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  • 351.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johansson, Ingela
    Hälsouniversitetet, Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Hälsouniversitetet, Linköping.
    Quality of life and coping strategies in recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:

    To explore relationships between quality of life (QOL), coping strategies, anxiety, depression and perceived control in recipients living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and compare those having received an ICD less or more than one year ago and those with a primary or secondary preventive indication.

    Methods:

    A cross-sectional, correlational design was used and 147 individuals (mean age 63 years, 121 men) who had lived with an ICD between 6 to 24 months completed Quality of Life Index-Cardiac version, Jalowiec Coping Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Control Attitude Scale.

    Results: 

    A regression analysis showed that anxiety and depression were negatively correlated (ß=.16, p=0.025, ß=.30, p=0.012) respectively and perceived control was positively correlated (ß= .26, p=0.001) with overall QOL in ICD recipient 6-24 months after implant. A second regression analysis showed significant relationships between the dependent variable overall use of coping strategies and the anxiety (R2 adj = 0.213, F (4.132) = 10.186, p=0.001). More anxiety was correlated (β = 3.27, p=0.001) with increased use of coping strategies. Anxiety was quite common up to 2 years after ICD implant. Optimism was found to be the most frequently used coping strategy, but the recipients did not use a multitude of coping strategies. There was no relationship found between QOL and the use of different coping strategies. Time since implantation or the indication for receiving an ICD did not influence QOL, the use of coping strategies, symptoms of anxiety and depression or perceived control.

    Conclusions:

    Despite being a cost-effective, reliable and efficient implanted device for reducing the incidence of sudden cardiac death, the ICD can be associated with notable consequences in everyday life for the recipient. We suggest that follow-up with education and psychosocial support should be provided more intensively during the first six months after implantation and thereafter be tailored toward those recipients experiencing symptoms of depression and anxiety, a lower perceived control in life and a diminished QOL. By using screening tools to assess perceived control, anxiety and depression during follow up after implantation in the outpatient ICD clinic, recipients perceiving low control and mental strain in their everyday life can be identified and supportive interventions considered in order to increase their QOL. Coping strategies should be further explored in research and clinical practice in order to support ICD recipient to use the appropriate coping strategies.

  • 352.
    Flodin, Eva
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Interactive Design - The desire for autonomous upright mobility: A longitudinal case study2007In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, E-ISSN 1878-643X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a child is born with a motor disability, making it difficult or impossible to acquire independent locomotion, a challenging task is to find assistive compensating technology. This study addresses the motor needs of a child, Hanna, with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA II). She participated in the development of her assistive technology, with a focus on her independent locomotion and posture, during her infancy, childhood and early teens in a longitudinal and interactive design project. From the very beginning, she expressed a strong attraction to autonomous upright mobility, in contrast to the more common sitting posture in a wheelchair. She has used different versions of the resulting powered walking aid ever since. The upright independent locomotion it has afforded has been of major importance for her self-image, independence and physical development. © 2007 IOS Press. All rights reserved.

  • 353.
    Flodin, Eva
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Certec, Rehabilitation Engineering Research, Department of Design Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Interactive Design - the desire for autonomous upright mobility: A longitudinal case study2007In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, E-ISSN 1878-643X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a child is born with a motor disability, making it difficult or impossible to acquire independent locomotion, a challenging task is to find assistive compensating technology. This study addresses the motor needs of a child, Hanna, with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA II). She participated in the development of her assistive technology, with a focus on her independent locomotion and posture, during her infancy, childhood and early teens in a longitudinal and interactive design project. From the very beginning, she expressed a strong attraction to autonomous upright mobility, in contrast to the more common sitting posture in a wheelchair. She has used different versions of the resulting powered walking aid ever since. The upright independent locomotion it has afforded has been of major importance for her self-image, independence and physical development. © 2007 IOS Press. All rights reserved.

  • 354.
    Fluur, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology UHL, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Strömberg, Anna
    Division of Nursing Sciences, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Thylen, Ingela
    Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Patients' experiences of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD); with a focus on battery replacement and end-of-life issues2013In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 202-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: ICD deactivation at end-of-life is technically uncomplicated. However, it may present a psychological challenge to healthcare professionals, patients, and next-of-kin. Objective: This study explored patients' experiences of complex issues of battery replacement and deactivation of the ICD. Methods: Semistructured interviews were administered to 37 medically stable ICD-recipients. Results: The ICD-recipients lived with an uncertain illness trajectory, but the majority had not reflected on battery replacement or elective ICD deactivation. Healthcare professionals had rarely discussed these issues with patients. However, this was consistent with the ICD-recipients' wishes. Many patients had misconceptions about the lifesaving capacity of the ICD and the majority stated that they would not choose to deactivate the ICD, even if they knew they were terminally ill, and it meant they would receive multiple shocks. Conclusion: The ICD-recipients tended not to think about end-of-life issues, which imply that many patients reach the final stages of life unaware of the option of ICD deactivation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  • 355.
    Fluur, Christina
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology UHL, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Division of Nursing Sciences, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Thylen, Ingela
    Division of Nursing Sciences, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Spouses’ reflections on Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator treatment with focus on the future and the end-of-life: a qualitative content analysis2014In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 70, no 8, p. 1758-1769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To explore future reflections of spouses living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipient with focus on the end-of-life phase in an anticipated palliative phase.

    Background. A history of or risk for life-threatening arrhythmias may require an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Despite the life-saving capacity of the device, eventually life will come to an end. As discussion about preferences of shock therapy at end-of-life phase seldom takes place in advance, the implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients may face defibrillating shocks in the final weeks of their lives, adding to stress and anxiety in patients and their families.

    Design. Qualitative study with in-depth interviews analysed with a content analysis.

    Methods. Interviews were performed with 18 spouses of medically stable implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipients during 2011–2012.

    Results. The spouses described how they dealt with changes in life and an uncertain future following the implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation. Six subcategories conceptualized the spouses' concerns: Aspiring for involvement; Managing an altered relationship; Being attentive to warning signs; Worries for deterioration in the partner's health; Waiting for the defibrillating shock; and Death is veiled in silence.

    Conclusion. Despite the partner's serious state of health; terminal illness or death and the role of the device was seldom discussed with healthcare professionals or the implantable cardioverter defibrillator recipient. Open and honest communication was requested as important to support coping with an unpredictable life situation and to reduce worries and uncertainty about the future and end-of-life. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 356.
    Fogaca, J. L.
    et al.
    Dept. of Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, United States.
    Zizzi, S. J.
    Dept. of Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, United States.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Walking multiple paths of supervision in American sport psychology: A qualitative tale of novice supervisees’ development2018In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 156-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited evidence for what characteristics of supervision delivery facilitate novice supervisees' development. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between supervision-delivery approaches and the perceptions of service-delivery competence development in novice practitioners. The authors interviewed 9 supervisor-supervisee dyads before and after the academic term in which the supervisees had their first applied experiences. Supervisees also completed reflective journal entries regarding their supervisory experiences and development. Data analysis included constant comparative analysis and triangulation of qualitative results with a practitioner-skills inventory. Different approaches to supervision delivery seemed to contribute similarly to novice supervisees' development. Supervisees developed in more areas when the dyads had consistent meetings, close supervisory relationships, feedback, and frequent opportunities for self-reflection and when supervisors adapted the delivery to the supervisees' developmental levels. In addition, factors in supervisees' background, practice, and supervision that contributed to perceptions of service-delivery competence are discussed. © 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 357.
    Folke, Solgun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Views of xerostomia among health care professionals: a qualitative study2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 791-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To explore and describe views of xerostomia among health care professionals.

