g., the holistic developmental perspective; Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) were integrated with approaches developed in cultural sport psychology (e.g., cultural positioning of research projects, attention to idiosyncratic transition pathways). This new paradigm is challenging and still not fully adopted by transition researchers but it has already stimulated an increased diversity in the transition research with several recently emerged trends. More specifically, I am going to focus on: (a) studies exploring temporal structures of normative (athletic retirement and the junior-to-senior), and non-normative (injury) transitions (Ivarsson, Stambulova, & Johnson, in press; Lundell Olsson & Pehrson, 2013; Reints, 2011), (b) contextualized research on dual career transitions (Blodgett & Schinke, 2014; Stambulova, Engström, Franck, Linnér, & Lindahl, 2014) (c) studies on quasi-normative transitions (i.e., predictable for certain categories of athletes), such as important competitions (e.g., Olympic Games as career transitions; Schinke, Stambulova, Trepanier, & Oghene, 2014), transitions to residential elite performance centers (Poczwardowski, Diehl, O’Neil, Cote, & Haberl, 2013), and cultural transitions (Agergaard & Ryba, 2014).

  • 78.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    New trends in career/talent development research: implications for football2015In: 8th World Congress on Science and Football: Copenhagen, Denmark, 20-23 May, 2015: Program and Abstracts / [ed] Jens Bangsbo & Peter Krustrup, Copenhagen: The WCSF2015 Scientific Committee , 2015, p. 135-135Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation will be focused on the most recent trends in career and talent development research in sport psychology with further elaboration on how this emerging knowledge might contribute to our understanding of career and talent development process in football. First, the junior-to-senior transition as a key transition within careers of the players who aspire to play on the elite/professional level will be considered as a process having a phase like temporal structure (e.g., preparation, orientation, adaptation and stabilization) based on the studies conducted in Sweden and the United Kingdom. Second, a dual career in football (i.e., combination of sport and education) will be considered on the example of Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian studies adopting the holistic lifespan perspective and emphasizing how players might search for an optimal balance between the two careers and relevant athletic and student identities. Third, the dual career will be considered from the holistic ecological perspective that is with a focus on players’ social environment and relevant organizational cultures facilitating dual careers on the example of Norwegian and Australian studies. Fourth, the emerging area of cultural transitions and their significance for global football context will be discussed with references to studies/reviews conducted in Finland, Denmark, Brazil, and Spain. Future directions of psychological career/talent development research in relation to football context will be outlined and further complemented by ideas for practical implications (e.g., psychological support in the junior-to-senior transition, dual career support services, and psychological support in cultural transitions).  

  • 79.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Reducing “chaos in the brickyard": From traditional to emerging trends in career transition research and practice2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 240-240Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introductory presentation to the symposium the author is going to apply building metaphors borrowed from Forscher’s “Chaos in the brickyard” (1963) to briefly summarize a current status of the career topic in sport psychology and then to consider several emerging research/applied trends to furtherpositioning them in the existing system of athlete career knowledge. Special attention will be paid to the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers paradigm (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013; 2014) and it’s a potential to connect different “floors” and “blocks” in theexisting “edifice” of career knowledge in sport psychology. The new research trends will be considered as “bricks” contributing to building new knowledge about athletes’ normative, non-normative, and quasi-normative transitions. In terms of normative transitions, the recent studies on the junior-to-senior transition trajectories/pathways (e.g., Franck & Stambulova, 2014), phases in junior-to-senior (Lundell Olsson & Pehrson, 2013) and athletic retirement (Reints, 2011) transitions as well dual career transitions (e.g., Stambulova, Engström, Franck, Linnér, & Lindahl, 2014) will be considered. Among new non-normative transition research an injury will be introduced as a career transition process with a sequence of phases and also with short-term and long-term career impacts (Ivarsson, Stambulova & Johnson, 2015). Among quasi-normative transitions, cultural transitions (e.g., Agergaard & Ryba, 2014; Ryba, Stambulova, Ronkainen, Bundgaard, & Selänne, 2014) and transitions to elite residential training centers (e.g., Poczwardowski, Diehl, O’Neil, Cote, & Haberl, 2013) will be considered, and also Olympic Games or other important competitions will be articulated as quasi-normative career transitions (e.g., Schinke, Stambulova, Trepanier, & Oghene, 2014; Wylleman, Reints, & Van Aken, 2012). In conclusion, new directions in applied work with transitional athletes (e.g., dual career support services, psychological support in the injury transition) that are (or might be) encouraged by the new research trends will be outlined. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science

