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  • 201.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Masochistic Marketing: Volvo Australia’s not ‘so safe’ strategy2006In: Journal of Consumer Marketing, ISSN 0736-3761, E-ISSN 2052-1200, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 438-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective is to describe a marketing approach used by Volvo in the Australian marketplace. It appears to be a rare approach and could be perceived to some extent as being "masochistic".

    Design/methodology/ approach: The research is based upon a case study. The term "masochistic marketing" is introduced.

    Findings: The "masochistic marketing" approach applied by Volvo in Australia should be seen as a process. It is dependent upon the outcome of a series of cause and effect relationships.

    Research limitations/implications: The masochistic marketing approach may be divided into four cause-related phases, all of which create a dualistic outcome of either positive or negative effect-chains in respect to the corporate image in the marketplace and society.

    Practical implications: A masochistic marketing approach is a high-risk venture. It is a challenging and demanding marketing process, because it plays on the humiliation of the corporate image itself. The core idea of the masochistic marketing approach violates, or at least appears to oppose, the fundaments of marketing.

    Originality/value: Masochistic marketing is not recommended to be used as a common approach, unless a series of events has turned the corporate image in the marketplace into something that is highly undesirable and a stigma.

    © Emerald Group publishing Limited.

  • 202.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Measurement and structural properties of organizational codes of ethics in private and public Sweden2010In: International Journal of Public Sector Management, ISSN 0951-3558, E-ISSN 1758-6666, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 549-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to test the measurement and structural properties in a model of organizational codes of ethics (OCE) in Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach – The measurement and structural properties of four OCE constructs (i.e. surveillance/training, internal communication, external communication, and guidance) were described and tested in a dual sample based upon private and public sectors of Sweden.

    Findings – Results show that the measurement and structural models of OCE in part have a satisfactory fit, validity, and reliability.

    Research limitations/implications – The paper makes a contribution to theory as it outlines a set of OCE constructs and it presents an empirical test of and OCE model in respect to measurement and structural properties. A number of research limitations are provided.

    Practical implications – It provides a model to be considered in the implementation and monitoring of OCE. The present research provides opportunities for further research in refining, extending, and testing the proposed OCE model in other cultural and organizational settings.

    Originality/value – The OCE model extends previous studies that have been predominately descriptive, by using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

  • 203.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Wood, Greg
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia.
    The commitment of public sector Sweden to codes of ethics2004In: International Journal of Public Sector Management, ISSN 0951-3558, E-ISSN 1758-6666, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 302-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the results of a study conducted of the top 100 public sector units in Sweden. These units are comprised of entities of government, municipalities, and county councils. The aim of the study was to examine and describe the commitment to codes of ethics in these Swedish public sector units. This article reports on the responses of those public sector units that possessed a code of ethics. The construct of commitment was measured by a consideration of the inputs, objectives and outputs of the code across six areas. The commitment to codes of ethics has an interest for those involved in the public sector in Sweden and society in general. Most public sector units are in the early stages of development and assimilation into overall ethics policies in code artefacts. On a specific level there are customized codes of ethics that are not always documented in a generic artefact. Theoretical and managerial implications are provided. Furthermore, suggestions for further research are proposed. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 204.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Deakin University, Burwood, Australia.
    Mathisen, Bror Roger
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Reflexive and Critical Views of Leadership Performance in Corporate Accomplishment: Framework and Illustration2008In: Journal of Management Development, ISSN 0262-1711, E-ISSN 1758-7492, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 879-899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper intends to shed some light on the relationship between leadership performance and corporate accomplishment through the aid of complexity sciences. The objective is to describe leadership performance in corporate accomplishment using different teleological approaches. Design/methodology/approach – The paper discusses the underlying criteria of the relationship between leadership performance and corporate accomplishment. Case illustration and narrative analogy are also provided. Findings – The authors believe that the discussion highlights a potential downside of leadership performance in corporate accomplishment and its precision rarely highlighted in practice and literature. Research limitations/implications – There is a reigning assumption in management practice that is based on the belief that a top-down approach of leadership performance in management and business practices is superior to the bottom-up approach. It proffers the assumed importance of strategic management issues, but neglects the knowledge, experience, competence and awareness inherent among employees at tactical and operational levels of business practices. It also proffers a mechanical view of employee performance and ignores the worth of the generation of ideas from subordinates in management and business practices that contribute to corporate achievements. Furthermore, it neglects the fact that it is not possible to know the future nor it is predictable. Practical implications – The paper contends that the importance of top management tends to be inflated in respect to corporate achievements in the management/leadership literature. It also contends that it should be questioned as to whether the top management of corporations are largely responsible for the corporate results on which they attempt to justify their salaries and other benefits. Furthermore, the paper contends that it also should be questioned as to what extent corporate accomplishment may be derived from the performance of the top management in organizations. Originality/value – The paper strives to contribute to the ongoing discussion of leadership performance in corporate accomplishment in various ways. The principal contributions are: a set of teleological sub-processes of leadership performance and a case illustration and narrative analogies of teleological leadership performance patterns, in respect to corporate accomplishment in management and business practices. These contributions provide theoretical and managerial ideas and insights to anticipate and avoid deficient or erroneous grounds of leadership performance evaluation in corporate accomplishment.

