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  • 301.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The search for foreign direct investment (FDI): The case of Ghana2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    That foreign direct investment (FDI) is a valuable undertaking that all nations strive to attract and sustain is well known and well discussed in the literature. However, a systematic study and/or analysis of how some countries invest much in attracting FDI, but with poor results, is lacking. This paper contributes by analyzing the incessant efforts which countries make to attract FDI with very dissatisfying results. One important conclusion from this study is that while a country uses numerous incentives and alleged macro and micro policies as means to bring in much FDI, potential investors might not respond because they might be thinking about areas where they could profitably and securely put their resources to use. Ghana is a case in point when looking at a country that has not succeeded well, in spite of investments in attracting FDI.

  • 302.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Abraha, Desalegn
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Interactive (Networked) Internationalization: The Case of Swedish Firms2007In: Bringing the country back in: the importance of local knowledge in a global economy : proceedings of the 49th Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business, Indianapolis, June 25-28, 2007, Indianapolis: Academy of International Business , 2007, p. 139-139Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extant literature stresses that having foreign market presence is imperative for most firms these days. However, how firms conceive of which foreign markets to enter, the entry mode to take and the resource commitments to make are not information or decision-making processes solely confined to a firm that internationalizes its activities. The purpose of this study is to provide deeper insights into the extent to which an independent actor (s) actively collaborates with the internationalizing firm so as to jointly determine the choice of market, the mode of entry and the level of investment committed in the market to be entered and even after the entry (i.e. the on-going activities). Based on two multiple case studies, one major finding of the study shows that independent actors, with their interconnected networks, have played and are still playing a major role in influencing the internationalization processes of each of the two firms in this study.

  • 303.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Amal, Mohamed
    Universidade Regional de Blumenau – FURB, Blumenau, Brazil.
    Impact of globalization: The ability of less developed countries' (LDCs') firms to cope with opportunities and challenges2011In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 120-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to contribute to the debate on the impact of globalization on the competitiveness of firms in least developed countries (LDCs). Two main research questions will be addressed. How does globalization affect the competitiveness of small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in LDCs? How can SMEs handle opportunities and challenges emerging from globalization?

    Design/methodology/approach – The methodology for this study is a conceptual attempt to review the existing literature and make some propositions about how SMEs can handle the opportunities and challenges emerging from globalization.

    Findings – Building on a developed operational framework affecting the competitiveness of firms, some of the expected results are that firms' capabilities with regards to innovation, learning, and internationalization, which increase their competitiveness, are enhanced by institutional setups. Second, establishing relationships with governmental and non-governmental institutions is crucial in terms of accessing resources, innovating, and entering into foreign markets.

    Originality/value – The paper represents a contribution to the debate on the impact of globalization on the competitiveness of firms, particularly SMEs, in LDCs. Although globalization has brought considerable benefits to many actors worldwide, its impact on competitiveness of (SMEs) are controversial. We suggest that globalization's effects depend on the capability of firms to learning, to innovate, and also on the institutional setup in LDCs.

  • 304.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Amal, Mohamed
    Raboch, Henrique
    The Internationalization of Multinational Companies (MNCs): An intra-sector comparison among firms from developing and developed countries2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the international statistic data of the United Nations Conference of Trade and Development (Unctad, 2008), the majority of Multinational Companies (MNCs) are from developed countries. However, in the last decade the participation of MNCs from emerging economies in the international flows of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) increased significantly, making them important global players. Although several scholars have addressed the internationalization process of emerging MNCs, no attempt has been made in the sense of directly comparing the internationalization process of firms from both developed and developing countries. To fill this gap, the aim of the present paper is to highlight the differences and similarities of the determinants and patterns of their internationalization. The integrated analytical model used in this study, which draws on insights from the Eclectic Paradigm and the Uppsala Internationalization approaches, has proved useful by helping to shed some light on the literature about MNCs’ internationalization process. The model in question has been structured in order to explore the differences and similarities of the internationalization processes of MNC from a developed and a developing country. This research uses a qualitative method with an exploratory nature, which allows deeper cross- cultural understanding. Multiple case studies of MNCs from countries with different levels of development (Brazil and Sweden) were carried out; this type of research allows addressing questions related to the determinants and patterns of internationalization. The results of the study show that there are strong evidences, which point out differences in term of ownership advantage development. However, the firms did not show substantial differences regarding internalization advantages. On the other hand, learning and experience of internationalization have been factors that have influenced the pattern and structure of the MNCs in both contexts. However, as the MNC from the developed country is more international and has longer experience, location decisions are no longer heavily influenced by these factors. The international network the MNC is part of and access to technology and knowledge partners are nowadays influencing the MNCs internationalization processes more. These findings are in line with earlier research that has pointed out that learning is most important in the early phases of MNCs international development while networks and location advantages are more important in later stages.

  • 305.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    A professional services firm's competence development2007In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1068-1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conceptualization of a firm's competence development has undergone some developments, as seen from the extant literature. However, studies or explanations of a firm's competence development over time seem to concentrate on firms that manufacture physical goods. The literature is devoid of studies on the competence development of professional services firms (PSFs). With two in-depth case studies, this paper seeks to shed light on factors that impinge on PSFs' competence development over time. An important finding of this study is that all the two PSFs' competence development over time has been influenced, in large measure, by their close and regular interaction with their respective immediate customers as well as with some significant third parties in their network of exchange relationships, where the actors mutually adapt to each other and also learn from each other. Evidences in all the two cases show that each of the firms has won and kept important customers that give them the most and frequent assignments per year, thanks to the factors that have affected their competence to meet customers' demand over time.