  • 80.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Talent Development in Sport: Career Transitions Perspective2006In: 2006 International Society of Sport Psychology Managing council Meeting and International Forum of the Psychology of Olympic Excellence, Taiwan: 2006: Proceedings, Society of Sport and Exercise Psychology of Taiwan (SSEPT) , 2006, p. 69-78Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Towards culturally informed knowledge in athlete career research: The ISSP project on athletes’ careers across cultures2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 46-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation will be focused on the ISSP contributions to promoting cultural epistemology of knowledge in athlete career research and also cultural sensitivity in career assistance to athletes. The initial step was made by the ISSP Position Stand on athletes’ career development and transitions (Stambulova et al., 2009) in which the authors emphasized cultural diversity in athletes’ careers, identified major cultural traditions in career research, and concluded that researchers (being aware or not) internalized their objectives from socio-cultural contexts they belonged to. The next and much bigger step was the ISSP monograph “Athletes’ careers across cultures” (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013) with several pioneer contributions to further promotion of culturally informed career research and assistance. First, this ISSP project allowed creating state of the art reviews of career research and assistance in 19 countries conducted by cultural insiders who (through this book) could provide international visibility to the career studies published in national languages as well as to the career assistance programs available in their countries. Second, the editors traced the evolution of incorporating cultural context into career research in sport psychology using the metaphor of waves with the cross-cultural wave, the cultural mindset wave, and the emerging cultural praxis wave under consideration (Ryba & Stambulova, 2013). Third, based on the analysis of the existing career literature and also ongoing changes in the global sport context, a new paradigm forcareer research/assistance termed cultural praxis of athletes’ careers was suggested (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013; 2014). In conclusion, an impact of the new paradigm (e.g., new trends in career research) and the monograph as a whole (e.g., increased interest in career research internationally) will be discussed with the acknowledgement to the ISSP efforts to support cultural diversity and decolonizing approaches in sport psychology research and applied work. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science

  • 82.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Engström, Cecilia
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    How to Become a Winner in the Long-Run? Dual Career Experiences of Swedish Adolescent Athletes2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 15-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation will focus on a national level Swedish project aimed at examining adolescent athletes’ transition to, and adaptation at, national elite sport schools (NESS). In this study transitional issues (e.g., demands, resources, coping strategies related to sport, studies and private life) and athletes’ personal attributes (e.g., athletic and student identities) were addressed from a holistic lifespan perspective using longitudinal mix-method (quantitative and qualitative) research design. The instruments used in the two quantitative measurements (autumn and spring) included:  the Dual Career Survey (Engström & Stambulova, 2010), the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), the Student Identity Measurement Scale (Engström & Stambulova, 2010), the Task & Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989), and the Basic Needs Satisfaction Scale (Chen et al., in press). Participants (main sample) were athletes of 15-16 years old, representing two genders, 27 sports, and 33 NESSs across the country with 261 who took part in the first measurement and 250 who took part in the second measurement. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted twice a year with 10 participants from the main sample. The results confirmed that starting at NESS meant for student-athletes entering a complicated transition embracing all major spheres of their life. At the beginning of the year the participants underestimated demands of studying, doing sports and living at NESS and overestimated (based on previous relevant experiences) their readiness to pursue dual career at NESS. Later, during the year more awareness and understanding of the reality came, and led to their self-re-evaluation of the adaptation process and outcomes.  So, the 1st year at NESS can be seen as a way from an illusory to real adaptation (which continued even in the end of the year). Results confirmed that one of the most difficult aspects in the adaptation process at NESS was finding an optimal balance between sport and studies. It appeared impossible all the time to give 100% in both. Therefore, student-athletes had to prioritize one side that typically was sport. Some athletes experienced a dissonance between prioritizing sport and receiving a message from coaches/teachers that they are expected to prioritize studies. The study also showed contributions of athletes’ personal development (e.g., athletic identity, task orientation) to the adaptation process. Moreover, perceived total importance of sport, studies, and private life as well as satisfaction with these life domains contributed positively to student-athletes’ adaptation at NESS.

