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  • 201.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johansson, Ingela
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Linköping University.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Linköping University.
    Organisation of care for Swedish patients with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator, a national survey2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 17-18, p. 2600-2608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.

    To describe the clinical aspects of implantable cardioverter defibrillators care in Sweden with focus on organisation, the role and education of nurses, patient information and education and areas in need of improvement.

    Background.

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators implantations have developed rapidly in recent years and are now an established arrhythmia treatment. The expanding indication for implantable cardioverter defibrillators implantation demands new competencies and resources in the implantable cardioverter defibrillators team members.

    Methods.

    Participants were recruited among physicians and nurses in all of the hospitals implanting implantable cardioverter defibrillators (n = 16). Data were collected by a questionnaire. Additionally, all written educational materials provided to patients pre- and postimplant were collected from all 16 hospitals. Deductive content analysis using Sarvimäki and Stenbock-Hult's five holistic dimensions was employed to ascertain how information was provided in brochures and information materials.

    Results.

    Half of the hospitals (n = 8) had nurse-based outpatient clinics and several others planned to introduce them. Three hospitals carried out distance follow-ups by means of tele-monitoring. The nurses had received specific implantable cardioverter defibrillators education from implantable cardioverter defibrillators companies and/or various university courses. The biophysical dimension dominated in the information material, while the emotional, intellectual and socio-cultural dimensions were scarcely described, and the spiritual-existential was not referred to at all.

    Conclusion.

    Holistic care of implantable cardioverter defibrillators patients can be achieved by means of a multidisciplinary implantable cardioverter defibrillators team and more patient-centred educational strategies. In Sweden, the organisation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators care and follow-up is developing towards more nurse-based clinics.

    Relevance to clinical practice.

    Development and implementation of structured care programmes with a more holistic approach can improve future implantable cardioverter defibrillators care. The content of the written educational materials need to be more holistic, rather than mainly focusing on the biophysical and technical aspects of living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

  • 202.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Thylen, Ingela
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Healthcare professionals' experiences of delivering care to patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 346-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a technical device used in the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias. After an ICD implantation, the entire life situation of the patient their next of kin can be affected psychologically and socially. Healthcare professionals play a vital role in providing educational counselling, support and technical follow-up of the device, but little is known about their experiences.

    AIM: This paper describes the experiences of Swedish healthcare professionals in delivering care to patients with an ICD.

    METHODS: A qualitative, descriptive design based on a phenomenographic approach was used. Data were collected through interviews with 12 specialist ICD nurses and 12 physicians, representing 16 ICD implantation centres in Sweden.

    FINDINGS: Two descriptive categories comprising seven subcategories emerged. Striving to provide competent care comprised the subcategories: providing access to care, improving one's qualifications and individualising care. Striving to infuse confirmation incorporated the subcategories: promoting independence, providing existential support, mediating security and comprising needs of next of kin.

    CONCLUSIONS: The healthcare professionals described how they wished to develop the care further. Both nurses and physicians were consistent in wanting to provide competent and confirming care based on a holistic perspective with high accessibility to the ICD team. The findings describe how healthcare professionals strive to provide professional clinical care in order to give the patients tools to handle their life situation. They suggested that more structured education and counselling according to guidelines should be provided. They also highlighted the need to increase their own competence by improving their knowledge and skills.

  • 203.
    Bonhomme, Justin
    et al.
    School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Seanor, Michelle
    Human Studies Program, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The career trajectories of two world champion boxers: interpretive thematic analysis of media stories2018In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athlete development can be described through transitions that mark turning phases throughout athletes’ careers. Our authors explored media data to unpack the career developments of two prominent world champion boxers from their early lives to world championship status. Employing thematic analysis, five themes were identified: (1) weathering hardships of early life (subthemes: the rough life of an innercity kid; abject poverty in war-torn Philippines), (2) entry into sport (subthemes: groomed to fight; boxing to escape poverty), (3) amateur experience (subthemes: Olympic medallist en route to the pros; struggling amateur with dreams of greatness), (4) launching a professional career (impressive American prospect; a charismatic unpolished slugger) and (5) capturing a world title (subthemes: the much-anticipated world champion; the unexpected world champion). This exploration augments our understanding of how two worldrenowned boxers’ career developments were represented through sport media and interpreted by the researchers, suggesting parallel pathways for future career boxers and those who work with them. © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 204.
    Book, Robert T.
    et al.
    Southern Denmark University, Odense, Denmark.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Empowering young athletesagainst the odds: Successful talent development environment in underserved communities.2019In: Abstract book of the 15th European Congress of Sport and Exercise Psychology / [ed] B. Strauss et al., Muenster, Germany, 2019, p. 321-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 205.
    Book, Robert T.
    et al.
    Southern Denmark University, Odense, Denmark.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Towards investigating athletic talent developmentenvironments in underserved communities in the United States2018In: The Science and Practice of Racket Sport for Improved Performance and Health: Special Focus on Table Tennis: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Urban Johnson, Lars Kristén, Miran Kondrič, Halmstad: Halmstad University , 2018, p. 69-70Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This presentation will focus on the content of PhD project of the first author who has had extensive experiences of working in American schools within underserved (i.e., poor) communities. In spite of lacking resources, some of these schools are able to contribute into developing high performance athletes in various sports (including racket sports) and empowering them to achieve the success against the odds. These real life examples served as an inspiration to investigate such athletes’ career pathways and environments in which they had grown up.

    Aim and theoretical framework: The aim of this project is to acquire knowledge regarding the challenges and barriers faced by athletic talent development environments in underserved communities (UATDEs) and how successful UATDEs manage to help athletes achieve athletic and personal success against the odds. The study is based on the holistic ecological approach (Henriksen, 2010; Henriksen & Stambulova, 2017), and particularly on the athletic talent development environment (ATDE) model. The model was previously applied to study ATDEs in Scandinavia with its high social and economic equality. Conversely, in the United States, with its large income gap, many underserved communities struggle to produce elite athletes, and little investigation has been conducted surrounding such environments.

    Project design and method: The project will consist of three studies. Study 1will focus on exploring career pathways to athletic success and related environmental and personal factors in American athletes with low SES background through a series of interviews. Another series of interviews will be used in Study 2 to examine key stakeholders' perspectives on challenges faced and strategies implemented in UATDEs. In Study 3, the case study approach will be used to investigate two successful UATDEs within American communities and identify shared features responsible for their talent development success.

    Expected results: It is expected that Study 1 will reveal that athletes at the UATDEs were forced to deal with hardship and overcome a number of challenges that made them more resilient compared to those from affluent circumstances. From Study 2 it is expected to identify a spectrum of complicated issues (e.g., lack of funding, less access to practice time, lower moral, high stress and low levels of communication and support) that the UATDEs deal with. The anticipated results from Study 3 are that successful UATDEs have unique but also shared features that may form the basis for developing UATDE frameworks as an expansion of the holistic ecological approach.