  • 205.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Deakin University, Warrnambool, VIC, Australia.
    Singh, Jang B.
    University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada.
    Carasco, Emily F.
    University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Deakin University, Warrnambool, VIC, Australia.
    Ethical Structures and Processes of Corporations Operating in Australia, Canada and Sweden: a Longitudinal and Cross-Cultural Study2009In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 485-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the ‘Partnership Model of Corporate Ethics’ (Wood, 2002), this study examines the ethical structures and processes that are put in place by organizations to enhance the ethical business behavior of staff. The study examines the use of these structures and processes amongst the top companies in the three countries of Australia, Canada, and Sweden over two time periods (2001–2002 and 2005–2006). Subsequently, a combined comparative and longitudinal approach is applied in the study, which we contend is a unique approach in the area of business ethics. The findings of the study indicate that corporations operating in Sweden have utilized ethical structures and processes differently than their Canadian and/or Australian counterparts, and that in each culture the way that companies fashion their approach to business ethics appears congruent with their national cultural values. There does, however, appear to be a convergence of views within the organizations of each culture, as the Swedish companies appear to have been more influenced in 2005–2006 by an Anglo-Saxon business paradigm than they have been in the past.

  • 206.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Singh, Jang
    University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Implementation, communication and benefits of corporate codes of ethics: an international and longitudinal approach for Australia, Canada and Sweden2009In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 389-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the implementation, communication and benefits of corporate codes of ethics by the top companies operating in Australia, Canada and Sweden. It provides an international comparison across three continents. It is also based on a longitudinal approach where three national surveys were performed in 2001–2002 and replications of the same surveys were performed in 2005–2006. The empirical findings of this research show in all three countries that large organisations indicate a substantial interest in corporate codes of ethics. There are, however, differences in the ways that the companies in each country implement and communicate their corporate codes of ethics and the benefits that they see being derived from them. The longitudinal comparison between 2001–2002 and 2005–2006 indicates changes in the implementation, communication and benefits of corporate codes of ethics in the three countries.

  • 207.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Vic., Australia.
    Singh, Jang
    Odette School of Business, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada.
    Payan, Janice M.
    Monfort College of Business, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO, USA.
    Callaghan, Michael
    School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Vic., Australia.
    The Embeddedness of Codes of Ethics in Organisations in Australia, Canada and USA2011In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 405-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to test the embeddedness of codes of ethics (ECE) in organizations on aggregated data from three countries, namely Australia, Canada and the United States. The properties of four constructs of ECE are described and tested, including surveillance/training, internal communication, external communication and guidance. The data analysis shows that the model has satisfactory fit, validity and reliability. Furthermore, the results are fairly consistent when tested on each of the three samples (i.e. cross-national validation). This cross-national study makes a contribution beyond previous descriptive or exploratory studies by using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Nevertheless, a number of limitations are raised, all of which provide opportunities for further research in refining, extending and testing the proposed ECE model in other cultural and corporate settings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 208.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Gregory
    Deakin University, Geelong, Vic, Australia.
    Singh, Jang B.
    University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Deakin University, Geelong, Vic, Australia.
    A cross-cultural construct of the ethos of the corporate codes of ethics: Australia, Canada and Sweden2009In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 253-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to develop and describe a construct of the ethos of the corporate codes of ethics (i.e. an ECCE construct) across three countries, namely Australia, Canada and Sweden. The introduced construct is rather unique as it is based on a cross-cultural sample seldom seen in the literature. While the outcome of statistical analyses indicated a satisfactory factor solution and acceptable estimates of reliability measures, some research limitations have been stressed. They provide a foundation for further research in the. field and testing of the ECCE construct in other cultural and corporate settings. We believe that the ECCE construct makes a contribution to theory and practice in the. field as it outlines a theoretical construct for the benefit of other researchers. It is also of managerial interest as it provides a grounded framework of areas to be considered in the implementation in organizations of corporate codes of ethics.