    BACKGROUND:

    Xerostomia (dry mouth) is caused by changes in quality and quantity of saliva due to poor health, certain drugs and radiation therapy. It is a common symptom, particularly among older people and has devastating consequences with regard to oral health and general well-being.

    METHODS:

    Data were obtained and categorised by interviewing 16 health care professionals. Qualitative content analysis was chosen as the method of analysis.

    DESIGN: Qualitative.

    RESULTS:

    The latent content was formulated into a theme: xerostomia is a well-known problem, yet there is inadequate management of patients with xerostomia. The findings identified three categories expressing the manifest content: awareness of xerostomia, indifferent attitude and insufficient support.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Although xerostomia was recognised as commonly occurring, it was considered to be an underestimated and an ignored problem. Proper attention to conditions of xerostomia and subsequent patient management were viewed as fragmentary and inadequate. Additional qualitative studies among patients with xerostomia would be desirable to gain further understanding of the problems with xerostomia, its professional recognition and management.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    A holistic view, positive professional attitudes and enhanced knowledge of xerostomia seem essential to augment collaboration among health care professionals and to improve compassion for and support of patients with xerostomia.

  • 358.
    Folke, Solgun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    The subjective meaning of xerostomia: an aggravating misery2009In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 245-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Xerostomia, the subjective sensation of dry mouth, is associated with qualitative and quantitative changes of saliva. Poor health, certain medications and radiation therapy constitute major risk factors. To gain further understanding of this condition the present study explored the main concern of xerostomia expressed by affl icted adults. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 participants and analysed according to the grounded theory method. An aggravating misery was identi-fi ed as the core category, meaning that the main concern of xerostomia is its devastating and debilitating impact on multiple domains of well-being. Professional consultation, search for affi rmation and social withdrawal were strategies of management. The fi ndings reveal that xerostomia is not a trivial condition for those suffering. Oral impairment as well as physical and psychosocial consequences of xerostomia has a negative impact on quality of life. There is an obvious need to enhance professional competence to improve the compassion for and the support of individuals affl icted by xerostomia

  • 359.
    Fors, Uno
    et al.
    Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Gunning, William
    Department of Pathology, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, USA.
    Can virtual patients be used to assess clinical reasoning? The effect of different grading metrics2012In: 15th Ottawa Conference, Abstracts, Ottawa: AMEE , 2012, p. 166-166Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Virtual patients (VPs) can be used to assess clinical reasoning. Grading metrics applied to VP exams may include scoring for appropriate differential diagnoses, proposed therapy, and the learner’s approach to the case. The learner’s inquiry of medical history, physical exam, and lab/ancillary tests utilized during the exam can all be graded.  However, the best grading metric used to assess clinical reasoning for VP examination is unresolved. 

    Summary of Work

    Results from two groups of students assessed by VP-based examination (n>300) were used as a basis to evaluate different grading metrics. These grading models were also compared with results of other traditional student examination performance. 

    Summary of Results

    Each method of grading had both pronounced advantages and disadvantages with none considered ideal. However one grading metric was perceived to perform slightly better. None of the scoring methods had a direct correlation with four traditional exam formats to which they were compared. 

    Conclusions

    Each grading metric used in this study had advantages and disadvantages. Medical school exams employing VP-based exams need to define what should be assessed for reliable utilization.

    Take-home Messages

    Objectives of VP-based examination are essential to measure learner competency in an appropriate context. Traditional exams do not necessarily measure the same aptitude that VP-based exams measure.

  • 360.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Bäcklund, Berit
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Hjort-Telhede, Eva
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Virtual patient cases for active student participation in nursing education2018In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 7, p. 63-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A didactive method which promote a more active student participation (ASP), Virtual Patient (VP) cases  may be a valuable intervention. VP cases are defined as interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios for healthcare education. VP cases are excellent for training clinical reasoning skills.

    The aim of the study was to investigate utilization of VP cases for ASP in nursing education, regarding student’s learning experience.

    The design was an intervention study, 58 students in the third semester of six in the nursing program were included in the study. In 2016-2017, interventions have been conducted in the Human Biomedicine course with the purpose to develop a course concept that included didactic methods that promoted ASP. The students performed four VP cases individually at home. Before solving  the VP cases, the students had lectures in medicine science for example concerning chest organs diseases. In order to be a complement to that lecture the VP case was about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The lectures were followed up with seminars where the students were able to ask questions regarding conducted VP cases. After each performed VP case, the student answered a self -evaluation form with open ended questions.  Data was conducted using content analysis.

    The result showed that the students found the VP cases challenging and motivational. The VPs taught them to think wide and stimulated to search for more knowledge. Finally they thought it was a good way to test themselves and appreciated the direct feedback, lack of knowledge became visible at once. © 2018 OMICS International

  • 361.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Bäcklund, Berit
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Hjort-Telhede, Eva
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Virtual Patient Cases for Active Student Participation in Nursing Education — Students’ Learning Experiences2019In: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 1475-1491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual Patient cases (VP cases) promote learning, teaching, and assessment of clinical reasoning and can stimulate and motivate active learning experiences in nursing education. The aim of the study was to investigate the use of VP cases for active student participation in nursing education regarding students’ learning experiences of clinical reasoning. After an intervention using VP cases in the graduate nursing program, 174 evaluation questionnaires were collected from the students. The questionnaire consisted of open-ended questions that covered students’ learning experiences using VP cases. Deductive content analysis was used with a focus on the students’ learning experiences. The results showed that the use of the VP cases provided a comprehensive view of the patient and encouraged the students to broaden their thinking and helped them in drawing conclusions and in structuring their problem-solving. The VP cases also stimulated their learning process and reflection. Their knowledge was challenged, and this motivated them to search for more knowledge that was then followed up in the VP cases. The students found that the VP cases provided support in translating theoretical knowledge into clinical reasoning, and they facilitated the application of theory in practice and encouraged the students to use their clinical reasoning. The VP cases allowed for self-evaluation, which was a motivating force and increased their awareness of their abilities for clinical reasoning. Learning experiences from VP cases seem to be applicable in higher education and seem especially useful in enabling nursing students to apply theory in their clinical practice. Experiential learning theory supports the learning experiences from VP cases in clinical reasoning. In addition, working with VP cases seems to promote active student participation. Copyright © 2019 by author(s) and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

  • 362.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fors, Uno
    Dept. of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Assessing clinical reasoning among experienced nurses as a base for a new assessment method for nursing students2011In: AMEE 2011: Vienna, Austria, Reed Messe Wien, 27-31 August 2011: Abstract book, Dundee, UK: AMEE , 2011, p. 313-313Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Postgraduate nursing education is a program which require knowledge and skills that guarantee the quality of professional competence. Many courses in nursing have learning outcomes including clinical reasoning (CR). Assessment is an important part of the learning process and should assess clinically relevant performance. Virtual Patients (VPs), have successfully been used in nursing education to promote learning and also been piloted for assessment of CR. Summary of work: However, it remains to solve how to score and grade VPs for assessment. Therefore, we need to determine the best practises that the assessment should be based on. This study investigates how clinically experienced specialist nurses apply CR for clinical decision making, to create the basis for a holistic assessment method based on VPs. Summary of results: VP cases representing different subdisciplines in paediatrics are implemented in a VP-system. 40 experienced nurses will work in pairs to solve the VP-cases, and their actions are logged in terms of what they do and in what order. Think Aloud is used to capture their thinking process. Conclusions: This study will give information about how experienced nurses solve clinical cases and thus which issues that should be assessed in VP-based assessment for nursing. Take-home messages: VP-based assessment for specialist nursing education is being developed.

