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  • 201.
    Peters, Wibke
    et al.
    Wildlife Biology Program, Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, United States & Bavarian State Institute of Forestry (LWF), Freising, Germany.
    Hebblewhite, Mark
    Wildlife Biology Program, Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, United States.
    Mysterud, Atle
    Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Eacker, Daniel
    Wildlife Biology Program, Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, United States.
    Hewison, A. J. Mark
    CEFS, University de Toulouse, INRA, Castanet Tolosan, France.
    Linnell, John D. C.
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Trondheim, Norway.
    Focardi, Stefano
    stituto dei Sistemi Complessi, CNR, Sesto Fiorentino, Italy.
    Urbano, Ferdinando
    Eurodeer Project, freelance consultan.
    De Groeve, Johannes
    Department of Geography, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium.
    Gehr, Benedikt
    Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Heurich, Marco
    Department of Conservation and Research, Bavarian Forest National Park, Grafenau, Germany.
    Jarnemo, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Kjellander, Petter
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Science (SLU), Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Kröschel, Max
    Chair of Wildlife Ecology and Management, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany & Forest Research Institute of Baden-Wuerttemberg, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
    Morellet, Nicolas
    CEFS, University de Toulouse, INRA, Castanet Tolosan, France.
    Pedrotti, Luca
    Parco Nationale dello Stelvio, Glorenza (BZ), Italy.
    Reinecke, Horst
    Department of Wildlife Sciences & Institute for Wildlife biology of Göttingen and Dresden, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
    Sandfort, Robin
    Institute of Wildlife Biology and Game Management, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria.
    Sönnichsen, Leif
    Mammal Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Białowieża, Poland & Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW), Berlin, Germany.
    Sunde, Peter
    Deptartment of Bioscience – Wildlife Ecology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Cagnacci, Francesca
    Biodiversity and Molecular Ecology Department, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige (TN), Italy & Organismic and Evolutionary Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States.
    Large herbivore migration plasticity along environmental gradients in Europe: life-history traits modulate forage effects2018In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 128, no 3, p. 416-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most common framework under which ungulate migration is studied predicts that it is driven by spatio–temporal variation in plant phenology, yet other hypotheses may explain differences within and between species. To disentangle more complex patterns than those based on single species/ single populations, we quantified migration variability using two sympatric ungulate species differing in their foraging strategy, mating system and physiological constraints due to body size. We related observed variation to a set of hypotheses. We used GPS-collar data from 537 individuals in 10 roe Capreolus capreolus and 12 red deer Cervus elaphus populations spanning environmental gradients across Europe to assess variation in migration propensity, distance and timing. Using time-to-event models, we explored how the probability of migration varied in relation to sex, landscape (e.g. topography, forest cover) and temporally-varying environmental factors (e.g. plant green-up, snow cover). Migration propensity varied across study areas. Red deer were, on average, three times more migratory than roe deer (56% versus 18%). This relationship was mainly driven by red deer males which were twice as migratory as females (82% versus 38%). The probability of roe deer migration was similar between sexes. Roe deer (both sexes) migrated earliest in spring. While territorial male roe deer migrated last in autumn, male and female red deer migrated around the same time in autumn, likely due to their polygynous mating system. Plant productivity determined the onset of spring migration in both species, but if plant productivity on winter ranges was sufficiently high, roe deer were less likely to leave. In autumn, migration coincided with reduced plant productivity for both species. This relationship was stronger for red deer. Our results confirm that ungulate migration is influenced by plant phenology, but in a novel way, that these effects appear to be modulated by species-specific traits, especially mating strategies. © 2018 The Authors. Oikos © 2018 Nordic Society Oikos

  • 202.
    Petersson, Håkan
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Mesh-Less Analysis of Products: A Revolution within Computer Based Design Analysis2019In: Proceedings of the ASME 2019 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition  (IMECE2019): November 11-14, 2019, Salt Lake City, UT, USA, 2019, Vol. 1, article id 11550Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many years, FEA (finite element analysis) has been the dominant way of evaluating the mechanical properties of products. Engineers and design analysts are well familiar with the technology, and it is used for a lot of different types of phenomena. It is not easy to use FEA as it requires a lot of knowledge and skills for the analysis to be successful. One of the many problems is that it quickly becomes a large model with a large number of equations that have to be solved. A computer with a large internal memory, a fast CPU and fast hard disk drives is expensive to purchase and to keep up to date.

    Another problem is when thin-walled solids have to be analyzed. You usually need 2-3 elements in thickness to be able to obtain all stresses, which requires a lot of elements and nodes and makes the computations large or even too large. To solve these types of problem, a conversion to surfaces has to be made, where 2D shell elements may be used. Converting solids to surfaces can be demanding and time-consuming. It is a compromise, but it is solvable as a 2D model. As we all know, all body-in-white, e.g., automotive and aerospace industry, is analyzed by this method.

    A new type of software has recently reached the market, mesh-less design analysis, which makes it possible to perform design analysis in all kind of solids, very quickly and by using much less solving time and computer power. As this type of software doesn’t mesh the geometry, much time can be saved both on the geometry but also on waiting time for the problem to be solved. The main question is, “is it too good to be true”?

    In this paper, the focus is on comparing two types of design analysis software, traditional FEA, and mesh-less design analysis. Different samples of design problems have been analyzed and compared; results and conclusions are reported. © 2019 by ASME

  • 203.
    Petersson, Håkan
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Optimizing Products and Production Using Additive Manufacturing by Introducing Bionics into the Engineering Design Process2017In: ASME 2017 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, New York: ASME Press, 2017, article id V011T15A017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to perform engineering design activities aiming at the design of new or redesign of existing products, a number of alternative processes, methods and techniques are available in the literature to the engineering designer/product developing enterprise. These processes, methods and techniques, are usually not explicitly expressed in terms of directives as to when and how they are to be used in the actual design of the product-to-be.

    An important goal in product development of today is to fulfill the terms for sustainable development, thus emphasizing the need to develop products which are not overexploiting the available resources provided by nature. By utilizing an approach to development and design based on bionics, i.e. utilizing biological methods and systems found in nature as a means of creating technical solutions, a conceptual framework is provided which is especially fit to accommodate the striving for sustainability.

    Striving for lightweight designs provides a significant potential to reduce the energy consumption of the product-to-be, which at present is a highly prioritized goal within sustainable development. Up until now, the dominating approach to lightweight designs has been to utilize lightweight materials such as different types of composites and metallic materials such as aluminum, magnesium and titanium.

    By introducing biomimicry into the engineering design process, an additional step towards efficient lightweight design solutions might be within reach. Since the objects created by nature are independent of costs and time, these are most often very complex especially regarding shapes and dimensions. In order to match these constraints in the creation of technical solutions (products), it is necessary to utilize optimization in combination with a flexible manufacturing process. The ideal manufacturing method to meet these demands is Additive Manufacturing (AM), though, at least for the time being, it imposes some constraints in size, costs etc. of the product to be manufactured.

    If the product designed is to be suitable for manufacturing for AM, it must be optimized, and so must the way it is to be processed. Therefore three of the most essential problems which need to be addressed in order to efficiently utilize AM are also elaborated upon and reported in the paper.

    The first of these problems is how to optimize the product-to-be. The second is to establish the orientation in which the product is to be manufactured during the AM process. The third is to find the best usage of the support material in the 3D printer, as there is no optimized process available for this activity. This is mainly due to the difficulties to foresee the waste of building material as, in most cases, this material can only be used once.

    In this paper, a process for the design and development of new products is proposed. The application of the process also includes essential elements to assure an efficient use of AM as mentioned above. The process is established on the basis of an integration of the Biomimicry Design Spiral, Bionic Structures and Elements and optimization into the Engineering Design Process. The utilization of the process is demonstrated by an application and reported in the form of a modified engineering design process — the Engineering Design and Biomimicry Design Process or the EDBP process for short.

    Copyright © 2017 by ASME

  • 204.
    Petersson, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Riggberger, Kenneth
    Stadionkontoret, Malmö Sports Academy, Malmö, Sweden.
    Brorsson, Sofia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Olsson, Charlotte M.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Unilateral Strength Training With Maximal Velocity Improves Lower Body Power Outcome And Movement Velocity2012In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 44, no Suppl. 2, p. 671-671Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 205.
    Philip, Rony
    et al.
    Amrita University, Coimbatore, India.
    Löfgren, Hans
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Experimental Verification of an Instrument to Test Flooring Materials2018In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Bristol: Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2018, Vol. 310, no 1, article id 012121Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this work is to validate the fluid model with different flooring materials and the measurements of an instrument to test flooring materials and its force attenuating capabilities using mathematical models to describe the signature and coefficients of the floor. The main contribution of the present work focus on the development of a mathematical fluid model for floors. The aim of the thesis was to analyze, compare different floor materials and to study the linear dynamics of falling impacts on floors. The impact of the hammer during a fall is captured by an accelerometer and response is collected using a picoscope. The collected data was analyzed using matlab least square method which is coded as per the fluid model. The finding from this thesis showed that the fluid model works with more elastic model but it doesn't work for rigid materials like wood. The importance of parameters like velocity, mass, energy loss and other coefficients of floor which influences the model during the impact of falling on floors were identified and a standardized testing method was set. © Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd.