  • 209.
    Sværi, Sander
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Slåtten, Terje
    Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    An SOS-Construct of Negative Emotions in Customers’ Service Experience (CSE) and Service Recovery by Firms (SRF)2011In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 323-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to test the validity and reliability of a SOS construct and its dimensions (i.e. self, other and situational) of negative emotions in the context of consumers' service experience (CSE) and the following processes of service recovery by firms (SRF).

    Design/methodology/approach: A triangular approach was used, based on interviews and a survey in the Norwegian tourism industry. This paper reports the results from the survey consisting of 3,104 customers.

    Findings: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses have been used to examine and test the SOS construct of negative emotions in CSE and SRF. The SOS construct tested has indicated an acceptable fit, validity and reliability.

    Research limitations/implications: The SOS construct of CSE and SRF may be seen as a seed for future research in refining and extending endeavors of managing critical incidents in CSE and SRF.

    Practical implications: Strategies to manage CSE and SRF should be aimed at solving the three different SOS dimensions of negative incidents in service encounters, namely those that are caused by the customer, the company, or the situation.

    Originality/value: The SOS construct brings together, complements and fortifies existing theory and previous research in the context of negative emotions in CSE and SRF.

    © Emerald Group Publishing Limited

  • 210.
    Wagner, Beverly
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, Strathclyde Business School, Glasgow, UK.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    A framework to navigate sustainability in business networks: The transformative business sustainability (TBS) model2014In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 340-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – The purpose of this paper is to describe a transformative business sustainability (TBS) model of stakeholders and sources in sustainable business practices with an interface and exchange node of resource residuals.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – The research is based upon a grounded methodology drawn from four in-depth case studies, spanning over six years in different countries and industries. Data were gathered from multiple sources, and interview transcriptions were returned to interviewees for clarification, accuracy, final proofreading and approval.

    Findings

    – The TBS model complements existing research by emphasising the importance of commitment to an overarching vision through corporate leadership assigning areas of strategic priority that respond to current and future environmental regulation and social needs.

    Research implications/limitations

    – Efforts aimed towards business sustainability and application of sustainable business practices in business networks include interfaces and interactions between involved stakeholders and sources. We argue that stakeholders and sources should be recognised as intertwined, where resources used in activities in a business network causing resource residuals may be recovered and reused by other actors in the business network.

    Practice implications

    – The TBS model can be used by managers to plan, implement and assess practices to provide a holistic view of sustainable business activities that supports the development of a company and its network. It may also be used to map and navigate interactions between elements within and external to the company.

    Originality/value

    – The principal contribution of the current research is twofold, a TBS model and a tool to map and navigate corporate sustainability efforts. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 211.
    Wagner, Beverly
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Conceptual Development of a Sustainable Business Approach2010In: Cuadernos Aragoneses de Economía, ISSN 0211-0865, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 19-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article sets out literature to underpin a conceptual framework that explains one way to organise sustainable business approaches. The literature review highlights seven interconnected issues, the natural environment, driving forces, purchasing policies, value-adding processes, intermediaries, retail practices and the marketplace. It is through a combination of these concepts that retailers, wholesalers, producers, suppliers and other intermediaries join forces to create sustainable approaches across the business network.

  • 212.
    Wood, Greg
    et al.
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Singh, Jang
    Odette School of Business, University of Windsor, Canada.
    Carasco, Emily
    University of Windsor, Canada.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Implementing the Ethos of Corporate Codes of Ethics: Australia, Canada and Sweden2004In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 389-403Article in journal (Refereed)
2345 201 - 212 of 212
CiteExportLink to result list
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Cite
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