  • 363.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Educational impacts of changed action of using VPs in postgraduate nurse education2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A meta-analysis of a thesis project entitled Virtual Patients (VPs) for Assessment of Clinical Reasoning has been performed.  VPs are interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios for the purpose of healthcare education and assessment. To teach and learn clinical reasoning (CR) can be hard because its complexity and difficulty to make it visible for students. VPs have been found to improve learning and be superior to traditional teaching methods for training CR.  Most VP systems have the potential to track all interactions of the user and therefore recommended for assessment.

    The aim of the meta-analysis, which is based on the research project’s four studies, was to reach a deeper understanding of the educational impact of using VPs in postgraduate pediatric nurse education.  Data was collected during 2008-2013. The first study evaluated the applicability and students’ acceptance of VP-based exams. Through thinking aloud the second study identified how clinically experienced nurses solved complex VP cases which was a base for the third study; evaluating a new scoring model for VP-based exams. Finally the last study explored if formative VP-based assessments in connection with self-evaluations had an impact on student’s development of CR and if they could detect their progression.

    For the meta-analysis, concepts of challenge, skills, novice and expert have been applied. The findings shows that VP-based assessments have high educational impacts: for example even if the students were novices in the domain of Child health care, the early exposure for formative VP-based assessments gave them an insight about what is required to work at such a unit as well as a stimulation to develop CR in this field. They became aware of what to focus on in literature and clinical practice. The students reported a perceived progression of CR ability from uncertainty about the competence, to self-efficacy.

  • 364.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fors, Uno
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management & Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    VP-based Final Examination: a model to reach advanced level standards for the degree of paediatric nursing in Sweden2010In: MEDINFO 2010: proceedings of the 13th World Congress on Medical Informatics / [ed] Charles Safran; S Reti; Heimar F Marin, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Web-SP is a system for virtual patient, developed at Karolin- ska Institutet (KI) in Sweden. In this study, we examine Web- SP cases for assessing paediatric nursing students.To investi- gate the possibility of using Web-SP for assessing clinical reasoning skills and to study students acceptance and to de- termine whether the skills required of experienced paediatric registered nurses could be adequately assessed by the system. The intervention included a two-part of exams. The results show high levels of acceptance of the Web-SP as an examin- ation method. Students also thought it was a good way to practice their clinical skills. Findings have relevance in the development of clinical information systems where clinical decision making is important.

  • 365.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Georg, Carina
    Dept. of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Uno
    Virtual Patients Lab, Dept. LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Assessing Clinical Reasoning skills in Nursing using Virtual Patients2010In: Proceeding of AMEE 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical reasoning (CR) in nursing covers many aspects of problem solving and decision making regarding the well-being and care of patients. CR is seldom a specific topic in nursing curricula and is usually informally trained during clinical rotations. CR in nursing is different from medicine, and besides a different vocabulary, decisions in nursing seldom are focused on medical diagnosis, laboratory/imaging data or therapy, but more on the caring process and well-being of the patient. This has led to problems finding good methods for assessing nursing students’ clinical reasoning skills.

     

    In this study, Virtual patients (VPs) were introduced as an assessment tool for CR in three different nursing courses at two universities comprising 64 students in total. Students’ opinions about this assessment method were investigated using questionnaires regarding students’ acceptance, adaptation to nursing procedures and the potential of the VP-based assessment as a learning experience.

     

    A vast majority of the students reported positive attitudes to the VP-based assessment. Many students thought that the VP cases were well adapted to nursing, but some wanted the VP system to be less “medical” and asked for more focus on nursing. Almost all students identified the VP-based assessment as a good learning experience.

  • 366.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Georg, Carina
    Dept. of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fors, Uno
    Dept. of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Virtual patients for assessment of clinical reasoning in nursing: A pilot study2011In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 757-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In different nursing programmes, one important learning outcome is clinical reasoning (CR) skills. However, to date, there is limited number of methods available for assessment of CR skills; especially for distance-based courses. This study investigates students' opinions about the feasibility of using Virtual Patients (VPs) for assessing CR in nursing education. VPs were introduced as an assessment tool in three different nursing courses at two universities, comprising 77 students in total. Students' overall acceptance of this assessment tool, including its applicability to the practise of nursing and the potential of VP-based assessment as a learning experience, were investigated using questionnaires. Course directors used the Web-SP system to assess students' interactions with VPs and their answers regarding diagnoses, caring procedures and their justifications. Students' found the VP cases to be realistic and engaging, and indicate a high level of acceptance for this assessment method. In addition, the students' indicated that VPs were good for practising their clinical skills, although some would prefer that the VP system be less "medical" and asked for more focus on nursing. Although most students supplied correct diagnoses and made adequate clinical decisions, there was a wide range in their ability to explain their clinical reasoning processes. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 367.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Rasmusson, Karin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Using academic reflection for examination in simulated environment2018In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 7, p. 53-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In nursing education, in semester four of six, in the course of 10 weeks clinical practice the final individual exam has developed. The aim was to deepen the clinical reasoning and make it more visible. The aim was also to give the student the possibility to reflect on the learning objectives, to identify additional knowledge needs and progression, which is a kind of learning recommended by higher education in Sweden. The academic reflection should have a clear purpose and show evidence of learning. Such a reflection requires that the student can use theory from the education to describe, explain and discuss critical events and their importance to future professional practice.

     Two classes with 75 nursing students participated in the study. One pair of students conducted a complex scenario in simulated environment during one hour including feedback. Another pair observed the scenario for identifying clinical reasoning, patient safety and team work. Then the pairs changed roles. Afterwards the students were instructed to make an academic reflection on their learning and progression based on seven open questions in a learning platform survey. Qualitative content analysis was used for data analysis.

    Students expressed that the scenarios trained the ability to manage acute situations, team communication, plan and prioritize nursing actions and prepare for future profession.

    The students felt that it was an excellent form of examination as the academic reflection forced the student to be aware of individual strengths and weaknesses and on the basis of this identify lack of knowledge.© 2018 OMICS International

  • 368.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fors, Uno
    Inst. Data och systemvetenskap, Stockholms Universitet.
    VP based examination in paediatric nursing2011In: Assessment for Quality: from knowledge to professional competence : programme & abstracts, Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet , 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 369.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hult, Håkan
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Assessing progression of clinical reasoning through Virtual Patients2014In: Ottawa Conference Abstracts: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: April 25-29, 2014: Transforming Healthcare through Excellence and Evaluation: 16th Ottawa Conference: 12th Canadian Conference on Medical Education, 2014, p. 71-72Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There have been discussions to use more formative assessments in health care education to contribute to students’ deep learning. Feedback is important, but a lot of student’s do not do anything with it. Thus, interventions which force students to reflect the new knowledge need to be introduced.

    In order to explore if formative VP-based exams had an impact on development of clinical reasoning ability and achievement of clinical decision making, we let postgraduate pediatric nurse students complete self-evaluation forms in connection with three VP- based assessments to follow their progress.

    Summary of Work

    After performed assessment and before answering the self-evaluation form, the students’ were asked to take part of the feedback section of the VP-system and the recommended interactions in the VP system. Data was conducted using content analysis with a deductive approach. Kolb’s’ model of Learning Cycle guided the analysis.

    Summary of Results

    The result showed a perceived progression of clinical reasoning skills by the students. After the first assessment the students described uncertainty and that knowledge gaps were exposed, at the second exam the awareness of clinical reasoning was obvious and the students were more certain of knowing how. Finally, self-efficacy in patient solving was expressed.

    Conclusions

    VP-based assessments with self-evaluation early in the education resulted in a gain of students’ own identification of the concept of clinical reasoning, awareness of what to focus on, and pay attention to during clinical practice.