  • 306.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Analyzing Customer-Orientation Practices of Firms from a Wider Perspective2008In: Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, ISSN 1051-712X, E-ISSN 1547-0628, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 45-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to deepen our understanding of the extent to which a firm's customer orientation practice, and the outcome thereof, is affected by its network of exchange relationships.

    METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Building on a network approach, multiple case studies are used to highlight firms' customer-orientation and the effects thereof.

    FINDINGS: Close, regular and extensive interaction and exchanges with customers and third parties have enabled each of the firms in this study to win and retain important customers over the years.

    Research Implications/Limitations : Each of the PSFs' (professional services firms) customer orientation, with its concomitant result, has been facilitated by mutual value creation by the sellers and the buyers plus the sellers' exchange relationships with third parties. However, customers' interconnected relationships and a broader quantitative study incorporating several services firms need be explored in further studies.

    ORIGINALITY/VALUE/CONTRIBUTION: The study provides insights into how a PSF utilizes its own capabilities and complementary capabilities from third parties to create superior value and satisfaction to customers.

  • 307.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    As I Journey Along: A Ghanaian's Perception Of Life In The Diaspora2005Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The book gives accounts of the forces that drive many young people to migrate from the less Developed World, especially Ghana, to come and live in the Diaspora. Coming to live, work or pursue some goals in the Diaspora is for many young Ghanaians, for example, the ultimate goal worth striving after. In Ghana and in most Third World Countries, many people's perception of better life in the Diaspora is shared by many parents and some respectable people, a fact that also reinforces the drive to migrate to the Diaspora. That alone can help them develop their potentialities. But the journey is tough, full of adventure for all. How many have experienced the life in the Diaspora and how many feel detached from their place of birth, Ghana, are among the major themes discussed in this book. People that have migrated from their countries to seek fortunes or whatever in the Diaspora, Potential travellers and politicians in poor countries stand to gain from the experiences shared in this book.

    (Editorial review from Amazon)

  • 308.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Development of a Country is a Collective Effort: The Case of Ghana2008Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our case country Ghana, like many others in Africa, is characterized by, for example, mass poverty, huge foreign debts, poor socio-economic infrasturcture and entrepreneurial base, inability to meet the challenges of the forces of globalization, and heavy reliance on foreign loans and aid. Often times the development of the country has been the sole responsibility of a single entity, a government or a few ruling elites. It is argued in this book that to overcome the problems mentioned above, involving many actors (e.g. industry, government, universities, and the general public)will produce a collective effort, which will enable the actors to leverage their complementary capabilities to bring about a sustainable economic development. In this book we emphasize areas in which Ghana should invest now in order to effect sustainable development, which will translate into, example, poverty reduction, enabling environment for firms to emerge, grow and be competitive.

  • 309.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Small firms' use of their business relationships to cope with increased competition2012In: International Academy of Business and Economics (IABE) 2012 Venice Summer Conference, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 310.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The Impact of Globalization and Trade Liberalization on Competitiveness of Firms in Less Developed Countries: A Longitudinal Study2009In: International Journal of Business Research, ISSN 1555-1296, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 7-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Abraha, Desalegn Gebrekidan
    School of Technology and Society, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Networked (interactive) position: a new view of developing and sustaining competitive advantage2008In: Competitiveness Review: an international business journal, ISSN 1059-5422, E-ISSN 2051-3143, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 333-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – In the extant literature a firm's development of its competitive advantage is seen to be the task of the firm alone. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new and a broader approach of how competitive advantage can be developed and maintained in today's highly competitive and dynamic markets. To this end, how a firm handles its relationships with significant actors in its network becomes very decisive for the development of its competitive advantage.

    Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on a network approach, case studies have been used to shed lights on the extent to which the development of competitive advantage of firms affect and are affected by their interaction with some actors in a network of exchange relationships.

    Findings – An important conclusion of this study is that a firm's highly valued performance, an indication of its strong position or competitive strength, has its roots in its regular and intensive interaction with some significant actors in its network.

    Research limitations/implications – All firms in this study have demonstrated that competitive advantage can be achieved by building up a strong position through interaction, learning and adaptation with some significant actors in the marketplace. Since the study is based on one setting, extending a similar study to several settings will be very useful.

    Originality/value – The paper provides insights into how a firm, in the effort to build its competitive advantage, draws on its own capabilities and complementary capabilities of its partners in a network.

  • 312.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Abraha, Desalegn Gebrekidan
    University of Skövde, P.O. Box 408, SE-541 28, Skövde, Sweden.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    University of Gävle, SE-801 76, Gävle, Sweden.
    Relationships and Networks in the Processes of Establishment of Firms in Transition Economies: Scandinavian Firms in Central and Eastern Europe2008In: International Journal of Strategic Management, ISSN 1555-2411, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus on the particular entry mode a firm uses to enter a new market, rather than on the process of establishment, dominates in extant literature. To fill this void, we apply an establishment process model developed from the network approach to illuminate the web of relationship forms embedded in the establishment process of two Scandinavian firms as they attempt to establish themselves in transition economies. In one case, the results show that Statoil's process of establishment in Estonia was both less time-consuming and less resource-consuming because the firm drew support from significant actors in their network of exchange relationships. In the second case, a lack of home and host country support for Scania in Croatia resulted in an arduous and costly process and less stable position in the market, with the firm's position changing several times as different problems cropped up. In light of the findings from the two cases, theoretical and practical implications for managing the establishment process are discussed.

