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  • 1551.
    Wilhsson, Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Halmstadprojektet – en deltagarstyrd intervention för att främja barns psykiska hälsa2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 1552.
    Wilhsson, Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Handling demands on success among girls and boys in primarly school – a conceptual model2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stress among adolescents in Western societies is becoming an issue of increasing concern and the global trend of adolescents’ health shows a gradual deterioration that is independent of national differences and increases with age. Research shows that many adolescents report high levels of stress, associated with a change in expectations about performance and an increased focus on school results.

    Purpose/methods: The aim of this study was to explore the main concern of adolescents to get a deeper knowledge on how they cope with demands in everyday life. Grounded theory was used as a method to generate a model.

    Results: The core category “striving to be successful and to succeed” explains participants’ main concern in their everyday lives as a continuous process aiming for success in the present and to succeed throughout their lives. The category is what the participants describe as a race against time and can be divided into the two conceptual categories “struggling with time” and “separating life into different worlds”, pronouncing how they struggle and cope with their main concern in order to obtain wellbeing. Our results show a difference between how girls and boys cope with their demands.

    Conclusions: We show that girls and boys used different strategies to cope with stress in their everyday life. The results are based on adolescent’s experiences and are therefore an important contribution for initiating interventions aimed at promoting adolescents mental health from a gender perspective.

  • 1553.
    Wilhsson, Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Girls and boys strategies to handle and cope with school-related stress2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no Suppl. 1, p. 221-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A trend of increased stress and deteriorating mental health of adolescents is a global challenge (Currier et al, 2012). Research shows that many adolescents report high levels of stress associated with an increased focus on school performance (Moknes et al, 2014). These demands generally have a stronger impact on girl’s health (Låftman & Modig, 2013) due to context and social construction of norms, values and beliefs about femininity and masculinity (Connell, 2002; Butler, 1999). The aim was to get a deeper understanding of girls and boys perceptions of how they handle demands and school-related stress.

    Methods

    This study has an explorative design and was analyzed by qualitative content analysis described by Graneheim and Lundman (2004). The participants were 42 adolescents 15 years old, interviewed in five focus groups, dived by gender from five randomly selected schools. Two additional gender mixed focus groups with 14 adolescents 15 years old, were recruited from two of the randomly selected schools.

    Results

    The results show that girls and boys handle school-related stress by using similar strategies, but in different ways. Girls express that they have to prioritize to deselect activities they use to do to handle demands from school, and boys prioritize their own activities to obtain strength to cope with demands. Girls often think about their future while boys more often live in present time, and don’t worry so much about the future. Girls receive social support and recovery from friends and family, while boys do various activities with their friends and family to get energy.

    Conclusions

    This study shows that girls and boys used different strategies to handle demand and school-related stress. The results are based on adolescent’s experiences and could therefore be an important foundation for interventions that promote adolescents capabilities to cope with increasing demands and to handle school-related stress.

    Key messages:

    • This study shows that girls and boys perceived and used different strategies to handle demand and school-related stress

    • The result is an important foundation for interventions that promote adolescents capabilities to cope with increasing demands and to handle school-related stress

    © The Author 2016.

  • 1554.
    Wilhsson, Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Strategies of Adolescent Girls and Boys for Coping With School-Related Stress2017In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 374-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress among adolescents in Western societies is becoming an issue of increasing concern of adolescent’s health. The aim of this study was to gain greater knowledge about how girls and boys perceive and cope with school-related stress. Participants were 14- to 15-year-old adolescents from a medium-sized municipality in southern Sweden. The data were collected from focus group interviews. The data were subjected to qualitative content analysis. The findings show that adolescents ‘‘prioritizing the future or the present by making choices, finding their own private sphere to relax, and recovering with family and friends.’’ There were gender differences in how these strategies were used. The findings could be used for initiating and planning health promotion interventions in school with focus on supporting girls’ and boys’ equal terms to cope with school-related stress in present and for the future and to give equal condition for future studies and opportunities in life. © The Author(s) 2016

  • 1555.
    Wilhsson, Marie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    A stakeholder perspective on adolescents' needs for support to cope with school-related stressManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background; Adolescents’ experiences of stress have increased in recent decades and is associated with an increase of psychosomatic symptoms and poorer academic achievement. Identification of ways to support adolescents’ handling of school related stress is a major challenge to promote their health and academic achievement. The purpose of this study was to describe the stakeholder’s perspectives on services that are needed for supporting adolescents in secondary school when coping with school-related stress.

    Methods; Representatives from the school health service and school management organization (n=23) from five secondary schools and parents (n=4) were recruited by snowball sampling. Interviews were analyzed by qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach.  

    Results; The study highlight different aspects of stakeholders’ perceptions of what is needed to support adolescents who experience school-related stress. Described are actions such as highlighting and changing organizational and contextual structures and developing the dialogue between the school and the home. Other described actions are to support adolescents’ abilities to plan and visualizing how time is used and to strengthen their adolescents’ belief in their own abilities.

    Conclusions; Our findings could be used in schools for developing interventions from a salutogenic approach to promote adolescents’ health in the present and for the future.

  • 1556.
    Wiman, Virginia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lydell, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Views of the workplace as a health promotion arena among managers of small companies2016In: Health Education Journal, ISSN 0017-8969, E-ISSN 1748-8176, Vol. 75, no 8, p. 950-960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several studies have shown that workplace health promotion leads to better health, increased productivity, as well as reduced absenteeism and presenteeism among employees. The objective of this study was to describe how managers in small companies (10–19 employees) perceive their company as an arena for promoting employees’ health.

    Method: A sample of 10 managers (four women) was strategically selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with each person. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis focused on both manifest and latent content.

    Results: Three main categories emerged from the analysis: the potential to promote employees’ health, responsibility as an employer and the need for external support. An arena for workplace health promotion is created when managers prioritise health at the workplace.

    Conclusion: Small companies often lack the knowledge and resources to manage health and safety problems and also have less access to occupational health services. This paper highlights the importance of the views of small company managers as resources for the development of health promotion. © 2016 by Health Education Journal

  • 1557.
    Wiman, Virginia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lydell, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity. Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Workplace health promotion; views from managers of small companies2012In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, no Suppl. 2, p. 129-129Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Workplace health promotion leads to better health, high morale, increased productivity and reduced absenteeism among employees. The role of leadership is vital when creating strategies for workplace health promotion. Small companies (less than 50 employees) have increased need for health promotion, as they often lack knowledge and resources to manage health and safety problems. Moreover, small companies have less access to occupational health service. The aim of this study was to describe how managers at small companies perceive their company as an arena for health promotion. 

    Methods: A sample of ten managers (four females) was strategically selected using maximal variation in terms of branch of industry. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis comprised of both manifest and latent content and triangulation between the authors was used. 

