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  • 151.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    Leipzig University, Germany.
    Putting culture into context: Cultural and cross-cultural perspectives in career development and transition research and practice2009In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 292-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within this paper we address the importance of historical and socio-cultural contexts in research and practice of athletes’ career development and transitions. We stress that not only sport participants, but also sport psychology researchers and consultants are infused by their historical and socio-cultural contexts. This is illustrated by evolutions of career development and transition research and practice in two different countries, Russia and Germany, where cardinal historical and social changes during the last decades illuminated the salience of the contextual factors. We use our European Perspectives on Athletic Retirement Project (e.g., Alfermann, Stambulova, & Zemaityte, 2004) to exemplify the contributions of recent cross-cultural studies to a better understanding of athletes’ career termination and adjustment to the post-career, and discuss the lessons learned from the Project. In conclusion, we propose how contemporary methodological approaches in cultural and cross-cultural psychology may help to develop more contextually sensitive career research and assistance to athletes.

  • 152.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    Leipzig University, Germany.
    Statler, Traci
    California State University at San Bernardino, USA.
    Cote, Jean
    Queen's University at Kingston, Canada.
    Career development and transitions of athletes2007In: Book of abstracts / [ed] Yannis Theodorakis Marios Goudas & Athanasios Papaioannou, FEPSAC , 2007, p. 153-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    Leipzig University, Germany.
    Statler, Traci
    California State University at Fullerton, USA.
    Côté, Jean
    Queen’s University at Kingston, Canada .
    ISSP Position Stand: Career Development and Transitions of Athletes2009In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 395-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ISSP Position Stand on Career Development and Transitions of Athletes draws attention to viewing athletes from the perspective of their career development and their broader historical and socio-cultural contexts. The particular focus of this paper is on career transitions as turning phases in career development. Successfully coping with transitions in and outside of sport allows greater opportunity for an athlete to live a long and successful life in sport as well as being able to adjust effectively to the post-career. Alternatively, failure in coping with a transition is often followed by negative consequences (e.g., premature dropout from sport, neuroses, alcohol/drug abuse, etc). Therefore, helping athletes to prepare for and/or cope with career transitions should be of primary concern for coaches, managers, athletes’ parents, and sport psychology consultants. In this paper we emphasize the role of contextual factors in career development/transition research and practice. Based on the literature review, we propose six statements and related recommendations for athletes and their significant others, as well as for researchers and consultants.

  • 154.
    Stambulova, Natalia B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Pehrson, Sebastian
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare.
    Olsson, Kasper
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Phases in the junior-to-senior transition of Swedish ice hockey players: From a conceptual framework to an empirical model2017In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 231-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore a temporal structure (i.e. sequence of phases and relevant psychological content) of the junior-to-senior transition (JST) in Swedish ice hockey players. The study was a qualitative exploration of the JST transition process designed in three steps. First, the athletic career transition model coupled with a holistic developmental approach and analysis of the Swedish ice hockey context, were used to create a conceptual four-phase (preparation, orientation, adaptation and stabilization) JST framework and interview guides. Second, seven active semi-professional ice hockey players were interviewed about their JST experiences and asked for their feedback on the conceptual framework. Finally, based on the empirical data and the participants’ feedback, the conceptual framework was transformed into an empirical model of the JST. In the empirical model ‘Phases in the JST of Swedish ice hockey players’ the authors provided a summary of the players’ transition experiences (i.e. perceived demands, resources, barriers, coping strategies and outcomes) within each of the four (i.e. the preparation, the orientation, the adaptation, and the stabilization) JST phases. Further, the authors discussed the empirical model in relation to theoretical frameworks and previous research and also provided methodology-, future research- and practice- oriented reflections addressed to researchers, coaches and sport psychology practitioners. © The Author(s) 2017

  • 155.
    Stambulova, Natalia B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Stephan, Yannick
    Centre for Research in Sport Sciences, Paris XI University, France.
    Järphag, Ulf
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Athletic retirement: a cross-national comparison of elite French and Swedish athletes2007In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 101-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The focus of this paper is on a cross-national comparison of elite French and Swedish athletes in terms of a) pre-conditions for the athletic retirement, b) coping and related factors, c) perceived quality and long-term consequences of the transition. The study also examines an impact of retirement planning upon the transition process and outcomes. Method: The Retirement from Sports survey (Alfermann, Stambulova, & Zemaityte, 2004) translated into French/Swedish and adapted for studying athletes in corresponding countries was employed. The sample was composed of 157 former international level athletes from France (n= 69) and Sweden (n=88) comprising both males and females and representatives of different sports. The data were analysed with ANOVA and MANOVA. Results: One common and two nationally-specific patterns have been identified in the process of the transition to the post-career. The common pattern involved mainly athletic retirement pre-conditions (e.g., retirement planning), coping (e.g., action-oriented strategies) and related factors (e.g., financial support). Cross-cultural differences related mainly to reasons for termination, emotional reactions upon retirement, perceived difficulty in starting a new professional career, usage of emotion-focused/avoidance coping strategies, duration of the transition, current athletic identity and professional choice/career/life satisfaction nowadays. Retirement planning, regardless of the country, was associated with more favourable emotions and coping behaviours in the transition but was not associated with perceived quality and long-term consequences of the transition. Conclusion: The study showed that the transition out of elite sports is a dynamic, multidimensional, multilevel, and multifactor process in which nationality/culture plays an important role.