  • 313.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Abraha Gebrekidan, Desalegn
    University of Skövde.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    University of Gävle.
    Relationships and networks in the processes of establishment of firms in transition economies: The case of Scandinavian firms in Central and Eastern Europe2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 314.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Gebrekidan, Desalegn Abraha
    School of Technology and Society, University of Skövde.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    Department of Business Studies, University of Gävle.
    Interactive (networked) internationalization: The case of Swedish firms2011In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 45, no 7/8, p. 1112-1129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to provide deeper insights into the extent to which an  independent actor(s) actively collaborates with the internationalizing firm so as to jointly determine the choice of market, the mode of entry and the level of investment committed in the market to be entered and even after the entry (i.e. the ongoing activities). Design/methodology/approach – Against the previous purpose section, a qualitative research approach is selected to guide the exploratory nature of this study. Thus qualitative data are used to build the two case studies because case studies are generally a more appropriate approach when “how” and “why” questions are being posed and when the investigator has little control over events. Findings – Based on two multiple case studies, one major finding of the study shows that independent actors, with their interconnected networks, have played and are still playing a major role in influencing the internationalization processes of each of the two firms in this study. Originality/value – This is an original paper developed based on two case studies which have not been published in any journal before. The paper highlights the role of external independent actors in internationalization, which is not mentioned at all or stressed in the extant literature.

  • 315.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Univ of Blumenau, Brazil.
    A communicacäo com consumidores através da Internet: Um estudo da communicacäo - online de hotéls (Brasil, Gana e Suecia)2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 316.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Univ. of Blumenau, Brazil.
    Place marketing: a cross-country study os a place marketer's use of its network of relationships - Brazil and Sweden2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 317.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Univ. of Blumenau, Brazil.
    Place marketing: A study of a place marketer's use of its networks of relationships2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Universidade Regional de Blumenau.
    Potential tourists’ image of a tourist destination: The case of Brazil2011In: Research on Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management 2009‐2011: Introducing the Research Area of Innovation Science / [ed] Sven-Åke Hörte, Halmstad: Högskolan i Halmstad , 2011, p. 135-148Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research deals with the image, which potential tourists may have about a tourist destination.Using a quantitative approach and a marketing and communication perspective, we tried to investigate how Brazil is seen by potential tourists who happened to be European students studying at the Halmstad University, Sweden. The research highlighted six categories, upon which the tourists’ image of Brazil is based, namely hospitality of the population, sexuality, tourism infrastructure, environment, economy, protection and safety. The results show that the image held by the studied target group about Brazil as a tourist destination, is an exotic country with a friendly population with an exuberant nature; the main identity icons are football and carnival events. Entertainment and fun are some other positive attributes mentioned by the respondents. However, violence and fragile security are the main concerns for the respondents.

  • 319.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    University of Blumenau, Brazil.
    Small firms' use of their business relationships to cope with increased competition2012In: International Journal of Business Strategy, ISSN 1553-9563, E-ISSN 2378-8585, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 36-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study is to explore the effect of how small firms draw on their limited networks to develop their markets and serve them well, a performance that will guarantee their survival and success. Drawing on a business relationship approach, two case studies have been used to highlight the extent to which exchange relationships have impacted on the performance of the small firms in this study. As an important finding, the study highlights the extent to which regular and intensive interactions between the case companies and the limited actors in their network have enabled each of the case companies to develop their respective niche markets and serve them well, something which also explains their survival and ability to win and retain loyal customers.

  • 320.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    University of Blumenau, Brazil.
    Place Marketing: A Study of a Place Marketer's use of its Network of Relationships2010In: Journal of International Management Studies, ISSN 1690-2140, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 14-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of winning and retaining investors who establish businesses in a particular place is under-researched. The purpose of this study is to analyze the extent to which place marketers (seller) and potential investors interact in order to establish, develop and maintain a win- win exchange relationships. A cross-country study, with multiple case studies, was used as method. The result shows that the seller has been able to win and maintain clients. The seller-client exchange relationships have been influenced by interaction with third parties. The seller-client interactions have been going on before, during, and after clients’ location of operations.

  • 321.
    Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Reinert, Venilton
    Universidade Regional de Blumenau, Brazil.
    The use of Internet as a marketing strategy in hotel market: A comparison between Brazil, Ghana, and Sweden2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new information technologies (NIT), especially the Internet, have created opportunities for companies. NIT can be used as a tool to execute marketing activities on three levels: (1) a firm can convey information about its products and services, using various communications tools, (2) conduct transactions by means of e-commerce and deliver its products/services online or (3) by the help of the conventional delivering way. In the tourism market, which is an information-oriented phenomenon, the NIT has had strong influence because people use the Internet to search for information to better plan their trips. In the hotel business, for example, the customers search for the company’s core service and support services, which can fulfill their basic and secondary needs. In this perspective, this study analyzed how hotels presented their services, prices, and communicated with their customers on the Internet. The main objective was to analyze the presentation of the marketing mix strategies in the hotels’ websites. The methodology used was first an exploratory research and then a descriptive study. The method was a qualitative and the population was hotels from three countries, Ghana, Sweden and Brazil. The results showed that the information aired in the hotels’ web pages were clearly directed to their respective target audience. To promote their services, the companies studied used, as their main communication tools, advertising, Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and public relations. It can be inferred that the companies uniformly used marketing and communication tools in their websites. Thus, to market their services, no difference was found among the three firms’ use of those tools.