    Results: Three main categories emerged from the analysis; sees the workplace as a possible arena, sees the opportunity to promote employees health and sees a need for external support. More in-depth analysis resulted in six subcategories. The latent content of these categories is described by the theme; Health promotion leadership in order to perceive the company as a health promotion arena. A key factor for workplace health promotion was the manager´s view of health promotion as a beneficial factor for the company. Furthermore, the managers expressed that they could promote employees´ health by organizing health promotion activities and promote a positive psychosocial work environment. The findings showed a need for easily accessible external support to assist managers in their work with health promotion. It is essential that the external support contributes with inspiration and knowledge of health promotion activities, for example by highlighting good practice from other small companies. 

    Conclusions: Using the manager´s view about the workplace as an arena for promoting health can be a step towards strategies for implementing workplace health promotion. However, for the development of healthy organizations it is necessary to have a comprehensive strategy in which employers, employees and society is pursuing the same goal.

  • 1558.
    Winterling, Jeanette
    et al.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden & Center of Haematology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wiklander, Maria
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Micaux Obol, Claire
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden & Stress Rehabilitation Research, Department of Clinical Sciences Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Lars E
    Medical Management Center, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden & Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, City University London, London, United Kingdom.
    Pelters, Britta
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Development of a Self-Help Web-Based Intervention Targeting Young Cancer Patients With Sexual Problems and Fertility Distress in Collaboration With Patient Research Partners2016In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 5, no 2, p. e60-, article id e60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Internet should be suitable for delivery of interventions targeting young cancer patients. Young people are familiar with the technologies, and this patient group is small and geographically dispersed. Still, only few psycho-educational Web-based interventions are designed for this group. Young cancer patients consider reproductive health, including sexuality, an area of great importance and approximately 50% report sexual problems and fertility-related concerns following cancer treatment. Therefore, we set out to develop a self-help Web-based intervention, Fex-Can, to alleviate such problems. To improve its quality, we decided to involve patients and significant others as research partners. The first 18 months of our collaboration are described in this paper. The intervention will subsequently be tested in a feasibility study followed by a randomized controlled trial.

    Objective: The study aims to describe the development of a Web-based intervention in long-term collaboration with patient research partners (PRPs).

    Methods: Ten former cancer patients and two significant others participated in building the Web-based intervention, using a participatory design. The development process is described according to the design step in the holistic framework presented by van Gemert-Pijnen et al and evaluates the PRPs’ impact on the content, system, and service quality of the planned intervention.

    Results: The collaboration between the research group and the PRPs mainly took place in the form of 1-day meetings to develop the key components of the intervention: educational and behavior change content, multimedia (pictures, video vignettes, and audios), interactive online activities (eg, self-monitoring), and partial feedback support (discussion forum, tailored feedback from experts). The PRPs influenced the intervention’s content quality in several ways. By repeated feedback on prototypes, the information became more comprehensive, relevant, and understandable. The PRPs gave suggestions concerning the number of exercises and pointed out texts and pictures needing revision (eg, experienced as normative or stereotypical) to increase the persuasiveness of the program. The system quality was improved by PRPs’ feedback on design, technical malfunctions, and navigation on the website. Based on feedback about availability of professional support (technical problems and program content), the organization for support was clarified, which increased service quality. The PRPs also influenced the research project on an overall level by suggesting modifications of inclusion criteria for the RCT and by questioning the implementation plan.

    Conclusions: With suggestions and continuous feedback from PRPs, it was possible to develop a Web-based intervention with persuasive design, believed to be relevant and attractive for young persons with cancer who have sexual problems or fertility distress. In the next step, the intervention will be tested in a feasibility study, followed by an RCT to test the intervention’s effectiveness in reducing sexual problems and fertility distress.

  • 1559.
    Wulff, Åsa
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Tideman, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Svensson, Ove
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Den regionala stödstrukturen i Halland – erfarenheter och synpunkter: Utvärdering av den regionala stödstrukturen för socialtjänsten och näraliggande hälso- och sjukvård genomförd av Högskolan i Halmstad på uppdrag av Region Halland2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Högskolan i Halmstad har på uppdrag av Region Halland utvärderat den regionala stödstrukturen för samverkan mellan kommunerna och Region Halland i länet. Utvärderingens huvudsyfte har varit att undersöka vilka erfarenheter ett urval av aktörer som arbetar inom stödstrukturen har av denna och vilka synpunkter de har på hur stödstrukturen fungerar. Ett annat syfte var att få underlag för lägesrapportering till SKL samt underlag för fortsatt utveckling och revidering av den regionala stödstrukturen. För att belysa innehållet i den samverkan som sker har man från strategisk nivå i den regionala stödstrukturen valt att till utvärderingen foga ett antal dokument om olika programområdens arbete (se bilagor). Utvärderingen bygger på genomgång av dokument om stödstrukturen och intervjuer med personer på dess olika nivåer. Intervjuer är genomförda med sammanlagt 28 personer från samtliga nivåer inom stödstrukturen: från arbetsgrupper och nätverk intervjuades 5 personer, på taktisk nivå intervjuades 13 personer, på strategisk nivå 8 personer samt från chefsgrupp Halland 2 personer.

    Av intervjuerna framgår att det finns bred uppslutning på alla nivåer bakom etableringen av den regionala stödstrukturen. Det förefaller som om strukturen med framgång har implementerats i hela organisationen, vilket är ett förhållande som tidigare forskning visat vara betydelsefull för att samverkan och samarbetet ska utvecklas positivt. Det bör dock framhållas att uppslutningen kring den regionala stödstrukturen utgår från hur denna är tänkt att fungera och inte från hur den för närvarande i alla delar faktiskt fungerar.

    Den positiva inställningen till den regionala stödstrukturen innebär inte att det saknas kritiska synpunkter. De som för fram kritik betonar dock att de, jämfört med tidigare, ser etableringen av den regionala stödstrukturen som en förbättring av samverkan och som lovande inför framtiden. Med tanke på att den regionala stödstrukturen befinner sig i ett uppbyggnadsskede framstår det som naturligt med viss kritik. Den grundläggande positiva inställningen kan dock ändras om förväntningarna på den regionala stödstrukturen inte infrias.

    Det framgår av intervjuerna att en horisontell integration av samverkan mellan socialtjänsten och den näraliggande hälso- och sjukvården inletts redan innan den regionala stödstrukturen etablerades. En intersektoriell samverkan inleddes över huvudmannaskapsgränserna mellan det dåvarande Landstinget Halland och länets kommuner. Denna samverkan breddades och fördjupades när Region Hallands bildande och sedan ytterligare med den regionala stödstrukturens etablering. Samverkan kan även beskrivas som interprofessionell genom att den innefattar samarbete mellan skilda professioner inom socialtjänsten och hälso- och sjukvården.

    De som intervjuats inom strategiska gruppen framhåller att det skett en effektivisering bl.a. genom att hälso- och sjukvården inom den regionala stödstrukturen kan samarbeta med ett kollektiv av kommuner istället för med sex enskilda kommuner. Samverkan underlättar även mottagandet och hanteringen av nationella överenskommelser inom berörda områden. En utmaning inför framtiden kan, enligt intervjuerna, bli att tvingas prioritera för att undvika den arbetsbelastning som det innebär att hantera samtliga nationella initiativ.