  • 156.
    Stambulova, Natalia B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Wrisberg, Craig A.
    University of Tennessee, United States.
    Ryba, Tatiana V.
    University of Tennessee, United States.
    A tale of two traditions in applied sport psychology: the heyday of Soviet sport and wake-up calls for North America2006In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 173-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is the second of two essays designed to acquaint English-speaking readers with the work of Avksenty Tcezarevich Puni (1898-1986), one of the fathers of Russian sport psychology. In our previous essay "The Russian origins of sport psychology: a translation of an early work of A. Tc. Puni" (Ryba, Stambulova, & Wrisberg, 2005), we discussed Puni's innovative ideas of psychological preparation of athletes based on his classic paper "Psychological preparation of athletes for a competition" that was published in 1963. In that essay, we grounded Puni's pioneering work within the specific socio-political and historical context of his era by providing a brief overview of his life (including extensive explanatory footnotes) in pre- and post-Socialist Revolution Russia. In this paper, we attempt to further historicize the work of Puni on the psychological preparation of athletes by discussing his ground-breaking model of Psychological Preparation for a Competition (PPC) and contrasting that work with the activity of sport psychology consultants taking place in North America during the same time period (i.e., 1960s and 1970s). In a concluding section, we will discuss some of the lessons sport psychology consultants have learned in the decades since Puni developed his model and suggest some ways future models might expand on Puni's view of the provision of psychological assistance for athletes.

  • 157.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Balague, Gloria
    University of Illinois at Chicago, IL.
    Petitpas, Albert
    Springfield College, MA.
    Fink, Cristina
    Drexel University, Mexico.
    Wylleman, Paul
    Free University of Brussels, Belgium.
    Helping athletes in career transitions: Perspectives of American and European consultants2010In: Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of AASP, Providence, RI: AASP Publication , 2010, p. 136-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 158.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Engström, Cecilia
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    How to Become a Winner in the Long-Run? Dual Career Experiences of Swedish Adolescent Athletes2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 15-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation will focus on a national level Swedish project aimed at examining adolescent athletes’ transition to, and adaptation at, national elite sport schools (NESS). In this study transitional issues (e.g., demands, resources, coping strategies related to sport, studies and private life) and athletes’ personal attributes (e.g., athletic and student identities) were addressed from a holistic lifespan perspective using longitudinal mix-method (quantitative and qualitative) research design. The instruments used in the two quantitative measurements (autumn and spring) included:  the Dual Career Survey (Engström & Stambulova, 2010), the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), the Student Identity Measurement Scale (Engström & Stambulova, 2010), the Task & Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989), and the Basic Needs Satisfaction Scale (Chen et al., in press). Participants (main sample) were athletes of 15-16 years old, representing two genders, 27 sports, and 33 NESSs across the country with 261 who took part in the first measurement and 250 who took part in the second measurement. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted twice a year with 10 participants from the main sample. The results confirmed that starting at NESS meant for student-athletes entering a complicated transition embracing all major spheres of their life. At the beginning of the year the participants underestimated demands of studying, doing sports and living at NESS and overestimated (based on previous relevant experiences) their readiness to pursue dual career at NESS. Later, during the year more awareness and understanding of the reality came, and led to their self-re-evaluation of the adaptation process and outcomes.  So, the 1st year at NESS can be seen as a way from an illusory to real adaptation (which continued even in the end of the year). Results confirmed that one of the most difficult aspects in the adaptation process at NESS was finding an optimal balance between sport and studies. It appeared impossible all the time to give 100% in both. Therefore, student-athletes had to prioritize one side that typically was sport. Some athletes experienced a dissonance between prioritizing sport and receiving a message from coaches/teachers that they are expected to prioritize studies. The study also showed contributions of athletes’ personal development (e.g., athletic identity, task orientation) to the adaptation process. Moreover, perceived total importance of sport, studies, and private life as well as satisfaction with these life domains contributed positively to student-athletes’ adaptation at NESS.

  • 159.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Engström, Cecilia
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    På väg mot att bli ”vinnare i långa loppet”: Riksidrottsgymnasieelevers upplevelser av dubbla karriärer under sitt första läsår2013Report (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Engström, Cecilia
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Swedish athletes' transition and adaptation during the first year at national elite sport schools2012In: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, p. 133-134Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Engström, Cecilia
    "Mindfoqus", Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Lindahl, Kent
    The Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Searching for an optimal balance: Dual career experiences of Swedish adolescent athletes2015In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 21, p. 4-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The paper presents a national level Swedish project aimed at examining adolescent student-athletes' dual career experiences (including sport, studies, and private life) during their first year at national elite sport schools (Swedish abbreviation RIGs will be used) with a particular focus on development of their athletic and student identities. The developmental model of transitions faced by athletes (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and the athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003) served as underlying frameworks.

    Design: A longitudinal mixed-method research design was used with autumn-to-spring quantitative and qualitative parts.

    Method: Sixteen year old student-athletes, representing 27 sports and 33 RIGs (n = 261 in the first and n = 250 in the second measurement), completed three quantitative instruments. Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 participants.

    Results: Results revealed (a) significant changes in the participants' transition/adaptation variables from the first to the second measurement accompanied by rather high perceived quality of adjustment at RIG both at the beginning and at the end of the educational year; (b) significant contributions of the transition variables to the perceived quality of adjustment with personal resources as a key predictor; (c) significantly higher athletic than student identity in both quantitative measurements, but with inter- and intra-individual differences with regard to balancing the two shown by the qualitative data.

