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  • 151.
    Barow, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Bernhard, Dörte
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lernen im Schatten der Gymnasialreform in Schweden2015In: Die UN-Behindertenrechtskonvention und ihre Umsetzung: Beiträge zur Interkulturellen und International vergleichenden Heil- und Sonderpädagogik / [ed] Annette Leonhardt, Katharina Müller & Tilly Truckenbrodt, Bad Heilbrunn: Verlag Julius Klinkhardt, 2015, p. 266-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    In den letzten Jahren hat sich das schwedische Bildungswesen grundlegend gewandelt. So wurde 2011 eine Gymnasialreform durchgeführt, die u.a. striktere Aufnahmekriterien vorsieht. Zugleich wurden fünf Einführungsprogramme implementiert, die Schülern den Übergang in ein Nationales Programm oder in den Arbeitsmarkt ermöglichen sollen. Im Beitrag wird deutlich, dass die Schülerzahl in speziellen Programmen zunimmt, ohne dass bislang eine verbesserte Eingliederung in den Arbeitsmarkt zu erkennen ist.

  • 152.
    Batory, Agnes
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Svensson, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Regulating Collaboration: The Legal Framework of Collaborative Governance in Ten European Countries2019In: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many scholars have considered when and why collaboration between government agencies and societal actors occurs. This article argues that a simple but largely overlooked answer to these questions is that a formal legal or administrative requirement to do so is in place. Therefore, the objective is to substantiate whether there are legal requirements to collaborate and in what type of source and context this obligation applies in ten European countries. The main finding is that collaboration is underpinned by an extensive range of legal requirements in Europe, although imposing these requirements is generally not the main objective. © 2019 The Author(s).

  • 153.
    Battochio, Randy C.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Career barriers in the National Hockey League: An inductive thematic analysis of first-hand data from Canadian professional ice hockey players2019In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 448-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of the study were: (a) to examine the Canadian National Hockey League (NHL) players’ internal and external barriers associated with the demands at each NHL career stage and status together with across-career barriers, and (b) to feature the Canadian NHL players’ barriers in the empirical career model. Five rookies, five veterans, and 13 retirees agreed to participate in conversational interviews before their transcripts underwent an interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2012). Prospects face draft year pressure and team camp anxiety. Rookies and sophomores deal with insecurity with teammates and roster spot uncertainty. Prime veterans have to manage ruminating over missed chances while seasoned veterans struggled with social connections. Across career stages and statuses, NHL players deal with career threatening injuries and conflicts with head coach. After discussing how these results contribute to the empirical career model of Canadian NHL players and also extend the career transition and maladaptation literatures, delimitations and future directions are proposed for sport psychology researchers. 

  • 154.
    Battochio, Randy C.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Coping strategies and resources in the National Hockey League: An inductive thematic analysis with Canadian professional ice-hockey players2017In: Conference Abstracts: 32nd Annual Conference AASP2017, Orlando, FL, October 18-21, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2017, p. 17-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Canadian ice-hockey players must overcome numerous stressors throughout their National Hockey  League (NHL) careers. Though sport psychology researchers have conducted preliminary studies, theoretical restrictions, small participant numbers, and the use of a structured interview guide have limited breadth of knowledge. Our authors constructed a comprehensive empirical career model by eliciting 23 Canadian NHL players. The intent in the presentation is to feature the stressors, barriers, coping strategies and resources utilised at each status and career stage. Five rookies, five veterans, and 13 retirees agreed to participate in conversational interviews before their transcripts underwent an interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2012). Prospects seeking to gain entry into the NHL needed (a) realistic expectations of draft pressures, (b) training camp expectations, (c) identify the team’s needs, and (d) if demoted, readjust their expectations. Rookies developing  as NHL p layers needed a high compete level when called-up while sophomores developed by (a) knowing their opponents, (b) generating role player production, and (c) made friendships. Veterans seeking to be All-Stars coped by (a) practicing scoring and creating scoring chances, and (b) showing Stanley Cup determination. Seasoned veterans extended their careers by preserving their physique. The authors will discuss the practical applications for sport psychology consultants tasked with ensuring that professional ice-hockey players move effectively through career transitions including entering the NHL, developing as an NHL players, reaching the NHL elite, and maintaining NHL play involvement. The authors will also speak about teammates, coaches, and support staff hoping to be effective resources to their players’ career progression. © 2017 by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology 

  • 155.
    Battochio, Randy C.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stages and demands in the careers of Canadian National Hockey League players2015In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 278-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have identified some demands of Canadian National Hockey League (NHL) players, yet there is little direction for players hoping to reach the lucrative league. The objectives of this study were to identify the stages, statuses and demands in Canadian NHL players’ careers and propose an empirical career model of Canadian NHL players. In total, 5 rookies, 5 veterans and 13 retirees had their interviews undergo an interpretive thematic analysis. Prospects face the NHL combine, training camp and minor league assignment. While developing into NHL players, rookies deal with NHL call-ups, team competition and formative production while sophomores seemed preoccupied by the opposition. Prime veterans become All-Stars by garnering point production and challenging for the Stanley Cup while seasoned veterans remain relevant through training camps. A discussion about the model’s viability is followed by applications for sport psychology researchers and practitioners. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

  • 156.
    Battochio, Randy
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Coping resources and strategies of Canadian ice-hockey players: An empirical National Hockey League career model2019In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 726-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport psychology researchers have studied careers of Canadian ice hockey players in the National Hockey League (NHL) and devised an empirical NHL career model (Authors, 2015; in press). The model was comprised of career stages, statuses, demands and barriers to career progression without any indication of coping. The intent in the present article is to feature coping resources and strategies utilized by players during each status and career stage within the empirical model. Five rookies, five veterans, and 13 retirees participated in conversational interviews and the data underwent a deductive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2012). Prospects seeking to gain entry into the NHL set controllable expectations rather than playing to impress coaches and staff. Most prospects played in the minor leagues where they adjusted their expectations to accept roles that they were likely to have during an NHL call-up. The career stage of developing as an NHL player was about rookies producing immediately in their role while holding off internal competition for their roster spot. In the same stage, sophomores were in their second full NHL season and they studied their opponents to avoid the sophomore slump. The stage of reaching the NHL elite involved constant pressure for point production and winning playoff games. The final stage was about seasoned veterans maintaining NHL play involvement by preserving their physique despite being worn down from long careers in a contact sport. The authors will discuss the significance of the model for sport psychology researchers and practitioners, and NHL stakeholders. © The Author(s) 2019.

