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  • 201.
    Molema, Marijn
    et al.
    Frisian Institute of Social Research, Leeuwarden, Netherlands & Fryske Akademy, Leeuwarden, Netherlands.
    Svensson, SaraHalmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Regional Economic Development and History2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regional Studies is inextricably intertwined with history. Cultural and institutional legacies inform choices between different policy options, meaning that the past plays a crucial role in how we think about regional economic development, planning and policy.

    Through a selection of accessible theoretical, methodological and empirical chapters, this book explores the connections between regional development and history. Drawing on the expertise of scholars in several disciplines, it links history to topics such as behavioural geography, interdependence, divergence and regional and urban policy.

    This innovative book will be of interest to researchers across regional studies, planning, economic geography and economic history.

  • 202.
    Nagy, Caroline
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Fler bråk i matematikundervisningen: En aktionsforskningsstudie där lärare lär om progression2017Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have a focus on progression in teaching and learning mathematics. An assumption for this study was that progression in teaching between school stages was important. The approach of the study was based on action research. Four teachers from preschool to 9th grade (age 1-16) were invited to a temporary team, a community of practice. The overall aim of the study was to develop knowledge about teaching fractions when teachers used students’ understandings as a point of departure for their action plans. A second aim was to illuminate what influences progression in their teaching.

    The team of teachers used the four phases of action research: plan, act, observe and reflect, during their learning processes. The teachers’ learning sessions were videotaped and transcribed and this provided the main data that formed the basis of the results. Wenger’s dimensions of social learning were used as an analytical tool: joint enterprise, mutual engagement and shared repertoire.

    Four themes that described teachers’ negotiation of qualities in mathematics instruction were identified: interpreting students’ understandings, basing instruction on students’ understandings, visualizing fractions and ensuring students’ understanding. When teachers, regardless of what stage was involved, reified similar instructions, it did not benefit students’ learning opportunities. In order to improve progression in teaching fractions, it was important that teachers succeeded in identifying students’ understandings and that the team negotiated different qualities in their community of practice. The shared repertoire (the pre-tests and the video recordings) formed the core of negotiating progression based on students’ understandings. The team showed a mutual engagement, with students’ learning as their joint enterprise. An implication of the study is that teachers from different educational stages can negotiate progression and improve it.

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  • 203.
    Nagy, Caroline
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Teaching about fractions in mathematics: Professional learning about progression with an action research approach2018In: The 46th Annual Congress of the Nordic Educational Research Association: Educational Research: Boundaries, Breaches and Bridges: Abstract book, Oslo, 2018, p. 556-556Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topic, aim and framework

    Progression in mathematics instruction can be seen as a quality in teaching that entails gradually increased demands on the student (Säfström, 2017). If there is a lack of progression in teaching or the demands increase too much, this can reduce students’ opportunities to learn. An assumption for this study was that progression in teaching between school stages was important. Furthermore, teachers should take joint responsibility for learning within their teams to develop the quality in teaching (cf. Wennergren, 2016).

    The approach of the study was based on action research. Four teachers from preschool to 9th grade (age 1-16) were invited to a temporary team, a community of practice. The overall aim of the study was to develop knowledge about teaching fractions when teachers used students’ understandings as a point of departure for their actions plans. A second aim was to illuminate what influences progression in their teaching. In addition, I intend to highlight the importance of the team’s negotiation of teaching fractions. Wenger’s dimensions of social learning were used as an analytical tool: joint enterprise, mutual engagement and shared repertoire.

    Methodology/research design

    The team of teachers used the four phases of action research: plan, act, observe and reflect, during their learning processes. The teachers’ learning sessions were videotaped and transcribed and this provided the main data that formed the basis of the results.

    Findings

    Four themes that described teachers’ negotiation of qualities in mathematics instruction were identified.

    Interpreting students’ understandings: By analysing students’ understandings through videotaped instruction, the teachers interpreted students’ understandings and observed which kind of instruction enabled learning.