  • 206.
    Boström, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Acute postoperative and cancer-related pain management: Patients experiences and perceptions in relation to health-related quality of life and the multidimensionality of pain2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes patients in acute postoperative pain as well as patients with acute cancer-related pain in palliative care, and their experiences and perceptions of pain management in relation to HRQOL and the multidimensionality of pain. A combination of qualitative and quantitative methods was chosen. Data were collected using interviews and questionnaires; APS, SF:36 and a new developed questionnaire PC-PPQ measuring care related to pain management in palliative care. For assessing pain VAS and Pain-o-Meter were used. The study group consisted of 100 patients on their second postoperative day, and of 75 patients with cancer-related pain from two palliative care teams. The result showed that at the time of the interview 29 of the patients with postoperative pain reported a pain > 3 on VAS and 79 reported VAS > 3 as worst pain past 24 hours. The higher the intensity of pain the less satisfied the postoperative patients were with the nurses´ way of treating their pain. Thirty-three patients stated that they had received information regarding the importance of pain relief. Patients with postoperative pain as well as patients with cancer-related pain had been prescribed analgesics mostly a combination of Paracetamol, NSAID and opioid. Of the 75 patients with cancer-related pain and in palliative care 22 patients reported pain >3 on POM-VAS and 47 patients reported >3 on POM-VAS as worst pain past 24 hours. Twenty-eight patients reported an average pain > 3 on POM-VAS past 24 hours. Twenty-four patients used the words troublesome or tiring when describing their affective pain. Sensory pain was described as prickling or sore by 15 patients. The patients perceived their pain as “aching all over” and expressed a wish for pain relief as well as a fear for increased pain. HRQOL especially physical functioning decreased for patients with average pain > 3. Being cared for by a nurseled or a physician-led palliative care team indicated no statistically significant differences for patients´ HRQOL or pain intensities. The patients had experienced a statistically significant better care after being referred to a palliative care team, despite that pain control had not been optimized. Patients expressed a need for communication, planning and trust in order to improve pain management. Continuity of care and the opportunity to talk increase the patients feeling of security, as well as improved their perceived pain control. Structured ongoing discussion concerning pain management from an early stage of the disease or already preoperatively can provide an important intervention to meet the results of this thesis. Pain assessment covering the multidimensionality of pain, and pain treatment plans including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment are further important interventions.

  • 207.
    Boström, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Hinic, Hansi
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Lundberg, Dag
    Dept. of Anaesthiol./Intensive Care, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Pain and health-related quality of life among cancer patients in final stage of life: a comparison between two palliative care teams2003In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A two-centred descriptive study was performed in order to describe and compare pain and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among cancer patients, in their final stage of life. The patients were cared for by either a nurse-led palliative care team I (PCT I) or a physician-led palliative care team II (PCT II). Forty-six consecutive, stratified patients (PCT I, n = 21 and PCT II, n = 25) participated. The medical outcomes study short form 36 (SF-36) was used for evaluating HRQOL and the Pain-O-Meter for assessing pain. Patients' pain intensity, pain quality and HRQOL showed no significant difference between the two groups PCT I and PCT II. The patients from PCT I had significantly longer survival time (P = 0.017) than those from PCT II. The different composition of the teams being led by nurses or physicians is worth further research; both from the patient's and staff's viewpoint, there may also be cost-benefits worth examining.

  • 208.
    Boström, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandh, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lundberg, Dag
    Lund University, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Lund University, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    A comparison of pain and health-related quality of life between two groups of cancer patients with differing average levels of pain2003In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 726-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study was performed to describe and compare pain and Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) in two groups of cancer patients in palliative care as well as to describe the correlation between pain and HRQOL. ○ Forty-seven patients with mild average pain [Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) < 3] and 28 patients with moderate to severe average pain (VAS > 3) were included. Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF-36) was used to evaluate HRQOL, pain intensity levels were measured with the VAS on Pain-O-Meter. ○ Compared to patients with mild pain, patients with moderate to severe pain had statistically significant, higher pain intensity for the items 'pain at time of interview', 'worst pain in the past 24 hours' and 'pain interrupting sleep.' They also had the lowest scores of the SF-36 dimensions: physical functioning, role-physical, and bodily pain. Patients with moderate to severe pain had statistically significant, fewer months of survival. There were statistically significant positive correlations between pain items and negative correlation between pain and SF-36 dimensions. ○ The conclusion is that pain has a negative impact on HRQOL, especially on physical health and that pain increases towards the final stages of life. Even if patients have to endure symptoms such as fatigue and anxiety during their short survival time, dealing with pain is an unnecessary burden, which can be prevented.

  • 209.
    Boström, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandh, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lundberg, Dag
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Cancer patients' experiences of care related to pain management before and after palliative care referral2004In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 238-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain is the main problem for patients with cancer referred to palliative care (PC). Pain management in PC requires a multidimensional approach. A questionnaire was used to determine cancer patients' experiences of care related to pain management, before and after being referred to PC, and to also discover possible correlations between pain control and other aspects of care. Seventy-five consecutive patients from two PC teams were included in the study. The patients had experienced a statistically significant (P < 0.01) improvement in care after being referred to PC, despite the fact that pain control had not been optimized. Patients' description of 'pain control' after being referred to PC had a statistically significant correlation with their 'feeling of security' and 'continuity of care' throughout the same period. The conclusion is that care provided in PC is vital to successful pain management. Pain control depends not only on analgesics but also on many other aspects of care provided by the nurse. Continuity of care and the opportunity to talk increases the patients' feeling of security, which is also of utmost importance to successful pain management.

  • 210.
    Boström, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandh, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lundberg, Dag
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Cancer-related pain in palliative care: patients' perceptions of pain management2004In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 410-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain is still a significant problem for many patients with cancer, despite numerous, clear and concise guidelines for the treatment of cancer-related pain. The impact of pain cognition on patients' experiences of cancer-related pain remains relatively unexplored. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how patients with cancer-related pain in palliative care perceive the management of their pain. Method: Thirty patients were strategically selected for interviews with open-ended questions, designed to explore the pain and pain management related to their cancer. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Findings: Patients described 10 different perceptions of pain and pain management summarized in the three categories: communication, planning and trust. In terms of communication, patients expressed a need for an open and honest dialogue with health care professionals about all problems concerning pain. Patients expressed an urgent need for planning of their pain treatment including all caring activities around them. When they felt trust in the health care organization as a whole, and in nurses and physicians in particular, they described improved ability and willingness to participate in pain management. While the findings are limited to patients in palliative care, questions are raised about others with cancer-related pain without access to a palliative care team. Conclusion: The opportunity for patients to discuss pain and its treatment seems to have occurred late in the course of disease, mostly not until coming in contact with a palliative care team. They expressed a wish to be pain-free, or attain as much pain relief as possible, with as few side effects as possible.

  • 211.
    Bothmer, Margareta von
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Studenters hälsovanor – hur ser de ut? Är studenter motiverade att leva hälsosamt?2004In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 81, no 4, p. 319-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tvärsnittsstudie av studenters självskattade hälsa i relation till hälsovanor, motivation och personlighetsvariabler.