  • 157.
    Bean, Corliss
    et al.
    School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
    Solstad, Bård Erlend
    Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Forneris, Tanya
    School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
    Longitudinal associations between perceived programme quality, basic needs support and basic needs satisfaction within youth sport: A person-centred approach2018In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acknowledging the importance of longitudinal data to test process-based psychological theories of motivation is critical. The purpose of this study was to use a person-centred approach to identify unique subgroups (i.e. profiles) of youth athletes based on their level of self-reported programme quality (PQ) and basic needs support mid-way through their sport season and investigate potential differences between the subgroups on their self-reported basic needs satisfaction at the end of the sport season. The current study involved 541 Canadian youth athletes (males n = 289; females n = 250; gender-fluid n = 2) within 52 sport programmes over the course of 18 months. Youthathletes ranged in age from 8 through 19 (M = 13.76, SD = 2.61). A latent profile analysis (LPA) in Mplus 8.0 was used to carry out the analyses. The LPA revealed three distinct profiles based on youth athletes’ levels of self-reported PQ and basic needs support. Specifically, athletes who perceived their sport experience to be of higher quality and supported their basic psychological needs midway through the sport season also reported higher levels of basic needs satisfaction at season end. Results from this study contribute to the field of sport psychology through understanding how basic needs theory contributes to the dimensions of programme quality and by informing recommendations for future coach education on how to satisfy youth athletes’ basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness through programmedelivery. © 2018 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 158.
    Becker-Larsen, Astrid
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport. University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    “Organizing for Excellence”: Stress-Recovery States in the Danish National Orienteering Team during a Training Camp and the 2015 World Championship2017In: Scandinavian Sports Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 8, p. 87-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elite athletes push themselves physically and psychologically to their limits in order to develop as athletes and to deliver top performances. To succeed, the athletes must manage their energy. This is particularly important in the periods of high demand on the athletes’ resources (Kellmann, Altenburg, Lormes, & Steinacker, 2001). These include training camps and competitions, because such events are generally intense and likely to induce increased stress, and their schedules often do not allow sufficient time for recovery (Elbe & Kellmann, 2007; Foster, Snyder, & Welsh, 1999). In 2015, the Danish national orienteering coach decided, as a new initiative, to include a three-week training camp in their preparation for the World Championship. The coach was aware that such a long period of intense focus on orienteering would require efficient energy management in the athletes. Therefore, the coach supported the research team in this study aimed at monitoring the athletes’ stress-recovery states during the preparatory camp and the World Championship, with further exploration of the athletes’ perceived sources of stress and recovery during the same period. From a research perspective, the present study is exclusive because of monitoring world-class athlete-participants during their preparation and participation in their most important event. From an applied perspective, searching for efficient processes for energy management during long-term training camps and competitions might become a frontier for improvement of athletes’ preparation and performance.

  • 159.
    Becker-Larsen, Astrid
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    "Organizing for excellence": stress-recovery states in the Danish national orienteering team during a training camp and the 2015 World Championship2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 639-640Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elite level athletes are under considerable pressure to perform, why energy management is a natural part of the life of elite athletes. Energy management is particularly important during periods of high demand on their resources, such as during training camps and competitions, which are often intense and do not allow sufficient time for recovery. Research on recovery has mainly focused on individual physical and physiological strategies. In the 2015 World Championship, the Danish national orienteering team was the best nation, winning four gold medals. In the present study we examined: (a) the stress-recovery states of the Danish orienteers during a three-week preparatory training camp and the following 2015 World Championship, and (b) their perceived sources of stress and recovery during the two events. The study was designed as mixed-method with the RESTQ-sport questionnaire, semi-structured interviews, and a coach’s journal as the data sources used longitudinally during the camp and the championship. Results revealed: (a) well-balanced stress-recovery states among all athletes during the entire period; and (b) perceived sources of stress and recovery classified into organizational, social, personal, and athletic. The athletes themselves stated that their well-balanced stress-recovery states positively affected their learning, well-being, and performance. The organizational strategies played a key role in reducing athletes’ unnecessary stress and in facilitating individual recovery. We suggest that “organizing for excellence”, keeping in mind athletes' energy management, is a special task for coaches and managers when preparing for camps and competitions. 

  • 160.
    Bella, Donander
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Madeleine, Andersson
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Den obehagliga undersökningen: Kvinnors erfarenheter av gynekologiska undersökningar2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The purpose of the gynecological examination is to evaluate and promote reproductive health among women. The gynecological examination is divided into three different stages, where the first stage includes an examination of the external parts of the female genital organs. Thereafter an examination of the internal parts of the organ and the abdomen are performed. Aim: The aim of the study was to illuminate women’s experiences of the gynecological examination. Method: A general literature study was used, with the guidance of a simple version of content analysis. The literature study was conducted through structured information retrieval in three databases focusing on nursing research. After the information retrieval was completed, a review and analysis was conducted on chosen qualitative and quantitative articles for further compilation of the result.  Result: The result was allocated into the following main categories: (1) Experiences of discomfort associated with the gynecological examination and (2) Experiences of promotive factors related to the experience of the gynecological examination. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that many women experience the gynecological examination as discomforting, where feelings of anxiety, worry, fear, exposure, loss of control and mistrust illuminated some of the discomfort. The incidence of adequate information, a good approach and communication were some factors that contributed to the experience. Some women found the presence of a nurse during the examination as substantial. 

  • 161.
    Bengtsson, Hans
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Centre for Studies of Political Science, Communication and Media (CPKM).
    Arvidsson, Jessica
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dagens och morgondagens LSS-boende: Rapport från en FoU-cirkel i Skåne2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport behandlar frågor som rör dagens och morgondagens boende för målgrupper inom LSS. Handläggare och chefer från åtta kommuner i Skåne som arbetar med dagens boende eller ansvarar för planering och utveckling av boendeformer har i en FoU-cirkel diskuterat problem och möjligheter inför framtiden. Deltagarna har identifierat och lyft viktiga frågeställningar att arbeta vidare med ute i kommunerna för att möta brukarnas behov och önskemål

  • 162.
    Bengtsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Hallands Sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Kvarnhäll, Jennie
    Hallands Sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Svenska sjuksköterskors upplevelse av handledningsprocessen vid sjuksköterskestudenters verksamhetsförlagda utbildning2011In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 47-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central part of the nursing profession is the supervision in clinical practice of nursing students and a consequence of this is that the nurse needs to be prepared and have sufficient knowledge to support student's learning process. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of nurses' experiences of the supervision of nursing students in clinical practice. Fifteen nurses with experience of being supervisor were interviewed and the data material was analyzed with a Grounded Theory approach. The results comprise a core category “supervision was perceived as developing and stimulation” and four categories; to have sufficient with time, to have a working co-operation, to have sufficient knowledge and to get confirmation. These categories formed a conceptual model explaining the nurse’s experiences of the process of supervision and their needs of time, co-operation, knowledge and confirmation if the supervision should be perceived as developing and stimulating. More research needs to be conducted to expand the perspective on how supervision education and opportunities for reflection during the clinical education contribute to the student's learning process.

  • 163.
    Bengtsson, Sverker
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Time, Money and Support: Student-Athletes Transition to High Achivement Sport2012In: Athletic Insight: The Online Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 1536-0431, E-ISSN 1947-6299, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of within-career transition, as experienced by student-athletes striving to reach the international level. Interviews were used to examine the perceptions of 26 Swedish student-athletes with a mean age of 22.5 years practicing individual sportsatthe national elite level, involved in a career assistance program. Categories identified through thematiccontent analysis were changes experienced in the transition, the career assistance program, resources to adjust to the new level in sport, satisfaction with their current situation, and strategies to adjust to the new level in sport. The athletes highlighted the value of interpersonal support and commitment, and recognized the need to develop further coping strategies, such as stress and time management. Practical implications for promoting successful within-career transitions are discussed. © 2012 Athletic Insight, Inc.

  • 164. Berggren, Ulf
    et al.
    Hägglin, Catharina
    Hallberg, Ulrika
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychological and Quality of Life Aspects of Edentulousness and Treatment with Dental Implants2005In: The osseointegration book: from calvarium to calcaneus, Berlin: Quintessence Publishing , 2005, p. 157-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Bergh, Susanne
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Skogman, Eva
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Tideman, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Vågar lite mer: Studerandes erfarenheter av längre folkhögskolekurser riktade till personer med utvecklingsstörning2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Specialpedagogiska skolmyndighetens (SPSM) övergripande uppdrag är att alla ska få möjlighet att nå målen för sina studier och för sin utbildning. Myndigheten arbetar med olika insatser och stöd för att fullgöra detta uppdrag. Den här rapporten handlar om folkhögskolor som får vissa statsbidrag från myndigheten, för att ge stöd till att personer med funktionsnedsättning ska kunna studera där. Myndigheten har till uppgift att följa upp och utvärdera effekter av de statsbidrag som ges.