    Basing instruction on students’ understandings: The teachers reified mathematical instructions based on students’ understandings, which entailed an expanded content.

    Visualizing fractions: There was not always an automatic correspondence between visualizing fractions with everyday materials or manipulative materials and the conventions regarding fractions within mathematics, which affected students’ learning opportunities.

    Ensuring students’ understanding: Even if the students seemed to be united about fractions, the teachers were uncertain how to ensure students’ understanding. The teachers were uncertain whether every student had an understanding of the concept and whether they were able to use their knowledge in another context.

    Conclusions

    When teachers, regardless of what stage was involved, reified similar instructions, it did not benefit students’ learning opportunities. In order to improve progression in teaching fractions, it was important that teachers succeeded in identifying students’ understandings and that the team negotiated different qualities in their community of practice. The shared repertoire (the pre-tests and the video recordings) formed the core of negotiating progression based on students’ understandings.

    Relevance to Nordic educational research

    This study contributes knowledge about diverse qualities in analysing students’ understandings by means of pre-tests or video recordings. The study also contributes knowledge about professional learning when participants have diverse experience.

  • 204.
    Nagy, Caroline
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Nehez, Jaana
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Wennergren, Ann-Christine
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    The power of written feedback for student teachers in teaching mathematics2019In: CARN-ALARA 2019, Imagine Tomorrow - Practitioner Learning for the Future: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Branko Bognar, Senka Gazibara & Sanja Simel Pranjić, 2019, p. 92-92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We will present a study in progress. The aim is to generate insights about thecontent-related feedback student teachers receive within the context of mathematicsteaching during their practicum period. Students perceive feedback as an importantprompt for developing their further knowledge within disciplines and courses that arepart of their programme. Similarly, lack of feedback has a negative impact on students’motivation. For feedback to be of relevance, it needs to both relate to course contentand provide guidance for future tasks. The main challenge faced by the provider offeedback is to ensure that feedback is explicit, since vague or unclear feedback iseither ignored by students or experienced as frustrating. Thus, mentors tend toobserve student teachers so they can provide explicit feedback that will guide studentteachers as they develop their teaching practice. Being able to provide feedback toa student teacher in the context of a lesson requires the observer to not only havepractitioner knowledge, but also a command of the relevant content knowledgerelating to the discipline. So far, we have established that that student teachers tendto seek generalised feedback, and that mentors rarely provide feedback that targetsdiscipline specific teaching considerations. Based on relevant research, we seek toinfluence mentors’ discipline specific feedback to student teachers, since that in turnenhances the learning outcomes for their students. The present study explores howmentor articulate feedback to student teachers who teach mathematics in the primaryyears, to pupils aged 6-9. To improve feedback both mentor and student teachersundertook a series of action research cycles as a part of their professional developmentinto providing and receiving discipline specific feedback. The emerging findings will bediscussed with mentors and students after the practicum period has been completed.

  • 205.
    Nehez, Jaana
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Rektorers utvecklingsarbete: Från rationella planer till dynamisk förbättring2019 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 206.
    Nehez, Jaana
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Rektorers utvecklingspraktiker: möjligheter och begränsningar2019In: Att utveckla utbildningspraktiker: Analys, förståelse och förändring genom teorin om praktikarkitekturer / [ed] Ingrid Henning Loeb, Lill Langelotz & Karin Rönnerman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, p. 63-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Nehez, Jaana
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Rätt riktade ledarhandlingar2019In: Didaktisk utvecklingsdialog: Lärares och skolledares professionella utveckling / [ed] Anette Olin, Jonas Almqvist, Lisbeth Gyllander Torkildsen & Karim Hamza, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 1, p. 145-146Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 208.
    Nehez, Jaana
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Theory of practice architectures to understand possibilities and constraints in principals’ improvement practices2019In: NERA 2019, Education in a Globalized World. 6-8 March, 2019, Uppsala, Sweden: Abstract book 2019-03-06, 2019, p. 890-891Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research Topic: This paper illustrates how we can use theory of practice architectures to understand what becomes meaningful for principals to do in school improvement. We often simplify principals’ possibilities to improve schools, which does not support principals’ improvement practices. Instead, we need to make the complexity in improvement practices visible.