  • 212.
    Bramsved, Rebecka
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regber, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Mehlig, K.
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Novak, D.
    Department of Pediatrics, Shalgrenska Academy, University of Gotehburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, L.
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mårild, S.
    Department of Pediatrics, Shalgrenska Academy, University of Gotehburg, Sweden.
    Parental education and income: independent and combined effects on children's growth and weight status2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Bramsved, Rebecka
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regber, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Novak, Daniel
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mehlig, Kirsten
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mårild, Staffan
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of family disposable income on development of height and BMI from birth up to eight years of age2016In: European Obesity Summit (EOS) – Joint Congress of EASO and IFSO-EC: ABSTRACTS, Freiburg: S. Karger, 2016, Vol. 9, p. 44-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Low socioeconomic position (SEP) is a known risk factor for development of obesity in childhood. e level of parental education is commonly used as proxy for SEP, but family disposable income is likely to also be of importance for SEP. e aim of this study was to determine the e ects of family disposable income on BMI and height trajectories from birth up to eight years of age, and the development of obesity at eight years of age.

    Methods: Growth data from birth to eight years age were collected for 3030 Swedish children. Register data on family disposable income was re- trieved from Statistics Sweden, and dichotomized for the analysis by the median value for the group. Register-derived information on parental ed- ucation and national background, maternal BMI, age and smoking status were considered as covariates in longitudinal mixed models and regres- sion analyses.

    Results: Mean birth weight was lower in families of lower income, 3.51 kg (SD 0.54) vs. 3.60 kg (SD 0.53) for children of higher-income parents, p < 0.0001. By age 5.5 years and 8 years, however, a reversed relation between groups was seen, where the children of lower income families showed signi cantly higher mean BMI. is di erence was no longer sig- ni cant when adjusting for covariates. Considering height, lower income was strongly related to lower height at 5.5 and 8 years, di erences were strengthened a er adjusting for confounders, -0.44 cm (95% CI -0.75,- 0.13) for age 5.5 years and -0.56 cm (95% CI -0.88, -0.23) at 8 years. e OR of obesity at 8 years age was 1.69 (95% CI 1.05–2.7) for the group of low income compared to the group of high income.

    Conclusions: Low family disposable income is related to increased risk of childhood obesity at 8 years of age. is could be attributed to a di erent growth pattern compared to children of high income. Our ndings that children of lower family income had lower mean birth weight and dis- played lower height later in childhood suggest that these children might have an unfavourable metabolic pro le and increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg 

  • 214.
    Bramsved, Rebecka
    et al.
    The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regber, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Novak, Daniel
    The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mehlig, Kirsten
    Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mårild, Staffan
    The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Parental education and family income affect birthweight, early longitudinal growth and body mass index development differently2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 11, p. 1946-1952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study investigated the effects of two parental socio-economic characteristics, education and income, on growth and risk of obesity in children from birth to 8 years of age.

    METHODS: Longitudinal growth data and national register-based information on socio-economic characteristics were available for 3,030 Swedish children. The development of body mass index (BMI) and height was compared in groups dichotomised by parental education and income.

    RESULTS: Low parental education was associated with a higher BMI from 4 years of age, independent of income, immigrant background, maternal BMI and smoking during pregnancy. Low family income was associated with a lower birthweight, but did not independently predict BMI development. At 8 years of age, children from less educated families had a three times higher risk of obesity, independent of parental income. Children whose parents had fewer years of education but high income had significantly higher height than all other children.

    CONCLUSION: Parental education protected against childhood obesity, even after adjusting for income and other important parental characteristics. Income-related differences in height, despite similar BMIs, raise questions about body composition and metabolic risk profiles. The dominant role of education underscores the value of health literacy initiatives for the parents of young children. ©2018 Foundation Acta Pædiatrica.

  • 215.
    Bremander, Ann
    et al.
    Spenshult Hosp Rheumat Dis, Ctr Res & Dev, S-31392 Oskarström, Sweden .
    Bergman, Stefan
    Spenshult Hosp Rheumat Dis, Ctr Res & Dev, Oskarström, Sweden .
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Perception of multimodal cognitive treatment for people with chronic widespread pain: changing one's life plan2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 24, p. 1996-2004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose.

    The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of chronic widespread pain patients' perception of a multimodal treatment with a cognitive approach.

    Methods.

    A reformulated grounded theory study based on interviews with 16 participants in the programme was conducted at the end of a 6-month treatment period.

    Results.

    The result describes a conceptual model of the informants' perception of the treatment. The core category 'changing one's life plan' comprised of three categories: 'changing one's perception of life', 'depending on support' and 'managing one's life'. Changing one's perception of life could be deep and overwhelming 'overall life changes' or more superficial 'life adjustments'. Support by health professionals and the patient group were of importance. At the end of the rehabilitation program managing one's life was perceived as either 'reorientation' or 'stagnation'. The informants who experienced overall life changes achieved reorientation with support by others, while those who experienced life adjustments did not change their way of managing one's life to any great extent.

    Conclusion.

    The core category changing one's life plan included the categories; changing one's perception of life, depending on support and managing one's life. Informants experiencing overall life changes were more likely to achieve reorientation than those who experienced life adjustments

  • 216.
    Brink, Eva
    et al.
    Dept. of Nursing, Health and Culture, Univ. of Trollhättan/Uddevalla.
    Grankvist, Gunne
    Dept. Studs. Individual and Soc., Univ. of Trollhättan/Uddevalla.
    Karlsson, Björn
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health-related quality of life in women and men one year after acute myocardial infarction2005In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 749-757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was, first, to detect possible changes in health-related quality of life (HRQL) over time and, second, to predict HRQL at 1year based on measures made 1 week and 5 months after a first-time acute myocardial infarction. There was an improvement in HRQL at 1year, as measured by the questionnaire 36-item Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form (SF-36), for both men and women as compared with the assessment 5 months after the acute myocardial infarction. However, the pattern was somewhat different for women and men. Women mainly reported increased scores on scales reflecting better mental health, whereas men, on the whole, demonstrated higher scores in the physical health domain. Depression (HAD) and fatigue were identified as early predictors of lower HRQL at the 1-year follow-up. Our conclusion is that early assessment of fatigue and depression is worthwhile, as they may indicate decreased HRQL in men and women 1year after first-time myocardial infarction.

  • 217.
    Brink, Eva
    et al.
    West University, Vänersborg, Sweden .
    Karlson, Björn W.
    AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R-M
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Readjustment 5 months after a first-time myocardial infarction: reorienting the active self2006In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 403-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    This paper reports on an interview study exploring the self-regulation process in women and men, 5 months after a first-time myocardial infarction.

    Background

    Somatic, psychological and social factors affect readjustment after a first-time myocardial infarction, and studies have demonstrated substantial rates of depression in patients after myocardial infarction Women report poorer mental health and physical condition than do men. Reconstruction of the self begins when disease poses novel problems and is more likely to occur in cases of long-lasting and disruptive illnesses. Experiencing myocardial infarction is likely to alter a person's mental representation of self. However, the self-regulation process following first-time myocardial infarction is not yet fully understood.

    Method

    Twenty-one people (11 women, 10 men) were interviewed 5 months after first-time myocardial infarction. The grounded theory method provided the strategies for data collection and analysis.

    Findings

    Interviewees' definition of themselves as active was threatened by fatigue and other health problems that kept them from taking part in activities as they had done before the heart attack. Although reorienting the active self was central to the process of recovery from myocardial infarction, reorienting was restricted by illness perception and coping.