  • 206.
    Pires, Mateus Marques
    et al.
    Ecology and Evolution Laboratory, Vale do Taquari University (UNIVATES), Lajeado, Rio Grande Do Sul, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Ecology and Evolution Laboratory, Vale do Taquari University (UNIVATES), Lajeado, Rio Grande Do Sul, Brazil.
    Renner, Samuel
    Ecology and Evolution Laboratory, Vale do Taquari University (UNIVATES), Lajeado, Rio Grande Do Sul, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Predicting the effects of future climate change on the distribution of an endemic damselfly (Odonata, Coenagrionidae) in subtropical South American grasslands2018In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is predicted to affect the distribution of freshwater taxa, and stronger impacts are expected on endemic species. However, the effects of future climates on freshwater insects from the Neotropical region have been generally overlooked. In this study, the distribution of a damselfly (Cyanallagma bonariense, Odonata, Coenagrionidae) endemic to the subtropical South American grasslands (Pampa) was modelled in relation to future scenarios of high greenhouse gas emissions (RCP 8.5) for 2050 and 2070. For this purpose, ecological niche models were developed based on assumptions of limited dispersal and niche conservatism, and the projected distribution of C. bonariense was contrasted with the location of current protected areas (PAs) in the Pampa. A broad potential distribution of C. bonariense was indicated throughout the Pampa, and projections predicted a predominance of range contractions rather than range shifts in climatically suitable areas for C. bonariense in 2050 and 2070. Projections of suitable areas overlapped in central Argentina and southernmost Uruguay in these periods. Our results indicated a potential resilience of C. bonariense to future climate change, which is likely related to the low restrictions in habitat use of C. bonariense. In every projection, however, most PAs were expected to lose effectiveness, as by 2070 most PAs fall outside the range of the predicted distribution of C. bonariense. Thus, the creation or enlargement of PAs in these areas is recommended and these results represent an important information for the conservation of endemic freshwater insects under global warming scenarios in an overlooked Neotropical landscape. © Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

  • 207.
    Ražanskas, Petras
    et al.
    Department of Electric Power Systems, Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Verikas, Antanas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research. Department of Electrical Power Systems, Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania.
    Viberg, Per-Arne
    Swedish Adrenaline, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Olsson, Charlotte M.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Predicting physiological parameters in fatiguing bicycling exercises using muscle activation timing2017In: Biomedical Signal Processing and Control, ISSN 1746-8094, E-ISSN 1746-8108, Vol. 35, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is concerned with a novel technique for prediction of blood lactate concentration level and oxygen uptake rate from multi-channel surface electromyography (sEMG) signals. The approach is built on predictive models exploiting a set of novel time-domain variables computed from sEMG signals. Signals from three muscles of each leg, namely, vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, and semitendinosus were used in this study. The feature set includes parameters reflecting asymmetry between legs, phase shifts between activation of different muscles, active time percentages, and sEMG amplitude. Prediction ability of both linear and non-linear (random forests-based) models was explored. The random forests models showed very good prediction accuracy and attained the coefficient of determination R2 = 0.962 for lactate concentration level and R2 = 0.980 for oxygen uptake rate. The linear models showed lower prediction accuracy. Comparable results were obtained also when sEMG amplitude data were removed from the training sets. A feature elimination algorithm allowed to build accurate random forests (R2 > 0.9) using just six (lactate concentration level) or four (oxygen uptake rate) time-domain variables. Models created to predict blood lactate concentration rate relied on variables reflecting interaction between front and back leg muscles, while parameters computed from front muscles and interactions between two legs were the most important variables for models created to predict oxygen uptake rate.© 2017 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 208.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Dimkovski, Zlate
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Traceology for prediction of polishing roses2019In: Abstracts book Met & Props 2019 LYON, 2019, p. 173-174Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 209.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Wagner, Michael
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Mazal, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Dahlén, Malin
    Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Detection of paint polishing defects2018In: Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, ISSN 2051-672X, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 024009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface finish plays a major role on perceived product quality, and is the first thing a potential buyer sees. Today end-of-line repairs of the body of cars and trucks are inevitably to secure required surface quality. Defects that occur in the paint shop, like dust particles, are eliminated by manual sanding/polishing which lead to other types of defects when the last polishing step is not performed correctly or not fully completed. One of those defects is known as 'polishing roses' or holograms, which are incredibly hard to detect in artificial light but are clearly visible in sunlight.

    This paper will present the first tests with a measurement set-up newly developed to measure and analyse polishing roses. The results showed good correlations to human visual evaluations where repaired panels were estimated based on the defects' intensity, severity and viewing angle.

  • 210.
    Reddy, Vijeth Venkataram
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Flys, Olena
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Research Institute of Sweden, Borås, Sweden.
    Chaparala, Anish
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Berrimi, Chihab E.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Study on surface texture of Fused Deposition Modeling2018In: Proceedings of the 8th Swedish Production Symposium (SPS 2018) / [ed] Mauro Onori, Lihui Wang, Xi Vincent Wang, Wei Ji, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 25, p. 8p. 389-396Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is mostly used to develop functional prototypes and in some applications for end-use parts. It is important to study the surfaces produced by FDM to understand the certainty of process. Truncheon design test artefacts are printed at different print settings and surfaces are measured using stylus profilometer. Taguchi’s design of experiments, signal-to-noise ratio and multiple regression statistics are implemented to establish a concise study of the individual and combined effect of process variables on surface texture parameters. Further, a model is developed to predict the roughness parameters and is compared with experimental values. The results suggest significant roughness parameter values decrease with increase in build inclination and increases with increase in layer thickness except the roughness peak count. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V

  • 211.
    Reddy, Vijeth Venkataram
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Tam, Pui Lam
    Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Characterization of subsurface deformation of turned brasses: lead brass (CuZn39Pb3) and lead free brass (CuZn21Si3P)2019In: 16th International Conference on Metrology And Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met And Props 2017), Bristol, UK: Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2019, article id 012006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adverse effects of lead on human health and the recycling problems of copper alloys with lead content has led to the increase in concern for reducing/eliminating the use of lead in brass and other copper alloys. The real challenge prevails in sustainable manufacturing of lead free brass and to maintain as well as control the surface integrity when lead is substituted in the brass with silicon. This article is part of the study that focuses on characterizing the surface integrity of machined lead brass and lead free brass. This paper deals with the study of surface layer characteristics of brass samples, investigating the subsurface deformation influenced by the turning operation. It is important to study the plastic deformation under the machined surface which directly affects the performance of the material on further machining or application. In this study, metallographic investigations are performed on turned samples of lead brass and lead free brass and include comparisons between the study samples based on the plastic deformations quantified by grain orientations and microhardness measurements. The study performed successfully characterizes the subsurface deformation and the results suggest slightly higher subsurface deformation in turned lead brass as compared to lead free brass.

  • 212.
    Reddy, Vijeth Venkataram
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Tam, Pui Lam
    Chalmers University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Subsurface Characterization of Turned Brass alloys using Backscattered Electron Microscopy2017In: Mets&Props 2017: 16th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces: Conference abstracts, 2017, p. 14-15Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Reddy, Vijeth Venkataram
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Schultheiss, Fredrik
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces. Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Lead free Brass: Topography Characterization2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The negative effects of lead on human health and the recycling problems of copper alloys with lead content has led to the increase in concern for reducing/eliminating the use of lead in brass and other copper alloys. Many materials are considered to replace lead in brass; silicon is one such alternative. The real challenge prevails in sustainable manufacturing of lead free brass, to maintain control of the surface integrity when substituting the lead content in the brass with silicon. The investigation includes defined areal surface parameters measured on the turned samples of lead- and lead free brass using an optical coherence scanning interferometer, CSI.This paper deals with the study of surface topography of turned samples of lead and lead free brass. It is important to study the topographical characteristics of the brass samples which are the intermediate link between the manufacturing process variables and the functional behaviour of the surface. To numerically evaluate the sample’s surface topography and to validate the measurements for a significant study, a general statistical methodology is implemented. The results suggest that the surface roughness is higher in lead brass compared to lead free brass and tool coatings have significant influence on the hybrid (Sdr & Sdq) parameters in the surface topography of brass samples.