    Conclusions: The study contributes to deeper understanding of dual career experiences of Swedish adolescent athletes; the authors provide recommendations for psychological dual career support services at RIGs and outline future research in the Swedish dual career model. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 162.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Franck, Alina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Weibull, Fredrik
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Assessment of the transition from junior to senior sports in Swedish athletes2012In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 79-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were (1) to explore the Transition Monitoring Survey (TMS) for assessing athletes’ transition from junior to senior sports, (2) to describe the transition from junior to senior sports in Swedish athletes based on the TMS data, and (3) to explore how the transition variables contribute to the athletes’ perceived degree of adjustment to the senior level and to their sport and life satisfaction. The TMS was developed based on career development/transition frameworks (Stambulova, 1994, 2003; Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and previous qualitative research on the transition from junior to senior sports. Altogether 416 participants organized in three samples were involved in this exploratory study. The study illuminated the strong points of the TMS as a theoretically based and culturally adapted instrument, but it also shed a light on some deficits of the TMS that should be eliminated in its further use in transition research. © 2012 Copyright International Society of Sport Psychology.

  • 163.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Hvatskaya, Elena
    The P.F. Lesgaft National State University of Sport, St.Petersburg, Russia.
    Athletes’ Careers in Russia: Between Olympic Games in Moscow and Sochi2012In: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, p. 118-118Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hvatskaya, Elena
    The P.F. Lesgaft National State University of Physical Culture, Sport, and Health, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Athletes’ Careers in Russia: From Moscow 1980 to the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics2013In: Athletes' careers across cultures / [ed] Natalia Stambulova and Tatiana V. Ryba, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 160-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Athletes’ careers in Sweden: Facilitating socialization into sports and re-socialization upon retirement2013In: Athletes' careers across cultures / [ed] Natalia Stambulova and Tatiana V. Ryba, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 197-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    How to manage the dual roles of teacher and supervisor: Halmstad supervision model2011In: Sport and Exercise Psychology: Human Performance, Well-being and Health: Proceedings of the 13th FEPSAC European Congress of Sport Psyhology, 12th-17th July, Madeira Island, Portugal / [ed] S. Serpa, N. Teixeira, M. J. Almeida, & A. Rosado, Funchal: Institute of Sport of the Autonomous Region of Madeira, IP-RAM , 2011, p. 147-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Novice consultants' experiences: Lessons learned by applied sport psychology students2010In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 295-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Applied sport psychology (ASP) literature reveals a number of publications on reflective practice and professional philosophies of well-established sport psychology consultants. However, there is much less interest in studying how novice consultants make the first steps in their careers and how they perceive the field of ASP in their respective countries and themselves within the field. The objective of this study is to analyse and structure lessons learned by students during their one-year ASP education and supervised practice in Sweden. Method: Thirty-seven ASP students (23 males and 14 females) took part in this study. The data were extracted from the students' final reports on their six-month interventions with athlete-clients. Altogether 278 raw data units (lessons learned) were identified. Results: We used both inductive and deductive analyses to create 33 themes and four categories named professional tools, consultant-client relationship, learning process and experiences, and professional philosophy. These four categories were further structured into three levels reflecting the students' learning process and exploration of the profession with the shifts from analysis to synthesis and from concrete to more generalized and strategic lessons learned. Conclusion: The study provides insight into the novice sport psychology consultants' reflective practice. The results are discussed using career development, scientist-practitioner and cultural sport psychology perspectives. Applications and future research directions are outlined.

  • 168.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Halmstad applied sport psychology supervision model in action: a case of an elite swedish golfer2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 105-105Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation is planned as having two parts. First, the Halmstad Supervision applied sport psychology Model (HSM) developed by the first and the second authors during their more than a decade experiences of running an applied sport psychology course at Halmstad University (Sweden) will be briefly introduced. The HSM is a “local” framework that consists of: (a) pre-conditions addressing students’ and teachers’ backgrounds, as well as contextual and organizational issues that influenced development of the HSM, (b) underlying frameworks (e.g., the scientist-practitioner model and Vygotsky’s socio-cultural theory), and goals for applied sport psychology supervision, (c) philosophy representing values and principles, theoretical orientations, and areas addressed in the supervision, (d) process including forms, methods and content, as well as the climate and ethics of supervision, and (e) outcomeswith students’ feedback and achievements (Stambulova,  Johnson & Linnér, 2014). Then, the third author’s (former student) experiences of the HSM in action during his six months intervention with an elite Swedish golfer will follow. The case under consideration was addressed by the student from a holistic developmental perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and included working issues, such as dealing with cognitive anxiety during golf matches, increasing the golfer’s self-confidence including one complicated situation with his coach, and helping the client with self-awareness and exploration of other than athletic roles to make his self-worth less depended on the golf performance. The student’s journey from the first contact with the client, through initial interviews, observations, and assessments to developing a working plan, realization of the plan with adjustments occurred, and up to termination of the intervention will be traced and complemented by reflections on the supervision and its effectiveness throughout different parts of the journey. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science