    Conclusion

    Participants had not established a stable health condition 5 months after first-time myocardial infarction. They mainly preferred to moderate rather than radically change their daily life activities. They needed more knowledge and support. Nurses can help with information and advice on managing daily life activities, including dialogue about lifestyle changes at this phase of readjustment.

  • 218.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Department of Research, Development and Education, Halmstad, Sweden & School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    Department of Research Development and Education, Varberg, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Lifestyle advice and lifestyle change: to what degree does lifestyle advice of healthcare professionals reach the population, focusing on gender, age and education?2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 118-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health promotion practice in health care has a high priority in the endeavour to achieve equal opportunities for health and diversity in health among the population. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether there is any connection between the lifestyle advice given by healthcare professionals and the lifestyle change of the population, focusing on age, gender and education level. The study is based on the data from a national population survey in Sweden in which 52 595 patients who had attended health care were interviewed by phone. The participants were asked whether healthcare professionals had raised the subject of lifestyle during the visit and whether the advice they gave had contributed to a lifestyle change. The results indicated that lifestyle issues were raised with 32.2% of those who attended health care, particularly among men, younger patients and those with a high education level. When lifestyle issues were raised, the advice contributed to 39.2% of patients making a lifestyle change, to a higher extent among men, older patients and those with a low education level. The study shows that lifestyle advice given by healthcare professionals, during both emergency and outpatient healthcare visits, is an important contributor to patients' lifestyle change. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  • 219.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Bergh, Håkan
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sverige.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Motivational interviewing as method in health promotion practice: A Swedish study2012In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, no Suppl. 2, p. 207-207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 220.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    General Practice and Public Health, Halland County Council, Falkenberg and School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    General Practice and Public Health, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Primary healthcare nurses' experiences with motivational interviewing in health promotion practice2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 23-24, p. 3322-3330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. 

    The aim of the study was to describe primary healthcare nurses’ experiences with motivational interviewing as a method for health promotion practice.

    Background. 

    A person’s lifestyle has a major effect on his or her health. Motivational interviewing is one way of working with lifestyle changes in health promotion practice. The basic plan of motivational interviewing is to help people understand their lifestyle problems and make positive lifestyle changes. Motivational interviewing has been proven to be more effective than conventional methods in increasing patient motivation.

    Design. 

    This study has a descriptive design and uses a qualitative method.

    Methods. 

    Twenty nurses who worked in primary health care and actively used motivational interviewing in their work were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was used to process the data.

    Results. 

    The primary healthcare nurses’ experiences with motivational interviewing as a method of health promotion practice demonstrate that motivational interviewing is a demanding, enriching and useful method that promotes awareness and guidance in the care relationship. The results also show that motivational interviewing is a valuable tool for primary healthcare nurses’ health promotion practice.

    Conclusion. 

    This study shows that motivational interviewing places several different demands on nurses who use this method. Those who work with motivational interviewing must make an effort to incorporate this new method to avoid falling back into the former practice of simply giving advice. Maintaining an open mind while implementing motivational interviewing in real healthcare settings is crucial for nurses to increase this method’s effectiveness.

    Relevance to clinical practice. 

    The nurses in the study had a positive experience with motivational interviewing, which can contribute to the increased use, adaption and development of motivational interviewing among primary healthcare professionals. Increased motivational interviewing knowledge and skills would also contribute to promotion of health lifestyle practices.

  • 221.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    PhD Student, Department of Research, Development and Education, Hospital of Halland, Halmstad.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    GP, Department of Research, Development and Education, Hospital of Halland, Varberg, Sweden .
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health promotion practice and its implementation in Swedish health care2013In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 374-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Health promotion practice is an important work assignment within the entire health and medical care sector. Nurses are important for the development and implementation of health promotion in clinical practice. Aim The aim was to describe how district nurses view health promotion practice and how it was implemented in clinical practice following a training initiative. Design The study has a descriptive design and a qualitative method. Methods The sample consisted of three focus groups with 16 participants. The interviews were conducted as a conversation with focus on the district nurses view of health promotion and its implementation in clinical practice. The data have been processed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Results Three categories, titled Training as motivation, Lack of grounding and Lack of scope were identified. The result demonstrated that training provides motivation, but also the importance of grounding in the organization and the need for scope in performing health promotion practice. Discussion Our results show that the training initiative has contributed positively to the district nurses' view of health promotion practice, but that they also feel that there are obstacles. The district nurses in our study suggest that health promotion practice should be more visible, and not something that is done when time permits. Conclusion The district nurses feel motivated and have an enthusiasm for health promotion practice but more time and resources are required to design successful health-promoting initiatives. Before implementing a major training initiative for healthcare personnel in health promotion, it is essential to examine whether the conditions for this exist in the organization

  • 222.
    Brobeck, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Halmstad, Sweden & School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Odencrants, Sigrid
    School of Health and Medical Sciences Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bergh, Håkan
    Department of Research, Development and Education, Varberg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Patients' experiences of lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing: a qualitative study2014In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: According to World Health Organization about 75% of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer could be prevented if the risk factors tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol could be eliminated. Patients often need help in monitoring themselves to make the proper lifestyle changes and it is important that adequate support is provided to enable the patients to take control over their health. Motivational interviewing is a framework that can help to facilitate this movement. The aim of this study was to describe how patients in primary health care settings experience lifestyle discussions based on motivational interviewing.

    Methods: This study has a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used as the method. Sixteen patients who had each visited a registered nurse for lifestyle discussions were interviewed.

    Results: The results show that the lifestyle discussions could enable self-determination in the process of lifestyle change but that certain conditions were required. Mutual interaction between the patient and the nurse that contributes to a sense of well-being in the patients was a necessary condition for the lifestyle discussion to be helpful. When the discussion resulted in a new way of thinking about lifestyle and when patient initiative was encouraged, the discussion could contribute to change. The patient’s free will to make a lifestyle change and the nurse’s sensitivity in the discussions created fertile soil for change.

    Conclusions: This study focuses on MI-based discussions, and the result shows that a subset of patients, who self-reported that they are motivated and aware of their role in making lifestyle changes, appreciate these strategies. However, it is not known whether discussions would be experienced in the same way if RNs used another method or if patients who were less motivated, engaged, or aware of their role in making lifestyle changes were interviewed. © 2014 Brobeck et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 223.
    Brorsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Lugnet Institute of Sport Science, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Department of Research and Education, Halmstad Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Carina
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bremander, Ann
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS). Research and Development Centre, Spenshult, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Hand flexor and extensor muscle activity in daily activities and hand exercises in women with rheumatoid arthritis or hand osteoarthritis2012In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 71, no Suppl. 3, p. 754-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Impaired hand grip function is common and occurs early in the course of disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and hand osteoarthritis (HOA), affecting daily life activities and quality of life.