    Take-home Messages

    VP with reflective tools is excellent to use in formative assessments to identify progress and to visualize the expected clinical competence.

  • 370.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Hult, Håkan
    Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Uno
    Dept. of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV), Stockholm University, Kista, Sweden.
    Assessing progression of clinical reasoning through virtual patients: An exploratory study2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To avoid test-driven learning, there have been discussions regarding the use of more formative assessments in health care education to promote students' deep learning. Feedback is important in formative assessment, but many students ignore it; therefore, interventions should be introduced which stimulate them to reflect on the new knowledge.

    The aim for this study was to explore if Virtual Patient (VP)-based formative assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, had an impact on postgraduate pediatric nursing students' development of clinical reasoning abilities. Students' self-evaluations served as the basis for measuring progress. Data was analysed using deductive content analysis.

    The findings showed a clear progression of the clinical reasoning ability of the students. After the first assessment, the students described feelings of uncertainty and that their knowledge gaps were exposed. At the mid-course assessment the awareness of improved clinical reasoning was obvious and the students were more certain of knowing how to solve the VP cases. In the final assessment, self-efficacy was expressed.

    VP-based assessments, in connection with self-evaluations, early in the education resulted in a gain of students' own identification of the concept of clinical reasoning, awareness of what to focus on during clinical practice and visualised expected clinical competence. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 371.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hult, Håkan
    Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Uno
    Dept. of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clinical reasoning in nursing, a think-aloud study using virtual patients – A base for an innovative assessment2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 538-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In health-care education, it is important to assess the competencies that are essential for the professional role. To develop clinical reasoning skills is crucial fornursing practice and therefore an important learning outcome in nursing education programmes. Virtual patients (VPs) are interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios and have been suggested for use not only for learning, but also for assessment of clinical reasoning. The aim of this study was to investigate how experienced paediatric nurses reason regarding complex VP cases and how they make clinical decisions. The study was also aimed to give information about possible issues that should be assessed in clinical reasoning exams for post-graduate students in diploma specialist paediatric nursing education. The information from this study is believed to be of high value when developing scoring and grading models for a VP-based examination for the specialist diploma in paediatricnursing education. Using the think-aloud method, data were collected from 30 RNs working in Swedish paediatric departments, and child or school health-care centres. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results indicate that experienced nurses try to consolidate their hypotheses by seeing a pattern and judging the value of signs, symptoms, physical examinations, laboratory tests and radiology. They show high specific competence but earlier experience of similar cases was also of importance for the decision making. The nurses thought it was an innovative assessment focusing on clinical reasoning and clinical decision making. They thought it was an enjoyable way to be assessed and that all three main issues could be assessed using VPs. In conclusion, VPs seem to be a possible model for assessing the clinical reasoning process and clinical decision making, but how to score and grade such exams needs further research. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 372.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hult, Håkan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Fors, Uno
    Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Evaluation of a novel scoring and grading model for VP-based exams in postgraduate nurse education2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1246-1251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For Virtual Patient-based exams, several scoring and grading methods have been proposed, but none have yet been validated. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new scoring and grading model for VP-based exams in postgraduate paediatric nurse education.The same student group of 19 students performed a VP-based exam in three consecutive courses. When using the scoring and grading assessment model, which contains a deduction system for unnecessary or unwanted actions, a progression was found in the three courses: 53% of the students passed the first exam, 63% the second and 84% passed the final exam. The most common reason for deduction of points was due to students asking too many interview questions or ordering too many laboratory tests.The results showed that the new scoring model made it possible to judge the students' clinical reasoning process as well as their progress. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 373.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hult, Håkan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fors, Uno G.H.
    Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Using VPs for assessment of clinical competence in postgraduate Paediatric Nurse Education2012In: Assessment of Competence in Medicine and the Healthcare Professions, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 374.
    Forsberg, Lena
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Tebelius, Ulla
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The riding school as a site for gender identity construction among Swedish teenage girls2011In: World Leisure Journal, ISSN 0441-9057, E-ISSN 1607-8055, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 42-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on observations and interviews with six teenage girls (age 14–16) currently highly active in a Swedish riding school. Riding is one of the most popular sporting activities among girls in Sweden and riding schools receive financial support from the government to make riding available to everyone. The aim of this paper is to explore how teenage girls construct their gender identity at the stable through the handling of horses and related work in their leisure time. Theoretically, we employ Butler’s (1999) theory of identity, based on social constructivism. The relationships with the horses, the hard work, the unexpected challenges, as well as the friendships among the girls, were found to be essential elements of the stable experience. At the stable, the girls learned to take action, handle risks and take the lead. This created an alternative way of enacting themselves as young females, resulting in an identity based on being independent, competent and powerful. As such, the riding school represents a developmental space where teenage girls can prepare themselves for their future, independent, lives. © 2011 World Leisure Organization.

  • 375.
    Forslöf, Caroline
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Widén, Sandra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    MÅLSÄTTNING OCH MOTIVATION INOM GYMTRÄNING: En kvantitativ studie baserad på gymaktiva vuxna2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship/effect between goal orientation, needs satisfaction, needs frustration, motivation and training frequency among gym active adults. Based on two working models two hypotheses were designed and tested through mediation analyzes. A quantitative research approach was conducted in which respondents were asked to answer a questionnaire with questions from the following measuring instruments: Godin Leisure- Time Exercise Questionnaire, Task and Ego Goal Orientation in Sport Questionnaire, The Balanced Measure of Psychological Needs and Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire". From a convenience sample, 128 respondents (70 women and 58 men) in the age 19-36 (M = 22.3, SD = 2.5) were recruited who participated in the study. The average number of training sessions/week was about nine for the participants. The study's main finding suggest that task goals positively correlated with identified regulation, intrinsic motivation, satisfaction of the three basic needs and self-determination motivation. There was also a positive correlation between exercise frequency and intrinsic motivation and exercise frequency. The results also showed a positive correlation between ego goals, amotivation and thwarting. The two hypotheses were rejected because the result did not generate any direct media effects. For future research, it is suggested to design studies that aim to investigate how the effect of exercise frequency may be affected depending on the goal orientation, and further suggested studies that investigate thwarting in relation to gym contexts.

  • 376.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Athletic and Student Identities of Swedish Adolescent Student-Athletes: Mixed-Method Exploration2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 153-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the project was to explore Swedish adolescent student-athletes’ transition to, and adaptation at, national elite sport schools (NESS) based on the holistic lifespan perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and career transition framework (Stambulova, 2003). Transitional variables (e.g., demands, coping strategies, personal and environmental resources,) covering student athletes’ sport, studies, and private life were studied in line with their athletic and student identities. This presentation will particularly focus on how student-athletes’ dual career experiences affect their athletic and student identities during their first year at NESS. Participants (main sample) were first year student-athletes of 15-16 years old representing different sports and 33 NESS across the country. A longitudinal mixed-method research design was implemented with the first quantitative measurement conducted in autumn (n = 261), and the second measurement in spring (n = 250). Athletic and student identities were measured using the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS; Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993) and the Student Identity Measurement Scale (SIMS; Engström & Stambulova, 2010). Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 participants from the main sample two times during the year (autumn and spring). Interview guides were structured in three parts exploring student athletes’ near past (e.g., previous experiences of combining sport, studies and private life or the dual career experiences between the two interviews), present status in the transition (e.g., demands, coping strategies, perception of themselves as students and athletes), and future expectations. The results of both quantitative and qualitative exploration of the student-athletes’ identity issue can be summarized as follows: (1) no significant changes were found in athletic and student identities between the two quantitative measurements, however, athletic identity was significantly higher than student identity in both measurements, (2) interviews confirmed that student-athletes perceived themselves to have higher athletic than student identity but also that inter-individual variations in their perceptions existed, (3) there were intra-individual differences in how student-athletes perceived their self-identities between the first and the second interview, (4) there was a clear message from the interviews that searching for an optimal balance between student and athlete roles and also between athletic and student identities was perceived as a key issue in adjusting to the dual career at NESS. The participants’ narratives will be used to illustrate the complexity of student-athletes’ perception of their athletic and student identities.