    Theory and Aim: The study focus principals’ actions in improvement in relation to context. It takes its departure from ten principals’ improvement concerning conditions for enterprise education. The research questions are: 1) what do principals do in a school improvement work and how do their actions change over time, and 2) how do the context form their actions?

    Methodology: The analysis is based on the theory of practice architectures (Kemmis, et al, 2014). A practice is formed by sayings, doings and relatings that hang together in a project. A project is what a practice is aiming for. Furthermore, cultural-discursive, material-economic and social-political arrangements shape and constrain the practice. So how a practice turns out is dependent on cultural-discursive, material-economical and socio-political arrangements. By analysing projects in principals’ improvement work, I show what principals are trying to uphold and what dilemmas they are trying to solve in their practice. By analysing the arrangements, I show why some projects overshadow other projects.The participants are a team of eleven upper secondary school principals at the same school. The research object was the arena where the principals met to discuss, reflect on and to create conditions for enterprise education. The empirical material, collected during one year, consisted of field notes from observations of joint principal meetings, transcripts from focus group conversations with the principals about their improvement practices, and of principals’ as well as mine written log notes.

    Findings: The results show six practices competed on the arena where the principals where supposed to work with the improvement work. Three of them enabled the intended improvement practices. The other three constrained the intended practice. In addition, over time they overshadowed the first three. Cultural-discursive arrangements like abstract ideas of what the principals´ were supposed to created conditions for as well as social-political arrangements like asymmetric relationships between the principals and expectations from the local school board on quick solutions enabled practices that constrained the planned change. What became meaningful for the principals engage in were not the planned improvement practice, but other already existing practices.

    Relevance to Nordic research: With the theory of practice architecture, it becomes obvious why school improvement from principals point of view is challenging. Analyses based on the theory contributes to the discussion about what kind of arrangements could support principals to motivate, initiate and lead school improvement. It also shows the importance of analyzing every unique context when planning improvement work to be able to understand what needs to be changed to strengthen principals’ improvement practices.

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  • 209.
    Nehez, Jaana
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Olin, Anette
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blossing, Ulf
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gyllander Torkildsen, Lisbeth
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lander, Rolf
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Organisations Interacting with Teacher Middle Leadership2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 210.
    Nehez, Jaana
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Swenninger, Anette
    Dalhemsskolan, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Hansson, Tina
    Dalhemsskolan, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Lindén, Camilla
    Dalhemsskolan, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Strengthened classroom management through digital observations at a high-need school?2019In: CARN-ALARA 2019, Imagine Tomorrow: Book of Abstracts: Practitioner Learning for the Future. 17-19 October 2019, Split, Croatia, 2019, p. 133-133Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 211.
    Nelson, Anders
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Sandberg, Mikael
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Labour-market orientation and approaches to studying — a study of the first Bologna Students at a Swedish Regional University2017In: Studies in Higher Education, ISSN 0307-5079, E-ISSN 1470-174X, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1545-1566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated labour-market orientations of students at a Swedish University with a dual/diverse focus on vocational/academic objectives. The aim was to investigate whether and how levels of students' labour-market orientation vary with social background, change during the study period, and are related to approaches to studying and achievements. The design was a multiple panel time-series study. Labour-market orientation was studied on the basis of locally designed questionnaires. Approaches to studying were analysed deductively in accordance with dimensions previously found by Study Process Questionnaires and inductively using a principal component analysis. Results suggest that labour-market orientations co-varied to a higher degree with the study programme than with social background. Contrary to what was hypothesized, being labour-market oriented was only moderately related to surface-oriented approaches to studying. It is suggested that future research should pay more attention to disciplinary traditions and local teacher and programme cultures in understanding developmental paths in labour-market orientation. © 2015 Society for Research into Higher Education