  • 83.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Engström, Cecilia
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Swedish athletes' transition and adaptation during the first year at national elite sport schools2012In: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, p. 133-134Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Engström, Cecilia
    "Mindfoqus", Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindahl, Kent
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Searching for an optimal balance: Dual career experiences of Swedish adolescent athletes2015In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 21, p. 4-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The paper presents a national level Swedish project aimed at examining adolescent student-athletes' dual career experiences (including sport, studies, and private life) during their first year at national elite sport schools (Swedish abbreviation RIGs will be used) with a particular focus on development of their athletic and student identities. The developmental model of transitions faced by athletes (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and the athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003) served as underlying frameworks.

    Design: A longitudinal mixed-method research design was used with autumn-to-spring quantitative and qualitative parts.

    Method: Sixteen year old student-athletes, representing 27 sports and 33 RIGs (n = 261 in the first and n = 250 in the second measurement), completed three quantitative instruments. Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 participants.

    Results: Results revealed (a) significant changes in the participants' transition/adaptation variables from the first to the second measurement accompanied by rather high perceived quality of adjustment at RIG both at the beginning and at the end of the educational year; (b) significant contributions of the transition variables to the perceived quality of adjustment with personal resources as a key predictor; (c) significantly higher athletic than student identity in both quantitative measurements, but with inter- and intra-individual differences with regard to balancing the two shown by the qualitative data.

    Conclusions: The study contributes to deeper understanding of dual career experiences of Swedish adolescent athletes; the authors provide recommendations for psychological dual career support services at RIGs and outline future research in the Swedish dual career model. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 85.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Hvatskaya, Elena
    The P.F. Lesgaft National State University of Sport, St.Petersburg, Russia.
    Athletes’ Careers in Russia: Between Olympic Games in Moscow and Sochi2012In: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, p. 118-118Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Athletes’ careers in Sweden: Facilitating socialization into sports and re-socialization upon retirement2013In: Athletes' careers across cultures / [ed] Natalia Stambulova and Tatiana V. Ryba, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 197-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Novice consultants' experiences: Lessons learned by applied sport psychology students2010In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 295-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Applied sport psychology (ASP) literature reveals a number of publications on reflective practice and professional philosophies of well-established sport psychology consultants. However, there is much less interest in studying how novice consultants make the first steps in their careers and how they perceive the field of ASP in their respective countries and themselves within the field. The objective of this study is to analyse and structure lessons learned by students during their one-year ASP education and supervised practice in Sweden. Method: Thirty-seven ASP students (23 males and 14 females) took part in this study. The data were extracted from the students' final reports on their six-month interventions with athlete-clients. Altogether 278 raw data units (lessons learned) were identified. Results: We used both inductive and deductive analyses to create 33 themes and four categories named professional tools, consultant-client relationship, learning process and experiences, and professional philosophy. These four categories were further structured into three levels reflecting the students' learning process and exploration of the profession with the shifts from analysis to synthesis and from concrete to more generalized and strategic lessons learned. Conclusion: The study provides insight into the novice sport psychology consultants' reflective practice. The results are discussed using career development, scientist-practitioner and cultural sport psychology perspectives. Applications and future research directions are outlined.