    Det gavs under intervjuerna bevis på att de intervjuade oberoende av organisationstillhörighet delar gemensamma mål. Ett sådant mål som återkom i flera intervjuer avsåg ambitionen att kunna erbjuda invånarna likvärdig vård/stöd oavsett var de bor i länet. Uppslutningen kring en gemensam målbild kan ses som uttryck för integration av samverkan hos de intervjuade. Den breda uppslutningen kommer sannolikt att bidra till att stärka samverkan mellan länets aktörer ytterligare framöver.

    Den horisontella integrationen inom den regionala stödstrukturen på chefsgruppsnivå, strategisk nivå, taktisk nivå och inom arbetsgrupper och nätverk har varit framgångsrik. Den vertikala integrationen av samverkan mellan de olika nivåerna i den regionala stödstrukturen verkar emellertid behöva utvecklas. Insynen och kunskapen om vad som sker på de olika nivåerna varierar med den position man har i den regionala stödstrukturen. Bäst överblick av organisationen har man från de översta nivåerna i pyramidens topp, i övrigt begränsas insynen till den egna nivån och näraliggande nivåer. I intervjuerna speglas detta i att man önskar delta på möten på andra nivåer och efterlyser tydliga befattningsbeskrivningar för varje nivå med preciserade beslutsmandat samt en utvecklad informations- och kommunikationsstrategi. Det finns också en kritik som utgår från upplevelser av över- respektive underordning mellan olika aktörer. 

    De intervjuade inom chefsgrupp Halland betonar vikten av att den regionala stödstrukturen behåller sitt fokus på nyttan för invånarna i länet. En inställning som delas av flera av dem som intervjuats. På taktisk nivå menar man dock att brukare och medborgare inte involverats i utvecklingen av den regionala stödstrukturen och att deras engagemang inte tagits tillvara i tillräcklig omfattning. En konsekvens av detta har, enligt kritikernas mening, varit att uppmärksamheten i allt för hög grad riktats mot organisatoriska lösningar snarare än mot nyttan för brukarna och länets invånare.

    En utmaning som den regionala stödstrukturen kommer att ställas inför är valet mellan förstärkning och utökning av resurser och ambitioner eller en mer återhållsam utveckling som bygger på uppfattningar om risker för byråkratisering och där strukturens stödjande funktion övergår i styrning. Av tidigare forskning framgår att införandet av nya former för samverkan med utökat samarbete ofta leder till ökad arbetsbelastning. Det är uppenbart utifrån intervjuerna att arbetsbelastningen ökat på alla nivåer av den regionala stödstrukturen och att det skapat problem. Även höga ambitioner om att utveckla stödstrukturen riskerar att bidra till ökad arbetsbelastning. Det fördes under intervjuerna fram flera förslag om utökning av den regionala stödstrukturen med ytterligare aktörer. Det är främst hälso- och sjukvårdens medverkan som efterlyses, med önskemål om att denna ska utökas till att omfatta närsjukvården och primärvården i länets kommuner och ytterligare verksamhetsgrenar. Betydelsen av att även finna samverkansformer med de privata utförarna togs upp. Det hävdades vidare att mycket av den problematik som hamnar hos den strategiska gruppen skulle kunna hanteras bättre genom utökad samverkan med skolan och elevhälsan. Utvecklade samverkansformer med kommunernas försörjningsstöd sågs som en annan viktig fråga.

    Ytterligare en utmaning för den regionala stödstrukturen är att förankra och utveckla arbetet på bred front med en evidensbaserad praktik inom socialtjänstens och den näraliggande hälso- och sjukvårdens verksamheter genom en tydligare knytning till processtöd och länets FoU-och FoUU-miljöer. Det kan även bidra till att brukarnas erfarenheter får en stärkt ställning, vilket efterlyses i intervjuerna.

    Sammanfattningsvis kan konstateras att den regionala stödstrukturen på kort tid fått en bred uppslutning och utvecklat samverkan mellan länets kommuner och Region Halland. Utmaningarna ligger framförallt i att förbättra kommunikation/information, ytterligare förtydliga ansvar och beslutsmandat samt värna strukturens stödjande roll.

  • 1560.
    Wylleman, Paul
    et al.
    Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Sport psychology and the Olympic Games: An introduction in the special issue2012In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 658-659Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1561.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Nygren, Jens M
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Building an Experience Framework for a Digital Peer Support Service for Children Surviving from Cancer2013In: Proceedings of Interaction Design and Children (IDC'13), New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 269-272Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood cancer survivors adjust to the physical, mental, and social difficulties associated with their illness and treatment. This process can be facilitated by social support from peers. For children, this is often problematic due to geographical, clinical, and age-related limitations. This paper reports on a stakeholder assessment study that confirms the relevance of a digital peer support service for childhood cancer survivors. The analysis establishes where in the existing health care process the digital peer support service should be introduced, what actors play a key role in facilitating service onboarding and use, and characterizes desirable user experience qualities. The analysis also yields a collection of design challenges to be addressed in the development of the digital peer support service. Copyright 2013 ACM.

  • 1562.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lindberg, Susanne
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Effects of Using Child Personas in the Development of a Digital Peer Support Service for Childhood Cancer Survivors2017In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 19, no 5, article id e161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Peer support services have the potential to support children who survive cancer by handling the physical, mental, and social challenges associated with survival and return to everyday life. Involving the children themselves in the design process allows for adapting services to authentic user behaviors and goals. As there are several challenges that put critical requirements on a user-centered design process, we developed a design method based on personas adapted to the particular needs of children that promotes health and handles a sensitive design context.

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of using child personas in the development of a digital peer support service for childhood cancer survivors.

    METHODS: The user group's needs and behaviors were characterized based on cohort data and literature, focus group interviews with childhood cancer survivors (n=15, 8-12 years), stakeholder interviews with health care professionals and parents (n=13), user interviews, and observations. Data were interpreted and explained together with childhood cancer survivors (n=5) in three explorative design workshops and a validation workshop with children (n=7).

    RESULTS: We present findings and insights on how to codesign child personas in the context of developing digital peer support services with childhood cancer survivors. The work resulted in three primary personas that model the behaviors, attitudes, and goals of three user archetypes tailored for developing health-promoting services in this particular use context. Additionally, we also report on the effects of using these personas in the design of a digital peer support service called Give Me a Break.

    CONCLUSIONS: By applying our progressive steps of data collection and analysis, we arrive at authentic child-personas that were successfully used to design and develop health-promoting services for children in vulnerable life stages. The child-personas serve as effective collaboration and communication aids for both internal and external purposes.