  • 214.
    Reddy, Vijeth Venkataram
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Schultheiss, Fredrik
    Division of Production and Materials Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Surface topography characterization of brass alloys: lead brass (CuZn39Pb3) and lead free brass (CuZn21Si3P)2017In: Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, ISSN 2051-672X, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 025001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufactured surfaces usually consist of topographical features which include both those put forth by the manufacturing process, and micro-features caused by disturbances during this process. Surface characterization basically involves study of these features which influence the functionality of the surface. This article focuses on characterization of the surface topography of machined lead brass and lead free brass. The adverse effect of lead on human health and the environment has led the manufacturing sector to focus on sustainable manufacturing of lead free brass, as well as how to maintain control of the surface integrity when substituting the lead content in the brass with silicon. The investigation includes defined areal surface parameters measured on the turned samples of lead- and lead free brass using an optical coherence scanning interferometer, CSI. This paper deals with the study of surface topography of turned samples of lead-and lead free brass. It is important to study the topographical characteristics of the brass samples which are the intermediate link between the manufacturing process variables and the functional behaviour of the surface. To numerically evaluate the sample's surface topography and to validate the measurements for a significant study, a general statistical methodology is implemented. The results indicate higher surface roughness in turned samples of lead brass compared to lead free brass. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd

  • 215.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – Univates, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – Univates, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Dalzochio, Marina S.
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – Univates, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Ecoregions within the Brazilian Pampa biome reflected in Odonata species assemblies2019In: Austral ecology (Print), ISSN 1442-9985, E-ISSN 1442-9993, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 461-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on vegetation composition, previous studies of the Pampa biome in southern Brazil have defined seven ecoregions within the area. Here, we test this ecoregion approach studying the semi-aquatic insect group Odonata in five of these regions, aiming at comparing the ecoregions to the more traditional environmental predictors of water quality and land cover. Based on a data set of occupancy comprising 99 species distributed between 131 localities, a one-way Permutational Multivariate Analysis of Variance was used to compare differences in the species composition between the ecoregions, followed by a Principal Component Analysis to visualize the variation. The composition varied significantly between all groups tested, and the ordination explained 61.8% of the variance. A partial redundancy analysis of ecoregions, land cover and water quality variables explained 71% of the variance in Odonata community structure. Ecoregion was the most important predictor, followed by water quality and land cover. Within these species assemblies, we could select certain species that were representative of a given ecoregion, to which their distribution within the Pampa biome was entirely or mainly confined. Of 24 representative species 41.7% were rare, while the rest were more abundant and, hence, easier to detect. We suspect that the differences found between the Pampa ecoregions might be due to geology, as such factors may be strong determinants of biodiversity. Specific ecological requirements at the family and genus levels also seemed to act selectively on the species compositions within the ecoregions. Today, the Pampa is highly fragmented due to agricultural activities such as rice cultivation, extensive cattle farming and forest plantations. We suggest that an ecoregion-based approach to the implementation of conservation measures may be the best way to help these distinct species assemblies survive. © 2018 Ecological Society of Australia

  • 216.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Bairro Universitário, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Bairro Universitário, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Ely, Gerson
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Bairro Universitário, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Preliminary dragonfly (Odonata) species list from the Pampa biome in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, with ecological notes for 19 new records for the state2017In: Biota Neotropica, ISSN 1806-129X, E-ISSN 1676-0611, Vol. 17, no 4, article id e20170374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An inventory of Odonata was carried out in the southern half of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in the Pampa biome. Originally, this biogeographical region was covered mostly by open fields and grassland, with sections of higher vegetation surrounding water bodies and rocky hills. Today the landscape is fragmented due to agricultural activities, mainly cattle farming, rice crops and forest plantations. Our survey was conducted in three municipalities from this region, between March 2015 and April 2016. Aiming at a general overview of the species composition, our sampling sites were selected on a wide basis, including lakes, bogs, temporary water bodies, small streams and river sections. Eighty two species of Odonata were collected comprising 40 genera and seven families. The dominant families were Libellulidae (56,1%), Coenagrionidae (24,5%) and Aeshnidae (7,3%). We found a diverse odonate assemblage, adding 19 new species records for the state of Rio Grande do Sul.

  • 217.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Lab de Evolução e Ecologia, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Lab de Evolução e Ecologia, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Effects of exotic tree plantations on the richness of dragonflies (Odonata) in Atlantic Forest, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil2016In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the forest types occurring in Southern Brazil is the mixed ombrophilous forest (MOF), a subtype of the Atlantic Forest, which is one of the richest biomes on Earth. This biome currently remains as a highly fragmented mosaic, under pressure from human development. The diversity and ecology of most animal groups in this biome are poorly known. We studied Odonata in a large forest fragment, including an ecological reserve: the Floresta Nacional de São Francisco de Paula (FLONA-SFP), in Rio Grande do Sul, administrated by the Brazilian government. The reserve is dominated by MOF with sectors of Pinus elliottii and Araucaria angustifolia. Three surveys of these forest sectors over one year yielded 42 species, with the highest species richness recorded in the P. elliottii sector. The odonate species recorded here are all generalist in terms of habitat preferences, but they appeared only in low numbers and were very particular in their occurrence pattern. We therefore assume that the introduction of an alien element in the Atlantic Forest has given rise to a new species assemblage, where the ecology of the species is adapted to the novel habitat of Pinus plantations. As expected, the species occurring in the MOF sectors were mainly habitat specialists. The Araucaria plantations had an intermediate species composition. Despite the differences observed in habitat preference between generalist and specialist species, such exotic plantation habitats may act as a temporary biodiversity reservoir for further habitat colonization. © 2016 Worldwide Dragonfly Association

  • 218.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado, RS, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    List of Odonates from the Floresta Nacional de São Francisco de Paula (FLONA - SFP), with two new distribution records for Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil2016In: Biota Neotropica, ISSN 1806-129X, E-ISSN 1676-0611, Vol. 3, article id e20150132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A survey of Odonata was carried out in the National Forest FLONA - SFP, Northeastern region of the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. This conservation unit is mainly covered by Mixed Ombrophilous Forest (MOF), a subtype of Atlantic Forest biome, being also areas covered in planted Pinus, planted Araucaria and open fields. Our sampling efforts were conducted in thirty aquatic environments inside this reserve during the period between January 2014 and November 2014. The sampling sites were selected randomly, comprehending lakes, bogs, small streams and river sections, all inserted in the four vegetation types occurring in the reserve. Fortysix species of Odonata were collected and grouped into 23 genera and seven families. The dominant families were Coenagrionidae (32%), Libellulidae (32%), Aeshnidae (12%), and, Calopterygidae and Lestidae (9%). As expected, the findings revealed the presence of a highly diverse Odonate assemblage, mainly represented by generalist species in the most human disturbed sectors (Pinus and Open fields) and some specialist species in the pristine forest. Two species were registered for the first time in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil: Libellula herculea Karsch, 1889 (Libellulidae) and Heteragrion luizfelipei Machado, 2006 (Heteragrionidae). © 2016, Universidade Estadual de Campinas UNICAMP. All rights reserved.

  • 219.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brasil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brasil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Man-made lakes form species-rich dragonfly communities in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (Odonata)2016In: Odonatologica, ISSN 0375-0183, Vol. 45, no 3-4, p. 135-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the forest types occurring in Southern Brazil is the Mixed Ombrophilous Forest (MOF), a subtype of the Atlantic Forest and one of the biodiversity hotspots on Earth. We sampled adult Odonata at 30 locations in the Floresta Nacional de São Francisco de Paula (FLONA-SFP), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, a national reserve which is divided into several sectors of MOF, planted Araucaria angustifolia, Pinus elliottii used for sustainable and financial purposes, and open fields. There are three types of aquatic environments in the reserve: lakes, swamps, and rivers/streams. Our aim was to obtain an overview of the species’ distribution patterns in the three types of aquatic environments and to evaluate the species occurring in lakes, an exclusively man-made habitat in this area. We recorded 46 species from seven odonate families; 25 species (x = 5.71 ± 1.77 SD) occurring in rivers/ streams, 24 in lakes (11.57 ± 2.15) and 21 in swamps (5.22 ± 3.60). Using Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NmDS), we showed that the species composition differed clearly between the three types of aquatic habitats. While swamps and rivers/streams had a relatively similar and uniform species composition, species in the lakes were more varied but the total species number was almost as high as that of the rivers/streams. The lake communities also differed distinctly from those of the other habitats, and we assume that the lake species originate from other degraded areas in the vicinity, indicating that the remains of the Atlantic Forest has already been strongly altered by humans. Given the poor knowledge of the Odonata in the Atlantic Forest/MOF, we hope that our study may increase the understanding of the communities, and contribute to the development of conservation measures for this fragmented biome.