    Den här rapporten handlar om betydelsen av studier på folkhögskola för personer med utvecklingsstörning. Det är deltagarnas egna erfarenheter och bedömningar av kursernas påverkan på kunskapsutvecklingen, sociala relationer, personlig utveckling och effekter för sysselsättningen som är i fokus. Intervjuer har genomförts med personer som studerar och med personer som tidigare har studerat på folkhögskola.

    I rapportens inledning redogörs för folkbildningens och folkhögskolornas grundläggande karaktär och uppdrag. Några slutsatser som studien visar på är att de studerande är nöjda med sina studier och att den personliga och sociala utvecklingen är i centrum. De flesta har sysselsättning inom daglig verksamhet efter genomförda studier. En slutsats som redovisas i studien är att folkbildningen har betydelse för att öka förutsättningar till ett aktivt liv i gemenskap med andra. Studien pekar även på behov av ökade och fördjupade studier av folkhögskolors betydelse för personer med utvecklingsstörning.

     

  • 166.
    Berglund, Jenny
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Haraldsson, Caisa
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Högt tryck på hälsan: En metasyntes om hur glaukom påverkar livet2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Glaucoma is a progressive chronic disease that slowly decreases visual perception. In order to optimize and individualize the care to people living with glaucoma, the ophthalmic nurse needs to understand the impact glaucoma has on daily life. The aim of this metha-synthesis is to present a synthesis of current research concerning experiences of living with glaucoma. The results of this metha-synthesis indicates that the feelings and experiences of living with glaucoma are coherent internationally. Glaucoma has both an emotional impact and an effect of the perceived autonomy. The treatment and regularly contacts with healthcare providers disturbs daily life. In order to improve the perceived health, persons with glaucoma need knowledge, how to cope with the different dimensions of the disease and the treatment. If the ophthalmic nurse, more efficiently could identify the areas in need of care, health promoted, check-up intervals prolonged, and the costs of healthcare reduced. Further research is needed concerning what persons living with glaucoma would prefer the healthcare to focus on, as well as the socioeconomic impact of their preferences.

  • 167.
    Bergman, Bodil
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Moving away from facades: in-depth interviews with subjectively healthy women diagnosed with distress2005In: Qualitative Research in Psychology, ISSN 1478-0887, E-ISSN 1478-0895, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 169-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:

    To gain a deeper understanding of why women, diagnosed with mental distress, reported good physical and mental health. What could the reason be and how did they feel four to five years later?

    Method:

    In-depth interviews were conducted with seven women; age 33 to 52, who worked in a Swedish male-dominated industry. The methodological approach relied on grounded theory.

    Results:

    A conceptual model was generated in the analysis, describing a temporal process of change in the women's self-image. Three core concepts illuminated this process:(1) maintaining an ideal self-image, (2) waking up/reappraising health and (3) struggling for a realistic self. The women were moving away from facades of meeting social expectations and pleasing others toward trusting and setting boundaries for themselves. Moving away from symptoms such asasthma, migraine and infections, as well as family problems, they felt and hoped that they had more control over their lives.

    Conclusions:

    A conceptual model was proposed to illustrate a temporal change in women's self-image related to their changing perception of health. Women's newway of life challenges the support system within organizations and society.

  • 168.
    Bergseth Bogsti, Wenche
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gjövik.
    Solvik, Elisabeth
    Högskolan i Gjövik.
    Engelien, Ragna Ingeborg
    Högskolan i Gjövik.
    Larsen Moen, Øyfrid
    Högskolan i Gjövik.
    Sønsteby Nordhagen, Siv
    Högskolan i Gjövik.
    Struksnes, Solveig
    Högskolan i Gjövik.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Styrket veiledning i sykepleierutdanningens praksisperioder2013In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 56-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A more complex and knowledge-based society has resulted in increasing specialization and greater demands on employees in the fields of practice. At Gjøvik University College, a new supervision model was tested for nursing students in practice. The main elements were: daily supervisors were given increased responsibility for assessing the students, while at the same time participating in three group counseling meetings. A portfolio contained the student’s work requirements. A weekly reflection hour was formalized. Purpose: The purpose was to elucidate how the supervision model influenced the student’s learning situation. Method: The SVIP model was evaluated by the use of focus group interviews. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Findings: Three categories: structure, inclusion and self-confidence describe the students’ need for clear guidelines and objectives, as well as their need to be included and to be seen. Conclusion: Various aspects of clinical practice, including daily supervision are important for student learning. Counseling meetings where the supervisor role is recognized and developed through the tutor, and daily supervisor sharing of experiences and knowledge, should permeate the cooperation.

  • 169.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Jonkoping.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Spenshult Hosp, Ctr Res & Dev, Oskarstrom.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Jonkoping.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-10401 Stockholm.
    Berglund, Anita
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-10401 Stockholm.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Petersson, Ingemar
    Univ Lund Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, S-22185 Lund.
    Patterns of background factors related to early RA patients conceptions of the cause of their disease2011In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 347-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to identify patterns of background factors related to the early RA patients' conceptions of the cause of the disease. Conceptions from a qualitative study formed the basis for the stratification of 785 patients from the Swedish EIRA study answering a question about their own thoughts about the cause to RA. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore the associations between patients' conceptions and relevant background factors: sex, age, civil status, educational level, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP) and smoking habits. The results were presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A conception of family-related strain was strongly associated with being young (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.33-0.78 for age 58-70 vs. 17-46), female (OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.25-0.60 for male vs. female) and having a high level of education (OR 2.15; 95% CI 1.54-3.01 for university degree vs. no degree). A conception of being exposed to climate changes was associated with being male (OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.24-3.22 for male vs. female), having a low level of education (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.18-0.58 for university degree vs. no degree) and positive Anti-CCP (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.03-2.87 for positive vs. negative Anti-CCP). Linking patients' conceptions of the cause of their RA to background factors potentially could create new opportunities for understanding the complexity of the aetiology in RA. Furthermore, this information is important and relevant in the care of patients with early RA.

  • 170.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre at Spenshult Hospital, Oskarström, Swede.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre at Spenshult Hospital, Oskarström, Swede.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berglund, Anita
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Petersson, Ingemar F.
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Patients’ conceptions of the cause of their Rheumatoid Arthritis: A qualitative study2009In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 243-255Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Spenshult Hosp, Ctr Res & Dev, Oskarstrom, Sweden .
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    “Delivering knowledge and advice”: Healthcare providers’ experiences of their interaction with patients’ management of rheumatoid arthritis2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 8473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheumatic diseases are often chronic and involve a lifetime of suffering. The focus of rheumatology care is to support patients to manage their lives and master their disease. Healthcare providers and patients have different views on the consequences of living with rheumatic diseases and patients are reporting unmet healthcare needs. There is a need to integrate providers’ perspective to develop the quality of rheumatology care. The aim was to explore healthcare providers’ experiences of their interaction with patients in their management of RA. Interviews with 18 providers from different clinical settings were analysed in accordance with the grounded theory method. A core category; Delivering knowledge and advice was found to be the most important task and involved providing the patient with information about the disease and appropriate forms of treatment. Healthcare providers’ attitudes and patients’ responses influenced the outcome of the delivery of knowledge and advice and three dimensions emerged; completed delivery, adjusted delivery and failed delivery. There were differences in the providers’ experiences in their interaction with patients as well as in reflections on their role as the delivering part. There could be difficulties in the interaction when patients’ expectations and preferences were not taken into account when giving advice. These findings highlight the importance of developing rheumatology care, as no provider or patient benefits if the delivery of knowledge and advice becomes a failed delivery. The healthcare organization must acknowledge the difficulties involved in the interaction with patients in their management of RA and find methods to develop a more person-centred approach to care.

  • 172.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Spenshult Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    "Striving for a good life" - the management of reumatoid arthritis as experienced by patients2011In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 5, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    To generate a theoretical model how patients experience their management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in everyday life.

    Method:

    An explorative design with the grounded theory approach was used by interviewing 16 informants with RA.