  • 377.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    A Swedish female basketball player’s junior-to-seniortransition: A narrative case study2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 32-33Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 378.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Individual pathways through the junior-to-senior transition: Narratives of two Swedish team sport athletes2019In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athletes frequently describe the JST as the most difficult within-career transition, and many of them have acknowledged that they failed to cope well with it (e.g., Stambulova, 2009). Athletes’ development in the junior-to-senior transition (JST) is influenced by narratives existing within relevant contexts and settings. This study served as a follow-up to the quantitative longitudinal study to gain a deeper understanding of individual JST paths through a qualitative narrative approach. The aim was to explore two team sport athletes’ (John, the football player, and Anna, the basketball player) JST pathways, emphasizing psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating and debilitating the process. Narrative type interviews were conducted, and the holistic-form structural analysis (Smith, 2016) was used. Through their narratives, John and Anna reconstructed their JST paths, attaching meanings to certain events, recounting the people involved, and making personal reflections. John had a performance and family narrative and Anna, an enjoyment and relationship narrative. They perceived their key facilitating persons to be their family members and teammates. The debilitating factors were some coaches’ behaviors. At the time of this study, John and Anna had already terminated their athletic careers and had refocused on getting an education. Although they did not reach elite senior levels in their sports, they found their athletic career meaningful life experiences.

  • 379.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Social influences on the junior-to-senior transition in Swedish athletes: narrative case studies2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 124-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The junior-to-senior transition (JST) is decisive for athletes who want to reach the elite/professional sport level. The JST: (a) is initiated by a set of demands relevant to athletic and non-athletic development, (b) lasts between one and four years, and (c) is characterized by athletes’ high dropout rate (Bruner, Munroe-Chandler, & Spink, 2008; Franck, Stambulova, & Weibull, 2016; Stambulova, 2009). This study is a follow up of the quantitative longitudinal study of the JST in Swedish club-based athletes (Franck et al., 2016; Franck, Stambulova, & Ivarsson, in press) and aimed at further qualitative exploration of the JST process emphasizing social influences involved. Four athletes (age M = 24.2, SD = 1.5) representing tennis, swimming, football, and basketball were interviewed. They were encouraged to reflect retrospectively on their JST process using five measurement points of the longitudinal study as an aid to structure their narratives. The interviews lasted for about 90 minutes. Thematic narrative analysis (Smith, 2016) was used to identify themes related to social influences during the JST and their perceived facilitative or debilitative effects. All four JST narratives were unique, however, to structure the results the narratives were pared to represent individual vs. team sport contexts. The results revealed that the social factors facilitating the JST were shared by both sport contexts and included family support, and good relationships with coaches and peers. The debilitating social factors that worked as the JST barriers were more diverse across the sport contexts. These factors covered a lack of sponsors/financial support and the ambiguity of requirements from the sport federations in individual sports, and changes in the structure of the team and selection to a higher level team not being ready for, in team sports. All participants went through the JST, continued a few years after, and then terminated their athletic careers.

  • 380.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Swedish Athletes’ Transition from Junior to Senior Sports: A Quantitative Longitudinal Study2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 58-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the process of the transition from junior to senior sports in Swedish athletes. Previous studies showed that the junior-to-senior transition (a) is initiated by a set of demands relevant to athletic and non-athletic development, (b) lasts for about two years, (c) known for a high dropout rate and often described by athletes as the most difficult within-career transition (e.g., Bruner et al., 2008; Stambulova, 2009; Vanden Auweele et al., 2004). This quantitative longitudinal study included five measurements that were conducted every six months, and altogether covered two-and-a-half-years with two measurements of the transition variables and one measurement of related personal variables each year. The following package of four instruments was used: the Transition Monitoring Survey (Stambulova, Franck, & Weibull, 2012), the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989) and the Physical Self-Perception Profile – Revised (Lindwall, Hagger, & Asci, 2007). In the first measurement 101 club-based Swedish athletes (74 males and 27 females) of 15 -20 years old took part. The dynamics of participants was characterized by an increasing dropout rate from each measurement to the next, and as a result only 37 participants were left to the time of the final (fifth) measurement. Overall dynamics of transitional variables throughout the five measurements was characterized by an increase in motivation and perceived quality of adjustment on the senior athletic level from the first to the third measurement followed by a decrease in these variables across the last two measurements. Decrease in the athletes’ perceived degree of adjustment was especially relevant to their adjustment to senior competitions and to combining sport and studies. Perceived importance of sport (especially of competitions) decreased progressively from the first to the fifth measurement. The other transitional variables (e.g., perceived demands, resources, coping strategies, stress level, need in support) were characterized by various types of dynamics. Meanwhile athletes’ athletic identity and overall satisfaction with their sport and life were rather high and stable across all the five measurements. The next step in the data treatment will be based on the Multilevel Modeling and the Latent Growth Curve Analysis to identify successful and less successful transitional pathways with relevant dynamics and patterns of the transitional and personal variables.

  • 381.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Swedish junior athletes’ personal profiles in relation to the dynamics of adjustment in the junior-to-senior transition2015In: Book of Abstracts of the 20th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science – 24th - 27th June 2015, Malmö – Sweden / [ed] A. Radmann, S. Hedemborg & E. Tsolakidis, Malmö: European College of Sport Science (ECSS) , 2015, p. 295-295Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to previous research, the junior-to-senior transition (JST) is decisive for athletes who want to reach the elite/professional sport level, it lasts for 2-4 years, and is known for its high dropout rate. The longitudinal study of the junior-to-senior transition process in Swedish club-based athletes conducted by the authors involved several lines of data analysis with this presentation focusing on the dynamics of athletes’ junior-to-senior transition adjustment in relation to their personal characteristics. The study had five measurements conducted every six months using several instruments; these instruments measured the athletes’ level of athletic identity, task- and ego orientation, self-esteem and adjustment in the transition process. The latent profile analysis identified three profiles (based on athletes personal characteristics; BIC = 771.11; entropy = 0.87; Parametric Bootstrapped likelihood ratio test = -356.07, p < 0.001). In the profile-1, athletes (34 males and 11 females) were characterized by high athletic identity, self-esteem, task orientation, and the JST motivation; they also had moderately high ego orientation. These athletes perceived to be 72 % adjusted at the first measurement, had a positive progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived to be 83 % adjusted at the senior level. In the profile-2, athletes (30 males and 7 females) perceived themselves to have high self-esteem and the JST motivation, relatively high athletic identity and task orientation complemented by moderate ego orientation. They perceived themselves to be 66 % adjusted at the first measurement, had a positive progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived themselves to be 73% adjusted. In the profile-3 athletes (9 males and 9 females) reported high self-esteem, relatively high task orientation, as well as moderate athletic identity, ego orientation and the JST motivation. These athletes perceived to be 62 % adjusted at the first measurement, had almost no progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived themselves to be 64 % adjusted. These findings supported our hypothesis that athletes with different profiles of personal characteristics follow different pathways through the JST process. The JST pathways are going to be explored more in detail with the aim to understand transition variables contributing to the dynamics of perceived adjustment. Further this knowledge can be used in assisting athletes in the JST.