  • 220.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Schmidt Dalzochio, Marina
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Water body type and land cover shape the dragonfly communities (Odonata) in the Pampa biome, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil2018In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogeographical region known as the Pampa biome in southern Brazil, was originally mainly covered with open fields or grassland, with areas of riparian forest surrounding the water bodies. Today this landscape appears highly fragmented due to agricultural activities such as rice cultivation, extensive cattle farming, and forest plantations. Studies have shown that the Pampa biome has high levels of biodiversity and endemism, but with regard to invertebrates, this biome is still one of the least known in Brazil. We therefore designed a study comparing the dragonfly (Odonata) communities to environmental and landscape features in this area, measuring diversity by species richness, relative abundance and Shannon index. Our results showed that the Pampa is a biome very rich in odonates, and that the species communities are highly dependent on the environmental conditions of the area. Habitats such as Rivers/Streams, bordered by native grasslands and riparian forests, were shown to harbour communities that were ecologically more complex and sensitive than other habitat types. Man-made lakes and agricultural areas displayed lower levels of biodiversity and odonate communities dominated by generalist species. By combining data on the communities of Odonata and other taxa, our analyses may be instrumental in determining priority areas for future conservation measures within the area. © 2018, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

  • 221.
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Barth, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    FabLab Halmstad – a hub and pilot plant for academia2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Toponova AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Rosén, Stefan
    Toponova AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Thomas, T. R.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science. Avalon Technology, London, United Kingdom.
    Analysis of 3-D surfaces in forming dies and sheet metal - Today and tomorrow2004In: Recent Advances in Manufacture & Use of Tools & Dies and Stamping of Steel Sheets: Proceedings of the international conference, October 5-6, 2004, Olofsröm, Sweden / [ed] Nader Asnafi, 2004, p. 29-53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of surface roughness on production of steel sheet are critically reviewed. New developments in the measurement and characterisation of surface roughness seem likely to improve our understanding of its effect on sheet metal production. Much useful information can still be acquired by 2D techniques but increasingly the evidence is that sheet metal surface roughness is better measured and characterised by 3D methods. The facility for direct surface visualization in 3D is shown to be particularly helpful. When measuring 3D the measurement area size and sampling space are critical and for evaluation the filtering of surface data into roughness and waviness is more complicated than for 2D profiles.

  • 223.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergman, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Kansei, surfaces and perception engineering2016In: Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, ISSN 2051-672X, Vol. 4, no 3, article id 033001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aesthetic and pleasing properties of a product are important and add significantly to the meaning and relevance of a product. Customer sensation and perception are largely about psychological factors. There has been a strong industrial and academic need and interest for methods and tools to quantify and link product properties to the human response but a lack of studies of the impact of surfaces. In this study, affective surface engineering is used to illustrate and model the link between customer expectations and perception to controllable product surface properties. The results highlight the use of the soft metrology concept for linking physical and human factors contributing to the perception of products. Examples of surface applications of the Kansei methodology are presented from sauna bath, health care, architectural and hygiene tissue application areas to illustrate, discuss and confirm the strength of the methodology. In the conclusions of the study, future research in soft metrology is proposed to allow understanding and modelling of product perception and sensations in combination with a development of the Kansei surface engineering methodology and software tools.

  • 224.
    Ryman Augustsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Department of Sport Science, Faculty of Social Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Julia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Jump height as performance indicator for the selection of youth football players to national teams2019In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, ISSN 0022-4707, E-ISSN 1827-1928, Vol. 59, no 10, p. 1669-1675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different jump tests such as the Countermovement Jump (CMJ), Abalakov Jump (AJ) and Standing Long Jump (SLJ) are often used in practice to evaluate muscular power and functional performance in football. These tests are also used in different selection processes and talent identification, but the significance of the tests for the selection of youth players to national teams are relatively unknown. The aim of this study was to compare jump ability between youth football players selected or not selected for the national team.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 22 players (aged 17±2 years), 11 national players (NP) and 11 non-national players (NNP) were evaluated in three different jump tests; CMJ, AJ and SLJ. Mean scores for the tests were analyzed and compared.

    Results: Significant differences were found between the groups regarding jump height in favor of the NP group in both the CMJ (NP 39.9±5.0 cm vs. NNP 34.2±4.9 cm, P=0.013) and the AJ (NP 47.1±5.4 vs. NNP 40.9±4.7, P=0.010). No group difference was found regarding jump length in SLJ (NP 246.2±17.9 vs. NNP 232.9±16.5, P=0.084).

    Conclusions: The results suggest that tests, measuring jump height, could be used as a performance indicator and part of the selection process of youth football players to national teams, whereas the use of jump length could be questioned. Copyright © 2019 Edizioni Minerva Medica

  • 225.
    Sardar, Samra
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Alish, Kerr
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, Dublin, Ireland.
    Vaartjes, Daniëlle
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Voetmann, Mathilde Emilie
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Biogen Denmark A/S, Hillerød, Denmark.
    Moltved, Emilie Riis
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & QuintilesIMS, North Carolina, USA.
    Andersson, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    A novel candidate for genetic control of Collagen Induced Arthritis is involved in transcriptional regulation of B-cell proliferation2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 226.
    Sardar, Samra
    et al.
    Dept. of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Dept. of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Old and new therapeutics for Rheumatoid Arthritis: in vivo models and drug development2016In: Immunopharmacology and immunotoxicology, ISSN 0892-3973, E-ISSN 1532-2513, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 2-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of novel drugs for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases is to a large extent dependent on the availability of good experimental in vivo models in order to perform preclinical tests of new drugs and for the identification of novel drug targets. Here, we review a number of existing rodent models for Rheumatoid Arthritis in the context of how these models have been utilized for developing established therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis and, furthermore, the present use of animal models for studies of novel drug candidates. We have studied the literature in the field for the use of in vivo models during development of anti-rheumatic drugs; from Methotrexate to various antibody treatments, to novel drugs that are, or have recently been, in clinical trials. For novel drugs, we have explored websites for clinical trials. Although a single Rheumatoid Arthritis in vivo model cannot mirror the complexity of disease development, there exist a number of good animal models for Rheumatoid Arthritis, each defining some parts in disease development, which are useful for studies of drug response. We find that many of the established drugs were not tested in in vivo models before being used in the clinic, but rather animal models have been subsequently used to find mechanisms for efficacy. Finally, we report a number of novel drugs, tested in preclinical in vivo models, presently in clinical trials. © 2016 Taylor and Francis.

  • 227.
    Sardar, Samra
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Nordic Bioscience A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kanne, Katrine
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark & Novartis International AG, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Analysis of polymorphisms in the mediator complex subunit 13-like (Med13L) gene in the context of immune function and development of experimental arthritis2018In: Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis, ISSN 0004-069X, E-ISSN 1661-4917, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 365-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mediator complex subunit 13-like (MED13L) protein is part of the multi-protein mediator complex and plays an important role in gene transcription. Polymorphisms in the MED13L gene have been linked to congenital heart anomalies and intellectual disabilities. Despite recent evidence of indirect links of MED13L to cytokine release and inflammation, impact of genetic variations in MED13L on immune cells remains unexplored. The B10.RIII and RIIIS/J mouse strains vary in susceptibility to induced experimental autoimmune disease models. From sequencing data of the two mouse strains, we identified six polymorphisms in the coding regions of Med13l. By using congenic mice, we studied the effect of these polymorphisms on immune cell development and function along with susceptibility to collagen-induced arthritis, an animal model for Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Combining in vivo disease data, in vitro functional data, and computational analysis of the reported non-synonymous polymorphisms, we report that genetic polymorphisms in Med13l do not affect the immune phenotype in these mice and are predicted to be non-disease associated. © The Author(s) 2018

  • 228.
    Sardar, Samra
    et al.
    Nordic Bioscience A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kerr, Alish
    Nuritas, Dublin, Ireland.
    Vaartjes, Daniëlle
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Moltved, Emilie Riis
    IQVIA Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Karosiene, Edita
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gupta, Ramneek
    Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Andersson, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    The oncoprotein TBX3 is controlling severity in experimental arthritis2019In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Development of autoimmune diseases is the result of a complex interplay between hereditary and environmental factors, with multiple genes contributing to the pathogenesis in human disease as well as in experimental models for disease. The T-box protein 3 is a transcriptional repressor essential during early embryonic development, in the formation of bone and additional organ systems, and in tumorigenesis.

    Methods: With the aim to find novel genes important for autoimmune inflammation, we have performed genetic studies of collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse experimental model for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Results: We show that a small genetic fragment on mouse chromosome 5, including Tbx3 and three additional protein-coding genes, is linked to severe arthritis and high titers of anti-collagen antibodies. Gene expression studies have revealed differential expression of Tbx3 in B-cells, where low expression was accompanied by a higher B-cell response upon B-cell receptor stimulation in vitro. Furthermore, we show that serum TBX3 levels rise concomitantly with increasing severity of CIA.