    Results:

    The generated theoretical model emerged in a core category-Striving for a good life with two categories; making use of personal resources and grasping for support from others, which formed the base of managing RA. When relating these categories together, four dimensions emerged which characterised patients' different ways of managing RA: mastering, relying, struggling and being resigned.

    Discussion:

    The management of RA incorporated the use of personal resources and the grasping for support from others. Both self-management strategies and patients' need of support were highlighted as aspects that were of importance when managing RA. Patients' experiences of their need of support to manage RA give extended knowledge that is of importance for nurses and other healthcare providers. The relationship between patients and healthcare providers is always the key to a good encounter. Interventions to increase self-management in RA have to incorporate this knowledge when trying to increase patients' self-efficacy and with their experience of support.

  • 173.
    Bergsten, Ulrika
    et al.
    Spenshult Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Petersson, Ingemar F.
    Spenshult Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Perception of tactile massage as a complement to other forms of pain relief in rheumatic disease2005In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 157-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate how patients with rheumatic disease perceive tactile massage as a complement to other pain alleviation methods.

    Methods: A phenomenographic approach with semi-structured interviews was employed on a strategic sample of 14 patients with various rheumatic diseases, both inflammatory and non-inflammatory, who had been admitted to Spenshult Rheumatic Hospital.

    Results: Three descriptive categories with a total of nine conceptions emerged. The descriptive categories were: experiencing alleviation, experiencing trust, and gaining insight. Experiencing alleviation described how patients experience relaxation, pleasure and respite. Experiencing trust described how patients experience a sense of security, confirmation and inner peace. Gaining insight described how patients get to know themselves, see possibilities, and experience wholeness.

    Conclusions: When caring for patients who have a chronic illness involving considerable changes to their lives, it is important for health professionals not only to be aware of their physical needs but also to take account of the whole person. This study demonstrates the importance of offering patients a complement to conventional treatment. Tactile massage is a method that promotes a holistic view of patients with chronic pain as well as allowing them to find a new focus in terms of the disease and how they cope with it in their daily lives.

  • 174.
    Bergström-Wuolo, Maya
    et al.
    Public Health Center, Norrbotten County Council, Luleå, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Josefin
    Health Counselor in Luleå, Luleå, Sweden.
    Hertting, Krister
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    My heart has no hurt: The health of young immigrants2018In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 290-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore health from the perspective of young immigrants in Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach: A total of 25 newly arrived young immigrants attending Swedish language classes in northern Sweden participated by drawing and writing open letters. They continued the open-ended sentence “Now I’ll draw and describe a day when I was feeling good, that was […].”

    Findings: The phenomenological analysis resulted in three themes: longing to be in control for a better life, searching for power in the good and the bad, and striving for a sense of belonging in the new society. The findings illuminate young immigrants’ perspectives of a health-promoting everyday life consisting of agency, reflection and a sense of community. The findings also highlight the young immigrants’ experiences when health-promoting aspects are lacking, characterized by disillusionment, anxiety and loneliness. The findings are discussed with health promotion, health literacy and young immigrants in mind.

    Practical implications: According to young immigrants, meeting basic needs such as food, sleep and housing is health promoting but easily taken for granted. Being able to have a say in matters concerning everyday life, social inclusion and finding power in memories – positive and negative – can promote health in young immigrants.

    Originality/value: The young immigrants were able to communicate via drawings and words to overcome language barriers. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 175.
    Bernhard, Dörte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Die Reform der "Gymnasiesärskola" in Schweden2015In: Die UN-Behindertenrechtskonvention und ihre Umsetzung: Beiträge zur Interkulturellen und International vergleichenden Heil- und Sonderpädagogik / [ed] Annette Leonhardt, Katharina Müller & Tilly Truckenbrodt, Bad Heilbrunn: Verlag Julius Klinkhardt, 2015, p. 258-265Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Im Zuge der schwedischen Gymnasialreform wird derzeit auch die so genannte „Gymnasiesärskola“, die gymnasiale Sonderschule für Jugendliche mit geistiger Behinderung umgestaltet. Diese Schulform soll stärker mit der allgemeinen gymnasialen Stufe zusammenarbeiten. Auch sollen mehr Berührungs­punkte zwischen Schule und Arbeitsleben geschaffen werden, um den Übergang der Jugendlichen in die Berufswelt zu erleichtern. Im Beitrag wird die Schulreform diskutiert, wobei eine stärkere Betonung der Qualifizierungsfunktion von Bildung deutlich wird.

  • 176.
    Bernhard, Dörte
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Stand und Perspektiven des Krankenhausunterrichts in Schweden2013In: Sonderpädagogische Förderung heute, ISSN 1866-9344, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 323-326Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 177.
    Bernhardsdottir, Johanna
    et al.
    Department of Nursing University of Iceland Reykjavik Iceland & Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland Reykjavik Iceland .
    Dimmit Champion, Jane
    School of Nursing The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX USA .
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). The Institute of Health and Care Science Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg Gothenburg Sweden.
    The experience of participation in a brief cognitive behavioural group therapy for psychologically distressed female university students2014In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 679-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the experience of participation in four sessions of cognitive behavioural group therapy for psychological distress for female university students' (n = 19), aged 22–45 years. Data were gathered with semi-structured interviews during March and April 2008 and analysed according to thematic content analysis. The results identified four themes: ‘Gaining knowledge and understanding’, ‘Becoming more balanced and positive in thinking’, ‘Feeling more self-confident and in control’ and ‘Opportunities for practice and in-depth reflections’. Future recommendations include an increase in sessions from four to five, with one booster session to follow-up on newly acquired skills. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 178.
    Bernson, Jenny M.
    et al.
    Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Elfstrom, Magnus L.
    Department of Psychology, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Hakeberg, Magnus
    Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    'Making dental care possible - a mutual affair'. A grounded theory relating to adult patients with dental fear and regular dental treatment2011In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 373-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental fear is a common and widespread problem, which can cause severe stress. Even so, most patients with dental fear undergo regular dental treatment in spite of their fear and many enjoy good oral health. The aim of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of how patients with dental fear manage to undergo dental treatment. Fourteen patients with dental fear, who undergo regular dental care, were interviewed. Qualitative analysis of the transcribed interviews was performed according to the principles of grounded theory. A conceptual framework was generated, and the main concern was identified as 'making dental care possible - a mutual affair'. Four additional categories explained how patients handled their dental fear and how dental care became possible. The strategies were labelled 'taking part in a mental wrestling match', 'trust-filled interaction with dental staff', 'striving for control' and 'seeking and/or receiving social support'. The results showed that making dental care possible for patients with dental fear is a mutual challenge that requires interplay between dental staff and patients, involving verbal and non-verbal communication reflecting respect, attention, and empathy. Moreover, a balance between nearness and distance and between professional and personal treatment is required.

  • 179.
    Berntsen, Hedda
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Kristiansen, Elsa
    School of Business, University of South-Eastern Norway, Drammen, Norway.
    Need-supportiveness and athlete well-being: Coaches’ competence-support at risk in the elite sport context throughout the season2019In: Current Issues in Sport Science, E-ISSN 2414-6641, Vol. 4, article id 010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how perceptions of coaches’ behaviour affected athletes’ wellbeing, by examining: (a) the potential change in perceptions of need-support from the coach (over an academic year), and (b) the within-person relationship between the three aspects of need-supportiveness and subjective vitality at the end of the winter sport season. Elite student athletes (N = 102, M age = 17.04) completed a questionnaire three times. Bayesian growth curve analyses showed that perceptions of relatedness and autonomy support were stable and high throughout the year. In contrast, perceptions of competence support decreased during the season. In addition, the results showed a credible positive within-person relationship between changes in all three facets of needsupportiveness from the coach and vitality measured at the end of the season, which supports SDT tenets. These findings reveal the importance of need-support for athletes’ well-being, and show that competence support needs extra attention in the elite sport context where competence satisfaction is constantly challenged.