  • 212.
    Nilson, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Crister Ericsson, Bandybaronen i folkhemmet: Familjen De Geer, bruket och folket (Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag 2013). 266 s.2015In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 135, no 4, p. 702-705Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Nilson, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Cunard, Samuel2017In: The Sea in World History: Exploration, Travel and Trade / [ed] Stephen K. Stein, Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2017, 1, p. 583-583Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Nilson, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Fiction, hierarchy and the hard life at sea: Fiction as a source to Swedish maritime history2014In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 134, no 3, p. 462-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article evaluates the use of fiction as a source to historical research, using portraits of life at sea during the interwar period in a selected number of novels as a test case. The novels, all written between 1924 and 1941, where highly regarded in their own time but are now mostly forgotten works. They belong to the genre of working class literature, and were very influential during the interwar period. Instead of assuming that fiction is simply a mirror of societal practices and norms, fiction is viewed as being engaged in dialogue with society, with both parts influencing each other. The result of the study indicates that fiction can indeed be used as a fruitful and reliable source for understanding what life was like at sea (and in port) during the interwar period. Fiction gives access to the rationale of individual thoughts, choices and actions, while (fictional) descriptions of interiors and exteriors, milieus, working conditions, skills etc. provide an important framing to portraits of life at sea.

  • 215.
    Nilson, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Hamburg-America Line2017In: The Sea in World History: Exploration, Travel and Trade / [ed] Stephen K. Stein, Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2017, 1, p. 633-634Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Nilson, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Historieförmedling i samverkan2018In: Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap / [ed] Martin Berg, Vaike Fors, Robert Willim, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 209-227Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 217.
    Nilson, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    "In the gutters of Antwerp" – Georg Dahlin, undercover journalism and representations of sailor-life during the interwar period2018In: Forum navale, ISSN 0280-6215, E-ISSN 2002-0015, Vol. 74, p. 82-123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 218.
    Nilson, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    "Inför döden" - svenska främlingslegionärers erfarenheter av koloniala krig i Marocko och Indokina under 1900-talet2015In: Fortid, ISSN 1504-1913, E-ISSN 1891-1668, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 23-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 219.
    Nilson, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). Institutionen för historiska studier, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Konsul Petris tårar: Bilder av sedernas tillstånd och sjömännens väl och ve i utländska hamnstäder under mellankrigstiden2015In: I främmande hamn: den svenska och svensk-norska konsulstjänsten 1700-1985 / [ed] Aryo Makko & Leos Müller, Malmö: Universus Academic Press , 2015, 1, p. 227-252Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 220.
    Nilson, Tomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Thorell, KristinaHalmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Cultural Heritage Preservation: The Past, the Present and the Future2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This anthology describes heritage preservation, development and management from different theoretical views and disciplines. It integrates perspectives from history, human geography, archaeology, social anthropology and heritage conservation. The texts revolve around different dimension of culture and heritage via examples from varying contexts and locations. 

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  • 221.
    Nilson, Tomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Thorell, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Introduction2018In: Cultural Heritage Preservation: The Past, the Present and the Future / [ed] T. Nilson & K. Thorell, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2018, p. 9-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Att planera sina naturvetenskapliga aktiviteter – CoRe som ett pedagogiskt redskap2018In: Att bli lärare / [ed] Eva Insulander & Staffan Selander, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 154-157Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Capturing and Developing Preschool Teachers/ Science Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) through CoRes2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Capturing PCK through students' experiences - A concern for policy and practice2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Capturing PCK through students´ experiences: A concern for policy and practice2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Capturing Science PCK Through Students’ Experiences2017In: A Companion to Research in Teacher Education: An international guide to teacher education research, featuring contributions by leading scholars in the field / [ed] Peters, Michael A.; Cowie, Bronwen; Menter, Ian, Singapore: Springer, 2017, 1, p. 753-767Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, there has been a growing interest within teacher education programmes regarding the effectiveness of how to prepare beginning teachers for their future profession. © Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