    Conclusions: From these results, we suggest that TBX3 is a novel factor important for the regulation of gene transcription in the immune system and that genetic polymorphisms, resulting in lower expression of Tbx3, are contributing to a more severe form of collagen-induced arthritis and high titers of autoantibodies. We also propose TBX3 as a putative diagnostic biomarker for rheumatoid arthritis.

  • 229.
    Schmidt Dalzochio, Marina
    et al.
    Ecology and Evolution, University of Vale do Taquari, UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Ecology and Evolution, University of Vale do Taquari, UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Renner, Samuel
    Ecology and Evolution, University of Vale do Taquari, UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Effect of tree plantations on the functional composition of Odonata species in the highlands of southern Brazil2018In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 808, no 1, p. 283-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in biodiversity have mainly been assessed using taxonomical diversity indices. Although these approaches contribute to the scientific understanding of species richness and composition patterns, trait-based metrics may be more useful for detecting responses to land use change. We used odonates as a model system to compare traits composition in mixed ombrophilous forest (MOF) and tree plantations: exotic species (Pinus sp.) and native species (Araucaria angustifolia). Our goal was to understand and compare how each vegetation type affects the selection of species traits, and which factors are responsible for the presence of the species in the environment. We recorded 36 Odonata species distributed across 14 functional groups. The functional composition varied between MOF and exotic tree plantations and was similar between these two habitats and native tree plantations. Native forest favoured specialist traits. Our results suggest that the conversion of MOF to tree plantations, especially exotic ones, results in a shift to less specialized Odonata communities with altered functional group composition. This result highlights the negative impact associated with the conversion of native forests into exotic plantations. Our results show that odonates with specialist traits are limited to natural forest sites, which makes the conservation of such areas crucial. © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature

  • 230.
    Secomb, Josh L
    et al.
    Queensland Academy of Sport, Nathan, Australia & Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia.
    Farley, Oliver R.
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Nimphius, Sophia
    Centre for Exercise and Sport Science Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia.
    Lundgren, Lina E.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Tran, Tai T.
    Canadian Sports Institute-Pacific, Victoria, Canada.
    Sheppard, Jeremy M.
    Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia & Canadian Sports Institute-Pacific, Victoria, Canada.
    The training-specific adaptations resulting from resistance training, gymnastics and plyometric training, and non-training in adolescent athletes2017In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 762-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous research has investigated the training-specific adaptations to training in adults, there is a paucity of research aimed at investigating these adaptations in adolescent athletes. As such, adolescent athletes’ training-specific adaptations from three different training interventions were investigated in this study. Sixteen adolescent athletes participated in this study, whereby eight performed both training interventions and eight the non-training control. Pre- and post-testing was performed for each intervention with the testing battery: ultrasonography of the vastus lateralis and lateral gastrocnemius, countermovement jump, squat jump, and isometric mid-thigh pull. The resistance training group had large significant increases in isometric mid-thigh pull relative peak force (p < 0.01, g = 0.85 (−0.01, 1.71)) and vastus lateralis fascicle length (p = 0.04, g = 0.94 (0.07, 1.80)). The gymnastics and plyometric group demonstrated large significant changes in vastus lateralis pennation angle (p = 0.03, g = −0.94 (−1.81, −0.08)) and fascicle length (p = 0.03, g = 1.07 (0.19, 1.95)), and moderate significant increases in lateral gastrocnemius thickness (p = 0.01, g = 0.63 (−0.21, 1.47)) and eccentric leg stiffness (p = 0.03, g = 0.60 (−0.24, 1.44)). No significant changes were observed for any variables in the non-training group. The resistance training evoked increases in lower-body force producing capabilities, whereas the gymnastics and plyometric training evoked changes in muscle structure and inherent muscle qualities. © 2017, © The Author(s) 2017.

  • 231.
    Selck, Henriette
    et al.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Adamsen, Peter B.
    Ramboll Environ, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Backhaus, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Banta, Gary T.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Bruce, Peter K.H.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Burton Jr., G. Allen
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
    Butts, Michael B.
    DHI Group, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Boegh, Eva
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Clague, John J.
    Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.
    Dinh, Khuong V.
    Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Doorn, Neelke
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Gunnarsson, Jonas S.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Hazlerigg, Charles
    Enviresearch, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
    Hunka, Agnieszka D.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Jensen, John
    Aarhus University, Silkeborg, Denmark.
    Lin, Yan
    Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Loureiro, Susana
    Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.
    Miraglia, Simona
    Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Munns Jr., Wayne R.
    US Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, Rhode Island, USA.
    Nadim, Farrokh
    Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, Norway.
    Palmqvist, Annemette
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Rämö, Robert A.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Seaby, Lauren P.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Syberg, Kristian
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Tangaa, Stine R.
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Thit, Amalie
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Windfeld, Ronja
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Zalewski, Maciej
    European Regional Centre for Ecohydrology (Polish Academy of Sciences), Lodz, Poland.
    Chapman, Peter M.
    Chapema Environmental Strategies, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
    Assessing and managing multiple risks in a changing world – The Roskilde recommendations2017In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 7-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Roskilde University (Denmark) hosted a November 2015 workshop, Environmental Risk—Assessing and Managing Multiple Risks in a Changing World. This Focus article presents the consensus recommendations of 30 attendees from 9 countries regarding implementation of a common currency (ecosystem services) for holistic environmental risk assessment and management; improvements to risk assessment and management in a complex, human-modified, and changing world; appropriate development of protection goals in a 2-stage process; dealing with societal issues; risk-management information needs; conducting risk assessment of risk management; and development of adaptive and flexible regulatory systems. The authors encourage both cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to address their 10 recommendations: 1) adopt ecosystem services as a common currency for risk assessment and management; 2) consider cumulative stressors (chemical and nonchemical) and determine which dominate to best manage and restore ecosystem services; 3) fully integrate risk managers and communities of interest into the risk-assessment process; 4) fully integrate risk assessors and communities of interest into the risk-management process; 5) consider socioeconomics and increased transparency in both risk assessment and risk management; 6) recognize the ethical rights of humans and ecosystems to an adequate level of protection; 7) determine relevant reference conditions and the proper ecological context for assessments in human-modified systems; 8) assess risks and benefits to humans and the ecosystem and consider unintended consequences of management actions; 9) avoid excessive conservatism or possible underprotection resulting from sole reliance on binary, numerical benchmarks; and 10) develop adaptive risk-management and regulatory goals based on ranges of uncertainty. © 2016 SETAC

  • 232.
    Sernhed, Kerstin
    et al.
    Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Lygnerud, Kristina
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Werner, Sven
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Energy Science. Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Synthesis of recent Swedish district heating research2018In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 151, p. 126-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, district heating meets currently above half of the heat demands in buildings. District heating research in Sweden has a long tradition dating back to 1975. The latest research program period included 34 projects and was executed between 2013 and 2017. In this paper, a synthesis is performed on the Swedish research frontier by assessing these recent research projects. The three study purposes was to provide an overview over the executed projects, to identify new research questions, and to identify future challenges to the Swedish district heating industry. The assessment was based on six defined key areas, such as demand, resources, system frameworks, technology, cold supply, and international perspective. The subsequent content analysis was performed from three perspectives: the perspective of energy system transition, the customer perspective, and the sustainability perspective. Final conclusions include the three future challenges for the Swedish district heating industry. These are future strategies to communicate the value of district heating, vision for district heating beyond the transition to fossil free supply, and technology development for efficient use of low temperature heat sources. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

  • 233.
    Song, Xiaojun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science. School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou, China.
    Ehde, Per Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Weisner, Stefan
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Effects of Water Depth and Phosphorus Availability on Nitrogen Removal in Agricultural Wetlands2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 12, article id 2626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excess nitrogen (N) from agricultural runoff is a cause of pollution inaquatic ecosystems. Created free water surface (FWS) wetlands can be used as buffering systems to lower the impacts of nutrients from agricultural runoff. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate critical factors for N removal in FWSwetlands receiving high nitrate (NO3) loads from agriculture. The study was performed in 12 experimental FWS wetlands in southern Sweden, receiving drainage water from an agricultural field area. The effects of water depth (mean depth of 0.4 m and 0.6 m, respectively) and phosphorus (P) availability (with or without additional P load) were investigated from July to October. The experiment was performed in a two-way design, with three wetlands of each combination of depth and P availability. The effects of P availability on the removal of NO3 and total N were strongly significant, with higher absolute N removal rates per wetland area (g m−2 day−1) as well as temperature-adjusted first-order area-based removal rate coefficients (Kat) in wetlands with external P addition compared to wetlands with no addition. Further, higher N removal in deep compared to shallow wetlands was indicated by statistically significant differences in Kat. The results show that low P availability may limit N removal in wetlands receiving agricultural drainage water. Furthermore, the results support that not only wetland area but also wetland volume may be important for N removal. The results have implications for the planning, location, and design of created wetlands in agricultural areas. © 2019 by the authors