  • 180.
    Berntsson, Tommy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Den prehospitala vårdrelationen ur ambulanssjuksköterskors perspektiv2010In: Forskningsseminarium 11 november 2010 Kunskapscentrum Prehospen, Högskolan i Borås.: Vårdande möten-möjligheter och hinder, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Berntsson, Tommy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Den prehospitala vårdrelationens sakaspekt -skapar förutsättningar för att förstå och tillgodose personens behov2013In: PreHospen 2013: Prehospital vård för att värna om patientens hälsa, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To be able to further develop the pre-hospital emergency care from a nursing perspective, both in the clinical setting and in the educational setting, it is important to get a better understanding and clarification of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship. Therefore, a study was conducted (Berntsson and Hildingh, 2012) to explore how the phases of the pre-hospital nurse–patient relationship described by Suserud (Dahlberg et al., 2003), emerge in 17 specialist ambulance nursing students (SANs) descriptions of ambulance missions. 

    Methods: The study has a descriptive design and uses a qualitative research method. An analysis method, qualitative content analysis with a directed approach, was used. A directed approach means that the analysis is based on existing theory or prior research (Hsieh and Shannon, 2005). In this study we decided to use Suserud’s description (Dahlberg et al., 2003) of the phases of the prehospital nurse–patient relationship to govern the analysis and the identification of categories. 

    Results: In the orientation phase of the pre-hospital nurse–patient relationship, there was an ongoing analysis process in which the SANSs were seeking to obtain an initial picture of the situation, this was made by: understand the situation with support from the EMD team, from a collegial discussion, from one’s own first assessment, from the patients and relatives or witnesses description, from the colleague’s actions, from some other health-care professional’s assessments and actions. 

    In the identification phase of the nurse–patient relationship, the SANSs made an extended assessment of the situation to understand the patient’s current needs, this was made by; assess the airway, the breathing, the circulation, the consciousness, the level and experience of pain, perform a head to toe assessment, collecting the patients’ health history and note aggravating environmental factors for care and transfer. 

    In the exploitation phase of the pre-hospital nurse–patient relationships, the SANSs focus was on the hands-on care of the patient, this was made by; provide care by managing ABC problems, assessing the cause for the disability problem, managing head-to toe problem, performing actions to prevent hypothermia, creating an intravenous access, managing pain problems, transferring the patient to the stretcher and the ambulance, assessing the patient’s vital signs and by selecting appropriate driving speed.

    In the resolution phase the SANSs targeted their attention towards the receiving care unit and the forthcoming care, this was made by; pre-warn or speak with the receiving unit, inform the patient about the continuing care in the receiving care unit, transfer the patient from the ambulance stretcher on the receiving unit, report to the receiving care unit, finish the nurse–patient relationship and follow up the patient’s condition.

    Conclusion: The results of the study show that the phases in the nurse–patient relationship, as described by Suserud (Dahlberg et al., 2003), appeared in the SANSs descriptions of ambulance missions. Furthermore, the study reveals that each phase of pre-hospital nurse–patient relationship includes several parts; these findings extend Suserud’s (Dahlberg et al., 2003) description.

  • 182.
    Berntsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The nurse-patient relationship in pre-hospital emergency care: form the perspective of Swedish specialist ambulance nursing students2013In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 257-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of the Swedish ambulance service has resulted in three different competence levels in Swedish ambulance teams: specialist ambulance nurses, registered nurses and emergency medical technicians. A nursing scientific model developed by Peplau (Peplau, H., 1991. Interpersonal Relations in Nursing. Springer Publishing Company, New York.) breaks down the nurse-patient relationship into a number of phases: an orientation, an identification, an exploitation and a resolution phase. This model has then been adapted to the pre-hospital emergency care by Suserud (Dahlberg, K., Segesten, K., Nyström, M., Suserud, B.-O., Fagerberg, I., 2003. Att förstå vårdvetenskap [To Understand Caring Science]. Studentlitteratur, Lund.). The purpose of this study was to explore, by direct content analysis, how the phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship described by Suserud (Dahlberg et al., 2003), emerge in 17 specialist ambulance nursing students descriptions of ambulance missions. The results show that the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship could be identified and each phase includes several different parts. Furthermore, the results show that the parts of each phase can vary depending on the patient's condition and the environmental circumstances of the ambulance mission. This improved understanding of the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship, and their parts, could be used by ambulance team members as a support during the pre-hospital caring process in ambulance missions. This new knowledge could also be used in education. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 183.
    Berntsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Wallinvirta, Eivor
    Arcada högskola Helsingfors, Helsingfors, Finland.
    Nyström, Patrik
    Arcada högskola Helsingfors, Helsingfors, Finland.
    Patientsäkerhet och vårdandets etik2013In: PreHospen 2013: Prehospital vård för att värna om patientens hälsa, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An international collaborative project has been ongoing since 2009 between the Ambulance training program in Nursing at the University of Halmstad and the program in Emergency Care at Arcada University of Applied Sciences. The purpose is to jointly develop knowledge about patient safety and caring ethics, through participation in experiential skills development in innovative environments. The focus areas of collaboration are: 1) To learn safety by preventing and creating resistance to human errors and malpractices in health care 2) To become aware of the outer and inner ethics, as a basis of use of the self 3) To create conditions for inner leadership and personal responsibility in health care. The course content planning is guided by an integrative pedagogy, which contains an active simulation exercise.

    Methods: Simulation exercises are given to interdisciplinary student teams at a one week exchange program in Helsinki in spring and in Halmstad in autumn. The assessment is a written work, and the student deepens understanding in evidence-based research.

    Results: Simulation has given students opportunities for an active and motivational approach to learning, where a high degree of knowledge, creativity and reflection co-exist. Students have expressed that they have learned to think and act in terms of patient safety and ethics. The concepts have been concrete and visibly demonstrated by simulating everyday prehospital emergency situations: e.g. a situation in which the patient refuses to be transported. The simulation exercises have explained theory and built bridges to practice.

    Conclusions: The discussions of reflection in interdisciplinary groups and after the simulations have been fruitful, due to students´ different experiences, but also because of awareness of cultural similarities and differences. Students have adopted permanent values of concrete models for how to act safely and ethically at the individual, community and organizational level.

  • 184.
    Billsten, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Fridell, Mats
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Robert
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) test used in the implementation of assessment instruments and treatment methods in a Swedish National study2018In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, ISSN 0740-5472, E-ISSN 1873-6483, Vol. 84, p. 9-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational climate and related factors are associated with outcome and are as such of vital interest for healthcare organizations. Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) is the questionnaire used in the present study to assess the influence of organizational factors on implementation success. The respondents were employed in one of 203 Swedish municipalities within social work and psychiatric substance/abuse treatment services. They took part in a nationwide implementation project organized by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (SALAR), commissioned by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Aim The aims were: (a) to identify classes (clusters) of employees with different ORC profiles on the basis of data collected in 2011 and (b) to investigate ORC profiles which predicted the use of assessment instruments, therapy methods and collaborative activities in 2011 and 2013. Design and recruitment The evaluation study applied a naturalistic design with registration of outcome at consecutive assessments. The participants were contacted via official e-mail addresses in their respective healthcare units and were encouraged by their officials to participate on a voluntary basis. Statistics Descriptive statistics were obtained using SPSS version 23. A latent profile analysis (LPA) using Mplus 7.3 was performed with a robust maximum likelihood estimator (MLR) to identify subgroups (clusters) based on the 18 ORC indexes. Results A total of 2402 employees responded to the survey, of whom 1794 (74.7%) completed the ORC scores. Descriptive analysis indicated that the respondents were a homogenous group of employees, where women (72.0%) formed the majority. Cronbach's alpha for the 18 ORC indexes ranged from α = 0.67 to α = 0.78. A principal component analysis yielded a four-factor solution explaining 62% of the variance in total ORC scores. The factors were: motivational readiness (α = 0.64), institutional resources (α = 0.52), staff attributes (α = 0.76), and organizational climate (α = 0.74). An LPA analysis of the four factors with their three distinct profiles provided the best data fit: Profile 3 (n = 614), Profile 2 (n = 934), and Profile 1 (n = 246). Respondents with the most favorable ORC scores (Profile 3) used significantly more instruments and more treatment methods and had a better collaborating network in 2011 as well as in 2013 compared to members in Profile 1, the least successful profile. Conclusion In a large sample of social work and healthcare professionals, ORC scores reflecting higher institutional resources, staff attributes and organizational climate and lower motivational readiness for change were associated with a successful implementation of good practice guidelines for the care and treatment of substance users in Sweden. Low motivational readiness as a construct may indicate satisfaction with the present situation. As ORC proved to be an indicator of successful dissemination of evidence-based guidelines into routine and specialist healthcare, it can be used to tailor interventions to individual employees or services and to improve the dissemination of and compliance with guidelines for the treatment of substance users. © 2017