  • 227.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Developing primary teachers’ TPACK through Digital Didactic Design (D3)2018Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 228.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Developing Science Teachers´ Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) through the approach of Learning Study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Digitalt läromedel Liber – Att planera undervisning i naturvetenskap2018Other (Refereed)
  • 230.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Self-Study and Pedagogical Content Knowledge2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 231.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    When Teaching Makes Difference: Developing Science Teachers ́ Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) Through the Approach of Learning Study2013In: NARST 2013 Annual Conference Abstracts, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to develop science teachers ́ PCK through their participation in a learning study. The research question that frames the study is “How do science teachers ́ learning about science teaching (PCK) develops as a shared practice through their participation in a learning study? As such, the project aims to investigate how teachers ́ increased (or not) professional knowledge of teaching is enhanced, and further, how students ́ learning might be developed as a consequence. During one semester, three secondary science teachers and a science education researcher worked together in a learning study in which the object of learning was to understand the concept of ion and how ions are formed. Data were collected from video recorded lessons and stimulated recall sessions in which the teachers and the researcher reflected on the lessons to analyze how the teachers developed knowledge of students learning and the impact of that knowledge on their own teaching. The results indicate that teachers ́ participation in the learning study proved to be helpful in their (re)considerations of their science teaching in that it points to the particular role of research-based learning in providing a metacognitive lens through which to analyze science teaching and learning.

  • 232.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Elm, Annika
    University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Capturing and Developing Early Childhood Teachers’ Science Pedagogical Content Knowledge Through CoRes2017In: Journal of Science Teacher Education, ISSN 1046-560X, E-ISSN 1573-1847, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 406-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decade, early childhood teachers have been faced with new needs to develop their content knowledge and pedagogi- cal content knowledge (PCK) for different science subject areas. In order to meet these challenges there is a strong need for professional learning programmes for early childhood teachers that focus on the development of knowledge, and skills to work with science activities in their own context. In this article, 46 early childhood teachers participated in a professional development programme aimed at helping teachers capture and further develop their content knowl- edge and PCK for teaching science through the use of content representations (CoRes). A CoRe is a holistic reflective tool for making explicit the different dimensions of, and links between, knowledge of content, teaching, and learning about a particular topic. The aim of the project was to investigate in what ways the use of the CoRe helped the teachers in planning and reflecting on their science teaching and in developing their PCK. Thus, the project was based on opportunities for teachers to develop and reframe their knowl- edge of science teaching in ways that stimulated children's curiosity for scientific phenomena. The result indicates that with its content- specific focus, the CoRe helped the teachers to highlight the science content in their activities, not only the general pedagogical knowl- edge. The use of the CoRes also helped the preschool teachers to establish the fundamental ideas of the topic they were teaching and to develop confidence in what they were teaching, why, and how. © 2017 Association for Science Teacher Education

  • 233.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Granklint Enochson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Rundberg, Mattias
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Coherence in science teacher education: Supporting preservice teachers´use of digital technologies in science2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research indicates, that despite increased access and improved technical arte­facts, few teachers have integrated ICT in the curriculum in a way that leads to significant changes in classroom practice. This paper reports on a project where 19 preservice teachers were provided with a reflective tool (T-CoRe) in order to systematically encourage reflection on why and how to use digital technologies in their science teaching. The project aimed to capture and understand aspects of preservice teachers TPACK while planning for teaching particular science topic. The results indicate that working with the T-CoRe has the potential of helping preservice teachers conceptualise their TPACK and make explicit the different dimensions of, and links between, knowledge of content, teaching, and learning about a topic through the use of digital technologies.