  • 322.
    Axel, Eriksson
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Pantzar, August
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Valet att miljöcertifiera byggnader: en studie om strategiska perspektiv och andra faktorer som kan vara avgörande i valet att miljöcertifiera byggnader2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 323.
    Axelsson, David
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Pyk, Karl
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Bibehållande av humankapital vid företagsförvärv.: En kvalitativ studie av svenska medicintekniska bolag.2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mergers and acquisitions has become a common thing in recent years. Assets change owners in hope of creating synergies and desirable outcomes. Human capital, i.e. the employees behind the numbers, is one asset that is often forgotten. It is therefore important to keep these key employees in the organisation post-acquisition in order to gain or retain competitive advantages and avoid unwelcome surprises. The aim of the study is to identify how Swedish medtech companies identifies key employees during a due diligence and how they retain them afterwards. We chose a qualitative approach for the study and have therefore conducted our interviews in a semi-structured manner. The study uses competence- and resource based theory to identify key employees and how to use them as a resource to gain a competitive advantage. Our result is that human capital is not a factor that can sustain a competitive advantage since it can be transferred via mergers and acquisitions. On the other hand, the competence based view can be used to maximize the resources in form of human capital. When a company is acquired, employees start integrating in the new organisation. The study uses onboarding theory to identify key aspects in how to acclimatise key employees. A conceptual model is eventually presented with our findings where key employees are identified by way of references, the former board of directors, statistics, meetings and industrial knowledge. The HR-department does generally gets involved late in the due diligence process, something that our respondents consider a potential problem. In post-acquisition, during the onboarding process, key factors are; obtaining information about the new culture, role clarification and new challenges to keep key employees in the new organisation.

    Keywords: Human Capital, mergers & acquisitions, medtech, onboarding, key employee retention.

  • 324.
    Axelsson, Elias
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Wolme, Kerstin
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Borda - Ett hjälpande steg i sjönöd2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 325.
    Axelsson, Emil
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK).
    Källner, David
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK).
    Plastgranulat Extruder2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 326.
    Axelsson, Helena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Spångberg, Annica
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Bioackumulering av tungmetaller i vildsvin (Sus scrofa): -analys av biotillgängligheten av bly och kadmium i vildsvinslever2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the wild boar population increases, so does the consuming of wild boar meat. Often with the belief that this is much healthier than conventional meat. International studies have shown that wild boar meat is more likely to contain higher concentrations of soil pollutions than other game meat. The aim of this study was therefore to analyze the concentrations of lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) in the liver of free living wild boars (Sus scrofa), located in the south of Sweden. Samples were taken from 10 wild boars during the hunting season of spring, 2018. The lead and cadmium concentrations in wild boar livers were determined by AAS- atomic absorption spectroscopy. Our result shows a higher uptake for cadmium than lead. Cadmium also seem to increase with age in wild boars due to bioaccumulation. However, 7 out of 10 livers exceeded the maximum limit for food safety standards regarding lead (0,10 mg/kg) and 2 out of 10 for cadmium (0,50 mg/kg). Therefore, the consumer should practice vigilance, especially for wild boar meat originating from areas known to be contaminated.

  • 327.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science. 19760807-4675.
    Energiutvinning ur magasinerat spillvatten2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    The houses we build today are very energy efficient and we have minimized the demand of energy for heating. But tap water can still consume 50% of the total energy cost. Mandatory laws and regulations of today forces us to look over our usage of energy.

    In this report I compare my own prototype with some of the existing systems for recycling energy in wastewater. All existing systems for recycling energy in wastewater only let the new tap water meet the wastewater in a simple heat-exchanger. This way most of the energy leaves the building with a low grade of recycling.

    My experiment diverse significantly from the existing systems. In my prototype I allow the wastewater to stay for some time in the building while I recycle the energy in it. A number of tests was made in an existing building with eight flats. Using a heat pump the tank with wastewater was forced to as low temperature as possible without reaching the freezing point.

  • 328.
    Axelsson, Markus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Lundgren, Oskar
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Raytelligent Cloud2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Todays age sees more and more devices connected to the internet providing otherwise quite limited hardware with the ability to perform more complex calculations. This project aims to create a system for managing a users radar devices using a cloud platform. The system also provides the ability for the user to upload their own custom applications which can make use of data provided by the radar device, run on virtual machines and if required have the ability to push notifications to the users mobile applications. To simplify the system development, it has been divided into three separate subsystems, specifically the radar device, the cloud service and the mobile application. The result of the project is a complete system with a web application which provides the user with the ability to register their radar device(s), upload source code which is compiled and run on the cloud platform and the ability to send push notices to a mobile application. 

  • 329.
    Ayed, Sami
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Energy Science.
    Assessment of energy losses for the climate shell in a commercial passenger ship2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The shipping industry is facing a major challenge. Current and future emission requirements result in considerably increased operating costs. Studies have shown that it is a large potential to reduce the ship operating costs by energy effectivisation. The focus has naturally been on systems with major energy losses, such as combustion engines, propulsion and hull friction.