  • 234.
    Sutton, Mark A.
    et al.
    Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Edinburgh Research Station) (CEH), Penicuik, United Kingdom.
    Nemitz, Eriko
    Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Edinburgh Research Station) (CEH), Penicuik, United Kingdom.
    Milford, Celia
    Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Edinburgh Research Station) (CEH), Penicuik, United Kingdom & Institute of Earth Sciences “Jaume Almera”, The Spanish National Research Council, Barcelona, Spain.
    Campbell, Claire
    Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (Edinburgh Research Station) (CEH), Penicuik, United Kingdom.
    Erisman, Jan Willem
    Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten, The Netherlands.
    Hensen, Arjan
    Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten, The Netherlands.
    Cellier, Pierre
    Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures, Thiverval-Grignon, France.
    David, M.
    Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures, Thiverval-Grignon, France.
    Loubet, Benjamin
    Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures, Thiverval-Grignon, France.
    Personne, Erwan
    Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures, Thiverval-Grignon, France.
    Schjoerring, Jan Kofod
    Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mattsson, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dorsey, James R.
    School for Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Gallagher, Martin William
    School for Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Horváth, László
    Hungarian Meteorological Service, Budapest, Hungary.
    Weidinger, Tamás
    Department of Meteorology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Mézáros, Robért
    Department of Meteorology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Dämmgen, Ulrich
    Institut für Agrar Ökologie, Bundesforschungsanstalt für Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Neftel, Albrecht
    Agroscope Reckenholz-Tänikon Research Station ART, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Herrmann, Beat
    Agroscope Reckenholz-Tänikon Research Station ART, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Lehman, B. E.
    University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Flechard, Christophe R.
    Soils, Agronomy and Spatialization Unit, UMR-SAS, INRA, Rennes, France.
    Burkhardt, Juergen K.
    Institute for Crop Science and Resource Conservation, INRES-PE, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Dynamics of ammonia exchange with cut grassland: Synthesis of results and conclusions of the GRAMINAE Integrated Experiment2009In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 6, no 12, p. 2907-2934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved data on biosphere-atmosphere exchange are fundamental to understanding the production and fate of ammonia (NH3) in the atmosphere. The GRAMINAE Integrated Experiment combined novel measurement and modelling approaches to provide the most comprehensive analysis of the interactions to date. Major intercomparisons of micrometeorological parameters and NH3 flux measurements using the aerodynamic gradient method and relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) were conducted. These showed close agreement, though the REA systems proved insufficiently precise to investigate vertical flux divergence. Grassland management had a large effect on fluxes: emissions increased after grass cutting (−50 to 700 ng m-2 s-1 NH3) and after N-fertilization (0 to 3800 ng m-2 s -1) compared with before the cut (−60 to 40 ng m-2 s -1). © Author(s) 2009.

  • 235.
    Tengblad, Stefan
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde, Skövde, Sverige.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Cregård, Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Organisatorisk komplexitet är också en möjlighet2018In: Att leda i en komplex organisation: Utmaningar och nya perspektiv för chefer i offentlig verksamhet / [ed] Anna Cregård, Erik Berntson & Stefan Tengblad, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, p. 183-195Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 236.
    Torell, A.
    et al.
    Ängelholms sjukhus, Ängelholm, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Spenshult R&D center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Spenshult R&D center, Halmstad, Sweden & The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Spenshult R&D center, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Symptoms of pain, fatigue and self-efficacy in young patients with spondyloarthritis: – a comparison between women and men2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, no Suppl. 2, p. 1515-1515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background; The disease spondyloarthritis (SpA) have often an early onset, and can debuts already in teenagers or young adults.  Knowledge of how these patients reporting pain, fatigue and self-efficacy can help to better understand the characteristics of women and men with SpA.

    Objectives: To study the differences between young women and men with SpA with regards to self-reported questionnaires on pain, fatigue and self-efficacy.

    A cross sectional population based cohort were used to create a young patients with SpA.

    Methods: The study is created on a cross-sectional population based cohort of patients with SpA.  They were identified through a health care register by searching for ICD-10 codes for SpA between the years 2003-2007, responding to a questionnaire survey in 2009. 201 patients, 18-36, 29% with the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, 39% with psoriatic arthritis, and 32% with undifferentiated spondyloarhtritis form a subgroup of young patients eligible for analysis.  The surveys including questions concerning self-reported pain (NRS 0-10 and pain mannequin), fatigue (NRS 0-10), self-efficacy (ASES 10-100, low-high). The pain mannequin was used to categorize patients into groups; non chronic pain, chronic regional pain or chronic generalized pain. Self-reported disease activity (BASDAI 0-10) and health related quality of life (EQ5D, 0-1) were used to describe the group. Characteristic symptoms are reported as mean, standard deviation (SD) and frequencies. Mann- Whitney U test and Chi2 test were used to study gender differences.

    Results: The mean age (SD) was, 30 (5) years, 60 % were women. The group reported disease activity (BASDAI) of 3.8 (2.3), quality of life 0.75 (0.16), and that they had their diagnosis for 7 (5) years. One third were smokers or former smokers, and 69 % reached WHO’s recommended level of health enhancing physical activity. Women reported higher pain 3.9 (2.4) compared to men 2.9 (2.1), p=0.001. In the group of both women and men 21 % reported regional chronic pain, 41 % generalized chronic pain and the remaining 38 % reported non chronic pain. More women reported regional and generalized chronic pain than men, p=0.026. Women reported more fatigue 5.0 (2.6) compared to men 3.9 (2.7), p=0.003, less self-efficacy for pain 53 (20), compared to men 59 (21), p=0.041 and for symptoms 59 (19) compared to men 65 (20), p=0.045.

    Conclusion: A significant proportion of both women and men reported symptoms consistent with chronic generalized pain. Women reported generally impaired health compared to men, with a greater percentage with chronic pain, higher rates of pain and fatigue and reduced self-efficacy to manage pain and symptoms. This information could be valuable for clinicians in the care of young patients with SpA. 

  • 237.
    Törnblom, Margareta
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hospital, Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Helsingborg, Sweden & RandD Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Maria
    RandD Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden & Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Department of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden.
    Trulsson Schouenborg, Anna
    Skåne University Hospital, Department of Pain Rehabilitation, Lund, Sweden & Lund University, Department of Health Sciences, Physiotherapy, Lund, Sweden.
    Haglund, Emma
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). RandD Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Validation of the Test for Substitution Patterns - in individuals with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis2019In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 78, no Suppl 2, p. 0712-0712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few tools evaluates quality of movements in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The Test for Substitution Patterns (TSP) is developed to measure the ability to perform five functional movements regarding postural control and altered movement patterns (1). TSP is validated and reliable in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injury, but has not yet been evaluated in individuals with knee OA.

    Objectives: To study the relationships between the OA modified TSP (OA-TSP) and self-reported knee function as measured with the Knee Injury and osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the 30-s chair stand test (30-s CST) in individuals with symptomatic knee OA. A second aim was to study the discriminative ability of the OA-TSP for unilateral knee pain.

    Methods: Sixty-two individuals with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis were included using consecutive sampling. Health status was assessed with the EuroQol five dimension scale (EQ5D, 0-1 worst-best), and knee function in five subscales for KOOS (pain, symptoms, ADL, quality of life and sport/recreation, 0-100 worst-best). The 30-s CST-test measured the number of rises in 30 seconds. In the OA-TSP, substitution patterns are observed and scored from 0-3 (no substitution pattern-poorly performed) during five standardized functional movements. The maximum score is 54 points/side with score of 108 points. Median and min-max were used for all descriptive data. Spearman´s correlation and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for analyzes. A correlation coefficient rs ≥±0.50 is considered large, ±0.30 to < 0.50 moderate and ±0.10 < 0.30 small.

    Results: The median age was 54 years (30-61), 76% were women. The median Body Mass Index was 25 (18-48) and EQ5D 0.8 (0.29-1.00). There were no significant differences between the gender regarding BMI and EQ5D. Median OA-TSP total score was 29 (10-70). Median KOOS pain was 75 (36-100), symptoms 71 (21-96), ADL 87 (30-100), and sport/rec 50 (0-100). In the 30-s CST the median was 16 raises (5-32). Moderate, significant correlations were observed between TSP total score and KOOS pain and KOOS ADL (rs=-0.30; p=0.03, rs=-0.35; p=0.01 respectively) and small correlations between TSP and KOOS sport/recreation and KOOS symptoms (rs=-0.13; p=0.36, rs=-0.22; p=0.11 respectively). There was a moderate, significant correlation between TSP total score and 30-s CST (rs=-0.34; p<0.01). Discriminative ability for the TSP for unilateral knee pain was found to be significant worse in the painful side, with median 18 (2-36) vs. 14 (7-37) in the not painful side, p=0.001.