    Objectives: To evaluate muscle force and muscle activity in forearm flexors and extensors during daily activities and clinically well-known hand exercises in women with RA and HOA compared with healthy controls

    Methods: The RA group was consecutively included from a specialist clinic and had a disease duration of at least one year.  Women with HOA were allocated from out-patients primary health care clinics in the same area and clinically diagnosed with symptomatic HOA. The age matched control group had no history of hand/arm injuries, inflammatory or muscle disease. Full active finger extension ability was required for all subjects. Hand force (Newton) was measured with EX-it (extension) and Grippit (flexion), both validated instruments. Muscle activity was measured in m. extensor digitorum communis (EDC) and m. flexor carpi radialis (FCR) with surface EMG (S-EMG) on the dominant hand while performing four daily activities (ADL) and four hand exercises and described as percent of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (% MVIC) based on data from EX-it and Grippit. Pain was measured with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 0-10 (best to worst). Differences between groups were analyzed and controlled for age.

    Results: Fifty-six women were included; 20 with RA (age mean (SD) 59.2 (10.7) years, VAS pain 2.2 (1.6)), 16 with HOA (age 67.5 (9.3) years, VAS pain 4.1 (1.9)) and 20 healthy controls (age 56.0 (9.7) years). Women with RA and HOA showed decreased extension and flexion force compared with healthy women (p<0.03).There was a tendency towards higher % MVIC in all tests for women with RA or HOA compared with healthy women, with a statistically significant difference between HOA and healthy women for EDC (p<0.05).

    ADL activities “writing with a pen”, and “cutting with scissors” showed the highest % MVIC in both EDC and FCR in all groups. The exercises “isolated opposition”, and “rolling the dough with flat hands”, had high % MVIC in EDC, while “squeezing the dough” and “isolated opposition” had high % MVIC in FCR.

    Conclusions: Women with RA and HOA tend to use a higher % MVIC than healthy women in many daily activities and in hand exercises. Strengthening exercises should include both extensor and flexor specific training.

    Disclosure of Interest: None Declared

  • 224.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Hubbert, Laila
    Linköping University.
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linköping University.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University.
    Effects of Long-term Nocturnal Oxygen Treatment in Patients With Severe Heart Failure2005In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 385-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is common in patients with heart failure (HF) and leads to disturbed sleep. The objective of this study was to determine the persistent effects of long-term nocturnal oxygen treatment in patients with severe HF regarding (1) objective outcomes, such as steep. SDB, cardiac function, and functional capacity; (2) subjective outcomes, such as self-assessed sleep difficulties, daytime sleepiness, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL); and (3) the relationship between objective and subjective outcomes. In this open nonrandomized experimental study, 22 patients, median age 71 years, with severe HF were studied before and after 3 months of receiving nocturnal oxygen. The measures used were overnight polysomnography, echocardiography, 6-minute walk test, self-assessed sleep difficulties (Uppsala Sleep Inventory-HF), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and HRQOL (36-ltem Short Form Health Survey and Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire). SDB, with a 90% dominance of central sleep apnea, occurred in 41 % of the patients with severe HF before intervention. After intervention, functional capacity improved for both the whole group of patients with HF (P < .01) and HF patients with SDB (P < .05). No improvements regarding cardiac function, objective sleep, subjective sleep, or SDB were seen, except for a decrease of ‚â•4% desaturations (P < 05). HRQOL did not differ significantly between HF patients with and without SDB before or after intervention with nocturnal oxygen. Long-term nocturnal oxygen treatment improved functional capacity in patients with severe HF, with or without SDB. No improvements were seen regarding sleep, daytime sleepiness, SDB, cardiac function, or HRQOL.

  • 225.
    Brännström, Margareta
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Lund University and Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica G.
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Thylén, Ingela
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Sexual Knowledge in Patients With a Myocardial Infarction and Their Partners2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 332-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sexual health and sexual activity are important elements of an individual's well-being. For couples, this topic is often affected after a myocardial infarction (MI). It has become increasingly clear that, after an MI, patients are insufficiently educated on how to resume normal sexual activity. However, sufficient data on the general knowledge that patients and partners have about sexual activity and MI are lacking.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to explore and compare patients' and partners' sexual knowledge 1 month after a first MI and 1 year after the event and to compare whether the individual knowledge had changed over time. A second aim was to investigate whether patients and their partners report receiving information about sexual health and sexual activity from healthcare professionals during the first year after the event and how this information was perceived.

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This descriptive, comparative survey study enrolled participants from 13 Swedish hospitals in 2007-2009. A total of 115 patients with a first MI and their partners answered the Sex After MI Knowledge Test questionnaire 1 month after the MI and 1 year after the event. Correct responses generated a maximum score of 75. RESULTS:: Only 41% of patients and 31% of partners stated that they had received information on sex and relationships at the 1 year follow-up. The patients scored 51 ± 10 on the Sex After MI Knowledge Test at inclusion into the study, compared with the 52 ± 10 score for the partners. At the 1-year follow-up, the patients' knowledge had significantly increased to a score of 55 ± 7, but the partners' knowledge did not significantly change (53 ± 10).

    CONCLUSIONS: First MI patients and their partners reported receiving limited information about sexual issues during the cardiac rehabilitation and had limited knowledge about sexual health and sexual activity.

  • 226.
    Bräutigam Ewe, Marie
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lydell, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Bergh, Håkan
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Research and Development Unit Halland, Region of Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Baigi, Amir
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Research and Development Unit Halland, Region of Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Månsson, Jörgen
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Characteristics of patients seeking a health promotion and weight reduction program in primary care2019In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 12, p. 235-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: An important task in primary health care (PHC) is to address lifestyle-related diseases. Overweight (OW) individuals make up a large proportion of PHC patients, and they increasingly have lifestyle-related illnesses that influence their quality of life. Structured health promotion and weight reduction programs could help these patients. The objective of this study was to explore the characteristics, lifestyle habits, and health conditions of individuals seeking a health promotion and weight reduction program in PHC.

    Patients and methods: The study involved a comparative cross-sectional design performed in PHC in southwestern Sweden. The study population comprised 286 participants (231 women, aged 40–65 years, body mass index [BMI] 28–35 kg/m2) who were recruited between March 2011 and April 2014 to the 2-year program by adverts in local newspapers and recruitment from three PHC centers. Two reference populations were used: a general population group and an OW group. The study population data were collected using a questionnaire, with validated questions regarding health, lifestyle, illnesses, and health care utilization.

    Results: People seeking a health promotion and weight reduction program were mostly women. They had a higher education level and experienced worse general health than the OW population, and they visited PHC more frequently than both reference groups. They also felt more stressed, humiliated, had more body pain, and smoked less compared to the general population. However, they did not exercise less or had a lower intake of fruits and vegetables than either reference population.

    Conclusion: Individuals seeking a weight reduction program were mostly women with a higher education level and a worse general health than the OW population. They used more health care services compared to the reference groups.

  • 227.
    Bräutigam-Ewe, Marie
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lydell, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Månsson, Jörgen
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dietary Advice on Prescription: Experiences with a Weight Reduction Programme2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 5-6, p. 795-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe overweight persons' experiences with weight reduction and participation in the dietary advice on prescription.

    Background: Approximately 20% of overweight individuals are able to successfully lose weight. Experiences from earlier weight reduction programmes indicate that those who succeed typically manage to avoid overeating to handle stress and have high motivation to lose weight. Those who fail have low self-control and engage in negative health behaviours such as eating when experiencing negative emotions and stress.

    Design: The study used adescriptive qualitative design and was conducted at a Primary Health Care Centre in south-west Sweden.