    A passenger ship like Stena Danica with a big climate controlled accommodation could be expected to have major heat losses. By calculating transmission losses from walls, ceilings, window sections, and the energy losses by ventilation, a general view of how heat losses are distributed has been established. The primary goal is to gather information that could be useful in further energy improvements.

    Due to lack of information and deficiently measured data have several assumptions and simplifications been made. Despite this, the calculations can be considered as indicative. The results indicated that about 50 percent of the energy losses occur by ventilation and the remaining consists of transmission losses in windows sections and climate shell, (About 25% each). The focus in the calculations has been to estimate the accommodations heating demand. Energy improvements that reduce the heating demand will reduce the cooling demand as well. This may be a greater incentive for measures as the air conditioning system are powered with higher energy quality; electricity. Besides shore power the electricity is mainly generated by diesel generators. The energy used for heating is mainly produced by waste heat or is supplied by shoreside district heating.

    Upgrading the ventilation systems are considered to be the most economic method to reduce the heat losses in the accommodation area. The ship's ventilation systems lack any type of demand control, this causes excessive energy losses as the ventilation demand vary greatly regarding to time of the day and numbers of passengers.

    The ship has a large amount of single pane windows that also contributes to large energy losses. To upgrade or replace these are considered to be more economic than to improve the insulation on the rest of the climate shell as it doesn’t affect the interior to the same extent. The latter may be worth considering in case of a major renovation of the vessel.

  • 330.
    Aziza, Amine
    et al.
    Institut national des postes et télécommunications (INPT), Rabat, Morocco.
    Oubrich, Mourad
    Madinat Al Irfane Rabat - Institutes - Morocco, Rabat, Morocco.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    The impact of CRM on QoE: An exploratory study from mobile phone industry in Morocco2015In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 22-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s mobile phone sector is marked by intensified competition and strong market penetration. In this environment, the carriers offer their customers a wide variety of services that are quite similar from one operator to another. These customers are always searching for a quality of experience (QoE). On one hand, operators interact with their customers through CRM practices inspired by their marketing strategies and rolled out through their procedures and technological support. On the other hand, the customers expect an extremely high quality of service (QoS) and subjectively perceive the utility and usability (Qp) of these mobile services. This paradox led us to study the impact of CRM on the customer experience (QoE) in the mobile phone industry, in this study with data from Morocco. Empirical data confirms existing theory, CRM determinants for QoE include quality of service, quality of interaction with customer, claims management and customer knowledge. However, we also found that practitioners are aware that organizations should look beyond the relationship to manage the customer experience. To this end we developed a model based on the first four CRM determinants and the findings in this study.

  • 331.
    Baaz, Matilda
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Månsson, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Dualitet i styrelsen - lönsamt eller inte?: En studie av små och medelstora företag2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 332.
    Baffour Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Iddris, Faisal
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Studying a Firm's Innovations as a Multi-Faceted (Interactive) Socio-Technical Process2015In: Review of Business Research, ISSN 1546-2609, E-ISSN 2378-9670, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to stimulate debate with regards to why firms will commit resources to innovate and the effects of the interactive nature of a firm’s innovation, as the firm engages in collaboration with several others to co-produce value. Methodologically, the study is a review of the existing literature on innovation, looking for an answer to the following. Why and how do a firm and some significant actors in its network engage in innovative activities to co-produce value? The study shows that, from a firm’s perspective, (1) a firm innovates in order to enhance its competitiveness and (2) a firm innovates because it enables it to achieve growth in an increasingly competitive environment.  A firm’s innovation should translate into value creation for some stakeholders. (3) Through innovations, a firm co-produces value, mostly, with others in its network. A firm’s internal capacity is complemented by external capacities of some actors in the firm’s network. © 2015 IABE. All Rights Reserved.

  • 333.
    Baffour Awuah, Gabriel
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Iddris, Faisal
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Studying a Firm's Innovations as a Multi-Faceted (Interactive) Socio-Technical Process2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 334.
    Bakker, Roel H.
    et al.
    Department of Applied Research in Care, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Pedersen, Eja
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    van den Berg, Godefridus Petrus
    GGD Amsterdam Public Health Service, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Stewart, R.E.
    Department of Community & Occupational Health, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Lok, W.
    Department of Applied Research in Care, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Bouma, J.
    Department of Health Care, Science shop, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Impact of wind turbine sound on annoyance, self-reported sleep disturbance and psychological distress2012In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 425, p. 42-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the research: The present government in the Netherlands intends to realize a substantial growth ofwind energy before 2020, both onshore and offshore. Wind turbines, when positioned in the neighborhood ofresidents may cause visual annoyance and noise annoyance. Studies on other environmental sound sources,such as railway, road traffic, industry and aircraft noise show that (long-term) exposure to sound can havenegative effects other than annoyance from noise. This study aims to elucidate the relation between exposureto the sound of wind turbines and annoyance, self-reported sleep disturbance and psychological distress ofpeople that live in their vicinity. Data were gathered by questionnaire that was sent by mail to a representativesample of residents of the Netherlands living in the vicinity of wind turbinesPrincipal results: A dose–response relationship was found between immission levels of wind turbine soundand selfreported noise annoyance. Sound exposure was also related to sleep disturbance and psychologicaldistress among those who reported that they could hear the sound, however not directly but with noiseannoyance acting as a mediator. Respondents living in areas with other background sounds were less affectedthan respondents in quiet areas.Major conclusions: People living in the vicinity of wind turbines are at risk of being annoyed by the noise, anadverse effect in itself. Noise annoyance in turn could lead to sleep disturbance and psychological distress. Nodirect effects of wind turbine noise on sleep disturbance or psychological stress has been demonstrated,which means that residents, who do not hear the sound, or do not feel disturbed, are not adversely affected.