    Conclusion: The OA-TSP could be used as a functional test to detect altered knee alignment interpreted as an early sign of knee OA and assist the physiotherapist in functional testing during the rehabilitation of individuals with symptomatic knee OA.

  • 238.
    Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science. Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Biol, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Agha, Ramsy
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Biol, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Cires, Samuel
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Biol, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Angeles Lezcano, Maria
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Biol, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Sanchez-Contreras, Maria
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Biol, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Waara, Karl-Otto
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Utkilen, Hans
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Dept Water Hyg, N-0403 Oslo, Norway..
    Quesada, Antonio
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Biol, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Effects of harmful cyanobacteria on the freshwater pathogenic free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii2013In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 130, p. 9-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grazing is a major regulating factor in cyanobacterial population dynamics and, subsequently, considerable effort has been spent on investigating the effects of cyanotoxins on major metazoan grazers. However, protozoan grazers such as free-living amoebae can also feed efficiently on cyanobacteria, while simultaneously posing a major threat for public health as parasites of humans and potential reservoirs of opportunistic pathogens. In this study, we conducted several experiments in which the freshwater amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii was exposed to pure microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and six cyanobacterial strains, three MC-producing strains (MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-YR, MC-WR, [Dha7] MC-RR) and three strains containing other oligopeptides such as anabaenopeptins and cyanopeptolins. Although the exposure to high concentrations of pure MC-LR yielded no effects on amoeba, all MC-producing strains inflicted high mortality rates on amoeba populations, suggesting that toxic effects must be mediated through the ingestion of toxic cells. Interestingly, an anabaenopeptin-producing strain caused the greatest inhibition of amoeba growth, indicating that toxic bioactive compounds other than MCs are of great importance for amoebae grazers. Confocal scanning microscopy revealed different alterations in amoeba cytoskeleton integrity and as such, the observed declines in amoeba densities could have indeed been caused via a cascade of cellular events primarily triggered by oligopeptides with protein-phosphatase inhibition capabilities such as MCs or anabaenopeptins. Moreover, inducible-defense mechanisms such as the egestion of toxic, MC-producing cyanobacterial cells and the increase of resting stages (encystation) in amoebae co-cultivated with all cyanobacterial strains were observed in our experiments. Consequently, cyanobacterial strains showed different susceptibilities to amoeba grazing which were possibly influenced by the potentiality of their toxic secondary metabolites. Hence, this study shows the importance of cyanobacterial toxicity against amoeba grazing and, that cyanobacteria may contain a wide range of chemical compounds capable of negatively affect free-living, herbivorous amoebae. Moreover, this is of high importance for understanding the interactions and population dynamics of such organisms in aquatic ecosystems. (c) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 239.
    Van der Elst, Kristien
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium & Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Centre, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven–University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Research and Development Centre, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sweden.
    De Groef, An
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Larsson, Ingrid
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mathijssen, Elke G.E.
    Department of Rheumatology, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Vriezekolk, Johanna E.
    Department of Rheumatology, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Westhovens, Rene
    Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium & Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Centre, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven–University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne J.L.
    Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands & Department of Rheumatology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    European Qualitative research project on Patient-preferred outcomes in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (EQPERA): rationale, design and methods of a multinational, multicentre, multilingual, longitudinal qualitative study2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e023606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Including the patient perspective is important to achieve optimal outcomes in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ample qualitative studies exist on patient outcomes in RA. A Belgian study recently unravelled what matters most to patients throughout the overwhelming and rapidly evolving early stage of RA. The present study, European Qualitative research project on Patient-preferred outcomes in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (EQPERA) was created to contribute to a more universal understanding of patient-preferred health and treatment outcomes by integrating the perspectives of patients with early RA from three European countries.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: In EQPERA, a qualitative, explorative, longitudinal study will be implemented in The Netherlands and Sweden, parallel to the methods applied in the previously conducted Belgian study. In each country, a purposive sample of patients with early RA will be individually interviewed 3-6 months after start of the initial RA treatment and subsequently, the same participants will be invited to take part in a focus group 12-18 months after RA treatment initiation. Data collection and analysis will be independently conducted by the local research teams in their native language. A meta-analysis of the local findings will be performed to explore and describe similarities, differences and patterns across countries.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was granted by the responsible local ethics committees. EQPERA follows the recommendations of the Declaration of Helsinki. Two main papers are foreseen (apart from the data reporting on the local findings) for peer-reviewed publication.

    © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019.

  • 240.
    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Flys, Olena
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). RISE, Research Institutes of Sweden, Borås, Sweden.
    Reddy, Vijeth Venkataram
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Leicht, Alexander
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hammar, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Potential approach towards effective topography characterization of 316L stainless steel components produced by selective laser melting process2018In: European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, Conference Proceedings - 18th International Conference and Exhibition, EUSPEN 2018, Bedford: euspen , 2018, p. 259-260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, an attempt is made to explain the surface texture of Selective Laser Melting (SLM) parts more satisfyingly than the existing methods. Investigations were carried out on the 316L stainless steel SLM samples. To account for most of the surface conditions, a truncheon artefact was employed for the analysis. A Stylus Profilometer was employed as a metrology tool for obtaining the 3D surface measurements. A methodology is proposed to extract and characterize the topographic features of Additive Manufactured (AM) surfaces. Here, the overall roughness of the surface is segregated into the roughness of the powder particles and the waviness due to thermal and the “staircase” effects. Analyzing these features individually results in an increased understanding of the AM process and an opportunity to optimize machine settings.

  • 241.
    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Flys, Olena
    Reddy, Vijeth Venkataram
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Surface topography characterization using 3D stereoscopic reconstruction of SEM images2018In: Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, ISSN 2051-672X, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 024006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major drawback of the optical microscope is its limitation to resolve finer details. Many microscopes have been developed to overcome the limitations set by the diffraction of visible light. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is one such alternative: it uses electrons for imaging, which have much smaller wavelength than photons. As a result high magnification with superior image resolution can be achieved. However, SEM generates 2D images which provide limited data for surface measurements and analysis. Often many research areas require the knowledge of 3D structures as they contribute to a comprehensive understanding of microstructure by allowing effective measurements and qualitative visualization of the samples under study. For this reason, stereo photogrammetry technique is employed to convert SEM images into 3D measurable data. This paper aims to utilize a stereoscopic reconstruction technique as a reliable method for characterization of surface topography. Reconstructed results from SEM images are compared with coherence scanning interferometer (CSI) results obtained by measuring a roughness reference standard sample. This paper presents a method to select the most robust/consistent surface texture parameters that are insensitive to the uncertainties involved in the reconstruction technique itself. Results from the two-stereoscopic reconstruction algorithms are also documented in this paper. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  • 242.
    Vedantha Krishna, Amogh
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Flys, Olena
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Research Institutes of Sweden (RISE), Borås, Sweden.
    Reddy, Vijeth Venkataram
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Surface topography characterization using 3D stereoscopic reconstruction of SEM images2017In: Mets&Props 2017: Mets&Props 2017: 16th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces: Conference abstracts, 2017, 2017, p. 219-221Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 243.
    Verikas, Antanas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research. Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Parker, James
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Bacauskiene, Marija
    Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Olsson, M. Charlotte
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Exploring relations between EMG and biomechanical data recorded during a golf swing2017In: Expert systems with applications, ISSN 0957-4174, E-ISSN 1873-6793, Vol. 88, p. 109-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring relations between patterns of peak rotational speed of thorax, pelvis and arm, and patterns of EMG signals recorded from eight muscle regions of forearms and shoulders during the golf swing is the main objective of this article. The linear canonical correlation analysis, allowing studying relations between sets of variables, was the main technique applied. To get deeper insights, linear and nonlinear random forests-based prediction models relating a single output variable, e.g. a thorax peak rotational speed, with a set of input variables, e.g. an average intensity of EMG signals were used. The experimental investigations using data from 16 golfers revealed statistically significant relations between sets of input and output variables. A strong direct linear relation was observed between lin- ear combinations of EMG averages and peak rotational speeds. The coefficient of determination values R2 = 0 . 958 and R2 = 0 . 943 obtained on unseen data by the random forest models designed to predict peak rotational speed of thorax and pelvis , indicate high modelling accuracy. However, predictions of peak rotational speed of arm were less accurate. This was expected, since peak rotational speed of arm played a minor role in the linear combination of peak speeds. The most important muscles to predict peak rotational speed of the body parts were identified. The investigations have shown that the canon- ical correlation analysis is a promising tool for studying relations between sets of biomechanical and EMG data. Better understanding of these relations will lead to guidelines concerning muscle engagement and coordination of thorax, pelvis and arms during a golf swing and will help golf coaches in providing substantiated advices. ©2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 244.
    Waara, Sylvia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Wojciechowska, Ewa
    Faculty of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Gdansk University of Technology, Gdansk, Poland.
    Treatment of landfill leachate in a constructed free water surface wetland system over a decade – Identification of disturbance in process behaviour and removal of eutrophying substances and organic material2019In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 249, article id 109319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An 8 ha free water surface wetland system in Orebro, Sweden, which has sediment traps followed by 10 ponds for treatment of landfill leachate in the methanogenic stage, was studied from 2003 to 2012. The wetland was irregularly loaded and the leachate characteristics showed high temporal and spatial variability, so Multivariate Statistical Process Control was chosen as the diagnostic tool for detecting anomalies prior to assessing removal efficiency for eutrophying substances and organics. Disturbances in process behaviour included those due to intermittent flow, dilution due to snowmelt, an episode of high pollutant load, and sampling technique. The wetland total nitrogen mass removal was 89%, resulting in a first order rate coefficient of 1.7 m/year. Total phosphorus mass removal was 98%, while mass reduction was lower for TOC (60%), although this was still below discharge limits. The low amount of labile organic material and phosphate are probably the main reasons for the low denitrification rate. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 245.
    Wang, H. J.
    et al.
    School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, China & Key Laboratory of Modern Measurement and Control Technology, Ministry of Education, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, China.
    Han, F. X.
    School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, China.
    Hgu, Y.
    Key Laboratory of Modern Measurement and Control Technology, Ministry of Education, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, China.
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Key Laboratory of Modern Measurement and Control Technology, Ministry of Education, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, China.
    Zou, A. N.
    School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, China & Key Laboratory of Modern Measurement and Control Technology, Ministry of Education, Beijing Information Science and Technology University, China.
    Evaluation method of running performance for five-axis machining center based on the "S" specimen2019In: 16th International Conference on Metrology and Properties of Engineering Surfaces (Met and Props 2017), Bristol, UK: Institute of Physics (IOP), 2019, article id 012012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the development of industries and the advanced manufacturing technology, the performance of the machine tools plays an important role for the product quality. Machining performance of five-axis machining centers, MC, in the manufacturing industry has been a hot research area, where evaluation methods based on cutting of a test piece are common, but it have proved hard to determine the relationship between test piece deviations and machine tool sensor data during manufacturing. An "S" test specimen has the characteristics of open and close angle, variable curvature, thin wall, and low stiffness. The quality of a machined "S" specimen is used to test the characteristics of five-axis MCs. Inaccurate manufacturing results in unqualified parts and the loss of business. Normally geometrical errors are hard to adjust and compensate for in the process. In order to evaluate, and map the relationship between the characteristics of geometrical work-piece deviations from a MC to in-line sensor data, a monitoring system was established in this study. The LABVIEW monitoring evaluation system is developed based on "running performance tracing". By using a coordinate measuring machine, CMM, and a Scanning Electron Microscope to measure the actual geometry and surface finish of the machined S part and compare it to the ideal geometry, a database and a running performance evaluation model for 5-axis MC based on the "S" specimen was developed. Finally, the effectiveness of the method of evaluation is verified by cutting experiments using a MAZAK five-axis MC. The Achievements reported here are helpful for solving the lack of systems to evaluate the running performance of five-axis CNC machine tools for high-end manufacturing industry in China, which has important application prospect and high economic value.