  • 185.
    Bittlingmayer, Uwe H.
    et al.
    Freiburg University of Education, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
    Harsch, Stephanie
    Freiburg University of Education, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
    Hertting, Krister
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Kostenius, Catrine
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lydell, Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Pelters, Pelle
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health promotion of refugees: lessons learned from interventions in two European countries2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The migration of many people to European countries in the last years created various challenges and evoked diverse responses. But rarely, lessons learned and good practice for health promotion interventions are exchanged between countries nor common solutions sought. In this workshop, we will shed light on the health situations of refugees in Sweden and Germany, and present four research projects regarding the health of refugees.

    Initially, we will outline the situation for refugees in the two countries generally, provide ample evidence on the health needs and particular burden of refugees, and discuss the increasing influence of racism. Finally, we will discuss the issue health promotion of refugees, needs, approaches, limitations.

  • 186.
    Bjurling-Sjöberg, Petronella
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Sect Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jansson, Inger
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala Univ, Sect Caring Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Engström, Gabriella
    Florida Atlantic Univ, Christine E Lynn Coll Nursing, Boca Raton, FL 33431 USA..
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Uppsala Univ, Sect Caring Sci, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Prevalence and quality of clinical pathways in Swedish intensive care units: a national survey2014In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 48-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectivesTo identify the prevalence of clinical pathways (CPs) in Swedish intensive care units (ICUs) and to explore the quality, content and evidence base of the documents. MethodsA descriptive and explorative survey of all Swedish ICUs (N84) and a review of submitted examples of CPs (n12) were conducted. ResultsCPs were in use at 20% of the Swedish ICUs. There was a significant geographic variation but no relationship between the use of CPs and category of hospital, type of ICU, size of ICU or type of health record applied. In total, 56 CPs were reported within a range of scopes and extensions. The content of the ICUs' CPs, as well as the degree to which they were interprofessional, evidence based, and renewed varied. ConclusionsProgress has been made in relation to CPs in recent years, but there is potential for further improvements. None of the ICUs had CPs that contained all key characteristics of a high-quality, interprofessional and evidence-based CP identified in the literature. Greater knowledge sharing and cooperation within the field would be beneficial, and further research is needed.

  • 187.
    Bjurwill, Christer
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Read and react: The football formula1993In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, ISSN 0031-5125, E-ISSN 1558-688X, Vol. 76, no 3_suppl, p. 1383-1386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is focused on the problem of vision and intelligence in football (soccer). One-touch play is the type of football that we are to see more often in the future. To prepare the players for such play, both managers and coaches must notice the importance of technical speed and tactical creativity. © Perceptual and Motor Skills 1993 

  • 188.
    Björklund, M.
    et al.
    Centre for Health Promotion Research, Halmstad University, Halmstad and the Ear Clinic, Nordvastra Skanes Sjukvardsdistrikt, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Cancer patients' experiences of nurses' behaviour and health promotion activities: a critical incident analysis1999In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 204-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with head and neck cancer report several disease- and health-related problems before, during and a long time after completed treatment. Nurses have an important role in educating/supporting these patients about/through the disease and treatment so that they can attain well-being. This study describes the cancer patients' experiences of nurses' behaviour in terms of critical incidents after nurses had given them care to promote health. The study had a qualitative, descriptive design and the method used was the critical incident technique. Twenty-one informants from the Nordic countries diagnosed with head and neck cancer were strategically selected. It was explained to the informants what a critical incident implies before the interviews took place; this was defined as a major event of great importance, an incident, which the informants still remember, due to its great importance for the outcome of their health and well-being. The nurses' behaviour was examined, and critical incidents were involved in 208 cases-150 positive and 58 negative ones-the number of incidents varying between three and 20 per informant. The nurses' health promotion activities or lack of such activities based on the patients' disease, treatment and symptoms, consisted of informing and instructing the patients as well as enabling their participation. Personal consideration and the nurses' cognisance, knowledge, competence, solicitude, demeanour and statements of understanding were found to be important. Continuous health promotion nursing interventions were of considerable value for the majority of this group of cancer patients. Oncology nurses could reconfirm and update the care of head and neck cancer patients by including health promotion activities in individual care plans. By more frequent use of health promotion models, such as the empowerment model, the nurses could identify and focus on those individuals who needed to alter their Life-style as well as tailor their approach towards these patient by setting goals for well-being and a healthy life-style.

  • 189.
    Blank, J.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Community Health, Göteborg University, Sweden;.
    Nordin, P.
    Skaraborg Institute, Skövde, Sweden.
    Toivonen, Henri
    Children Health Care, Skaraborg, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Ulf
    Department of Public Health and Community Health, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Prevalence of overweight and obesity among preschool children between 2004 and 2008, in a rural area of Sweden: The Skaraborg Evaluation Child Obesity Prevention Project (SECOPP)2010In: Special Issue: Abstracts of the 11th International Congress on Obesity, 11-15 July 2010, Stockholm, Sweden, Chichester, England: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, p. 73-74Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Childhood obesity is considered a serious public health problem and it has increased over the last two decades. The aim of this paper was to report 5-year change in prevalence of overweight and obesity among preschool children in a rural area of Sweden. Material and Method: Body height and weight were obtained in 2004, 2006 and 2008. A total of 1914 children (1014 boys and 900 girls), aged 4 years ± 4 months and were examined at Child Welfare Clinics in two municipalities in the Skaraborg area in Region of Västra Götaland, Sweden were included in the study. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and categorized according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) and WHO cut-off as reference methods in defining overweight and obesity, and GLM methods were used to estimate the change with age as a covariate. Result: Between 2004 and 2008, overweight increased in boys according to IOTF 2.0% (P = 0.048), whereas no such trend was seen when using WHO cut-offs. In girls, overweight increased significant according to the both definitions IOTF 9.1% (P < 0.001) and WHO 2.8% (P = 0.010). Obesity has decreased in both boys and girls, however not significant. According to IOTF obesity decreased with 1.1% in boys and 1.9% in girls, and WHO with 2.1% in boys and 1.5% in girls. Conclusion: This study shows that overweight has increased in both sexes and obesity rates remained rather steady. However, public health strategies targeting the whole population is still needed.