  • 169.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Insights from Sweden: Halmstad Applied Sport Psychology Supervision Model2014In: Becoming a Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Professional: A Global Perspective / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York & London: Psychology Press, 2014, p. 276-284Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 170.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Student’s Supervised Practice on Helping an Elite Swedish Golfer: Application of the Halmstad Applied Sport Psychology Supervision Model2016In: Global Practices and Training in Applied Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology: A Case Study Approach / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 280-289Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Setting up a Short International Experience for Students: Reflections from the Receiving Side2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, European Universities work on internationalization of their programs in response to the Europe 2020 Strategy, emphasizing a higher quality of education and employability of young people. During the last few years, fruitful collaboration was established between an American University and a European University. Culminating points of this collaboration were two visits of American students and staff to the host-university in Europe during 2013-15. In this presentation, representatives of the host-university will share their experiences and suggestions for organizing one week study abroad programs for American students and reflect on their pre-, during, and post-visit experiences. The preparatory period lasted for several months and included a visit to the American university to take part in marketing the study abroad trip, several meetings to design the program for the visit and ensure that all involved knew their responsibilities, discussing and receiving approval of the program from the two international departments. The program consisted of four educational modules (classes specially designed for the American students and classes together with local students involving teachers from both universities), sport events (e.g., practicing team handball with a local team, table tennis tournament), and social/cultural events (e.g., sightseeing tours). The American students also received a homework assignment to reflect on what they learned about the host-country’s higher education system, sport and exercise psychology at the host-university, and the host-country’s sport culture during their visit. Their assignments were collected post-visit and content analyzed. The summary (also shared with the American side) provided us with not only positive feedback, but also some insights into how to improve our work. Therefore, the benefits of the visits were mutual. This presentation will conclude with a list of suggestions to help promote the development of study a broad experiences for those universities that may host such programs.

  • 172.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulov, Alexander
    Wrestling club Allians, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Sport psychology consulting in Russia and Sweden2009In: Cultural sport psychology / [ed] Schinke, Robert & Hanrahan, Stephanie J., Champaign: Human Kinetics , 2009, p. 125-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Hur kunde du Ludmila?: en idrottspsykologisk analys2002In: Svensk Idrottspsykologi : medlemsblad för Svensk idrottspsykologisk förening (SIPF), Vol. 2, no 1, p. 2-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Searching for an optimal balance: Reflections on the Swedish national dual career project2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, p. 15-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation the authors will summarize a recent Swedish dual career project and then reflect on lessons learned from this project in terms of a nature of dual career development and related factors. This longitudinal mixed-method study with a set of questionnaires (N=261; N=250) and interviews (N=10) was aimed at examining adolescent student-athletes’ dual career experiences during their first year at national elite sport schools with a particular focus on development of their athletic and student identities. It was based on the holistic developmental perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004), the athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003), and the “winning in the long-run” philosophy underlying the Swedish dual career system (Lindahl, 2011). Briefly, the results of the study revealed: (a) significant changes in the transition variables during the educational year and their significant contributions to the student-athletes’ perceived quality of adjustment with personal resources as a key predictor, and (b) the participants’ search for an optimal balance between their athlete and student roles/identities. Further elaboration on the results led to several conclusions that might inform future dual career studies. First, to clarify a nature of dual career development, the optimal dual career balance was defined as a combination of sport and studies that helped student-athletes achieve their educational and athletic goals, live satisfying private lives and maintain their health and well-being. Second, recommendations for the dual career service providers emphasized: (a) helping student-athletes to develop personal resources (e.g., life skills), (b) planning shifts in prioritizing sport or studies during the educational year/competitive season, and (c) ensuring an empowerment (rather than controlling) approach in social support from coaches and teachers. Third, the Swedish dual career modeldrafted based on the study might be an example for other countries to proceed with the national dual career guidelines. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 175.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dual career competences of Swedish high school athletes2016In: AASP 2016: 31st Annual Conference: Phoenix, AZ, Sept. 28 - Oct.1: Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2016, p. 149-149Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden dual ‘sport and education’ career (DC) programs on the high school level are established at 51 settings across the country. Within these programs student-athletes practice their sport in sport clubs and in educational settings, and have supportive conditions at school (e.g., flexible scheduling). This study, investigating Swedish high school student-athletes’ DC competences, is a national project and also a part of the European project ‘Gold in Education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) with eight other countries involved.  In this presentation (approved by the ethical board of the GEES consortium) we briefly introduce the GEES project and then focus on Swedish research findings. The DC Competences Survey was used to explore student-athletes general as well as scenario-specific DC competences. The sample consisted of 909 high school student-athletes (mean age =18.2; 43% females) from various sports. In examining general competences, the participants were introduced to 38 c ompetences and asked to evaluate them in terms of possession and importance for a successful DC. The highest in possession was “ability to live independently”, and the top three in importance (also evaluated higher by females) included: “perseverance during challenging times and in the face of setbacks”, “understanding importance of rest and recuperation”, “ability to cope with stress in sport and study”. In examining scenario-specific competences the participants read six scenarios, each presenting a difficult DC situation (e.g., missing significant days of study, sacrifices in social life, living away from home, injury), and responded about coping experiences (including perceived effectiveness) and related competences. The competences significantly contributed to effectiveness of coping with DC scenarios. It was also possible to identify transferable competences used by student-athletes in four or more scenarios (e.g., “dedication to succeed in both sport and stu dies”). The findings have become useful in defining the content of DC support services in Sweden.