  • 246.
    Wang, Jun
    et al.
    The Belt and Road Joint Laboratory for Winter Sports, Department of Exercise Physiology, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, ChinaBeijing Sport Univ, Dept Exercise Physiol, Belt & Rd Joint Lab Winter Sports, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Ji, Yunhui
    Department of Physical Education, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, China.
    Zhou, Li
    The Belt and Road Joint Laboratory for Winter Sports, Department of Exercise Physiology, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China.
    Xiang, Yang
    School of Physical Education, Yan’an University, Yan’an, China.
    Heinonen, Ilkka
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Turku PET Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Zhang, Peng
    Department of Exercise Science, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania, East Stroudsburg, PA, United States.
    A New Method to Improve Running Economy and Maximal Aerobic Power in Athletes: Endurance Training With Periodic Carbon Monoxide Inhalation2019In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 10, article id 701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Altitude training stimulates erythropoietin hormone (EPO) release and increases blood hemoglobin (Hb) mass, which may result in improved oxygen (O-2) transport capacity. It was hypothesized in the present study that periodic inhalation of carbon monoxide (CO) might elicit similar physiological adaptations compared to altitude training.

    Methods: Twelve male college student athletes, who were well-trained soccer players, participated. They performed a 4-week treadmill-training program, five times a week. Participants were randomly assigned into an experimental group with inhaling CO (INCO) (1 mL/kg body weight for 2 min) in O-2 (4 L) before all training sessions and a control group without inhaling CO (NOCO). CO and EPO concentrations in venous blood were first measured acutely at the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th hour after INCO, and total hemoglobin mass (tHb), running economy and VO(2)max were measured before and after the 4 weeks training intervention.

    Results: HbCO% increased from 0.7 to 4.4% (P < 0.05) after 1 h of CO inhalation and EPO increased from 1.9 to 2.7 mIU/mL after 4 h post CO inhalation (P < 0.05) acutely before the intervention. After the training, the tHb and VO(2)max in the INCO group increased significantly by 3.7 and 2.7%, respectively, while no significant differences were observed in the NOCO condition. O-2 uptake at given submaximal speeds declined by approximately 4% in the INCO group.

    Conclusion: Acutely, EPO increased sharply post CO inhalation, peaking at 4 h post inhalation. 4-weeks of training with CO inhalation before exercise sessions improved tHb and VO(2)max as well as running economy, suggesting that moderate CO inhalation could be a new method to improve the endurance performance in athletes. © 2019 Frontiers Media S.A. All Rights Reserved.

  • 247.
    Weisner, Stefan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Johannesson, Karin
    IFM Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thiere, Geraldine
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Svengren, Henrik
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Ehde, Per Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Tonderski, Karin S.
    IFM Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    National Large-Scale Wetland Creation in Agricultural Areas—Potential versus Realized Effects on Nutrient Transports2016In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 8, no 11, article id 544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During 2007–2013, the Swedish Board of Agriculture granted support within a national program to about 1000 wetlands, corresponding to a 5300-hectare wetland area, with the dual goal to remove nutrients from water and to improve biodiversity in agricultural landscapes. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects on nutrient transports that are realized within the national program to what could be obtained with the same area of wetlands if location and design of wetlands were optimized. In single, highly nutrient-loaded wetlands, a removal of around 1000 kg nitrogen and 100 kg phosphorus per hectare wetland area and year was estimated from monitoring data. Statistical models were developed to estimate the overall nutrient removal effects of wetlands created within the national program. Depending on model, the effect of the national program as a whole was estimated to between 27 and 38 kg nitrogen and between 2.7 and 4.5 kg phosphorus per hectare created wetland area and year. Comparison of what is achieved in individual wetlands to what was achieved in the national program indicates that nutrient removal effects could be increased substantially in future wetland programs by emphasising location and design of wetlands.

  • 248.
    Werner, Sven
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    District heating and cooling in Sweden2017In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 126, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose with this review is to provide a presentation of the background and current position for district heating and cooling in Sweden. The review structure considers the market, technical, supply, environmental, institutional, and future contexts. The main conclusions are high utilisation of district heating in Swedish buildings, commitment to the third generation of district heating technology, high proportions of heat recycling and renewable supply, high compliance to European definition of efficient district heating, considerable reductions of fossil carbon dioxide emissions, strong national driving forces from high fossil fuel taxes, and soft district heating regulation based on transparency. District cooling systems are small compared to district heating systems. From strong legislative driving forces, the Swedish heat market became a testing ground for a market situation when fossil fuels are expensive in a heat market. The long-term market solutions have then become district heating in dense urban areas and local heat pumps in suburban and rural areas. © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 249.
    Werner, Sven
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Energy Science. Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Fjärrvärmens framtida roll i Europa2017Report (Other academic)
  • 250.
    Werner, Sven
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    International review of district heating and cooling2017In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 137, p. 617-631Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose with this review is to provide a presentation of the background for the current position for district heating and cooling in the world, with some deeper insights into European conditions. The review structure considers the market, technical, supply, environmental, institutional, and future contexts. The main global conclusions are low utilisation of district heating in buildings, varying implementation rates with respect to countries, moderate commitment to the fundamental idea of district heating, low recognition of possible carbon dioxide emission reductions, and low awareness in general of the district heating and cooling benefits. The cold deliveries from district cooling systems are much smaller than heat deliveries from district heating systems. The European situation can be characterised by higher commitment to the fundamental idea of district heating, lower specific carbon dioxide emissions, and higher awareness of the district heating and cooling benefits. The conclusions obtained from the six contexts analysed show that district heating and cooling systems have strong potentials to be viable heat and cold supply options in a future world. However, more efforts are required for identification, assessment, and implementation of these potentials in order to harvest the global benefits with district heating and cooling. © 2017 The Author

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