    Methods: The first nineteen study participants who completed the weight reduction programme in two years responded in writing to five open questions about their experiences with the programme. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis.

    Results: The participants appreciated the face-to-face meetings with the nurse because they felt seen and listened to during these sessions. They also felt their life situations and self-discipline had an impact on how well they were able to follow the programme. Dietary advice on prescription advice was considered to be helpful for achieving behavioural changes and losing weight. People who succeeded in sustainably losing weight described the importance of support from partners or close friends.

    Conclusions: To achieve sustainable weight reduction, it is important to individualise the programme in order to address each person's life situation and the unique difficulties they may encounter.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Motivational interviewing appears to be a good technique for developing a successful relationship between the nurse and the patient. The dietary advice on prescription advice was perceived to be a good way to improve food habits and can easily be used at many Primary Health Care Centres. Patient's partners should also be offered the opportunity to participate in the programme.

    © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 228.
    Bundesen, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Natural rubber latex: a matter of concern for nurses2008In: AORN Journal, ISSN 0001-2092, E-ISSN 1878-0369, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 197-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past 20 years, the use of protective gloves in health care has increased, as have hypersensitivity reactions to the natural rubber latex (NRL) used in glove manufacture. A study was conducted to determine what nurses who work in environments in which NRL is commonly used know about NRL, including their education about and experience with NRL-related allergies. Nurses replied to a questionnaire with 20 statements pertaining to NRL and NRL-related allergies. The results showed that the nurses had inadequate knowledge about NRL, but nurses in a specialty training program scored significantly higher than professionally active nurses.

  • 229.
    Burcar, Veronika
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Man och brottsoffer - oförenliga identiteter?: Unga mäns berättelser om våld och offerskap2010In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, no 2-3, p. 63-76Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Burchard Erdvik, Irina
    et al.
    Inland Norway University of Applied Science, Elverum, Norway.
    Haugen, Tommy
    University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Säfvenbom, Reidar
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Development of basic psychological need satisfaction in physical education: Effects of a two-year PE programme2019In: Journal for Research in Arts and Sports Education, E-ISSN 2535-2857, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 4-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that sports-active students experience more basic need satisfaction (autonomy, competence, relatedness) in physical education (PE) than their non-sports-active peers, and thus, reap most of the benefits of PE. This study aimed to investigate the role of a two-year PE programme, referred to as Interest-based PE, in contributing to students’ basic need satisfaction in PE, and in particular, to assess potential basic needs-benefits among students who were not involved in leisure-time sport. Among 693 students, 348 were offered a choice of two different PE approaches (“explorative” vs. “sports” approach) for the next two years, while the remaining students continued to receive traditional PE. Girls, non-sports-active students, and students who experienced less need satisfaction in PE at baseline were more likely to choose the explorative approach, thereby signifying a wish for a less sports-centred PE. However, no significant differences in autonomy, competence, and relatedness need satisfaction were identified between Interest-based PE groups and their respective control groups over the course of the programme. Sports active students experienced more gains in relatedness need satisfaction than non-sports active students over the course of the programme, suggesting that challenges in promoting equal opportunities for learning in PE may require more than “Interest-based PE”.

  • 231.
    Burchard Erdvik, Irina
    et al.
    Faculty of Social and Health Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway & Department of Physical Education, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Haugen, Tommy
    Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Säfvenbom, Reidar
    Department of Physical Education, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Global Self-Worth among Adolescents: The Role of Basic Psychological Need Satisfaction in Physical Education2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global self-worth is important for healthy development and learning, and is therefore highlighted as a major aim in the Norwegian physical education (PE) curriculum. Based on prior research this study aimed to assess potential differences in global self-worth and contextual basic need satisfaction among 2854 adolescents (47.5% boys, 52.5% girls, ages 13 and 16) participating in different movement contexts, and to determine whether basic need satisfaction in PE relates to global self-worth. Structural equation modeling analyses indicate that basic need satisfaction in PE relates significantly to global self-worth. However, adolescents who do not participate in movement contexts outside school report significantly lower basic need satisfaction in PE compared to their sports-active peers, and could possibly therefore experience reduced global self-worth development through PE. Findings support research showing that sports active youth reap most of the benefits of PE, and thus, that PE violates the principles of equal education. © 2019 Burchard Erdvik et al. Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 232.
    Bökberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Significance of quality of care for quality of life in persons with dementia at risk of nursing home admission: a cross-sectional study2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Quality of life in persons with dementia is, in large part, dependent on the quality of care they receive. Investigating both subjective and objective aspects of quality of care may reveal areas for improvement regarding their care, which information may ultimately enable persons with dementia to remain living in their own homes while maintaining quality of life. The aim of this study was to 1) describe self-reported quality of life in persons with dementia at risk of nursing home admission. 2) describe subjective and objective aspects of quality of care, 3) investigate the significance of quality of care for quality of life.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional interview study design was used, based on questionnaires about quality of life (QoL-AD) and different aspects of quality of care (CLINT and quality indicators). The sample consisted of 177 persons with dementia living in urban and rural areas in Skåne County, Sweden. Descriptive and comparative statistics (Mann-Whitney U-test) were used to analyse the data.

    Results

    Based upon Lawton’s conceptual framework for QoL in older people, persons with pain showed significantly lower quality of life in the dimensions behavioural competence (p = 0.026) and psychological wellbeing (p = 0.006) compared with those without pain. Satisfaction with care seemed to have a positive effect on quality of life. The overall quality of life was perceived high even though one-third of the persons with dementia had daily pain and had had a weight loss of ≥4% during the preceding year. Furthermore, 23% of the persons with dementia had fallen during the last month and 40% of them had sustained an injury when falling.

    Conclusion

    This study indicates need for improvements in home care and services for persons with dementia at risk for nursing home admission. Registered nurses are responsible for nursing interventions related to pain, patient safety, skin care, prevention of accidents, and malnutrition. Therefore, it is of great importance for nurses to have knowledge about areas that can be improved to be able to tailor interventions and thereby improve quality of care outcomes such as quality of life in persons with dementia living at home. © 2017 The Author(s).

  • 233.
    Bökberg, Christina
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Utilisation of formal and informal care and services at home among persons with dementia: a cross-sectional study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 843-851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The progression of dementia disease implies increasing needs for both informal and formal care and services but also risk of institutionalisation. To better adjust care and services in the phase preceding institutionalisation it is important to find out whether utilisation of formal and informal care and services is determined by increased needs and by who meets the needs.Aim

    The aim was to compare persons with dementia (65+) with different levels of cognitive impairment, regarding utilisation of formal and informal care and service at home.Methods

    The participants consisted of 177 persons with dementia ≥65 years old and at risk of nursing home admission, divided into groups according to their cognitive function. Structured interviews were conducted based on questionnaires about type and amount of formal and informal care utilised, as well as questions regarding cognitive impairment, dependency in activities of daily living (ADLs) and neuropsychiatric symptoms. To analyse the data, descriptive and comparative statistics were used.Results