  • 335.
    Balakrishnan, Srinivas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Mohan, Raghul
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Working with Multiple Business Models: A Case Study of HMS2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Customer needs are ever changing and organizations are under constant pressure to fulfill these needs. This resulted in the organization moving in new areas and introducing new offerings/business models. In order to thrive in the competitive market, new companies were acquired with a new set of business units were introduced or existing business units are converged. This resulted in the emergence of multiple business model phenomena and ultimately strategies were developed to manage the business models simultaneously.

    Purpose: The motivation behind this study, is to find the strategy for operating multiple businesses models embraced by an organization to thrive in a developing field.

    Methodology: This study is a based on qualitative analysis with a single case study method. The information has been gathered from the two semi-structured interviews with top management of the company and by means of annual reports & financial documents. The findings have been analyzed within the case analysis. The case organization is HMS Industrial Networks, a Swedish Industrial communication equipment manufacturer.

    Empirical Findings: The findings contain a total review of the organization history and business models from 1988 to 2018, based on the gathered information. It is organized in identified time periods.

    Conclusions: It can be concluded that business models of HMS have evolved from its establishment to current day. Moreover, integrating strategy used to manage multiple business models through acquisition and realizing synergies that adversely alters the distribution of possible outcomes regardless of an increase or decrease of the expected outcome.

    Future Research: The future research is needed in order to find other types of strategies for managing multiple business models.

  • 336.
    Bangalore Manjunath, Harsha
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Kumar, Santosh
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Designing of Kids Train2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Designing a Kids Train body and Chassis, where Body of a train plays an important role as it should be attractive, fun, educational, comfortable and safer for the kids. and the chassis should be able to withstand sufficient load and able to accommodate steering, battery, seating, motor, axles and bumper at all sides which is developed for SB international AB.A literature study is carried out to review various designs body of train and chassis, latest innovations and advanced materials used to manufacture the same. The various types of forces and stresses commonly acting on chassis structures are analyzed and their effects on the vehicle is understood and different types of train design is studied in order to make an attractive train for the kids by using Waterfall method to understand the concepts in designing a Train body. The pro-con analysis is conducted to evaluate merits and demerits of each alternative type of body of a train and the material to manufacture it. The most essential 

    design criteria are derived from the QFD (Quality function deployment) which then acts as important guidelines during the actual design process.Structural chassis frame is designed as per the design criteria with little modification and designing a body of a train using the CAD software CATIAV5R20 and the structural stability of the same is tested and analyzed using Inspire (solid thinking) software.

  • 337.
    Banis, Alvianos
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Johansson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Political Communication Strategies Applied on Business Organizations2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the current communication techniques and strategies used by political parties resulting in these parties achieving significant growth, understand the components of those communication techniques in order to isolate the factors attributing to this achieved success and develop a model that can be replicated from a business organization in order to achieve similar beneficial results.The study revealed that there is a clear connection between political parties and business organizations, broadening the research fields of both entities respectively. Furthermore, the findings were categorized based on potential value, with practices such as “thriving on dissatisfaction”, “taking advantage of emotions”, “showing visible structures as an organization / political party”, “intentional use of weak signals”, “leader’s direct connection to audience” and “formulating receiver interpretation of signals” appearing to have high potential in achieving success if implemented correctly in the communication strategy.

  • 338.
    Bao, Yuanjia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Li, Yanqing
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    How can catering businesses achieve competitive advantages in Chinese market: Using service differentiation strategy as marketing strategy2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 339.
    Barcelo, Lidia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Kano Model applied to low cost airlines2017Student paper other, 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 340.
    Bark, Johanna
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Framgångsrik hållbarhetskommunikation: Kommunikationens betydelse för miljöarbete inom små och medelstora företag2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie syftar att svara på frågeställningen om hur en klimatsatsning inom små och

    medelstora företag (SME) kommuniceras på bästa sätt och var i svårigheter kan ligga. Jämförelser

    görs också med liknande projekt som genomförts och de framgångsfaktorer de haft för att se om

    de går att överföras till de små och medelstora företagen i Halland, som ingår i denna studie.

    Genom jämförelser med andra rapporter, djupintervjuer med representanter ur de medverkande

    företagen, workshops i samarbete med EMC och Alexandersoninstitutet samt analys av dessa har

    utmaningar och möjligheter i arbetet med att implicera klimatarbetet i företagens verksamhet

    identifierats. Resultaten har analyserats i enlighet med miljöpsykologisk ansats. Genom att

    utvärdera attityder, upplevd kontroll och upplevda hinder, har förslag för implementering och

    kommunikation tagits fram.

    Resultatet av djupintervjuer och workshops visar att företagen behöver vägledning när det gäller

    kommunikationen av sitt klimatarbete internt såväl som externt. Företagen vet inte vilka kanaler

    som ska väljas eller vad som ska kommuniceras. De flesta är överens om att ledningen behöver

    föregå med gott exempel. Därför bör ledningen utbildas i första hand. Företagen har bland annat

    problem med att anställda tillhör olika grupper som arbetar på skilda sätt, vilket gör att

    kommunikationen behöver anpassas för att passa respektive grupp. Svårigheter att omvandla

    klimatåtgärder till mätbara värden så att de tydligt kan redovisas för medarbetare och därmed öka

    motivationen till ett förändrat beteende är andra faktorer företagen har problem med.