  • 176.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    St.-Petersburg State University of Physical Education and Sports, St.-Petersburg, Russia.
    Lukiyanov, Vladimir
    St.-Petersburg State University of Physical Education and Sports, St.-Petersburg, Russia.
    Post-sports career adaptation of Russian athletes2000In: Proceedings of the 5th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Sciences / [ed] J. Avela, P. Komi, & J. Komilainen, ECSS , 2000, p. 701-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ryba, TatianaAarhus University, Denmark.
    Athletes' careers across cultures2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 178.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Athletes’ careers across cultures : new directions in career research and praxis2011In: Sport and Exercise Psychology: Human Performance, Well-being and Health: Proceedings of the 13th FEPSAC European Congress of Sport Psyhology, 12th-17th July, Madeira Island, Portugal / [ed] S. Serpa, N. Teixeira, M. J. Almeida, & A. Rosado, Funchal: Institute of Sport of the Autonomous Region of Madeira, IP-RAM , 2011, p. 137-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Athletes’ careers across cultures: The ISSP project2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 56-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This symposium introduces the recent ISSP book project: “Athletes’ Careers across Cultures” (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013). The book editors and several chapter authors will discuss how culture (as a multilevel phenomenon) informs athletes’ career development as well as existing career research and career assistance programs around the world. The first presenter will briefly introduce the idea of “Athletes’ Careers across Cultures” project and then focus on two epistemological perspectives (‘waves’) in existing career research, such as the cross cultural perspective gravitating to the positivist epistemology, and the cultural mindset perspective located within a constructivist epistemological paradigm. She will further share the insights related to the emerging “third wave” based on the cultural praxis paradigm. The second presenter will focus on Canadian context tracing an evolution and introducing several theoretical frameworks and lines of current career research in Canada. The third presenter is going to discuss New Zealand context emphasizing how a change on the society/sport system level that is development of the Carded Athlete Program influenced carded athletes’ career development and transitional experiences. This presenter will also point out that a holistic perspective in managing athletes’ development in the Carded Athlete Program is only declared, and more should be done to incorporate this perspective in New Zealand’s sporting culture. The forth presenter will show how the holistic/developmental perspective embodied into the developmental model of transitions faced by athletes (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) has already informed both career research and career support services for athletes in Belgium (Flanders). The fifth presenter is going to emphasize the lessons learned from the analysis of career research and career assistance in 19 countries represented in “Athletes’ Careers across Cultures” and will proceed with a set of new challenges for career researchers and practitioners shaped as cultural praxis of athletes’ careers approach.

  • 180.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Aarhus. Denmark.
    Setting the bar: Towards cultural praxis of athletes’ careers2013In: Athletes' careers across cultures / [ed] Natalia Stambulova & Tatiana V. Ryba, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 235-254Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 181.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Towards Cultural Praxis of Athletes' Careers2013In: Lifelong Physical and Mental Well-Being through Sport and Exercise: 2013 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2013, p. 147-147Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 182.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark .
    Towards cultural praxis of athletes’ careers2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, p. 57-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In editing the recent ISSP book, Athletes’ Careers across Cultures, we were able to analyze the evolution and current status of career research and assistance in 19 countries. One lesson from this analysis is that career researchers/practitioners should be more proactive in anticipating and matching changes in both the modern sporting context and international sporting culture (e.g., increased globalization, commercialization, professionalization, transnationalism, and cultural exchange). Based on this analysis and the collective wisdom of the book’s contributors, we suggest a new paradigm termed cultural praxis of athletes’ careers (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013), which we set as a challenge for career researchers and practitioners. The quintessence of this approach is to consider career theories, research and assistance as permeated by culture and united into cultural praxis. More specifically, the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers implies: (a) a merge of the holistic lifespan (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and holistic ecological (Henriksen, 2010) perspectives in career research and assistance, (b) reflexive situatedness of career projects in relevant socio-cultural and historical contexts (e.g., Ryba, 2009; Ryba, Schinke & Tenenbaum, 2010; Stambulova & Alfermann, 2009), (c) an idiosyncratic approach in career research and assistance with specific attention to diversity in career patterns/trajectories, including marginalized athletic populations, such as female, gay, and ethnic minority athletes (e.g., Ryba & Schinke, 2009; Stambulova, 2010), (d) an increased attention to transnationalism in contemporary sporting culture and to trans-disciplinary career research, helping to grasp athletes’ multifaceted lived experiences in sport and beyond (e.g., Azócar, Torregrosa, Pallarés, & Pérez, 2012; Ryba, 2011; Ryba, Haapanen, Mosek, & Ng, 2012; Schinke, Gauthier, Dubuc, & Crowder, 2007), (e) multicultural and transnational consulting, including international networks of existing Career Assistance Programs (e.g., Schinke & Hanrahan, 2009; Schinke, McGannon, Parham, & Lane, 2012; Stambulova, Alfermann, Statler, & Côté, 2009), (f) participatory action research facilitating close collaboration between researchers, practitioners, and athlete-participants (Ryba, 2009; Schinke, Peltier, Ryba, M. J. Wabano, & M.Wabano, 2010). In brief, the approach we have coined as cultural praxis of athletes’ careers challenges the culture-blind career theories, research and practice in sport psychology and stimulates sport psychologists to deal with issues of marginalization, representation and social justice through theory, research and applied work.