  • 382.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The junior to senior transition: A narrative analysis of the pathways of two Swedish athletes2019In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 284-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are as many careers with various pathways as there are athletes, and the interest in the junior-to-senior transition (JST) stems from its particular importance for athletes’ lives when aiming for the senior elite levels of their sports (Stambulova 1994, 2009). This study is a follow-up of the quantitative longitudinal study that investigated the JST process in Swedish sport club athletes (Franck et al. 2016a, 2016b). The aim of this study was to explore two athletes’ (pseudonyms Erik, the swimmer, and Jessika, the tennis player) JST transition pathways, emphasising psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating and debilitating the transition process. Narrative type interviews were conducted, and the stories were analysed using the holistic-form structural analysis (Smith 2016). The analysis provided a central storyline (performance narrative) that is similar for both athletes, and two side storylines: Erik’s effort and relationship narrative and Jessika’s injury and reorientation narrative. They shared psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating the transition process, including family, coaches and sport club environment. For Erik, the debilitating factors were the negative changes in the group and a poor relationship with the new coach. The debilitating factors that influenced Jessika’s JST were the decrease/loss of financial support and the challenge of facing younger opponents against whom she felt she shouldn’t lose when making a comeback after an injury. After the JST, both Erik and Jessika changed their tracks in life, terminated their athletic careers and focused on pursuing higher education qualifications.

  • 383.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The junior to senior transition: a narrative analysis of the pathways of two Swedish athletes2019In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 284-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are as many careers with various pathways as there are athletes, and the interest in the junior-to-senior transition (JST) stems from its particular importance for athletes’ lives when aiming for the senior elite levels of their sports (Stambulova 1994, 2009). This study is a follow-up of the quantitative longitudinal study that investigated the JST process in Swedish sport club athletes (Authors et al. 2016a, 2016b). The aim of this study was to explore two athletes’ (pseudonyms Erik, the swimmer, and Jessika, the tennis player) JST transition pathways, emphasising psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating and debilitating the transition process. Narrative type interviews were conducted, and the stories were analysed using the holistic-form structural analysis (Smith 2016). The analysis provided a central storyline (performance narrative) that is similar for both athletes, and two side storylines: Erik’s effort and relationship narrative and Jessika’s injury and reorientation narrative. They shared psychosocial factors that were perceived as facilitating the transition process, including family, coaches and sport club environment. For Erik, the debilitating factors were the negative changes in the group and a poor relationship with the new coach. The debilitating factors that influenced Jessika’s JST were the decrease/loss of financial support and the challenge of facing younger opponents against whom she felt she shouldn’t lose when making a comeback after an injury. After the JST, both Erik and Jessika changed their tracks in life, terminated their athletic careers and focused on pursuing higher education qualifications. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 384.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Swedish athletes' adjustment patterns in the junior-to-senior transition2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 398-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific objectives of this study were: (a) to identify adjustment patterns in the JST based on athletes’ dynamics of adjustment during a two-and-a–half-year period, and (b) to describe the athletes’ demographic, personal and transitional characteristics at the beginning of the JST that were related to the different adjustment patterns. This quantitative longitudinal study consisted of five measurements conducted approximately every six months over a two-and-a-half-year period. One instrument was used to measure the transition variables and three instruments to measure personal characteristics. In the first measurement, 101 club-based Swedish athletes with the mean age of 16.51 (SD = 1.32) took part. The latent profile analysis (LPA) on athletes’ perceived degree of adjustment provided three profiles with different patterns in the JST. Profile 1 had a progressive adjustment pattern, whereas the second profile had a regressive adjustment pattern, and the third profile had a sustainable adjustment pattern. The descriptive statistics and Cohen’s d indicated that there were differences (with variation in magnitude) between the three profiles at the first measurement in terms of how athletes perceived different transitional characteristics. Keeping a primary focus on sport (but also having attention to other spheres of life), high athletic identity and motivation to reach senior level were characteristics relevant for both progressive and sustainable adjustment patterns. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 385.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Weibull, Fredrik
    School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Profiles of personal characteristics and relevant pathways in the junior-to-senior transition: A longitudinal study of Swedish athletes2016In: International Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 0047-0767, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 483-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the specific foci were as follows: (1) to identify profiles of athletes in the junior-to-senior transition (JST) based on their personal characteristics (athletic identity, self-esteem and goal orientation) and (2) to describe the JST pathways relevant to the profiles. This quantitative longitudinal study included five measurements that were conducted approximately every six months. The following package of four instruments was used: the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989), the self-esteem sub-scale from the Physical Self-Perception Profile – Revised (Lindwall, Hagger, & Asci, 2007) and the Transition Monitoring Survey (Stambulova, Franck, & Weibull, 2012). In the first measurement 100 club-based Swedish athletes (73 male and 27 female) with the mean age of 16.51 (SD = 1.32) participated. The Latent Profile Analysis identified three profiles of athletes and several similarities and differences can be seen in the profiles of athletes’ transition pathways. The main findings are: (1) three profiles of personal characteristics associated with different JST transition pathways were identified; (2) athletic identity appeared to be key personal characteristic that influenced the dynamic of adjustment and (3) different styles of coping strategies were associated with different JST pathways. The JST pathways relevant to the profiles are discussed based on the theoretical framework and previous research.

  • 386.
    Franke, Anita
    et al.
    Department of Education, Pedagogen B, University of Gothenburg, Läroverksgatan 15, Box 300, SE 405 30, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Research supervisors’ different ways of experiencing supervision of doctoral students2011In: Studies in Higher Education, ISSN 0307-5079, E-ISSN 1470-174X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 7-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research supervisors’ different ways of experiencing their supervision of doctoral students are analysed in terms of the students’ questions and problems as they relate to the supervisor’s research, and what consequences this connection, or non‐connection, to the supervisor’s research has for supervision and the role of supervisor. Thirty supervisors of doctoral students at different faculties at a university in Sweden were interviewed. The results illustrate two supervision structures, called research practice‐oriented and research relation‐oriented supervision. The principal differences between these two ways of structuring supervision consist of whether the supervisor and the doctoral student participate in a common research practice and share objects of research with the same or a related research approach, or whether the doctoral student’s research problems and research objects lack a clear connection with the supervisor’s research.

  • 387.
    Franke, Anita
    et al.
    Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Gustafsson, Bertil
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högskolepedagogisk handledning: Erfarenheter av pedagogisk förnyelse vid Högskolan i Halmstad2007Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Upprinnelsen till denna arbetsrapport är erfarenheter av ett pedagogiskt utvecklingsarbete om högskolepedagogisk handledning, finansierat av Högskoleverket, Rådet för högre utbildning. Projektet planerades och genomfördes i ett konsortium under 2003 samt avrapporterades i april 2004. Konsortiet bestod av Chalmers Lindholmen, Göteborg; Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Karlskrona och Högskolan i Halmstad, Halmstad. Projektledare var Anita Franke, Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik, Göteborgs universitet. Övriga projektmedarbetare var: Elsie Anderberg, Institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik, Göteborgs universitet, Erling Fjeldstad, CKK, Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, Helene Ivarsson, Christer Alvegård och Jörgen Andersson, Blekinge Tekniska Högskola samt Barbro Arvidsson och Bertil Gustafsson, Sektionen för hälsa och samhälle, Högskolan i Halmstad.

    Projektets idé om pedagogisk utveckling var att utveckla handledningskompetens hos lärare inom högskolan. Avsikten var att hos kursdeltagarna försöka åstadkomma en medvetenhet om lärande och lärprocesser i arbetet med pedagogisk handledning bland studerande och doktorander.