  • 1563.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Co-constructing Child Personas for Health-Promoting Services with Vulnerable Children2014In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Toronto, ON, Canada: ACM Press, 2014, p. 3767-3776Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability of health-promoting resources for young children diagnosed with cancer who are transitioning from intensive care to everyday life is limited. In the context of designing digital peer support services for children who are considered vulnerable due to clinical and age-related aspects, there are several challenges that put critical requirements on a user-centered design process. This paper reports on a new method for co-constructing child-personas that are tailored for developing health-promoting services where empirical data is restricted due to practical and ethical reasons. In particular, we are proposing to focus children design workshop sessions on salutogenesis, and complement this with a pathogenic perspective by interviewing healthcare professionals and parents. We also introduce the use of proxy personas, and redemption scenarios in the form of comicboards, both collaboratively constructed by children and designers through storytelling. By applying four progressive steps of data collection and analysis we arrive at authentic child-personas that can be used to design and develop health-promoting services for children in vulnerable life stages.

  • 1564.
    Wårdh, Inger
    et al.
    Dept of Gerodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Department of Health Sciences and Statistical, School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nursing staff's understanding of oral health care for patients with cancer diagnoses: an intervention study2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 799-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-lasting changes in the nursing staff's understanding of oral health care for cancer patients after an oral health care intervention. The study also assessed whether there were changes between registered nurses and auxiliary nurses. Background. The maintenance of good oral health care in cancer patients is essential for nutrition, recovery and wellbeing and requires the involvement of nursing staff. However, several studies reveal that the need to prioritize oral health care has not been made sufficiently clear. Methods. The nursing staff (registered nurses, n = 133 and auxiliary nurses, n = 109) on five wards at different hospitals providing cancer care took part in a four-hour oral healthcare training session, including the use of an oral assessment guide and answered a questionnaire initially and after this intervention. The data were statistically analyzed. Results. Several aspects of implementation opportunities improved, but they did not include attitudes to oral health care. Knowledge of oral diseases decreased, more for auxiliary nurses than for registered nurses. Conclusions. A four-hour oral health training session and subsequent activities improve the nursing staff's understanding of oral health care for patients with cancer diagnoses in some respects but not in terms of attitudes to oral health care or specific oral knowledge. Relevance to clinical practice. Oral healthcare education and training activities for nursing staff can produce some improvements in the understanding of oral health care for cancer patients but not in attitudes and specific oral knowledge. These areas must be covered during the basic education period or/and by a routine oral healthcare programme for nursing staff, probably including an oral healthcare standard.

  • 1565.
    Zervas, Yannis
    et al.
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Physical activity and cognitive functioning1999In: Psychology for physical educators / [ed] Yves Vanden Auweele, Frank Bakker, Stuart Biddle, Marc Durand, Roland Seiler, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics , 1999, p. 135-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1566.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Changes and transitions of responsibility when next of kin becomes the caregivers2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In the ordinary everyday existence of individuals, life usually goes by without them reflecting on its fragility or their relationships. Individuals in a close relationship are united with each other in a mutual dependency and share memories from the past, perceptions of the present and dreams and hopes for the future. When one of them suddenly seriously ill and thereby assumes the role of seriously ill patient while the other takes on the role of close relative, their normal life is changed into an extraordinary situation. Everyday life can be complex when next of kin are preoccupied with taking responsibility of the care, which in turn lead to a changed life situation and restrictions in everyday life. The summary of the current knowledge highlighted the importance of understanding of next of kin´ coping approaches during responsibility for caring at home. 

    Aim and method

    This study explores the process of changes for next of kin´ in a care home for older relatives from the perspectives of the responsibility for caring. Data were collected using narrative interview with 8 next of kin’ at home. The following questions were asked: Please describe the changed situation you have gone through, when you having the difficult care situation and what did you do to cope with your situation? The individual interviews were nearly all transcribed verbatim, a few were listen to and taking notes during listening. The data set were analyzed by using thematic analysis.

    Findings and conclusion

    Four themes revealed from narrative interviews with the next of kin´. The four themes were: Sources of responsibility related to family interaction; Consequences of changes for everyday; Importance on maintaining their own conditions; Roles and relationships over time. Based on a synthesis of data the themes and basic transitions that emerged were termed “re-constructing roles and relationships”. This highlights the subtle and dynamic way of changes and reinforces the importance of understanding the transitions from multiple perspectives. The results of the study may encourage people to engage themselves in self-help activities and strengthen them to believe they are to care for each other.

  • 1567.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Everyday Life among Next of Kin of Haemodialysis Patients2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Everyday life can be complex when next of kin of haemodialysis patients are preoccupied with taking care of the patient and his/her health, which implies the difficulties and requirements needed. The general aim of this thesis was to explore and describe everyday life among next of kin of haemodialysis patients with focus on the life situation, health, time and professional support. Two perspectives of the thesis was applied: a holistic perspective on the everyday life of next of haemodialysis patient and a social perspective with focus on human communication and understanding of next of kin’s experience of everyday life. A qualitative descriptive and explorative design, comprising a phenomenographic and content analysis was used in Studies I-IV. The data collected in the studies consisted of interviews with next of kin to haemodialysis patient and analysis of professional support for next of kin to chronic haemodialysis patients in nursing documentation from two hospitals in Sweden. The experience of time in everyday life among next of kin of haemodialysis patients demonstrated that time for them is minimised and life space contracted. Next of kin experienced ambivalence towards their own health, especially in cases of patients’ spouses When next of kin of haemodialysis patient’s became involved in the patients’ care, they experienced arduousness in relation to their own health as well as less uninterrupted time for themselves in everyday life, and their life situation was characterised by confinement and social isolation. They were aware of the prognosis of renal disease and the fact that haemodialysis is a life-sustaining treatment, which forced them to live for the moment. The everyday life among the next of kin changed when the family became involved in the care, which in turn lead to a changed life situation and restrictions in everyday life. Lack of knowledge in nursing documentation of professional support revealed necessity of the readiness of next of kin. It is therefore important to be familiar with this in the nursing process, especially when the patient and their next of kin need support and attention in everyday life.

    Original papers not included.

  • 1568.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Going in Dialysis is Time to Live: Family’s Experiences of Everyday Life with Haemodialysis Treatment2010In: Proceedings of the Sustaining Everyday Life Conference: April 22–24 2009, Campus Norrköping, Sweden / [ed] Kristina Karlsson and Kajsa Ellergård, Linköping: Linköping University , 2010, p. 123-133Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time is a central concept when attempting to capture how life develops as results of the interaction between the individual and those in his/her immediate environment. Chronic renal disease such as ESRD with chronic haemodialysis not only shortens life but also places everyday life on a thin line survival paramount. The haemodialysis is also a time-consuming treatment that makes it necessary to carefully plan of everyday life and involves next of kin to a large degree. The aim of this study was to explore the content of time in everyday life as experienced by the next of kin of haemodialysis patients. This study used explorative and descriptive design with a content analysis approach. The interviews, which were conducted in the informants’ homes, lasted 20-60 minutes and were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim in order to not to lose any information. Twenty next of kin were selected purposive with the criterion of having at least one year of experience as a next of kin of a patient on haemodialysis. The content of time in everyday life can be described as follows: fragmented time, vacuous time and uninterrupted time. Conclusion which illustrate how time is minimised and life space contracted for next of kin and their family. They were aware of the prognosis of renal disease and the fact that haemodialysis is life-sustaining treatment, which forced them to live for the moment. It is important to gain insight into how time influences the next of kin’s experiences of everyday life and how this knowledge can be communicated in the nursing science.