    The findings revealed that the group with severe dementia used significantly more help with ADLs and supervision in terms of time (number of hours and days) provided by the informal caregiver, compared with the group with moderate dementia. Utilisation of formal care and services was highest in the group with the most severe cognitive impairments (Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination score of <9). The group with severe dementia were more dependent in ADLs and had more neuropsychiatric symptoms (hallucinations and motor disturbances). They were younger and more often cohabitated with the informal caregiver, compared with the group with moderate dementia.Conclusion

    This study shows that in the phase preceding institutionalisation the ADL and supervision needs due to progression of dementia appear to tend to be met first and foremost by the informal caregivers. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  • 234.
    Börmfelt, P-O
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Kritik på arbetsplatsen – efterfrågas och motarbetas2015In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 26-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 235.
    Börnhorst, Claudia
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Unit of Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Russo, Paola
    Unit of Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Kourides, Yannis
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Sion, Isabelle
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Molnár, Denés
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Moreno, Luis A.
    Rodríguez, Gerardo
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Ben-Shlomo, Yoav
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Howe, Laura
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom, MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mehlig, Kirsten
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regber, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Bammann, Karin
    Institute for Public Health and Nursing Research (IPP), Faculty for Human and Health Sciences, University Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Foraita, Ronja
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS, Bremen, Germany, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Tilling, Kate
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Early Life Factors and Inter-Country Heterogeneity in BMI Growth Trajectories of European Children: The IDEFICS Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, article id e0149268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Starting from birth, this explorative study aimed to investigate between-country differences in body mass index (BMI) trajectories and whether early life factors explain these differences.

    Methods

    The sample included 7,644 children from seven European countries (Belgium, Cyprus, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Spain, Sweden) participating in the multi-centre IDEFICS study. Information on early life factors and in total 53,409 repeated measurements of height and weight from 0 to <12 years of age were collected during the baseline (2007/2008) and follow-up examination (2009/2010) supplemented by records of routine child health visits. Country-specific BMI growth curves were estimated using fractional polynomial mixed effects models. Several covariates focussing on early life factors were added to the models to investigate their role in the between-countries differences.

    Results

    Large between-country differences were observed with Italian children showing significantly higher mean BMI values at all ages ≥ 3 years compared to the other countries. For instance, at age 11 years mean BMI values in Italian boys and girls were 22.3 [21.9;22.8; 99% confidence interval] and 22.0 [21.5;22.4], respectively, compared to a range of 18.4 [18.1;18.8] to 20.3 [19.8;20.7] in boys and 18.2 [17.8;18.6] to 20.3 [19.8;20.7] in girls in the other countries. After adjustment for early life factors, differences between country-specific BMI curves became smaller. Maternal BMI was the factor being most strongly associated with BMI growth (p<0.01 in all countries) with associations increasing during childhood. Gestational weight gain (GWG) was weakly associated with BMI at birth in all countries. In some countries, positive associations between BMI growth and children not being breastfed, mothers’ smoking during pregnancy and low educational level of parents were found.

    Conclusion

    Early life factors seem to explain only some of the inter-country variation in growth. Maternal BMI showed the strongest association with children’s BMI growth.

  • 236.
    Börnhorst, Claudia
    et al.
    a Biometry and Data Management, Leibniz Institute for Epidemiology and Prevention Research, BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Tornaritis, M.
    c Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Molnár, D.
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regber, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Potential selection effects when estimating associations between the infancy peak or adiposity rebound and later body mass index in children2018In: Revue d'épidémiologie et de santé publique, ISSN 0398-7620, E-ISSN 1773-0627, Vol. 66, no Suppl. 5, p. S422-S423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Lots of research has been conducted to identify early life factors or growth characteristics in infancy and childhood related to an unfavorable weight development. For instance, a late age at infancy peak (IP), an early age at adiposity rebound (AR) as well as body mass index (BMI) at IP and AR were shown to be positively associated with later adiposity status. The present study aims to investigate the usefulness of the IP and AR in comparison to other measures of BMI growth as indicators of later weight status. For the first time, the selection effect possibly occurring when excluding children with non-identifiable IP or AR will be explored.

    Methods: Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants (IDEFICS)/I. Family is an ongoing cohort study conducted in eight European countries with 16,229 children participating in the baseline survey in 2006/2007 [1]. In a subset of 4744 children with at least four repeated measurements of height and weight in the age interval from 0 to 8 years (37,998 measurements in total; survey data supplemented with records of routine child visits), fractional polynomial mixed-effects models were used to derive individual BMI trajectories. Based on these trajectories, age and BMI at IP and AR, BMI values and growth velocities at selected ages as well as the area under the BMI curve were estimated. The BMI growth measures were standardized and related to later BMI z-scores (mean age at outcome assessment: 9.2 years).

    Results: Age and BMI at IP and AR were not identifiable in 5.4% and 7.8% of the children, respectively. These groups of children showed a significantly higher BMI growth during infancy and childhood. In the remaining sample, BMI at IP correlated almost perfectly (r ≥ 0.99) with BMI at ages 0.5, 1 and 1.5 years, whereas BMI at AR correlated perfectly with BMI at ages 4–6 years (r ≥ 0.98). In the total study group, BMI values in infancy and childhood were positively associated with later BMI z-scores where associations increased with age. Associations between BMI velocities and later BMI z-scores were largest at ages 5 and 6 years. Results markedly differed for children with non-identifiable IP and AR, demonstrating a selection effect.

    Conclusions: IP and AR may not be estimable in children with higher-than-average BMI growth. Excluding these children from analyses may result in a selection bias that distorts effect estimates. BMI values at ages 1 and 5 years might be more appropriate to use as predictors for later weight status instead.

    © 2018 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS

  • 237.
    Börnhorst, Claudia
    et al.
    Biometry and Data Management, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany.
    Siani, Alfonso
    Unit of Epidemiology and Population Genetics, Institute of Food Sciences, National Research Council, Avellino, Italy.
    Tornaritis, Michalis
    Research and Education Institute of Child Health, Strovolos, Cyprus.
    Molnár, Dénes
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regber, Susann
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Reisch, Lucia
    Department of Intercultural Communication and Management, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    De Decker, Annelies
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Moreno, Luis A
    GENUD (Growth, Exercise, Nutrition and Development) Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad de Zaragoza, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Zaragoza, Spain.
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Biometry and Data Management, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS & Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Pigeot, Iris
    Biometry and Data Management, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Bremen, Germany & Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Potential selection effects when estimating associations between the infancy peak or adiposity rebound and later body mass index in children2017In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 518-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION:This study aims to evaluate a potential selection effect caused by exclusion of children with non-identifiable infancy peak (IP) and adiposity rebound (AR) when estimating associations between age and body mass index (BMI) at IP and AR and later weight status

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In 4744 children with at least 4 repeated measurements of height and weight in the age interval from 0 to 8 years (37 998 measurements) participating in the IDEFICS (Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants)/I.Family cohort study, fractional polynomial multilevel models were used to derive individual BMI trajectories. Based on these trajectories, age and BMI at IP and AR, BMI values and growth velocities at selected ages as well as the area under the BMI curve were estimated. The BMI growth measures were standardized and related to later BMI z-scores (mean age at outcome assessment: 9.2 years).