    Denna rapport är ett resultat av ett fortsatt samarbete kring frågor om högskolepedagogisk handledning mellan Anita Franke och Barbro Arvidsson. Medverkar i rapporten gör också Bertil Gustafsson. Vår avsikt är att visa på betydelsen av att högskolelärares kompetens i arbetet med handledning och undervisning grundas i pedagogiska teorier. Mot denna bakgrund beskrivs, analyseras, och reflekteras erfarenheter och exempel från det pedagogiska utvecklingsarbetets planering och genomförande vid Högskolan i Halmstad. Rapporten är tänkt att användas i arbetet med högskolepedagogisk utbildning och i pedagogiskt utvecklingsarbete.

  • 388.
    Fredin, Agnetha
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and nursing.
    Skolsköterskans arbete med elever med psykisk ohälsa: En intervjustudie2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Psykisk ohälsa ökar bland barn och unga i Sverige. Samtidigt som det är allt fler som inte uppnår godkända betyg i skolan. Det finns ett dubbelriktat samband mellan psykisk ohälsa och skolprestation. Skolsköterskans uppdrag är att stödja elevernas utveckling mot utbildningens mål samt verka för god hälsa. Syftet var att belysa skolsköterskans arbete med elevers psykiska ohälsa. Studien genomfördes som en kvalitativ intervjustudie med semistrukturerade frågor. Sex skolsköterskor från fyra kommuner intervjuades utifrån strategiskt urval. Intervjuerna har analyserats genom kvalitativ innehållsanalys. Resultatet i studien presenteras med ett övergripande tema; ”Skolsköterskan, en delvis outnyttjad resurs i arbetet med elever med psykisk ohälsa”. Kategorierna som framkom var; arbete med psykisk ohälsa tillhör skolsköterskans vardag, bedömning som grund för samverkan samt organisatoriska förutsättningar.Resultatet visade att skolsköterskorna dagligen arbetar med psykisk ohälsa. För att nå framgång i arbetet krävs organisatoriska förutsättningar. Resultatet belyser också hur skolsköterskans bedömning av elevens psykiska hälsa avgör det fortsatta handläggandet och samverkan. Idag saknas handlingsplan för psykisk ohälsa nationellt och förhoppningen är att studien kommer att få betydelse i det fortsatta arbete genom att belysa vad skolsköterskan utifrån sin profession kan göra.

    Ytterligare forskning behövs inom området psykisk ohälsa för att stödja skolsköterskans hälsofrämjande, förebyggande och åtgärdande arbete på individ-, grupp och organisationsnivå.

  • 389.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The case study as a research strategy1997In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A research strategy seldom used in the caring sciences is the case study. A case study is an empirical in-depth inquiry about an individual, family, group or organization. It is preferable when 'how' and 'why' questions are asked. The case study is mainly used to explain those causal links in real-life intervention that are too complex for either the survey or experimental strategies. Like other research strategies, its design includes questions or propositions, units of analysis, the logic linking the data to the questions or propositions, and the interpretations of the outcomes. A case study can be reported as a single case or as a compilation of a series of cases. In conclusion a case study is a simple and excellent way for a care professional to present him or herself to the scientific world.

  • 390.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Baigi, Amir
    Primary Health Care R&D Unit, County Council Halland, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Developing and testing the psychometric properties of a short-form questionnaire regarding the psychosocial condition after a cardiac event2010In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 29-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychosocial difficulties in patients after a cardiac event is well-known concept yet no systematic or routine assessment with focus on their psychosocial condition with regard to coping, social support and sense of coherence is established. Accordingly the aim of this pilot study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a short-form questionnaire regarding patients’ psychosocial condition after a cardiac event to be used in every day clinical practice. This pilot study, which had a methodological design, used selected sample of 30 participants to answer a questionnaire built on 37 items in order to determine face, content and construct validity and homogeneity reliability. Five factors built on 18 items emerged, all with good values for the psychometric tests chosen, and labelled according to their theoretical belongings: closeness, belongingness, availability, concordance and outlook. This short-form questionnaire measuring the psychosocial condition after a cardiac event useful in every day clinical practice seems appropriate but needs further psychometric development carried out in large scale studies with regard to cultural-socio-demographics and diagnoses.

  • 391.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildebrandt, Linda
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Status and trends in Swedish dissertations in the area of cardiovascular nursing2007In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 72-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, cardiovascular nursing (CVN) is a young branch of nursing science. The explicit knowledge contained in CVN dissertations has, so far, not been studied in Europe, and this is especially true in the case of Sweden. Accordingly, the aim of this literature study was to describe the status of and compare trends in Swedish dissertations in the area of CVN in terms of organisational structure, approach, research strategy, social orientation and socio-demographic aspects. The literature search resulted in 29 dissertations and a 26-item questionnaire that illuminated the problem areas. Most dissertations were produced in the universities of Göteborg, Halmstad and Linköping; a minority had a nurse as main supervisor; rehabilitation was the most common CVN approach; very few of the dissertations had an experimental design; and the majority was hospital-based. The main trends were (A) an increase in dissertations that were written during the last 6 years, (B) an increased number of nurses as main supervisors as well as publication in nursing journals, (C) an increase in hospital care settings while a decrease in community settings, and finally, (D) an increased number of dissertations addressing the issues of tertiary prevention as well as focusing on patients and next-of-kin as target groups. An important implication is to stimulate nurse-led interventions at all preventative levels in order to maintain or improve the cardiac health of both healthy and sick individuals, but also in order to visualize CVN and distinguish it from cardiology.

  • 392.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, A.
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Jinhage, B.-M.
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Flemme, Inger
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandstedt, B.
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Mårtensson, J.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and their conceptions of the life situation: a qualitative analysis2000In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is today widely used for the treatment of sudden cardiac near-death episodes as a result of malignant ventricular dysrhythmia.After examining the literature, only four descriptive studies, all carried out in the USA, with a qualitative analysis based on ICD-patients' own perspectives on their life situation have been found.The aim of this study was to describe how patients living with an ICD-device in south-western Sweden conceive their life situation.As the focus was on patients' conceptions seen from a holistic perspective, an analysis inspired by phenomenography was employed on a strategic sample of 15 ICD-patients.Six categories emerged: a feeling of safety, a feeling of gratitude, a feeling of being, having a network, having a belief in the future, and gaining awareness.Although the findings cannot be generalized because of the descriptive research design, they illuminate the beneficial as well as intrusive effects of such a device, and emphasize the need for support groups for patients and families as well as further education for personnel in hospital and primary health care.

  • 393.
    Fröberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Linus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Christina
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Korp, Peter
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Raustorp, Anders
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Sport Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Larsson, Christel
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of an Empowerment-Based Health-Promotion School Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Time among Adolescents in a Multicultural Area2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 11, article id 2542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity (PA) decreases with age, and interventions are needed to promote PA during adolescence, especially, among those in low-socioeconomic status (SES) areas. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a two-year, empowerment-based health-promotion school intervention had any effects on changes in (a) moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), (b) sedentary time (SED), (c) exercise training (ET) frequency, and (d) ET duration, among adolescents. Participants (aged 12⁻13 years at baseline) from one intervention school and two control schools, were recruited from a multicultural area of Sweden, characterized by low-SES. During the course of the two-year intervention, a total of 135 participants (43% boys) were included in the study. The intervention was developed and implemented as a result of cooperation and shared decision-making among the researchers and the participants. MVPA and SED were measured with accelerometers, and ET frequency and duration was self-reported at the beginning of the seventh, eighth, and ninth grade, respectively. There were no significant effects of the two-year, empowerment-based health-promotion school intervention on changes in the accelerometer-measured MVPA and SED, or the self-reported ET frequency and duration, among the adolescents. Overall, the intervention was unsuccessful at promoting PA and reducing SED. Several possible explanations for the intervention's lack of effects are discussed.

