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  • 201.
    Werner, Sven
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Lygnerud, Kristina
    IVL Svenska miljöinstitutet, Sverige.
    Sernhed, Kerstin
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Lauenburg, Patrick
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    En syntes av Fjärrsyn 2013-2017: Bortom förnybart2017Report (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Wikenros, Camilla
    et al.
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Aronsson, Malin
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Liberg, Olof
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Jarnemo, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Hansson, Jessica
    Halmstad University.
    Wallgren, Märtha
    3 Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sand, Håkan
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Bergström, Råger
    3 Forestry Research Institute of Sweden, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 83, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fear or food - Abundance of red fox in relation to occurrence of lynx and Wolf2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 9059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apex predators may affect mesopredators through intraguild predation and/or supply of carrion from their prey, causing a trade-off between avoidance and attractiveness. We used wildlife triangle snow-tracking data to investigate the abundance of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in relation to lynx (Lynx lynx) and wolf (Canis lupus) occurrence as well as land composition and vole (Microtus spp.) density. Data from the Swedish wolf-monitoring system and VHF/GPS-collared wolves were used to study the effect of wolf pack size and time since wolf territory establishment on fox abundance. Bottom-up processes were more influential than top-down effects as the proportion of arable land was the key indicator of fox abundance at the landscape level. At this spatial scale, there was no effect of wolf abundance on fox abundance, whereas lynx abundance had a positive effect. In contrast, at the wolf territory level there was a negative effect of wolves on fox abundance when including detailed information of pack size and time since territory establishment, whereas there was no effect of lynx abundance. This study shows that different apex predator species may affect mesopredator abundance in different ways and that the results may be dependent on the spatiotemporal scale and resolution of the data. © 2017 The Author(s).

  • 203.
    Wikenros, Camilla
    et al.
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, Sweden; Mammal Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Białowieża, Poland.
    Jarnemo, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Frisén, Marielle
    Halmstad University.
    Kuijper, Dries P. J.
    Mammal Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Waszkiewicza 1, Białowieża, Poland.
    Schmidt, Krzysztof
    Mammal Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Białowieża, Poland.
    Mesopredator behavioral response to olfactory signals of an apex predator2017In: Journal of ethology, ISSN 0289-0771, E-ISSN 1439-5444, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olfactory signals constitute an important mechanism in interspecific interactions, but little is known regarding their role in communication between predator species. We analyzed the behavioral responses of a mesopredator, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), to an olfactory cue (scat) of an apex predator, the lynx (Lynx lynx) in BiałowieÅŒa Primeval Forest, Poland, using video camera traps. Red fox visited sites with scats more often than expected and the duration of their visits was longer at scat sites than at control sites (no scat added). Vigilant behavior, sniffing and scent marking (including over-marking) occurred more often at scat sites compared to control sites, where foxes mainly passed by. Vigilance was most pronounced during the first days of the recordings. Red fox behavior was also influenced by foxes previously visiting scat sites. They sniffed and scent marked (multiple over-marking) more frequently when the lynx scat had been over-marked previously by red fox. Fox visits to lynx scats may be seen as a trade-off between obtaining information on a potential food source (prey killed by lynx) and the potential risk of predation by an apex predator. © 2017, The Author(s).

2345 201 - 203 of 203
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