    Små och medelstora företag kan arbeta med ett antal framgångsfaktorer grundade på analyser av

    ovanstående. Det är viktigt att arbeta strukturerat och med tydliga mål, det är också viktigt att

    använda sig av mindre målgrupper, även under den interna hållbarhetskommunikationen. Tesen att

    den interna kommunikationen är avgörande för ett framgångsrikt hållbarhetsarbete kan styrkas

    med hjälp av denna studie.

  • 341.
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Barriers to growth and development in small firms2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the extended summary is to develop the understanding of the existence and reasons behind barriers to growth and development in small firms. More specifically, four questions are addressed: (1) What do we know about the term barrier, how can it be defined? (2) What types of barriers to growth and development have been identified? (3) How can barriers to growth and development be addressed in a framework? and (4) How do the results of the appended papers (Papers I-V) contribute to the research field of barriers to growth and development?

    A literature review was undertaken to answer the first two questions. The literature review was conducted in two phases. The conceptual and operational definition of barriers was addressed in the first phase. The results reveal diverse ways of focusing on barriers, which made it necessary to address similar terms, such as problem and causes of business failure in the second phase of the literature review. The different terms used in the papers of the literature review are discussed in order to determine whether or not the understanding of their content is coherent and conceptual. Based on the conceptual understanding and definition of barriers, the different aspects focused on in the literature were discussed, which led to the second question, What are the various aspects of barriers to growth and development?

    The knowledge gained from the literature review and the development of the understanding of the barrier concept led to the third question, Can barriers to growth and development be addressed in a framework? The discussion takes its starting point in the studies identified in the literature review and is related to some of the appended papers (Papers I and II). Similarities and differences between frameworks used in the papers identified in the literature review are discussed and, based on this knowledge, a framework for barriers to growth and development in small firms is presented. The framework distinguishes two types of barriers, namely internal/external barriers and tangible/intangible barriers.

    The knowledge available in the reviewed papers within the field of barriers to growth and development in small firms in combination with the results from the appended papers (Papers I-V) resulted in the fourth question. Part of the contribution of the appended papers concerns the operational definition, for example that barriers to innovation should be categorised as either occurring or preventing firms from innovating (Paper II), while other contributions concern specific types of barriers, for example the importance of managerial skills (Paper V). Overall, the contribution focuses on conditional factors, such as strategy and planning, organisation and management, and institution and policy factors, in relation to growth and development.

  • 342.
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Diversity as a competitive advantage? A case study of Immigrant Labour in Swedish Agriculture2018In: Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, ISSN 1913-8059, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 130-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates cultural diversity as means to business sustainability and competitive advantage for entrepreneurs in the agricultural sector. 80 agricultural entrepreneurs have been addressed in this study, which include face-to-face meetings between entrepreneurs and candidates for employment.

    While supportive of the idea of cultural diversity as a beneficial element of business sustainability, most farmers stated they lacked both the time and the resources to manage the issues associated with immigrant workers. However, lack of organisational changes and managerial skills can also be a potential barrier for integration when the farm address growth and employment ambitions.

  • 343.
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Fabrication Laboratory as the Learning Environment for Higher Education2019In: The 10th International Multi-Conferences on Complexity, Informatics and Cybernetics. March 12-15, Orlando, Florida, USA: Proceedings Volume II (Post-Conference Edition) / [ed] Nagib Callaos, Heing-Wei Chu, Jeremy Horne, Suzanne K. Lundford, Belkis Sánchez & Michael Savoie, Orlando: International Institute of Informatics and Systemics , 2019, Vol. 2, p. 3p. 194-196Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing trend of using digital production, such as additive manufacturing, in direct consumer markets. Digital production enables new and advanced tools, which provide shorter development time and lower cost for manufacturing. In this paper we focus on the education and learning environment for digital production and prototyping at a fabrication laboratory (FabLab). FabLab (Fabrication Laboratory) is a small-scale innovation space offering digital fabrication and production. A FabLab is, among many things, a platform for learning and exchanging experience when experimenting and developing new solutions. FabLabs bring together students, researchers and teachers as well as industrial partners in a single physical location for the purposes of designing, prototyping, and do-it-yourself manufacturing. This explorative and creative environment provide insights to knowledge creation, based on the constructive learning theory, which address active involvement by the participants. To take full advantage of this creative learning environment, aspects such as student characteristics, the nature of the subject matter, and the teaching carried out by the staff, also needs to be addressed. © 2019 International Institute of Informatics and Systemics

  • 344.
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Fit among competitive strategy, administrative mechanisms, and performance: A comparative study of small firms in mature and new industries2003In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 133-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At least two different administrative mechanisms are available for the small business manager to develop and to pursue a competitive strategy. One refers to managerial skills needed to implement and to follow the competitive strategy chosen by the firm. The other refers to the design of organization structure - that is, how job tasks are divided, grouped, and coordinated. This paper argues that the fit among the competitive strategy followed by a firm, the utilization of the administrative mechanisms, and the performance of the firm is related to industry maturity.