  • 234.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Karlsson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Capturing student teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) using CoRes and digital technology2019In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 419-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, digital technologies have become more common in providing opportunities for reflection and in-depth analysis of classroom practices and have afforded new ways of organizing teacher education. In particular, videotaped lessons have proven to be a valuable tool for capturing teaching episodes, subsequent reflection and development of student teachers’ professional knowledge, here referred to as ‘pedagogical content knowledge’ (PCK). The aim of this project was to investigate how the use of the reflective tool, content representations (CoRes) in combination with video and associated digital tools might be used as a means for capturing student teachers’ professional knowledge of practice. In the study we explore how a group of 24 secondary science student teachers were provided with Content Representations (CoRe) and video annotations to support their reflection-on-actionduring their practicum. Video annotations, alongside a written reflection of critical incidents in the student teachers’ teaching constituted data for analysis. Our findings suggest that the different tools enabled the student teachers to connect captured examples of teaching instances with theoretical issues, and in this way offered the ability to see as well as to analyse their teaching practice. As such, the CoRe, together with the video annotation tool, proved to be successful in scaffolding and structuring student teachers’ reflection-on-action, allowing them to connect their reflections to components of PCK and further to articulate connections between these components. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 235.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Loughran, John
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Developing professional knowledge as a science teacher educator2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 236.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Loughran, John
    Faculty of Education, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Formative assessment in learning to teach science2013In: Valuing assessment in science education: Pedagogy, curriculum, policy / [ed] Corrigan, D., Gunstone, D. & Jones, A., Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2013, p. 325-345Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores one way of formatively assessing student teachers’ development of their learning about teaching science. This chapter is based on the use of formative interactions as a way of understanding how their learning develops. In so doing, this chapter also offers insights into how student teachers’ professional learning might be catalysed and enhanced. The data for this study is based on a primary science teacher education research project (N = 24 participants) that aimed to connect research on [formative] assessment with the development of student teachers’ learning to teach science, and, as a consequence, sets out to illustrate how an articulation of this knowledge might inform approaches to science teacher education. The results of this project highlight the potential to positively focus student teachers’ self-reflection and self-assessment through formative interactions.

  • 237.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Murphy, Colette
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Catching the Moments – Coteaching to Stimulate Science in the Preschool Context2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important task for the preschool teacher is to create meaningful learning situations where children have opportunities to experience science. However, many teachers have both weak subject knowledge and a lack of confidence to teach science. The aim of the project presented in this article was to capture how nine preschool teachers developed their learning of and self-confidence in teaching science during a two-year professional development (PD) project while coplanning, coteaching, and coreflecting on their teaching activities. During the project, the preschool teachers’ self-confidence and attitudes played an important role for the their approach to science activities. Their collaborative learning and reflection became important for their PD and for the way science phenomena were included in the preschool context. As such, the project is based on opportunities for preschool teachers to develop their ideas about science and to reframe their work with the aim to stimulate children’s curiosity for science.

  • 238.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Rundberg, Mattias
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Ämnesdidaktik i det digitaliserade klassrummet2018Other (Refereed)
  • 239.
    Norell Pejner, Margaretha
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lundström, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Ourique de Morais, Wagner
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Laurell, Hélène
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Isaksson, Anna
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Språk, kultur och samhälle.
    Stranne, Frida
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Smart medication organizer – one way to promote self-management and safety in drug administration in elderly people2017Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 240.
    Nurmi, Bo
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Michelsen, C. S.
    Center for Research and Development, Sciens College, Malmö, Sweden.
    Norlander, T.
    Center for Research and Development, Evidens University College, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The importance of reflection: An exploratory analysis on how prospective psychotherapists learn self-determination2019In: Open Psychology Journal, ISSN 1874-3501, E-ISSN 1874-3501, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 197-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Learning to become a psychotherapist is a complicated process. Research on this topic has been limited and there is little consensus on how to assess therapeutic skills. SP/SR (Self-Reflection/Self-Practice) has emerged as a theory and method for learning psychotherapy. In this article students’ reflections on how to become a psychotherapist has been studied from a phenomenological perspective. Objective: The aim of the present exploratory study was to generate preliminary hypotheses for future investigations in order to elucidate the complicated processes that occur during the therapist training programs. Methods: Five prospective psychotherapists were recruited to the present investigation, who all studied at the penultimate semester at Evidens University College, Gothenburg, Sweden. Unstructured qualitative in-depth interviews were used followed by phenomenological analysis. Results: Analysis yielded 252 meaning units and 12 categories which in turn led to four overarching themes: Learning as a visit to the dentist (when learning becomes painful because certain issues are not resolved); Learning as theatre (when the students just perform what is expected in order to pass); Learning as post-training soreness (when the learning process is challenging on a relevant level); Learning as reflections (when the students seek the intrinsic meaning). Conclusion: The study provided a basis for preliminary hypotheses for future investigations: reflections are helpful for managing the challenges described in the four themes. This, in turn, led to the formulation of some proposals for research questions for future investigations. © 2019 Psychotherapist et al.