  • 88.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Halmstad applied sport psychology supervision model in action: a case of an elite swedish golfer2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 105-105Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation is planned as having two parts. First, the Halmstad Supervision applied sport psychology Model (HSM) developed by the first and the second authors during their more than a decade experiences of running an applied sport psychology course at Halmstad University (Sweden) will be briefly introduced. The HSM is a “local” framework that consists of: (a) pre-conditions addressing students’ and teachers’ backgrounds, as well as contextual and organizational issues that influenced development of the HSM, (b) underlying frameworks (e.g., the scientist-practitioner model and Vygotsky’s socio-cultural theory), and goals for applied sport psychology supervision, (c) philosophy representing values and principles, theoretical orientations, and areas addressed in the supervision, (d) process including forms, methods and content, as well as the climate and ethics of supervision, and (e) outcomeswith students’ feedback and achievements (Stambulova,  Johnson & Linnér, 2014). Then, the third author’s (former student) experiences of the HSM in action during his six months intervention with an elite Swedish golfer will follow. The case under consideration was addressed by the student from a holistic developmental perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and included working issues, such as dealing with cognitive anxiety during golf matches, increasing the golfer’s self-confidence including one complicated situation with his coach, and helping the client with self-awareness and exploration of other than athletic roles to make his self-worth less depended on the golf performance. The student’s journey from the first contact with the client, through initial interviews, observations, and assessments to developing a working plan, realization of the plan with adjustments occurred, and up to termination of the intervention will be traced and complemented by reflections on the supervision and its effectiveness throughout different parts of the journey. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science

  • 89.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Insights from Sweden: Halmstad Applied Sport Psychology Supervision Model2014In: Becoming a Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Professional: A Global Perspective / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York & London: Psychology Press, 2014, p. 276-284Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Student’s Supervised Practice on Helping an Elite Swedish Golfer: Application of the Halmstad Applied Sport Psychology Supervision Model2016In: Global Practices and Training in Applied Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology: A Case Study Approach / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 280-289Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulov, Alexander
    Wrestling club Allians, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Sport psychology consulting in Russia and Sweden2009In: Cultural sport psychology / [ed] Schinke, Robert & Hanrahan, Stephanie J., Champaign: Human Kinetics , 2009, p. 125-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Searching for an optimal balance: Reflections on the Swedish national dual career project2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 15-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation the authors will summarize a recent Swedish dual career project and then reflect on lessons learned from this project in terms of a nature of dual career development and related factors. This longitudinal mixed-method study with a set of questionnaires (N=261; N=250) and interviews (N=10) was aimed at examining adolescent student-athletes’ dual career experiences during their first year at national elite sport schools with a particular focus on development of their athletic and student identities. It was based on the holistic developmental perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004), the athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003), and the “winning in the long-run” philosophy underlying the Swedish dual career system (Lindahl, 2011). Briefly, the results of the study revealed: (a) significant changes in the transition variables during the educational year and their significant contributions to the student-athletes’ perceived quality of adjustment with personal resources as a key predictor, and (b) the participants’ search for an optimal balance between their athlete and student roles/identities. Further elaboration on the results led to several conclusions that might inform future dual career studies. First, to clarify a nature of dual career development, the optimal dual career balance was defined as a combination of sport and studies that helped student-athletes achieve their educational and athletic goals, live satisfying private lives and maintain their health and well-being. Second, recommendations for the dual career service providers emphasized: (a) helping student-athletes to develop personal resources (e.g., life skills), (b) planning shifts in prioritizing sport or studies during the educational year/competitive season, and (c) ensuring an empowerment (rather than controlling) approach in social support from coaches and teachers. Third, the Swedish dual career modeldrafted based on the study might be an example for other countries to proceed with the national dual career guidelines. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 93.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Athletes’ careers across cultures: The ISSP project2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 56-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This symposium introduces the recent ISSP book project: “Athletes’ Careers across Cultures” (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013). The book editors and several chapter authors will discuss how culture (as a multilevel phenomenon) informs athletes’ career development as well as existing career research and career assistance programs around the world. The first presenter will briefly introduce the idea of “Athletes’ Careers across Cultures” project and then focus on two epistemological perspectives (‘waves’) in existing career research, such as the cross cultural perspective gravitating to the positivist epistemology, and the cultural mindset perspective located within a constructivist epistemological paradigm. She will further share the insights related to the emerging “third wave” based on the cultural praxis paradigm. The second presenter will focus on Canadian context tracing an evolution and introducing several theoretical frameworks and lines of current career research in Canada. The third presenter is going to discuss New Zealand context emphasizing how a change on the society/sport system level that is development of the Carded Athlete Program influenced carded athletes’ career development and transitional experiences. This presenter will also point out that a holistic perspective in managing athletes’ development in the Carded Athlete Program is only declared, and more should be done to incorporate this perspective in New Zealand’s sporting culture. The forth presenter will show how the holistic/developmental perspective embodied into the developmental model of transitions faced by athletes (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) has already informed both career research and career support services for athletes in Belgium (Flanders). The fifth presenter is going to emphasize the lessons learned from the analysis of career research and career assistance in 19 countries represented in “Athletes’ Careers across Cultures” and will proceed with a set of new challenges for career researchers and practitioners shaped as cultural praxis of athletes’ careers approach.