  • 183.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Ryba, Tatiana V.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    A critical review of career research and assistance through the cultural lens: towards cultural praxis of athletes' careers2014In: International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1750-984X, E-ISSN 1750-9858, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review article, a content area of athlete career in sport psychology is analyzed through the cultural lens: that is, through paradigmatic perspectives of cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, and cultural studies. Based on previous review papers, but mainly on the chapters of the anthology Athletes' Careers across Cultures, we identified three dominant (North American, Australian, and European) and two emerging (Asian and South American) cultural discourses in the career topic. These discourses are characterized by research foci, theoretical frameworks, and career assistance programs in action. Our critical analysis of career research and assistance around the world further indicates a need for more contextualized and culturally competent career projects, which blend theory/research, applied work, and lived culture into cultural praxis. To satisfy this need, a new paradigm termed cultural praxis of athletes' careers is suggested. In conclusion, we emphasize the importance of review papers in negotiating emerging terminology, values, principles, and approaches underlying the career topic, and share some ideas for future reviews in career research and assistance.

  • 184.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Experts focus on the context: Postulates derived from the authors’ shared experiences and wisdom.2017In: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 131-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 185.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Schinke, Robert
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Van Raalte, Judy
    Springfield College, Springfield, USA.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Brewer, Britton
    Springfield College, Springfield, USA.
    Petitpas, Albert
    Springfield College, Springfield, USA.
    Blodgett, Amy
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Aunola, Kaisa
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Viljaranta, Jaana
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Selänne, Harri
    Mehiläinen Sports Medical Clinic, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dual Career in Sport and Education: Context-Driven Research in North America and Europe2016In: Association for Applied Sport Psychology - 2016 Conference Program & Proceedings, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2016, p. 148-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the North American intercollegiate (school-based) sport context, the career development of student-athletes is an established research area focused on athletes’ transition to the university and their athletic, professional, and personal development, including preparation for the university graduation and termination in sports. In contrast, athletes’ simultaneous pursuits in sport and studies, termed a “dual career” (DC) (European Union Guidelines on Athletes’ DCs, 2012), is a relatively new research trend within Europe, where sport is mainly club-based. Therefore, special arrangements between sporting and educational institutions are needed to facilitate athletes’ DCs. European researchers adopt a holistic lifespan perspective (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013) to consider student-athletes’ athletic and academic pursuits as intertwined with their psychological, psychosocial, and financial developments. It is also emphasized that athletes (although supported) are  expected to take responsibility and develop competences to successfully initiate, maintain, and terminate their DCs. This symposium brings together North American and European researchers to discuss overlapping and specific features of DC research and applications in situ. The first presenter will briefly overview the US context of intercollegiate sports, introduce athletic identity foreclosure as a problematic issue and share a new sport-specific instrument to measure identity foreclosure. The second presenter will introduce a Canadian DC context and summarize four projects on how specific populations within it, that are immigrant and Aboriginal student-athletes, cope with DC challenges in conjunction with their acculturation processes. The third presenter will “transport” the audience to Finland and share a mixed-method project on achievement motivation of Finnish adolescent athletes, emphasizing a cultural construction of motivation. The fourth presenter will outline researc h findings on DC competences of Swedish adolescent athletes as a part of the European project titled “Gold and Education and Elite Sport”. The discussion will then be concentrated on DC intervention strategies, situated within national cultural contexts.

  • 186.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulov, Alexander
    Athletic club 'Alliance', Halmstad, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    ‘Believe in Yourself, Channel Energy, and Play Your Trumps’: Olympic Preparation in Complex Coordination Sports2012In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 679-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This paper is aimed at (a) analysing the psychological context of complex coordination sports (CCSs) and specific contextual factors related to Olympic Games, (b) sharing the authors' experiences in Olympic preparation of athletes in diving, figure skating, and artistic and rhythmic gymnastics with an emphasis on typical working issues and strategies; and (c) summarizing the authors' reflections on the role of the national sport system and cultural contexts in Olympic preparation and major lessons learnt in working with Olympic athletes. Design and Method: Analysing and structuring the authors' professional experiences in working with Olympic athletes in CCSs based on the scientist-practitioner model. Results: Major results include (a) a summary of psychological context for Olympic athletes in CCSs; (b) the temporal structure of Olympic preparation; (c) four categories of Olympic athletes; (d) consultants' strategies, reflecting major psychological aspects of Olympic preparation in CCSs; and (e) lessons learnt in working with Olympic athletes in CCSs. Conclusion: The authors emphasize the large responsibility of sport psychology practitioners working with Olympic athletes in CCSs and share lessons learnt, with a focus on seven major sport psychology approaches validated in their practice. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 187.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Stephan, Yannick
    Paris XI University, Paris, France.
    Athletic retirement of elite Swedish and French athletes2005In: Proceedings of the 11th World Congress of Sport Psychology, ISSP , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 188.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Wylleman, Paul
    Free University, Brussels, Belgium.
    Athletes' career development and transitions2014In: Routledge Companion to Sport and Exercise Psychology: Global perspectives and fundamental concepts / [ed] Athanasios G. Papaioannou & Dieter Hackfort, London: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 605-620Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter has three foci. First, it describes what stages athletes go through during their multi-year athletic career and also in their psychological, psychosocial, and academic-vocational development. The second and particular focus of this chapter is on career transitions as turning phases in career development. Successfully coping with athletic and non-athletic, normative (i.e., predictable) and non-normative (i.e., less predictable) transitions allows greater opportunity for an athlete to live a long and successful life in sport as well as being able to adjust effectively to the post-sports career. Alternatively, failure in coping with a transition leads to a crisis which is often followed by negative consequences such as premature dropout from sport, neurosis, alcohol/drug abuse, etc. The third focus of the chapter is on career assistance that is on a set of interventions helping athletes to optimize their career development and prepare for and/or cope with career transitions.