  • 1569.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Journal club - a forum of discussion for scientific dialectics2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 4652-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the sometimes hectic routines of daily academic work, it can be difficult to find opportunities for naturally creative encounters with our colleagues, where we can jointly focus methodological issues in research. Where do we find the time and place for constructive discussions on published research? And how can we foster such meetings?

    As a senior lecturer and researcher, I have a strong interest in research seminars in the field of clinical activity, as well as long-standing experience of coordinating and leading such seminars. I also gained extensive knowledge of seminar dynamics from my doctoral studies at the University of Linköping.

    Over the years, I have developed a particular way of working with seminars, aiming to contribute to the establishment of interdisciplinary research groups at the School of Health and Social Science, at Halmstad University. One of my ideas was to take advantage of the privileged position of our university, and the fact that it hosts a scientific journal and its Editor-in-Chief, Professor Lillemor Hallberg. This is why I started the Journal Club in 2006—the same year that the International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being was launched.

    Initially, I simply sent an invitation to my fellow researchers at the School of Health and Social Science, explaining the purpose of the meetings. The idea was to use the Journal Club to discuss selected articles from the International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, and critically examine them.

    It is essential that the articles are distributed to participants well in advance, and that participants have had time to read the contents, so they are prepared to critically examine the aims, methods and results of the discussed articles.

    My vision with the meetings at the Journal Club was to give added impetus to scientific dialectics at the School, to develop a critical approach and deepen methodological understanding. We need a continuous reflection concerning qualitative research approaches and various standpoints with respect to research ethics, in order to increase methodological awareness in our research. In this way, the monthly seminars contribute to developing our competencies as researchers, as well as keeping our knowledge up-to-date.

    Another aim of the Journal Club is to be a discussion forum for interdisciplinary research issues, relating to health, life-styles, well-being and the quality of life. Uniting a critical mass at our school, and bringing about an engaging discussion, allows us to test our ideas in a stimulating dialogue with colleagues. It also provides an opportunity to widen and deepen our understanding of current issues.

    The Journal Club has met since the autumn term 2006, always on the same day of the week, at the same time and place, at the School of Health and Social Science. The objective is to give these encounters a “club feeling”, and to shape a tradition of a recurrent event at the School. Before each seminar at the Journal Club, an invitation is sent to all teaching and research staff at the School.

    The availability of the most recent articles from the International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, combined with the Editor-in-Chief's contribution to the seminars, gives the meetings an additional dimension, and strengthens the impact that the Journal Club has at Halmstad University. The role of the Club is also strengthened by the important position that the International Journal of Qualitative Studies occupies on our own nursing programmes, both at junior and senior levels. The articles are widely used and discussed on our Nursing science and Methods courses.

  • 1570.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Livet i skuggan av dialys: beskrivning av anhörigas vardag ; tema: välfärd och välbefinnande2007In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 239-246Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1571.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Maintaining families´well-being in everyday life2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 7206-7211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to discuss how everyday life changes for the family in the event of chronic illness or disability. It changes physically due to loss of body function and socially due to time and other constraints related to treatment or lack of mobility. Equally important, there is a psychological impact due to the uncertainty of the future. The article will explore how family participation can help to maintain well-being in everyday life. The family should therefore focus on their own needs as much as on the needs of the family members who are ill. In order to maintain well-being in everyday life, it is crucial for the family to create routines and spend time doing things that they enjoy. By doing this, the family will create a rhythm of well-being regardless of the critical family situation. Family members and professional caregivers also need to come together at the beginning and during the illness or disability event to discuss changes that could be made day-to-day for all those involved, thereby making for an easier transition into care giving.

  • 1572.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Opportunities with integrated Cancer blog - a Swedish Pilot Project on Cancer Rehabilitation Process2013In: eHealth and Nursing: Innovation for the Future / [ed] Sheerin, F, Sermeus, W and Ehrenberg, A, 2013, p. 330-332Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1573.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Vård av anhörig: ett livsstilval med konsekvenser för hälsan2010In: Hälsa och livsstil: forskning och praktiska tillämpningar / [ed] Lillemor R-M Hallberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 1, p. 289-305Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1574.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Ahlner Elmqvist, Marianne
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Maria
    Department of Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lilja Andersson, Petra
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    How the Final Swedish Clinical Exam Prepares the Nursing Students for Their Future Challenges-Qualitative Analysis2014In: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 5, no 21, p. 1887-1894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The national clinical final examination (NCFE) plays an important role in order to measure the level of knowledge and performance of nursing students. Our findings indicate that the design of the NCFE is beneficial for the students’ clinical reasoning and problem solution in the caring situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of the NCFE from lecturers who corrected the written part examination. A further aim was to study the lectures and the RN during observation in the bedside part of the examination. The NCFE is divided into two parts: a theoretical (written) part and a practical (bedside) part. In nursing education it is essential to assess nursing competencies for the future professional role such as the assessment of clinical competence that has become central to evaluate what outcomes are assessed. In addition, it provides a valuable approach to measure the level of knowledge and performance of nursing students. Future development of the NCFE is necessary regarding the degree to which the examination meets learning objectives and educational results.

  • 1575.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Forsberg, Elenita
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    “The happiness with dancing give power to life”: Qualitative analysis of Dance for Parkinson with a salutogenic perspective2019In: The international fields of arts, health and wellbeing, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1576.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Medicine, Central Hospital Halmstad, S-301 85 Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Conceptions of life situation among next-of-kin of haemodialysis patients2001In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of renal disease in a family is a strain on both the patient and the next-of-kin, affecting their life situations. Surprisingly, few studies dealing with the ways that the next-of-kin experience their situation are available. The aim of this study was to describe how the next-of-kin of haemodialysis patients conceive their life situation. Data were collected by interviewing 12 people who live with someone with dialysis-treated renal disease and analysed according to a qualitative method inspired by the phenomenographic approach. Six description categories of how the subjects construed their life situation emerged: a feeling of confinement; a feeling of social isolation; a feeling that the way of life has changed; a feeling of security in life; a feeling of a threatening future; and promoting health. The next-of-kin generally expressed a large degree of commitment to and concern for the sick person. In spite of their life situation having been dramatically changed, the next-of-kin described an ability to adapt. With the help of society the feelings of confinement and social isolation can be dispersed, enabling the next-of-kin to promote the health of the sick person. A suggestion for further research is to study what adaptation strategies next-of-kin use in their life situation.

  • 1577.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health in everyday life among spouses of haemodialysis patients: a content analysis2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that haemodialysis requires that spouses support and assist their partner during the treatment period, little attention has been focused on their health. The aim of this study was to explore experiences of health in everyday life among spouses of haemodialysis patients. The study had an explorative and descriptive design based on content analysis. Thirteen participants were interviewed in their home without the presence of the patient. The results show that arduousness was experienced when that spouses' everyday life was taken up by caring for the patient at the expense of his/her own health. Spouses exhibited stamina and neglected their own health when focusing on the patient and minimising their own condition. Independence in everyday life revealed that spouses who cared about themselves and looked after their own health experienced relaxation and happiness, which protected their health. Clinical interventions should include an assessment of the spouses' health and everyday life in order to plan the care to ensure that it is directed towards increasing their independence. Instruments need to be developed that assess when and how spouses experience the greatest sense of well-being, if they have scope for relaxation and recovery, and what type of support they require in their everyday life.