  • 190.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Health among people with psychotic disorders and effects of an individualized lifestyle intervention to promote health2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the thesis was to increase knowledge of health among people with psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and other long-term psychotic conditions. The aim was also to investigate health effects, in terms of clinical health outcomes and self-reported questionnaires, of atwo-year individualized lifestyle intervention implemented in psychiatric outpatient services involving cooperation with the municipal social psychiatry services. The motivation for the study was to generate new knowledge in order to be able to promote health in people with psychotic disorders and to improve the care and support provided for this target group. The thesis consists of four studies. A quantitative study (Study I), was conducted using a cross-sectional design to investigate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the relationships between self-rated salutogenic health, sense of coherence, CVD risk, and body mass index among people with psychoticdisorders (n=57). The study was conducted in four psychiatric outpatient services; questionnaires were completed by the participants and clinical health measurements were collected by the participant’s contact nurse at the psychiatric outpatient services. The participants showed a moderate/high risk of CVD, the mean for BMI was 31.9 (59.6% were obese) and 31.6% were overweight. The results did not reveal any relationships between the subjective and objective measuresof health indicating the need for both subjective and objective assessments of health in psychiatric care. In a qualitative study (Study II), data were collected with semi-structured interviews (n=16) andanalyzed with qualitative content analysis. The interviews resulted in an overall theme “Being regarded as a whole human being by self and others”, which showed the multidimensional nature of health and the issues that enable healthy living among people with severe mental illness. Three categories emerged: (i) everyday structure (ii), motivating life events and (iii) support from significant others. The results indicate that a person with severe mental illness needs to be encountered as a wholeperson if healthy living is to be enabled. In a quasi-experimental study (Study III), the potential effects of participation in the two-year lifestyle intervention (intervention group n=54 and control group (n=13) were investigated. The data were collected at baseline, after 12 months and after 24 months using the self-reported questionnaire the Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS), the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25) and the National Public Health Survey. Measures of clinical healthoutcomes were conducted by the participant’s contact nurse at the psychiatric outpatient services. Multilevel modeling was used to test differences in changes over time. Significant changes were foundin physical activity, HbA1c and waist circumference after participation in individualized lifestyle intervention. The relationship between changes in physical activity, levels of salutogenic health and glycated hemoglobin (Hb1Ac) were investigated (n=54) in Study IV. The data were collected atbaseline, after 12 months and after 24 months using the self-reported questionnaires Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale (SHIS) and National Public Health Survey. Within-person changes in physical activity between baseline and at the end of the twenty-four-month intervention were calculated. Selfreported increased physical activity was positively associated with self-rated salutogenic health and negatively associated with level of HbA1c after participation in the intervention. The thesis shows that a well-founded assessment of general health needs must consider both the individual's subjective experiences and objective measurements in order to form a solid foundation for dialogue and shareddecision-making about essential care services. The results also show that it is possible to stimulate healthy behavioral changes with a two-year individualized lifestyle intervention and bring both subjectively and objectively measured health benefits for people with psychotic disorders. The importance of nurses in psychiatric care applying a holistic approach and integrating lifestyle interventions into daily person-centered psychiatric care in collaboration with other healthcare providers to facilitate changes towards a healthy lifestyle in persons with psychotic illness is emphasized in the thesis.

  • 191.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Experiences of data collection issues in qualitative studies involving people diagnosed with schizophrenia2016In: Abstracts: Narrative Nursing: Nordic Conference Of Mental Health Nursing: 14-16 September 2016, 2016, p. 41-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The viewpoint and special needs of individuals with severe mental illness are crucial for the development of mental health nursing. In-depth knowledge of the perspectives of people with schizophrenia is primarily established in dialogue with individuals with experience of the phenomenon investigated. Attaining trustworthiness in the findings in qualitative studies is of great importance and the interview approach used should assure trustworthiness in the data collection at different levels with regard to the perspectives of the individual, which is essential for developing nursing research and practice.

    Aim: The aim of the paper was to describe and discuss the issues related to data collection in qualitative studies involving people diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Method: Six qualitative interview studies regarding experiences of different aspects of life among people diagnosed with schizophrenia were reflected on and discussed in terms of issues related to data collection involving people with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia (N=75).

    Results: The discussions that generated the results revealed three topics in qualitative studies involving individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia: 1) Selection of research context with respect to participants’ different aspects of life, 2) Sampling issues with regard to judgements of participants’ ability to contribute with information and 3) Choice of data collection methods to meet the aim of the enquiry.

    Conclusion: Three crucial areas in data collection in qualitative studies with individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia were revealed. Further studies regarding sampling procedures and analysis of collected data are needed to ensure trustworthiness of findings regarding interviews involving people with severe mental illness.

  • 192.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linneaus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    How to facilitate healthy living described by persons with persistent psychiatric disorders in psychiatric out-patient settings – challenging health care professionals2016In: Abstracts: Narrative Nursing: Nordic Conference Of Mental Health Nursing: 14-16 September 2016, 2016, p. 13-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the previous decades, scientific research has demonstrated that people with persistent mental illness like schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders have a reduced life expectancy and have a higher risk of being affected of preventable physical illnesses such as developing metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Additionally it have made evident for lower quality of life as well. These risk factors make health promoting essential in the care providing and therefore it ́s important for the health professionals to have a deeper knowledge about the facilitating factors to healthy living described by persons themselves.

    Aim: The aim of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of persons affected by persistent mental illness such as schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders what facilitates healthy living in their everyday life. The presentation has the focus on the facilitative factors applying health professionals when providing care for persons in psychiatric out-patient settings.

    Method: The study was carried out in three different psychiatric out-patient settings in the southern Sweden. The data was collected through qualitative interviews (N= 16) and analyses by qualitative, inductive approach abased on Granheim and Lundmans ́ conceptualization of content analysis.

    Results: First, it is essential for persons with persistent and severe mental illness that they get support to bring out their needs to healthier living by having a dialogue about the issues of healthy living in their everyday life. In this dialog they may also need support to reflect and find out their own motivating factors to healthier living. Additionally, in this dialogue it is important to be aware of that they will be regarded as a whole person and include many areas of life like daily structure and social life. The professionals should show a truly involvement and active interest to persons when increasing healthy living.

    Conclusion: Many persons with persistent mental illness need practical support in their everyday life to maintaining healthier living. This requires the close cooperation between psychiatric out-patient settings, the housing support professionals from municipalities and the social services.

  • 193.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health Effects of an Individualized Lifestyle Intervention for People with Psychotic Disorders in Psychiatric Outpatient Services: A Two Year Follow-Up2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 839-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with psychotic disorders experience to a great extent avoidable physical illnesses and early mortality. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential effects for this group of participating in a lifestyle intervention. A multi-component nurse-led lifestyle intervention using quasi-experimental design was performed. Changes in biomedical and clinical measurements, self-reported health, symptoms of illness and health behavior were investigated. Multilevel modeling was used to statistically test differences in changes over time. Statistically significant changes were found in physical activity, HbA1c and waist circumference. A lifestyle intervention for people with severe mental illness can be beneficial for increasing physical activity. © 2019 Blomqvist et al. Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 194.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Center for Collaborative Palliative Care , Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Health Risks among People with Severe Mental Illness in Psychiatric Outpatient Settings2018In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 585-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life expectancy is greatly reduced in patients with schizophrenia, and cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of mortality. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and to investigate the relationships between self-rated health, sense of coherence, CVD risk, and body mass index (BMI) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in psychiatric outpatient settings. Nearly 50% of the participants were exposed to moderate/high risk of CVD and over 50% were obese. The results showed no statistically relationships between the subjective and objective measures (Bayes factor <1) of health. The integration of physical health into clinical psychiatric nursing practice is vital. © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 195.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Relationship between physical activity and health outcomes in persons with psychotic disorders after participation in a two-year individualized lifestyle interventionIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with psychotic disorders have a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, and excessive mortality rates which makes lifestyle interventions imperative in mental health care. The aim of the study was to investigate relationships between changes in physical activity, levels of salutogenic health, and glycated hemoglobin (Hb1Ac) among people with psychotic disorders after participation in a two-year individualized lifestyle intervention in psychiatric outpatient services. The results from latent change score (LCS) analyses showed that self-reported increased physical activity was positively associated with the level of salutogenic health and negatively associated with the level of HbA1c after participation in a two-year lifestyle intervention. The results of this study suggest that an individualized two-year lifestyle intervention brings benefits regarding both subjectively and objectively measured health for people with psychotic disorders.