  • 345.
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Fit Between Competitive Strategy, Administrative Mechanisms and Performance: A Comparative Study of Small Firms in Mature and New Industries2003In: Journal of small business management (Print), ISSN 0047-2778, E-ISSN 1540-627X, Vol. 2, no 41, p. 133-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At least two different administrative mechanisms are available for the small business manager to develop and to pursue a competitive strategy. One refers to managerial skills needed to implement and to follow the competitive strategy chosen by the firm. The other refers to the design of organization structure—that is, how job tasks are divided, grouped, and coordinated. This paper argues that the fit among the competitive strategy followed by a firm, the utilization of the administrative mechanisms, and the performance of the firm is related to industry maturity.

  • 346.
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Immigrant Labour in Swedish Agriculture: A Sustainable Business Model Innovation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates cultural diversity as means to business sustainability and competitive advantage for entrepreneurs in the agricultural sector. The paper focuses on challenges and barriers in immigrant workforce integration as revealed by a year-long project conducted among farmers in the region of Halland (on Sweden’s southwest coast). The paper reports on a matchmaking project between farmers seeking employees and job seekers (immigrants) seeking employment. The project began with interviews with 80 farmers and continued with an exploratory meeting with 42 farmers, four discussion meetings with 16 farmers, and face-to-face meetings between farmers and candidates for employment. The project concluded with follow-up interviews with the 42 farmers. While 42 of the 80 farmers were interested in exploring the benefits of immigrant workforce integration, the others (53%) declined further participation in the project. Ultimately, one farmer hired three immigrants. While supportive of the idea of cultural diversity as a beneficial element of business sustainability, most farmers stated they lacked both the time and the resources to manage the issues associated with immigrant workers such as their lack of technical and mechanical skills, and the language differences.

  • 347.
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    The use and abuse of 3D printing - Towards a mobile business model framework2019In: International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications, ISSN 2248-9622, E-ISSN 2248-9622, Vol. 9, no 11, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aim to clarify changes in user activities and behaviour across different types of actors following the development of 3D printers. It proposes a mobile business model and outlining the features of development for direct digital manufacturing.

    The exploratory study show that the use of 3D printing a) lowers the knowledge and resource barriers for experimentation and entrepreneurial entry, b) increases product and concept prototyping in product development, c) provides a potential for business model innovation by expanding the boundaries of the firm upstream and downstream, and d) becomes a ticket for entrepreneurial entry

  • 348.
    Barth, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Bäckman, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Ellmarker, Josefin
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Sustainable Development for Food Waste: A Case Study of Catered Meal Service at Schools and Elderly Care homes2019In: Journal of Strategic Innovation and Sustainability, ISSN 1718-2077, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 21-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food waste is an important topic in the context of sustainable development. Although many studies have addressed this topic, there is still limited knowledge owing to insufficient data. This study reports on food waste in two institutional settings in a Swedish municipality: schools and elderly care homes. The findings suggest it is easier to measure and reduce food waste in stable environments, such as exist at schools, than at environments characterized by change and unpredictability, such as exist at elderly care homes. Specific areas examined and compared include cooking and receiving kitchens, infrastructure, communications, and support. © North American Business Press.

  • 349.
    Barth, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Holmén, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    The use and abuse of 3D-printing from a business model perspective2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper analyses changes in user activities and behaviour across different types of actors following the introduction of 3D printers. 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, has been claimed to disrupt manufacturing, allowing firms to move from prototyping to full-scale end-part production and replacement part production in a one-step process. 3D printing has many different uses, for example, the manufacturing of toys, shoes, lamps and fashion accessories, and by implication many different types of users and buyers. There are few empirical studies on the types of uses and users of 3D, hampering our understanding in what ways the 3D printers may change the behaviour of users, and whether 3D printers affect the likelihood and the nature of entrepreneurship or business model innovation. To investigate this, a model was created based on the 3DP literature. The model is applied on a distributor customer database and four interview-based illustrative case studies. The empirical findings show that the use of 3DP a) lowers the knowledge and resource barriers for experimentation and entrepreneurial entry, b) increases product and concept prototyping in product development, c) provides a potential for business model innovation by expanding the boundaries of the firm upstream and downstream, and d) becomes a ticket for entrepreneurial entry. Based on our results, the paper suggests that the potential of 3D printers alter user innovative activities is high but most of the potential is latent.

  • 350.
    Barth, Henrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Melin, Martin
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. of Work Sciences, Business Economics and Environmental Psychology, Alnarp, Sweden.
    A Green Lean approach to global competition and climate change in the agricultural sector – A Swedish case study2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 204, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased global competition in the agricultural sector is rapidly changing the structure of farms and farming. As the number of small and diversified farms (often family-owned) decreases, the number of large and specialized farms (often corporate-owned) is increasing. In this transformation, the agricultural sector is more and more concerned with strategy, innovation, and competition in the effort to be more productive and more profitable. At the same time, the sector faces demands that it become more environmentally responsible in its policies and practices. This paper proposes a Lean Implementation Framework that small and mid-size farms can use as they aim to increase production and profit and yet support environmental sustainability. This case study takes an action-oriented research approach that focuses on the implementation of a Green Lean approach at 34 Swedish farms using various Lean tools. The paper describes how training sessions, farm visits, workshops, and counseling were used to introduce the farmers to the benefits and risks of the implementation of a new business model that added Green elements to the traditional business model design. The paper concludes with recommendations for adaptations to the Framework and suggestions for future research. © 2018

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