  • 241.
    Nygård Larsson, Pia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Semantiska vågor – elevers diskursiva rörlighet i gruppsamtal2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 17-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to use and understand a scientific language students need the ability to move between everyday and scientific discourses. This article analyses exploratory talks, and use of language when students collaboratively discuss a science assignment. The aim is to develop an analytical tool that can facilitate understanding and visualization of students' language use. The concepts of discursive mobility (Nygård Larsson, 2011) and semantic waves (Martin, 2013; Maton, 2013) constitute the starting point in the analysis and the students’ discussions are explored by using the concepts of semantic gravity and semantic density. The results display that all of the students’ conversations contain a certain degree of discursive mobility. However, there exists differences in how the conversations move between everyday and scientific languages and in terms of how successful the students are to formulate a specific subject language. In some conversations, everyday expressions become a productive resource and a bridge to a more scientific language.

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  • 242.
    Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Holmquist, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Trolle-Schultz Jensen, Jette
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Delutvärderingsrapport 1 i Individsamverkansteam (IST) Halmstad2015Report (Other academic)
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  • 243.
    Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Holmquist, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Trolle-Schultz Jensen, Jette
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Delutvärderingsrapport 1: Projekt Individsamverkansteam (IST) Kungsbacka2014Report (Other academic)
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  • 244.
    Nyman, Carin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Holmquist, Mats
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Trolle-Schultz Jensen, Jette
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Delutvärderingsrapport 2: Projekt Individsamverkansteam (IST) Kungsbacka2016Report (Other academic)
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  • 245.
    Nyman, Rimma
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Säfström, Anna Ida
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Taflin, Eva
    Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, Sverige & Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Rika lösningar på rika problem: att dela smörgåsar2016In: Nämnaren : tidskrift för matematikundervisning, ISSN 0348-2723, Vol. 199, no 3, p. 21-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 246.
    Nyman, Rimma
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Säfström, Anna Ida
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Taflin, Eva
    Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, Sverige & Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Rika lösningar på rika problem – att välja glasskulor2018In: Nämnaren : tidskrift för matematikundervisning, ISSN 0348-2723, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 9-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I en serie av tre artiklar tar vi upp erfarenheter från arbete med rika matematiska problem. I den förra artikeln presenterade vi problemet Att dela smörgåsar. I denna andra del har vi valt en enkel variant av ett klassiskt kombinatorikproblem i en elevnära kontext. Vi har samlat in lösningar från elever i årskurs 2–3 och synliggör olika uttrycksformer.

  • 247.
    O'Dell, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Willim, Robert
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Entanglements: Issues in applied research and theoretical scholarship2017In: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 206-224Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 248.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Multi-Targeted Ethnography2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As a concept, ethnography is currently riding on a wave of popularity. Having branched out from the folds of anthropology and ethnology it is now currently in vogue in a range of disciplinary fields from contemporary cultural sociology to architecture, design, marketing and management. But the question this article focuses upon concerns the ends of ethnography. What is it capable of becoming, and how might its limits be pushed?

    Pursuing this question, the article argues for a need to rethink and re-theorize ethnography from a slightly different direction than that which is predominantly taught in the cultural and social sciences. It is direction that the article describes as distributive in stance and orientation rather than accumulative. That is, while ethnography is usually framed and taught as an accumulative process of gathering and assembling materials (an endeavor of creating order) the article argues for a need to more systematically theorize (and teach) ethnography in relation to the audiences it is meant to touch, move, and have an impact upon.