  • 196.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Experiences of methodological issues in qualitative studies involving people with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia2016In: Programme: Second Nordic Conference in Nursing Research, 2016, p. 60-60Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The viewpoint and special needs of individuals with severe mental illness is crucial in development of mental health nursing. In-depth knowledge of the perspectives of people with severe mental illness is primarily established in dialog with individuals experienced in the phenomenon investigated. To reach trustworthiness of findings in qualitative studies is central and the interview approach used should assure trustworthiness in data collection regarding perspectives of the individual essential in developing nursing research and practice.

    Aim: The aim of the paper was to describe and discuss methodological issues related to research interviews involving people with severe and persistent mental illness.

    Method: Five qualitative interview studies regarding experiences of different aspects of life among people with severe mental illness were reflected and discussed regarding methodological issues related to the interview situation involving people with severe and persistent mental illness (N=51).

    Results: The discussions forming the results revealed three crucial topics in qualitative interview studies with individuals with severe mental illness. Use previous experiences of interactions with persons with mental disabilities with an open mind without prejudices. Balance the interviewee’s need of support and encouragement during the interview without manipulating contents of statements. Comprehend the essential meaning in the interviewee’s statements even when statements are short and narrow.

    Discussion: Three crucial topics in qualitative interview studies with individuals with severe mental illness were revealed. Further studies regarding sampling procedures and analysis of collected data are needed to ensure trustworthiness of findings regarding interviews involving people with severe mental illness.

  • 197.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linneaus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Ing-Marie
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Enabling healthy living: Experiences of people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services2018In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 236-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that people with severe mental illness have a reduced life expectancy and a greater risk of being affected by preventable physical illnesses such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There are still, however, only a few published studies focusing on what enables healthy living for this group. This study thus aimed to describe what enables healthy living among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services. The data were collected in qualitative interviews (n = 16) and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The interviews resulted in an overall theme "Being regarded as a whole human being by self and others", which showed the multidimensional nature of health and the issues that enable healthy living among people with severe mental illness. Three categories emerged: (i) everyday structure (ii), motivating life events and (iii) support from significant others. The results indicate that a person with severe mental illness needs to be encountered as a whole person if healthy living is to be enabled. Attaining healthy living requires collaboration between the providers of care, help and support. Health care organizations need to work together to develop and provide interventions to enable healthy living and to reduce poor physical health among people with severe mental illness. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  • 198.
    Blomqvist, Marjut
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Central County Hospital Halmstad, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    "Family in the waiting room": A Swedish study of nurses' conceptions of family participation in acute psychiatric in-patient setting2011In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 20, p. 185-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Family plays an important role in the care provided for patients in all areas of nursing. However, relatively few studies deal with the focus of the present study: the ways that nurses experience family participation in acute psychiatric inpatient settings. Data were collected by interviewing 18 nurses who had experience working in such settings. A phenomenographical approach was used to analyse the interviews. Three descriptive categories were found: family participation as a part of the caring process, barriers to family participation, and nurses' resources in family participation. The findings show that the nurses' conceptions of family participation varied, and that the family was not always a priority in this caring context. The implementation of family participation was often only based on the nurses' own interests and insights. This could mean that family participation differed substantially, depending on which nurse a family encountered, and which unit the patient was admitted at. Finally, nurses had little professional autonomy, and organizational support and education were also lacking.

  • 199.
    Boberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Persson, Jonathan
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Klubba och Boll är allt som behövs för att ha skoj: En studie om kommunikationens och kommunikationskulturensbetydelse i ett elitsatsande ungdomsinnebandylag2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: When playing in teams, communication is important, not just communication with words but also non-verbal communication such as gestures and body languish. The purpose with this study is to see how there is a co-op among communicating players , between leaders and players and to examine what meaning communication and culture got  in a youth team. The ambition with this study was to increase our knowledge about communication and communicationculture in the youth floorball team. This study is qualitative and was inspired by an ethnographical method so we got the information from observations of a youth floorball team, totally we made four observations. The result were analyzed and categorized from our observation papers. The results where categorized into four headlines, One and two-way communication, Artifacts, The communicationculture of the youth team and actions. The leader got a very important role as communicator and pedagogical leader for the communicationculture that the individual of the group wants to be used in order to promote the development in the team. In the future, more teams needs to be studied to get a more reliable source of information that can be used on a greater populace.

  • 200.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Caring for Patients with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Experiences of Patients and Healthcare Professionals2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) is a technical device used in the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias. After the implantation of an ICD the entire life situation can be affected with psychological and social consequences for the patient and his/her next of kin. The healthcare professionals play a vital role in providing educational information, support, and technical follow-up of the device. During recent years more and more hospitals have introduced a more team based organisation where the physicians collaborate with specialised ICD nurses.

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to explore how patients with an ICD experienced their life situation and howhealthcare professionals described their experiences of delivering care to ICD patients.

    Methods: The design was descriptive, combining both quantitative and qualitative approaches, and the data was collected from Sweden and the USA. The Uncertainty of Illness Scale (MUIS-C) and Quality of life Index (QLI) instruments were used to determine the level of uncertainty and satisfaction with life (I), in-depth interviews with a phenomenographic approach was used to describe how Swedish and US patients living with an ICD conceived their life situation (II, III) and how healthcare professionals’ experienced delivering care to patients with an ICD, (IV). Finally, to explore clinical aspects of ICD care in Sweden, the Delivery of ICD Questionnaire (DOIQ) was used to describe the healthcare professionals’ experiences and a content analysis was used to describe the written educational information material provided to patients (V).

    Results: There were no differences in uncertainty between pre and post ICD implantation either in Swedish or the US patients. Satisfaction with life was significantly higher among US patients compared to Swedish patients both before and after ICD implantation within the health-functioning, socio-economic and psychological-spiritual domains. The Swedish ICD patients experienced a significantly higher satisfaction with life within the socioeconomic domain after 3 months. (I). The patients felt safe in having an ICD implanted, but the conceptions varied from seeing the device as a life saver to being worried about what could happen. Gratitude at having an ICD varied from happiness at being alive to something that was alien and disturbed the patient. Being more or less dependent included how patient experienced feelings from well-being to grief. Having a network varied from having sufficient support to loneliness. Having a belief in the future ranged from having confidence to look forward to resignation. Gaining awareness described patients’ adaptation to living with an ICD and limitations due to the ICD (II). The patients also underwent a transition from becoming aware of the restriction in the life situation through a process of adaption and having trust in the ICD. This phase was followed by a reorientation phase where they adapted to their life situation and the patient and his/her family regained of their lives (III). The healthcare professionals strove to provide competent and individualised care and infuse confirmation to the patients in form of information, education and support. They gave the patients tools to handle their life situation, through existential support and mediating security (IV). Half of the hospitals had nurse-based clinic and others planned to introduce them. Three hospitals performed follow-up in the form of remote home monitoring. The nurse had specific ICD education from ICD companies and/or various university courses. In the educational information material the biophysical dimensions dominated while the emotional dimension was scarcely described, and the spiritual-existential was not referred to at all (V).

    Conclusions: This thesis offers a further contribution to the scholarly discussion about the relationship between technology and human existence and how to cope with this transition. Our studies revealed that the embodiment of the ICD reflects a merger of experiences about its presence and potential from both patients’ and healthcare professionals’ perspective. This research hopefully encourages healthcare professionals to carefully reflect on what it is like to live with an ICD and to consider practice improvement for the patients’ and the next of kin.

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