    RESULTS: Age and BMI at IP and AR were not identifiable in 5.4% and 7.8% of the children, respectively. These groups of children showed a significantly higher BMI growth during infancy and childhood. In the remaining sample, BMI at IP correlated almost perfectly (r⩾0.99) with BMI at ages 0.5, 1 and 1.5 years, whereas BMI at AR correlated perfectly with BMI at ages 4-6 years (r⩾0.98). In the total study group, BMI values in infancy and childhood were positively associated with later BMI z-scores where associations increased with age. Associations between BMI velocities and later BMI z-scores were largest at ages 5 and 6 years. Results differed for children with non-identifiable IP and AR, demonstrating a selection effect.

    CONCLUSIONS: IP and AR may not be estimable in children with higher-than-average BMI growth. Excluding these children from analyses may result in a selection bias that distorts effect estimates. BMI values at ages 1 and 5 years might be more appropriate to use as predictors for later weight status instead. © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved.

  • 238.
    Caiman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Hasslöf, Helen
    Malmö universitet, Malmö, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Urbas, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Didaktiska perspektiv på hållbar utveckling2018In: Lärportalen: Hållbar utveckling / [ed] Claes Malmberg, Stockholm: Skolverket , 2018, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet ger en introduktion till lärande i hållbar utveckling. Det görs genom att ge en bild av hur de komplexa och ämnesövergripande hållbarhetsfrågorna kan karaktäriseras. Kapitlet lägger vikt vid att diskutera och problematisera de viktiga frågorna, varför behövs en undervisning i hållbar utveckling, vad ska undervisningen innehålla samt hur ska den organiseras.

  • 239.
    Calebrant, Honey
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Sandh, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jansson, Inger
    Institutet för hälsa och vårdvetenskap, Sahlgrenska Akademi, Göteborg, Sweden.
    How the Nurse Anesthetist Decides to Manage Perioperative Fluid Status2016In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 406-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To determine the factors that affect how nurse anesthetists in a county in Sweden decide how to manage perioperative fluid status.

    Design

    A cross-sectional qualitative study was conducted at two surgical wards in a county hospital.

    Methods

    Sixteen nurse anesthetists were interviewed to explore how nurse anesthetists assess patients' intraoperative fluid requirements and the subsequent measures adopted.

    Finding

    Three categories emerged through content analysis: clinical criteria and the thought process that drives decision making, interdependence in decision making, and uncertainty in decision making.

    Conclusions

    This study revealed differences with regard to fluid management among nurse anesthetists in a county in Sweden. For the assessments and subsequent measures that are carried out to ensure optimal fluid therapy, more research is needed to provide evidence, and evidence-based guidelines need to be developed in Sweden. © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses.

  • 240.
    Campo, Mickael
    et al.
    Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Laboratoire Psy-DREPI: Psychologie – Dynamiques Relationnelles Et Processus Identitaires (EA-7458), Dijon, France.
    M. Mackie, Diane
    Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, United States.
    Sanchez, Xavier
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Emotions in Group Sports: A Narrative Review From a Social Identity Perspective2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, novel lines of research have developed to study the influence of identity processes in sport-related behaviors. Yet, whereas emotions in sport are the result of a complex psychosocial process, little attention has been paid to examining the mechanisms that underlie how group membership influences athletes’ emotional experiences. The present narrative review aims at complementing the comprehensive review produced by Rees et al. (2015) on social identity in sport by reporting specific work on identity-based emotions in sport. To that end, we firstly overview the different terminology currently used in the field of emotions in groups to clarify the distinct nature of emotions that result from an individual’s social identity. Secondly, we discuss key concepts of social identity to better understand the mechanisms underlying identity-based emotions. Thirdly, we address existing knowledge on identity-based emotions in sport. We close the present narrative review by suggesting future research perspectives based on existing meta-theories of social identity. Evidence from the social psychology literature is discussed alongside existing works from the sport literature to propose a crucial theoretical approach to better understand emotions in sport. © 2019 Campo, Mackie and Sanchez.

  • 241.
    Carlsson, Björn A.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Johnson, UrbanHalmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).Josefsson, KarinHalmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).Stambulova, NataliaHalmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Proceedings of the Nordic Conference 2008: Health, Participation and Effects of Sport and Exercise2008Conference proceedings (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 242.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Att söka förlossningsvård i tidigt förlossningsskede2008In: Forskningskonferens: Konferens med fokus på forskning inom omvårdnad/vård, folkhälsovetenskap, handikapp, socialt arbete och idrottspsykologi, 2008, p. 16-16Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Att träda in i förlossningen: kvinnors tillit till sin egen förmåga att hantera förlossningen och deras upplevelse av det tidiga förlossningsarbetet2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 244.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Being in a safe and thus secure place, the core of the early labour: A secondary analysis in a Swedish context2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30230Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Early labour is the very first phase of the labour process and is considered to be a period of time when no professional attendance is needed. However there is a high frequency of women who seek care at the delivery wards during this phase. When a woman is admitted to the delivery ward, one role for midwives is to determine whether the woman is in established labour or not. If the woman is assessed as being in early labour she will probably then be advised to return home. This recommendation is made due to past research that found that the longer a woman is in hospital the higher the risk for complications for her and her child. Women have described how this situation leaves them in a vulnerable situation where their preferences are not always met and where they are not always included in the decision-making process.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to generate a theory based on where a woman chooses to be during the early labour process and to increase our understanding about how experiences can differ from place to place.

    Methods: The method was a secondary analysis with grounded theory. The data used in the analysis was from two qualitative interview studies and 37 transcripts.

    Conclusion: The findings revealed a substantive theory that women needed to be in a safe and thus secure place during early labour. This theory also describes the interplay between how women ascribed their meaning of childbirth as either a natural live event or a medical one, how this influenced where they wanted to be during early labour, and how that chosen place influenced their experiences of labour and birth.

  • 245.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Dagen då allt rasade samman: att bli anmäld som vårdpersonal2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 246.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Delaktighet för barn och unga i hälso- och sjukvård: En realitet eller ett omöjligt uppdrag2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 247.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Födandets rum: förlossningsrummet2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, pregnant women are encouraged to remain at home until the active phase of labour. This recommendation is based on evidence, that women who seek care and are admitted in the latent phase of labour are subjected to more obstetric interventions and suffer more complications, than women who remain at home until the active phase of labour. The objective of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of how women, who remain at home until the active phase of labour, experience the period from labour onset until admission to delivery ward.

    Method: In-depth interviews were conducted with nineteen women after they had given birth to their first child.

    A constructivist grounded theory method was used.

    Findings:Maintaining power” was identified as the core category, explaining the women’s experience of having enough power to deal with the situation, when labour started. Four related categories; “to share the experience with another”, “to listen to the rhythm of the body”, “to distract oneself” and” to be encased in a glass vessel”, explained how the women coped and thereby maintained power.

    Conclusions: The women in this study had a sense of power that was expressed as a driving

    force towards the birth, a bodily and mental strength linked to the conviction that they had the right to decide over their own bodies. This implies that women have the ability to make choices during the birth process that enable them to maintain their power.  The professionals need to be sensitive, supportive and respectful of women’s own preferences in the health care encounter, to promote the existing power throughout the birthing process.

  • 248.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Förlossningens latensfas2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Maintaining power; an asset during early labour process2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 250.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Platsen och rummets betydelse i tidigt förlossningarbete2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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