  • 94.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Towards Cultural Praxis of Athletes' Careers2013In: Lifelong Physical and Mental Well-Being through Sport and Exercise: 2013 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2013, p. 147-147Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark .
    Towards cultural praxis of athletes’ careers2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 57-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In editing the recent ISSP book, Athletes’ Careers across Cultures, we were able to analyze the evolution and current status of career research and assistance in 19 countries. One lesson from this analysis is that career researchers/practitioners should be more proactive in anticipating and matching changes in both the modern sporting context and international sporting culture (e.g., increased globalization, commercialization, professionalization, transnationalism, and cultural exchange). Based on this analysis and the collective wisdom of the book’s contributors, we suggest a new paradigm termed cultural praxis of athletes’ careers (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013), which we set as a challenge for career researchers and practitioners. The quintessence of this approach is to consider career theories, research and assistance as permeated by culture and united into cultural praxis. More specifically, the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers implies: (a) a merge of the holistic lifespan (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and holistic ecological (Henriksen, 2010) perspectives in career research and assistance, (b) reflexive situatedness of career projects in relevant socio-cultural and historical contexts (e.g., Ryba, 2009; Ryba, Schinke & Tenenbaum, 2010; Stambulova & Alfermann, 2009), (c) an idiosyncratic approach in career research and assistance with specific attention to diversity in career patterns/trajectories, including marginalized athletic populations, such as female, gay, and ethnic minority athletes (e.g., Ryba & Schinke, 2009; Stambulova, 2010), (d) an increased attention to transnationalism in contemporary sporting culture and to trans-disciplinary career research, helping to grasp athletes’ multifaceted lived experiences in sport and beyond (e.g., Azócar, Torregrosa, Pallarés, & Pérez, 2012; Ryba, 2011; Ryba, Haapanen, Mosek, & Ng, 2012; Schinke, Gauthier, Dubuc, & Crowder, 2007), (e) multicultural and transnational consulting, including international networks of existing Career Assistance Programs (e.g., Schinke & Hanrahan, 2009; Schinke, McGannon, Parham, & Lane, 2012; Stambulova, Alfermann, Statler, & Côté, 2009), (f) participatory action research facilitating close collaboration between researchers, practitioners, and athlete-participants (Ryba, 2009; Schinke, Peltier, Ryba, M. J. Wabano, & M.Wabano, 2010). In brief, the approach we have coined as cultural praxis of athletes’ careers challenges the culture-blind career theories, research and practice in sport psychology and stimulates sport psychologists to deal with issues of marginalization, representation and social justice through theory, research and applied work.