  • 1578.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Professional support for next of kin of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment: a content analysis study of nursing documentation2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 353-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives. The aim of this study was to examine the content of nursing documentation with a focus on professional support for next of kin (NoK) of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment. Background. Professional support in nursing focuses on promotion, maintenance and restoration of health and prevention of illness. Design. The study had a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used to search for themes based on descriptions contained in the collected nursing documentation. Methods. The total number of nursing records of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment (n = 50) for the 5-year period 1998–2002 was included. All nursing documentation was systematic in accordance with the VIPS-documentation model. Results. The professional support could be described within the framework of three themes: to explore NoK's supportive resources, to enable NoK' readiness in caring for the patient and to co-operate with NoK in the care of the patient in the home, captured by the core theme which described the professional support as a continuous process. Conclusions. Next of kin are a supportive resource in the nursing care of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment and professional support for NoK focuses on planning their participation in the care of patients in the home. Relevance to clinical practice. Professional support for NoK should be documented in family focused nursing diagnoses, which would make it possible to search for different types of support. Future research might explore nurses' or NoK's views on carer support.

  • 1579.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    "Time for dialysis as time to live": Experiences of time in everyday life of the Swedish next of kin of hemodialysis patients2009In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 45-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the content of time in everyday life as experienced by the next of kin of patients on hemodialysis in Sweden. Chronic renal disease often requires hemodialysis, which is a time-consuming treatment that makes it necessary to carefully plan everyday life and involves the next of kin to a large degree. This study used a descriptive design with a content analysis approach. The analysis of the data from the twenty interviews revealed the experiences of time in the everyday lives of the next of kin of a patient on hemodialysis. The content of time in everyday life can be described as follows: fragmented time, vacuous time, and uninterrupted time. The findings show how everyday life time for the next of kin is minimized and that the common life space is contracted. The next of kin must be provided with supervision in order to provide them with more of their own time in everyday life, which can benefit their health.

  • 1580.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Time in everyday life as experienced by next of kin of haemodialysis patientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to explore the content of time in everyday life as experienced by the next of kin of haemodialysis patients.

    Background Chronic renal disease often requires haemodialysis which is a time-consuming treatment that necessitates careful planning of everyday life and involves next of kin to a large degree. Next of kin's time can be severely restricted when his/her life is devoted to the needs of the haemodialysis patient.

    Method This study used explorative and descriptive design with a qualitative content analysis approach. Twenty next of kin selected purposive with the criterion of having at least one year of experience as a next of kin of a patient on haemodialysis.

    Results Analysis of data from the interviews revealed experiences of time in everyday lives of the next of kin of haemodialysis patients. Their experiences were reflected in the concepts fragmented time, vacuous time and uninterrupted time.

    Conclusion The experience of time in the everyday lives of next of kin of haemodialysis patients demonstrated that time for themselves was minimised and that common life space contracted. The next of kin were also aware of the prognosis of renal disease and the fact that haemodialysis was a life-sustaining treatment, which forced them to live in the present. They afforded wellness when they experienced a break from everyday live and could use their time for their own needs. Attention should be focused on time in the nurse's assessment of the next of kin's everyday life and whether or not next of kin have sufficient time required for the patient's care. There is need for further research that focuses on a generalisation of the fmdings by means of the development of instruments that can contribute assessment of time in everyday life among next of kin of chronically ill patients.

  • 1581.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hallberg, Ulrika
    Nordiska Högskolan för Folkhälsovetenskap.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Book review: "Developing grounded theory. The second generation"2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 5058-Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Developing Grounded Theory. The Second Generation is a very useful and clarifying book arisen from a one-day symposium on advances in qualitative methods in Alberta, 2007. The conference was sponsored by the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology (IIQM). For the first time, the students of Barney Glaser and Anselm Strauss, “the second generation” of grounded theory researchers, met to discuss grounded theory and its developments. With the exception of Janice Morse, the authors of this book worked directly with Anselm Strauss and Barney Glaser. In this volume they provide a description of the history, principles and practice of the grounded theory methods.

  • 1582.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högstedt, Benkt
    Dept. of Development and Research, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden .
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Time distribution factors of hospital and home care among chronic haemodialysis patients2004In: EDTNA-ERCA journal, ISSN 1019-083X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, many studies are available that focus on haemodialysis; however studies on the time distribution factor involved are lacking. It is therefore important to study the distribution of time, taking into account outpatient care, inpatient care and home care. The aim of the study was to chart over a five-year period, the time distribution factors of hospital care and home care among chronic haemodialysis patients. The design of the study was descriptive, and the data material was drawn from a patient register (N = 61). The data analysis was performed by means of both descriptive and inferential statistics.

  • 1583.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Kristén, Lars
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Dancing Together for Social Sustainability from a Life Course Perspective - Integrating Children and Senior Citizens in Action Research Project2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This project has its starting-point in dance project with children and senior citizens. Children and senior citizen have their own health challenges. The Swedish culture does not encourage intergenerational activities in organizations and communities. Intergenerational contacts are in many terms referred to within families, except certain environments such as the educational institutions. Especially, the intergenerational contacts between children and senior citizens are neglected as an important factor in promoting knowledge and health in society. It does not need to be questioned, that both knowledge and health contributes to the sustainability in society. If individuals from different generations have the opportunity to exercise physical activities together, it is likely that it generates positive values for social sustainability. Social constructivism combined with a life course perspective is the fundamental theoretical standpoint for this project.  We will explain the complex matter of how theses processes of “constructed realities” are accomplish before approaching the central ideas of social constructivism in relation to our project.

    The overall aim was to understand the knowledge of the social value of intergenerational physical activities, and how different age groups communicate their experiences in a life course perspective. There were many things we could learn in a life course perspective through activities among children and senior citizens, and how we could make use of this knowledge for implementations for social sustainability in general. This study included a three-stage process qualitative data from 48 stakeholders describing in individuals diaries about daily exercise, collected during one and a half year, with focus groups interviews with 24 children and 24 senior citizens. The third stage dancing activities was conducted, and follow up interviews with both participants. The thematic analysis was used emerge the results. We found a common joy for both children and senior citizens when performing the physical activities. Women believed physical activities improved their inclusion and social networks. The men found that the physical activities improved their wellbeing and health.