    In order to do this, the text takes critical inspiration in George Marcus’ writings on multi-sited ethnography and pushes the concept in the direction of ethnography’s audiences, and towards the development and theorization of new modes of multi-targeted ethnography.

    Central to the line of argumentation made in the paper is an emphasis upon a metaphorical shift in how ethnography is thought of: a shift that moves from the realm of “writing culture” to one of composing ethnography. Writing culture, it is argued, is a cognitive textual endeavor, but composing ethnography moves further, bringing the senses and embodied experiences into play. It asks how, in addition to writing, can culture and cultural experiences be rendered sensually to engage and move different publics and to ever gauge, calibrate and configure that rendering to best meet the needs and competencies of the audience of the day. And the phrasing “of the day” is important here, because it is argued that a disposition to multi-targeted ethnography understands the ethnographic outcome to be temporary, contingent and ever open to change and development.

    This requires a bricolage approach to the melding of analytical/theoretical perspectives with materials, but it also necessitates the development of performative techniques that move beyond textual representations, and it involves explicitly formulated distributive ambitions often not addressed in traditional anthropological courses: including, but not limited to the oral, visual, and digital skills needed to engage different publics and communicate results, the ability to translate concepts and explanations in ways that make them relevant in different contexts, and a belief in the ability of cultural analysis to provide solutions.

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  • 249.
    Olin, Anette
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Rönnerman, Karin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Löfving, Christina
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Berndtsen, Marina
    Åbo Akademi, Åbo, Finland.
    Nehez, Jaana
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Wennergren, Ann-Christine
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Action research education influencing teachers’ development work2019In: CARN-ALARA 2019, Imagine Tomorrow - Practitioner Learning for the Future: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Branko Bognar, Senka Gazibara & Sanja Simel Pranjić, 2019, p. 88-88Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers are expected to develop and follow up their practices in order to create thebest possible opportunities for student learning and growth. Action research providesprocesses and tools for such an approach and for this reason, some universities inthe Nordic countries have integrated action research into their teacher educationand in-service programs. Action research is not primarily technical when it comes toinvestigating practices but rather strives for critical thinking and thereby empowermentfor teachers. Expectations and traditions collide under those circumstances and thequestion is what action research education leads to.

    In this symposium we want to explore (1) if and how teachers, through studyingand practicing action research, develop their practices and knowledge, (2) How theeducation itself and the schools where the teachers work nurture or constrain teachers’development work.

    In Sweden, we have interviewed teachers participating in master programs givenat two universities (Gothenburg and Halmstad). The focus in the interviews was onwhether their practices in schools have changed and if so how the education hasinfluenced those changes. In Finland, teachers, who have conducted action researchas part of an in-service course at Åbo Akademi University, have been interviewedwith the same research focus. In Sweden, one teacher, who participated in the masterprogram in Gothenburg, has studied herself in her new role as teacher educator/facilitator at the University and present results from this study.

    Our results contribute with knowledge on how educational action researchemerges, sometimes easily and sometimes with more difficulties, in two Nordiccontexts as a way for teachers to become owners of their own development work.

  • 250.
    Pelger, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Observed learning outcomes of integrated communication training in science education: skills and subject matter understanding2017In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore how different ways of training communication skills can be successfully implemented in higher education, and which effects these activities may have on science students’ learning. Using content analysis, we studied a material consisting of 34 reports, written by 70 academic science teachers, as part of a teacher-training course on communication in science higher education. In the course, the teachers developed and implemented communication tasks into their content courses, and analysed and reported on the observed learning outcomes. The tasks covered both written and oral communication addressing different audiences, inside as well as outside of academia. We found that integrating different ways of communication training in science courses entailed improved skills in sharing and discussing science information, and in addition, increased subject understanding. Thus, we conclude that the integration of communication training may effectively support students’ science learning in higher education.

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