  • 189.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Wylleman, Paul
    University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium.
    [Editorial]: Dual career development and transitions2015In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 21, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Wylleman, Paul
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussel, Belgium.
    Elite athletes’ vocational development: European perspectives2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – “The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments” / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 15-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main challenges that active and former elite athletes face isto pursue a satisfying vocational career during and after their termination insport. In order to enhance elite athletes’ employability and employmentopportunities, the ‘Be a Winner In elite Sport and Employment before and afterathletic Retirement (B-WISER)’ was initiated in 2017 with the support of theErasmus+ Sport programme of the European Union. The aim of this invitedsymposium is to disseminate and discuss the research findings of the first workpackage of the B-Wiser project. More specifically, the speakers will focus onsport, educational and job-market stakeholders’ perceptions of athletes’ employabilityissues and as well as their roles, cooperation, and efficiency in supporting activeelite athletes, just retired athletes, and former athletes during their firstemployment. The symposium will consistof two oral presentations and a panel discussion. The first presentationwill provide a general outline of the B-WISER project by presenting theconsortium, the aims, work packages and methodology of the project. The secondpresentation will focus on an evaluation of roles, cooperation and efficiencymeasures of the career support services from a European perspective. In thefinal panel discussion, career research and assistance experts from the sixparticipating countries (i.e. Belgium, Germany, Italy, Slovenia, Spain andSweden) will discuss various aspects of the vocational career support to activeand retired elite athletes from their national perspective.

  • 191.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Wylleman, Paul
    Free University of Brussels, Belgium.
    New trends in the career transition research2011In: Sport and Exercise Psychology: Human Performance, Well-being and Health: Proceedings of the 13th FEPSAC European Congress of Sport Psyhology, 12th-17th July, Madeira Island, Portugal / [ed] S. Serpa, N. Teixeira, M. J. Almeida, & A. Rosado, Funchal: Institute of Sport of the Autonomous Region of Madeira, IP-RAM , 2011, p. 213-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 192.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Wylleman, Paul
    Free University in Brussels, Belgium .
    Talent development and career development topics in sport psychology: Two liquids in one bottle or the same liquid in two bottles?2011In: Proceedings of the 13th European Congress of Sport Psychology, Madeira, Portugal. FEPSAC on-line publication, FEPSAC , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An idea of this invited symposium is to get together career and talent development researchers and practitioners in sport psychology to share ideas and discuss possible ways of improving cooperation between these two overlapping topics. The symposium will start with two presentations of the talent development and career development topics in sport psychology each covering relevant key terms, evolution, theoretical frameworks, major research directions, and applied aspects. The presentations will be followed by a panel discussion with six participants representing both topics and different cultural traditions in sport psychology. Here is a set of discussion questions: (1) What is the common ground and what are the differences between both approaches? (2) What are the topics of mutual interest? For example, (a) Career initiation and related talent development issues: early specialization vs. early diversification; talent selection vs. young athletes' motivation and commitment; beginning of sport specialization; role of parents; (b) Career continuation and related talent development issues: dropout from sports in adolescent years and transition from junior to senior sports; identity development and dual careers for junior athletes (elite sport schools, etc.), and (c) Career termination and related talent development issues: transferable skills, personal identity, readiness for athletic retirement, (3) What can we learn from each other? (4) What are the needs in future research and how can we cooperate with each other? The symposium might become a turning point in cooperation between the career and talent development topics and also be followed by a join publication of the symposium participants.

  • 193.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Wylleman, Paul
    Free University of Brussels, Belgium.
    Torregrosa, Miquel
    Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain .
    Career development and transition topic in sport psychology2011In: Proceedings of the 13th European Congress of Sport Psychology, Madeira, Portugal. FEPSAC on-line publication, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Career development and transition topic in sport psychology has had an about fifty-year evolution with an essential increase in research and applications during the past two decades (e.g., Wylleman, Alfermann, & Lavallee, 2004). Current status of the topic is characterized by: (a) sport-specific definitions of key concepts, such as athletic career, career transition, crisis-transition, and career assistance (e.g., Alfermann & Stambulova, 2007), (b) classifications of athletes' transitions (athletic and non-athletic; normative and non-normative), related theoretical frameworks (descriptive and explanatory) and interventions (preventive/educational and crisis/negative consequences coping), (c) holistic lifespan perspective (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004) and a solid body of knowledge about athletes' transitions and the factors involved (especially, about athletic retirement and transition to senior/elite sports); (d) professional practice experiences accumulated in career assistance programs (e.g., Gordon, Lavallee, & Grove, 2005), and (e) principles, values, typical working issues, intervention strategies and tools integrated into the professional culture of career assistance (Stambulova, 2010). Career development and transition research is currently spread around the world, and the researchers normally internalize their research foci from relevant socio-cultural contexts (Stambulova, Alfermann, Statler, & Côté, 2009). Culturally informed career assistance programs in various countries provide services helping athletes to reach both athletic and personal excellence, and make their athletic career a resource for the life career (e.g., Wylleman, Theeboom, & Lavallee, 2004).