  • 1584.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Larsson, Glenn
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Holmström, Madelaine
    Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Follow up study of Assessment by Ambulance and Triage Classification (RETTS) in Electronic Health Records2015In: ACENDIO 2015: eHealth and Nursing: Knowledge for Patient Care / [ed] Fintan Sheerin, Walter Sermeus & Anna Ehrenberg, Dublin: Association for Common European Nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes , 2015, p. 28-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The ordinary process for the ambulance nurse is to give prehospital care and transport all patients to the emergency ward regardless of the patients’ medical conditions. The Ambulance organisation south of Sweden has introduced a model of prehospital care for all adult patients with different severities of illness.

    Aim: The main focus of the study is to give a faster prehospital assessment in collaboration with the ambulance nurse and primary health care. The secondary focus is to investigate the use of RETTS (Rapid Emergency Triage, and Treatment System) while writing the information regarding the patient. If the patient’s condition turns out to be level GREEN by RETTS, the ambulance nurse contact with the primary care physicians for a dialogue and together they decide which level of care is the most appropriate for the patient’s condition. There are three levels of care; 1. The patient is able to stay at home with supervision from the primary health care. 2. The ambulance transporting the patient to the primary health care unit for assessment. 3. The ambulance transport the patient to the emergency ward.

    Method: The study design was to exploratory interventions study. The data was conducted in all Electronic Health Records during August – September 2014 (N=67). The ambulance nurse assess patients from 18 years and older with (RETTS). There are three levels of care; 1. The patient is able to stay at home with supervision from the primary health care. 2. The ambulance transporting the patient to the primary health care unit for assessment. 3. The ambulance transport the patient to the emergency ward. The data was analyzed by a descriptive method conducted by statistics from the nurses while using the clinical support systems (RETTS) for decision-making.

    Results: Preliminary results will be presented with focus on clinical decision-making, clinical support systems by RETTS, and how ambulance nurse administrated their decision in Electronic Health Records.  

  • 1585.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Pham, Lotta
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ways of promoting health to patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease from a nursing perspective in Vietnam: A phenomenographic study2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health promotion plays an important role in the management of diabetes and chronic kidney disease, especially when the prevalence of the disease is rising in Vietnam. Nurses have been identified to be the front figure in health promotion; however, little is written about how nurses in Vietnam work with these issues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurses’ conceptions about how health is promoted, with special focus on physically activity, for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and/or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Individual interviews were done with 25 nurses working at two major hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. A phenomenographic approach was used to analyse the interviews. Nurses described how creating positive relationships and supporting patients to take part in their social context promoted health. Health was also promoted by educating patients and relatives about health and disease and by supporting patients to be physically active. The findings indicate that the Vietnamese nursing knowledge about health promotion needs to be gathered, and health promotion needs to be further integrated in the education. Further research is necessary to examine patients’ knowledge and attitudes about health and the efficiency of various health-promoting strategies in the Vietnamese context. © 2016 L. Pham & K. Ziegert

  • 1586.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Rämgård, Margareta
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mapping family and social space in caring: a metamethod study2008In: Parallel presentations: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, Taylor&Francis , 2008, p. 29-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social relations are about how we treat each other. They imply explicit and tacit knowledge, rules of behaviour, and values inherent in specific social spaces. When a family is struck by a life-threatening illness, the individual’s ‘‘life space’’ tends to shrink. This impacts the mutual relationships in the family, as well as the situation in the home. Therefore, there are obvious dialectics between spatial and social dimensions, when close relatives are afflicted by serious illness. This paper explores how research on homecare involves space in analysing social issues.Meta-method analysis was chosen, in order to extend the review format and analyse meta-questions. Meta-synthesis in different research areas and fora involved the examina- tion of a set of qualitative studies. Material was collected using the Cinahl, PubMed and Academic Search data- bases. These were supplemented by the Social Science Index, Sociological Abstract and Science Direct, to explore if aspects of care and space are treated in social science. The sample consisted of 38 articles, displaying a wide variety of methods. Findings suggest that in the fields of caring and sociological research, spatial factors are only implicitly described, and the dynamics of the social and spatial dialectics in home caring relationships seem to be rare. The concept of space in caring is found in a few studies in human geography. The observed absence of a spatial perspective in caring is problematic, since it neglects the fact that relationship and caring are situated in context.

  • 1587.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Schjetlein, Anne-Marie
    Halmstad County Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Learning of simulated cardiac arrests in hospital environments to support performance of the multidisciplinary team2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Survival after cardiac arrest in hospital environments has in various studies reported to be between 15-39%. In Swedish hospitals 30% of patients who suffer cardiac arrest survive to discharge. There are significant opportunities for improvement in cardiac arrests in hospitals, especially those on general wards. There are few studies of the multidisciplinary team performance regarding both technical and non-technical skills in simulated cardiac arrest on general wards.

    Summary of Work: The focus of this study was to observe the multidisciplinary team performance in simulated cardiac arrest on general wards to gain knowledge about existing methods and thus be able to identify areas for improvement. The study design was an exploratory observational study. There were 33 participants in a total of three wards. The simulated cardiac arrest was videotaped, and a patient simulator was used.

    Summary of Results: The results suggest that guidelines not always were adhered to cooperation. In the order for the guidelines to work in the multidisciplinary team, background knowledge is required. However, the team leader did not coordinated to the multidisciplinary team work, and did not use effective communication.

    Conclusions: Finally, the result suggested suboptimal performance regarding leadership and communication, which in turn affected resources and working environment. The opportunity with simulation is to train together in a situation without any risk for the patients.

    Take home Messages: Simulated cardiac arrests will give the opportunity to train the multidisciplinary team technical and non-technical skills.

     

  • 1588.
    Zizzi, Sam J.
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Andersen, Mark B.Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 1589.
    Zlocki, Jakob
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Johansson, Mattias
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Mindfulness och dess effekt på uppmärksamhets- och perceptionsförmåga bland tävlingsinriktade idrottsutövare: En experimentell pilotstudie.: 2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of one 45 minute mindfulness session on: (1) Sustained attention abilities, (2) executive attention abilities, and (3) perceptual abilities. An experimental study was carried out on athletes (n = 48) who all met the specific requirements for being able to participate in this study. The results showed no significant difference in all three variables between the experiment group and the control group. In conclusion, the results and implications are discussed in relation to previous research, supported by theoretical frames of references. 

  • 1590.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Variety of Regional Innovation Systems and Their Institutional Characteristics2018In: New Avenues for Regional Innovation Systems: Theoretical Advances, Empirical Cases and Policy Lessons / [ed] Arne Isaksen, Roman Martin & Michaela Trippl, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 41-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regional Innovation Systems (RISs) come in many shapes. Current RIS typologies, however, pay insufficient attention to institutional factors and as a consequence they fall short of capturing an essential source of variety of RISs in a systematic way. This chapter contributes to a further conceptual development of the RIS approach by capturing regional variety not only in terms of actors and networks but also in terms of institutions. It is shown that an institutional perspective can enrich existing RIS typologies by providing insights into the distinctive institutional frameworks of different RIS types and their particular institutional bottlenecks. Three main causes of institutional bottlenecks are identified, that is, lack of or poorly developed institutions, inappropriate institutions, and contradicting/poorly aligned institutions. As shown in this chapter the institutional perspective advocated here holds a strong potential to contribute to a further conceptual development of the RIS approach. © Springer International Publishing AG 2018. All rights reserved.