  • 96.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ryba, Tatiana V.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    A critical review of career research and assistance through the cultural lens: towards cultural praxis of athletes' careers2014In: International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1750-984X, E-ISSN 1750-9858, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review article, a content area of athlete career in sport psychology is analyzed through the cultural lens: that is, through paradigmatic perspectives of cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, and cultural studies. Based on previous review papers, but mainly on the chapters of the anthology Athletes' Careers across Cultures, we identified three dominant (North American, Australian, and European) and two emerging (Asian and South American) cultural discourses in the career topic. These discourses are characterized by research foci, theoretical frameworks, and career assistance programs in action. Our critical analysis of career research and assistance around the world further indicates a need for more contextualized and culturally competent career projects, which blend theory/research, applied work, and lived culture into cultural praxis. To satisfy this need, a new paradigm termed cultural praxis of athletes' careers is suggested. In conclusion, we emphasize the importance of review papers in negotiating emerging terminology, values, principles, and approaches underlying the career topic, and share some ideas for future reviews in career research and assistance.

  • 97.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Wylleman, Paul
    Free University, Brussels, Belgium.
    Athletes' career development and transitions2014In: Routledge Companion to Sport and Exercise Psychology: Global perspectives and fundamental concepts / [ed] Athanasios G. Papaioannou & Dieter Hackfort, London: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 605-620Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter has three foci. First, it describes what stages athletes go through during their multi-year athletic career and also in their psychological, psychosocial, and academic-vocational development. The second and particular focus of this chapter is on career transitions as turning phases in career development. Successfully coping with athletic and non-athletic, normative (i.e., predictable) and non-normative (i.e., less predictable) transitions allows greater opportunity for an athlete to live a long and successful life in sport as well as being able to adjust effectively to the post-sports career. Alternatively, failure in coping with a transition leads to a crisis which is often followed by negative consequences such as premature dropout from sport, neurosis, alcohol/drug abuse, etc. The third focus of the chapter is on career assistance that is on a set of interventions helping athletes to optimize their career development and prepare for and/or cope with career transitions.

  • 98.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Wylleman, Paul
    University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium.
    [Editorial]: Dual career development and transitions2015In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 21, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Stenling, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden & Research Institute for Sport and Exercise, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Using bifactor exploratory structural equation modeling to examine global and specific factors in measures of sports coaches' interpersonal styles2015In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work we investigated distinct sources of construct-relevant psychometric multidimensionality in two sport-specific measures of coaches’ need-supportive (ISS-C) and controlling interpersonal (CCBS) styles. A recently proposed bifactor exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) framework was employed to achieve this aim. In Study 1, using a sample of floorball players, the results indicated that the ISS-C can be considered as a unidimensional measure, with one global factor explaining most of the variance in the items. In Study 2, using a sample of male ice hockey players, the results indicated that the items in the CCBS are represented by both a general factor and specific factors, but the subscales differ with regard to the amount of variance in the items accounted for by the general and specific factors. These results add further insight into the psychometric properties of these two measures and the dimensionality of these two constructs.

  • 100.
    Stenling, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bayesian Structural Equation Modeling in Sport and Exercise Psychology2015In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, p. 410-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bayesian statistics is on the rise in mainstream psychology, but applications in sport and exercise psychology research are scarce. In this article, the foundations of Bayesian analysis are introduced, and we will illustrate how to apply Bayesian structural equation modeling in a sport and exercise psychology setting. More specifically, we contrasted a confirmatory factor analysis on the Sport Motivation Scale II estimated with the most commonly used estimator, maximum likelihood, and a Bayesian approach with weakly informative priors for cross-loadings and correlated residuals. The results indicated that the model with Bayesian estimation and weakly informative priors provided a good fit to the data, whereas the model estimated with a maximum likelihood estimator did not produce a well-fitting model. The reasons for this discrepancy between maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation are discussed as well as potential advantages and caveats with the Bayesian approach. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.

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