  • 394.
    Fröhlich-Gildhoff, Klaus
    et al.
    University of Applied Sciences, Freiburg.
    Kjellman, Cecilia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Lecaplain, Patrick
    Prata Gomes, Miguel
    Paula Frassinetti School of Education, Porto.
    Wojciechowski, Tomasz
    Violence Prevention and Resilience Promotion in Schools: Report about the international research project STRONG - Supportive Tools for Resilient Open-minded and Non-violent Grassroots work in schools2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Violent prevention research findings suggest different key aspects for the application of a powerful prevention strategy. The project tries to tackle the complexity of supporting a healthy mental development in children while also meeting the requirments for succesful prevention. Resilience promotion proved to be a suitable concept for implementing a violence prevention strategy in secondary schools.  This two-year practice-oriented research project, with international partners from five contries had the aim of supporting schools in developing a resilience-promoting and violence-preventing strategy in a multi-level and multi-setting approach. As a result, a toolbox for resource-oriented training in schools for teachers and pupils was created. The measures undertaken during the project have been evaluated empirically and the iflunce of resilience-promoting acivities in school has been assessed. Different national implementations in easch country are presented as well as international comparisons, reflections and perspectives.

  • 395.
    Galanis, Evangelos
    et al.
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Hatzigeorgiadis, Antonis
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Comoutos, Nikos
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Charachousi, Fedra
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Sanchez, Xavier
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    From the lab to the field: Effects of self-talk on task performance under distracting conditions2018In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 32, p. 26-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored the effectiveness of self-talk strategies on task performance under conditions of external distraction in laboratory and field experiments. In the laboratory experiment, 28 sport science students (Mage 21.48±1.58 years) were tested on a computer game requiring attention and fine execution following a baseline assessment and a short self-talk training. In the field experiment, 28 female basketball players (Mage 20.96±4.51 years) were tested on free-throwing, following a baseline assessment and a six-week intervention. In both settings the final assessment took place under conditions of external distraction (noncontinuous, sudden, loud noise). Analyses of covariance showed that participants of the self-talk group performed better than participants of the control group. Findings suggest that self-talk can counter the effects of distraction on performance, and indicate that the attentional effects of self-talk is a viable mechanism to explain the facilitating effects of self-talk on performance. © 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 396.
    Garell, Cecilia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Sexuell och reproduktiv hälsa - insatser till ensamkommande ungdomar samt personal vid EKB-hem och ungdomsmottagningar: En utvärdering på uppdrag av Region Halland2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här rapporten är slutrapporten för utvärderingen av projektet ”Sexuell och reproduktiv hälsa – insatser till ensamkommande ungdomar samt personal vid EKB-hem och ungdomsmottagningar” under året 2018.Intervjuer har genomförts med personer som på olika sätt är involverade i projektet; kurator gymnasieskola, integrationssamordnare Länsstyrelsen, socialpedagog kommun, hälso- och sjukvårdstrateg regionen, kuratorer ungdomsmottagning, barnmorskor ungdomsmottagning, projektledare samt deltagande ungdom. Information via epost har inhämtats från verksamhetsledare för en enhet för ensamkommande barn. Utvärderingen har gjorts utifrån en pedagogisk förklarings- och handlingsinriktad utvärderingsmodell där utfallet sedan värderats mot ett teoretiskt perspektiv; ett sociokulturellt perspektiv på lärande samt med hjälp av begreppen empowerment och health literacy. Den genomgående bild som framträtt är att projektet är uppskattat och viktigt. Projektledaren har fått mycket beröm för sin kunskap och kompetens inom området och för sitt sätt att möta ungdomarna. Personalen vid ungdomsmottagningen menar att de inspirerats av projektledaren och har lärt sig ett nytt pedagogiskt förhållningssätt för att möta dessa ungdomar. En annan, lika genomgående bild, är att kommunikationen i projektet har varit dålig med flera oklarheter och dubbla budskap. Det har varit ostrukturerat. Det har varit svårigheter i samarbetet med skolorna och en osäkerhet i om ungdomarna kommer att dyka upp på informationsträffarna eller inte. Tolkningen har också stundtals varit problematisk. Projektledaren och projektet har varit flexibla och kunnat anpassa sig efter ändrade förutsättningar och behov. Bedömningen är att projektet har nått sina mål om ökad kunskap både för ensamkommande ungdomar och för personal på ungdomsmottagningar.

  • 397.
    Garell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    A Legal Framework to Support Development and Assessment of Digital Health Services2016In: JMIR medical informatics, ISSN 2291-9694, Vol. 4, no 2, p. e17-e17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Digital health services empower people to track, manage, and improve their own health and quality of life while delivering a more personalized and precise health care, at a lower cost and with higher efficiency and availability. Essential for the use of digital health services is that the treatment of any personal data is compatible with the Patient Data Act, Personal Data Act, and other applicable privacy laws.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to develop a framework for legal challenges to support designers in development and assessment of digital health services.

    METHODS: A purposive sampling, together with snowball recruitment, was used to identify stakeholders and information sources for organizing, extending, and prioritizing the different concepts, actors, and regulations in relation to digital health and health-promoting digital systems. The data were collected through structured interviewing and iteration, and 3 different cases were used for face validation of the framework.

    RESULTS: A framework for assessing the legal challenges in developing digital health services (Legal Challenges in Digital Health [LCDH] Framework) was created and consists of 6 key questions to be used to evaluate a digital health service according to current legislation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Structured discussion about legal challenges in relation to health-promoting digital services can be enabled by a constructive framework to investigate, assess, and verify the digital service according to current legislation. The LCDH Framework developed in this study proposes such a framework and can be used in prospective evaluation of the relationship of a potential health-promoting digital service with the existing laws and regulations.

  • 398.
    Garell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Lagutrymmet för hälsofrämjande e-tjänster i förhållande till hälso- och sjukvården2014Report (Other academic)
  • 399.
    Gavois, Helena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mental health professional support in families with a member suffering from severe mental illness: a grounded theory model2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 102-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to develop a model of mental health professional (MHP) support based on the needs of families with a member suffering from severe mental illness (SMI). Twelve family members were interviewed with the focus on their needs of support by MHP, then the interviews were analyzed according to the grounded theory method. The generated model of MHP support had two core categories: the family members’ process from crisis to recovery and their interaction with the MHP about mental health/illness and daily living of the person with SMI. Interaction based on ongoing contact between MHP and family members influenced the family members’ process from crisis towards recovery. Four MHP strategies – being present, listening, sharing and empowering – met the family members’ needs of support in the different stages of the crisis. Being present includes early contact, early information and protection by MHP at onset of illness or relapse. Listening includes assessing burden, maintaining contact and confirmation in daily living for the person with SMI. Sharing between MHP and family members includes co-ordination, open communication and security in daily living for the person with SMI. Finally, the MHP strategy empowering includes creating a context, counselling and encouraging development for the family members. The present model has a holistic approach and can be used as an overall guide for MHP support in clinical care of families of persons with SMI. For future studies, it is important to study the interaction of the family with SMI and the connection between hope, coping and empowerment.

  • 400. Gibbs, Petah
    et al.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Marchant, Daryl B.
    Institute of Sport, Exercise, and Active Living Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The Athlete Apperception Technique: Manual and Materials for Sport and Clinical Psychologists2017Book (Other academic)
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