  • 1591.
    Zukauskaite, Elena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Trippl, Michaela
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Plechero, Monica
    University of Venice, Venice, Italy.
    Institutional Thickness Revisited2017In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 325-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last two decades, the notion of institutional thickness has become a key reference for a large body of work that has sought to provide profound insights into the link between institutions and regional development. However, only few attempts have been made to reassess the concept, to improve its methodology, and to reflect on its empirical application. The aim of this article is to revise the original concept of institutional thickness. We draw on and seek to contribute to current work in economic geography and related disciplines on the role of organizations and institutions in regional development. We identify some crucial limitations and provide suggestions for how they can be addressed. It is argued that much can be gained by (1) explicitly elaborating on the relation between the organizational and institutional dimensions of thickness, (2) moving beyond overly static views on thickness, (3) developing a multiscalar approach to thickness, and (4) identifying features for assessing thickness in absolute and relative terms. © 2017 Clark University.

  • 1592.
    Åkerlund, Ejvor
    et al.
    Health Care Center, Varberg, Sweden.
    Odams, Eva
    Maternal Care Center, Varberg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Irene
    Health Care Center, Veddige, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nipple necrosis after reduction mammaplasty: A case report1995In: International Journal of Rehabilitation and Health, ISSN 1068-9591, E-ISSN 1573-1537, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 285-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this case report was to describe a rare complication in the rehabilitative phase: nipple necrosis resulting from reduction mammaplasty. the patients in the two cases presented, having systemic disease, did not receive optimal treatment for the prevention of pyoderma gangraenosum; a plausible cause of the complication. Patients having systemic disease ought to undergo thorough examinations before submitting to any reduction mammaplasty. © 1995 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  • 1593.
    Årestedt, K.
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Ågren, S. A. Susanna
    Linköping University, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden .
    Flemme, Inger
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Moser, D. M. Bedbra
    Univ Kentucky, Coll Nursing, Lexington, KY 40506, USA.
    Strömberg, A. S. Anna
    Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden .
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Control Attitudes Scale (CAS) for patients with cardiac disease and their partners2010In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 31, no Supplement 1, p. 230-230Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1594.
    Ödegård, Synnöve
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hallberg, Lillemor
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Perceived potential risk factors in child care2004In: Journal of Health Organisation & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 38-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is based on semi-structured interviews focusing on staff members’ opinions about potential risk factors that could threaten patient safety. The aim was to acquire more in-depth knowledge about the causes of patient injuries. The study, which was conducted at a children's hospital, has a qualitative approach that is influenced by the critical incident technique. A total of 28 persons were interviewed. Analysis of the data resulted in five qualitatively differentiated categories of potential risk factors: a large influx of patients, a lack of professional experience, a lack of inter-professional communication and cooperation, and deficiencies related to work hours and to the physical environment. The results reflect a complex picture where the risks, as described by the informants, can either alone or in concert directly or indirectly affect the individual in the practice of his or her profession or contribute to a mistake.

  • 1595.
    Öijervall, Jörgen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Främjande faktorer för professionell utveckling i processorienterad omvårdnadshandledning i grupp: Sjuksköterskors erfarenheter ett år efter avslutad sjuksköterskeutbildning2013In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 9-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of factors enhancing professional development trough process-oriented group super- vision, one year after completed nursing education. The objective of process-oriented group supervision in nursing care is to support students’ development of their ability to manage complex care situations. The attitude of the supervisor and the students’ willingness to reflect on them- selves have been described as playing key roles in process-oriented group supervision during nursing education. The link to nursing science has also been described as significant by several researchers, but some supervisors are not using nursing science as a foundation in group supervision for nurses. The analysis was completed using a qualitative content analysis method based on interviews with 18 nurses resulting in the general theme “Process oriented pedagogy” which is presented in three categories: Supervisor’s character, Pedagogical strategy and Reflective communication. The findings suggest that the supervisor's personal qualities in combination with an inspiring structure are impor- tant to promote the participants’ reflective communication during the group supervision sessions. Reflective communication supports the students’ development towards a deeper professional knowledge. Further research should focus on the use of nursing science as a foundation in clinical process-oriented group supervision.

  • 1596.
    Öijervall, Jörgen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Promoting factors for professional development in process oriented group supervision. Nurses experiences one year after completed nursing degree2013In: Breaking Barriers 2013, 2013, p. 43-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of factors enhancing professional development trough process-oriented group supervision, one year after completed nursing education. The objective of process-oriented group supervision in nursing care is to support students’ development of their ability to manage complex care situations. The attitude of the supervisor and the students’willingness to reflect on themselves have been described as playing key roles in process-oriented group supervision during nursing education. The link to nursing science has also been described as significant by several researchers, but some supervisors are not using nursing science as a foundation in group supervision for nurses. The analysis was completed using a qualitative content analysis method based on interviews with 18 nurses resulting in the general theme “Process oriented pedagogy” which is presented in three categories: Supervisor’s character, Pedagogical strategy and Reflective communication. The findings suggest that the supervisor's personal qualities in combination with an inspiring structure are important to promote the participants’ reflective ommunication during the group supervision sessions. Reflective communication supports the students’ development towards a deeper professional knowledge. Further research should focus on the use of nursing science as a foundation in clinical process-oriented group supervision.

  • 1597.
    Östberg, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Gullberg, Bo
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Sweden.
    Råstam, Lennart
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Ulf
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Sweden.
    Tooth loss and obesity in a defined Swedish population2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 427-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore the association between tooth loss and obesity in an adult Swedish population, and to investigate the influence of socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity.

    Methods: A cross-sectional population health survey conducted in 2001-2005 in 2816 randomly selected Swedish men and women (age: 30-74 years; participation rate 76%). Main measures were; tooth loss: < 20 remaining teeth (self-reported), general obesity: BMI[≥]30 kg m-2, abdominal obesity: waist circumference > 88 in women and > 102 cm in men. Adjustments were made for socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity.

    Results: 420 individuals (21.2%) had < 20 remaining teeth: 30-59 years 6.0%, 60-74 years 53.5%. Mean BMI was similar in men and women (26.9 kg m-2), however, both general and abdominal obesity was still more frequent among women (both p < 0.001). There was a significant interaction between age and tooth loss in the association with both general (p = 0.004) and abdominal obesity (p < 0.011) in men. In participants below 60 years of age, the association between tooth loss and general obesity (OR 2.17 [95% CI 1.51 - 3.12]) and abdominal obesity (2.23 [1.58 - 3.15]), respectively, was statistically significant independent of age and gender, and remained so also when accounting for differences in socioeconomy, life-style, and co-morbidity. There was no similar association in those 60 years or older. The findings in men and women were robust and concordant.

    Conclusions: Common mechanisms for oral health and obesity should be explored more also including longitudinal designs. The findings are important for targeting comprehensive interventions against obesity and tooth loss, especially among younger adults.

29303132 1551 - 1597 of 1597
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