  • 194.
    Storm, Louise
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Carsten
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Comparing interventions with youth and senior elite athletes: Insights from expert sport psychology practitioners2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 492-492Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meaningful sport psychology practice requires a context-sensitive approach. Competitive youth sport and senior elite (professional) sport can be seen as two different contexts that require different applied approaches; however we know little about the differences, and we are in lack of studies that directly compare interventions from these two contexts (Henriksen, Larsen, Storm & Ryom, 2014). Literature on applied sport psychology with senior athletes is far richer than corresponding literature on working with youth athletes. The objectives were: (1) to identify key themes that expert practitioners used to communicate their experiences of sport psychology interventions, and to integrate them into an empirical framework, and (2) to explore the experiences of these practitioners in their successful and less successful interventions in youth and senior sports using the framework. Twelve internationally recognized sport psychology practitioners (SPPs) were involved in semi-structured interviews (Smith & Sparkes, 2016). The data were thematically analyzed (Braun, Clarke & Weate, 2016). The SPPs’ intervention narratives contains eight themes integrated into two categories: (1) content and focus, with themes concerning e.g., adaptation of content, targeted mental skills, and beyond mental skills. (2) The organization and delivery with themes concerning e.g. the settings and ways of delivery, the nature of the athlete-practitioner relationship, the involvement of the athletes’ significant others. There were significant qualitative differences between competitive youth and elite senior contexts regarding how the interventions goes beyond mental skills and in how the SPPs involved the athletes’ significant others. From an overall perspective, the present study supports a key notion: talented youth athletes are not miniature versions of their elite adult counterparts. Working in these two different contexts requires specific approaches and should follow different guidelines.

  • 195.
    Tod, David
    et al.
    Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Morris, Robert
    Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Eubank, Martin
    Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Ensuring sustainable development of athlete career research: Mentors’ panel2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 191-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The panel will consist of four mentors led by a moderator (discussant). The panellists will be invited to elaborate on: (a) innovations in athlete career research in general, and particularly on the projects and presentations of the young scholars, (b) their mentorship experiences and how they help young scholars to navigate their careers, and (c) strategies on improving international collaboration and cross-generation professional links to ensure continuity and integrity in further development of the athlete career topic in sport psychology. The moderator will encourage discussion between the panellists and facilitate audience questions and feedback.

  • 196.
    Watson II, Jack
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Clement, Damien
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The Internationalization of Training in Sport and Exercise Psychology2016In: AASP 2016: 31st Annual Conference: Phoenix, AZ, Sept. 28 - Oct.1: Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2016, p. 164-164Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University faculty are often encouraged by administrators through strategic plans to develop international exchange opportunities to help students expand ideas and forms of thought (Lumby & Foskett, 2016). Given the educational, practical, and legal issues associated with the provision of sport psychology around the world, such a charge could be very helpful for the development of the field of sport and exercise psychology. This encouragement to internationalize programs makes sense in terms of the potential benefits for the educational, social, cultural and professional development of students, as well as the professional development of faculty. However, the logistical challenges of developing such programs can be overwhelming, especially when added on to the other pressures and time demands facing faculty in the current structure of higher education. This symposium will provide attendees with an overview of a specific exchange program developed between an American and European  university with the goal of enhancing the educational opportunities for students at both institutions. Individual presentations will address: 1) the benefits and challenges associated with internationalization of programs, 2) the steps associated with moving from concept development to actual travel, 3) the process of coordinating the receipt of study abroad students and faculty, and 4) future perspectives about international collaboration in the education of sport and exercise psychology students. The primary goals of this symposium will be to provide the audience with an understanding of the benefits and challenges of establishing and carrying out such a program from both the sending and receiving institutions, the provision of suggestions for moving forward with such a program from the perspective of both the sending and receiving institutions, and the identification of future directions with regard to the internationalization of sport and exercise psychology programs.

  • 197.
    Watson, Jack
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Clement, Damien
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Future perspectives on international collaboration in sport and exercise psychology education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After two successful experiences of organizing study abroad trips, the American and the European Universities now work to continue and expand the collaboration for the benefit of both sides’ students and staff. Strategic planning for the future development of this internationalization initiative now includes the development of bi-direction exchanges, semester long study abroad opportunities, the development of a shared online learning platform for the creation of discussion boards and learning modules that would be available to both the American and European students, and the development of a joint on-line course on selected topics in international sport and exercise psychology related to major expertise areas at both universities. The focus of this presentation will be to reflect on the potential strategies in place to meet the current challenges of internationalization. This portion of the presentation will utilize a discussion based format and include the audience to help facilitate the achievement of the stated goals.  Such a discussion will include an overview of the lessons learned in the past, a discussion of the future vision for internationalization, and a discussion about problem solving strategies that can be used within university settings to enhance the likelihood of creating a successful internationalization experience for both students and faculty within sport and exercise psychology. As an outcome, the benefits and challenges of developing such an initiative will be outlined.

  • 198.
    Wylleman, Paul
    et al.
    Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussel, Belgium.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    P.F. Lesgaft State Academy of Physical Education, St.-Petersburg, Russia.
    Biddle, Stuart
    Department of Physical Education, Sports Science and Recreation Management, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Career transitions in sport: Research and interventions1999In: Psychology of Sport and Exercise: Enhancing the Quality of Life, Proceedings of the 10th European Congress of Sport Psychology – FEPSAC, Part 2 / [ed] V. Hosek, P. Tilinger, & L. Bilek, Prague: Charles University , 1999, p. 301-303Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 199.
    Zervas, Yannis
    et al.
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Physical activity and cognitive functioning1999In: Psychology for physical educators / [ed] Yves Vanden Auweele, Frank Bakker, Stuart Biddle, Marc Durand, Roland Seiler, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics , 1999, p. 135-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
1234 151 - 199 of 199
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