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  • 151.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Bååth, Hans
    Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Supply Chain Management Ethics: Conceptual Framework and Illustration2008In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 398-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework of Supply Chain Management Ethics (SCM-ethics). Design/methodology/approach – The research is based upon a qualitative approach using a series of semi-structured interviews. Multiple perspectives and respondents have been applied in the data collection process. The study is limited to the Swedish vehicle industry. Findings – The empirical findings indicate that the corporate focus of SCM-ethics is in part narrow in the Swedish vehicle industry. The partial focus may endanger the corporate ethical performance in the long run, while the immediate one may not be affected. Research limitations/implications – The approach undertaken and thereof empirical limitations restrict the generality of findings. However, a structure of operationalisation of SCM-ethics is introduced. It is based upon four orientations and nine areas of questions, all of which serve as a fundament for further research. Practical implications – The article explores the common grounds, and provides initial insights into the complex and multifaceted field, of SCM-ethics. It may be used for teaching, training and analytical purposes. It may also be used for further managerial exploration and replication of SCM-ethics in business. Originality/value – The principal contributions are a conceptual framework based upon four distinctive orientations and a set of summarized interview series in the context of SCM-ethics, all of which may be of interest to both practitioners and scholars.

  • 152.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway & Deakin University, Australia.
    Lagrosen, Stefan
    Department of Economics and Informatics, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Future directions of marketing knowledge: proposing an enriching framework including self-actualisation marketing2009In: International Journal of Electronic Customer Relationship Management, ISSN 1750-0664, E-ISSN 1750-0672, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 327-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to review schools and frameworks of marketing knowledge in order to propose future directions of marketing knowledge. The authors also provide a brief retrospective view of the marketing discipline. Reflecting over the origin, evolution and current status, the authors have come to distinguish three cornerstones of marketing knowledge namely objective, process and subjective. On this basis, five potential steps in the development of marketing knowledge are identified. The paper draws attention to the areas: the entrance of marketers, the levels of marketing knowledge, the introduction of self-actualisation marketing, the effect of time and complexity on marketing knowledge, and the need for syntheses and generalisations of marketing knowledge. A framework for enriching the field of marketing with these five interrelated paths of development is proposed. Finally, it provides a model of proposition to future marketing knowledge. Copyright © 2009 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 153.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wagner, Beverly
    Strathclyde Graduate Business School, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    A Process Directed towards Sustainable Business Operations and a Model for Improving the GWP-Footprint (CO2e) on Earth2011In: Management of environmental quality, ISSN 1477-7835, E-ISSN 1758-6119, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 451-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe: a process to achieve sustainable business operations; and a sustainable business model of Global Warming Potential (GWP) footprint on Earth, GWP being the measure of how much a given amount of greenhouse gas is estimated to contribute to global warming. It is a relative scale which compares the effect of a given gas (e.g. methane or nitrous oxide) with that of the same amount of carbon dioxide.

    Design/methodology/approach – A Swedish fast food chain selling hamburger meals is examined in a case study. Data were collected from available corporate internal and external documentation, by site observations as well as from non‐structured interviews with top managers and company employees.

    Findings – The company's efforts to accomplish its target of “zero mission” GWP‐footprint (CO2e) on Earth consist of both an iterative and continuous process and business model. Both underpin the corporate notion and desire to reduce fossil fuel dependency and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Research limitations/implications – The findings stress the importance of addressing corporate GWP‐footprints (CO2e) from a business perspective, rather than relying on political or governmental legislation and regulation. It also opens opportunities for further research.

    Practical implications – The case shows the possibility of implementing successful sustainable operations and sustainable business models in national “for‐profit” organisations without governmental subsidies in a highly competitive market, dominated by powerful multinational fast food chains.

    Social implications – Changing consumer behaviour and purchasing patterns, as well as governmental intervention imposed at top political levels worldwide, will most likely increase the necessity for companies to create sustainable business models linked to GWP‐footprint (CO2e).

    Originality/value – The principal contribution based on the presented case study is an illustration of how one can achieve sustainable business operations and create a sustainable business model in an industry that often has been heavily criticised in the past for harming the natural environment. It also shows how to create awareness of the GWP‐footprint (CO2e) of a company's products so that in turn customers may be able to make conscious and deliberate product choices.

  • 154.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Wood, Greg
    School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Australia.
    Proactive versus Reactive Business Ethics Performance: A Conceptual Framework of Profile Analysis and Case Illustrations2004In: Corporate Governance : The International Journal of Effective Board Performance, ISSN 1472-0701, E-ISSN 1758-6054, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 18-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of this paper focuses on proactive versus reactive business ethics performance in the marketplace. The internal perception of a corporation and the external perception of the same corporation are used as generic determinants of business ethics performance. In turn, they are underpinned by evolutionary and contextual issues in the marketplace. The authors provide a generic conceptual framework of proactive and reactive business ethics performance. Case illustrations underpin the positives and negatives of proactive and reactive business ethics in the marketplace. A profile analysis process of proactive and reactive business ethics performance is also outlined. The gap between the internal and external perceptions of a corporation's actions becomes crucial to achieve successful business ethics performance in the marketplace. Therefore, a corporation's current business ethics performance should always be regarded as an on-the-spot-account that is either proactive or reactive. An important insight of this research is that business ethics performance requires the ongoing re-connection with reality by corporations. © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

  • 155.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Wood, Greg
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Public Sector Ethics in Sweden: a 4P-Model of Internal and External Determinants in Codes of Ethics2004In: Corporate Governance : The International Journal of Effective Board Performance, ISSN 1472-0701, E-ISSN 1758-6054, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 54-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarizes and aggregates the results of a study conducted of the largest 100 public sector organizations derived from three categories in Sweden. These categories of organizations comprise 40 entities of government, 40 municipalities, and 20 county councils. The objective was to describe the determinants of codes of ethics in Swedish public sector organizations. This research reports on the responses of 27 organizations that possessed a code of ethics. The principal contribution is a 4P-model of seven internal and external determinants in public sector codes of ethics. The identified determinants relate to four principal sectors of a society, namely: public community sector, private corporate sector, private citizen sector, and political/policy conduct sector.

  • 156.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Wood, Greg
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Australia.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Australia.
    A comparison between corporate and public sector business ethics in Sweden2004In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 13, no 2-3, p. 166-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines and reports upon the results of a study conducted in 2002 of the top 100 corporate sector organizations and the top 100 public sector organizations in Sweden. The aim of the study was to examine, via a self-administered mail questionnaire, the commitment to business ethics of these top 200 Swedish organizations. This research reports on the responses of those organizations that possessed a code of ethics. It would appear that in corporate Sweden business ethics has only recently become a topic of interest and that many organizations are in the early stages of code development and assimilation into organization policies. In the Swedish public sector, organizations are less developed in their business ethics artifacts causing them to appear to be lagging behind the corporate sector. This disparity between the two sectors in Sweden currently, and each sector's intended future implementation of codes of ethics, could mean that these two sectors of business may become highly divergent in their acceptance of business ethics practices as a norm.

  • 157.
    Tontini, Gerson
    et al.
    Department of Business Management, Regional University of Blumenau, Blumenau, Brazil.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    How to Use Improvement Gap Analysis to Identify Which Incremental Innovations Should be Incorporated into Products: Managerial Recommendations2014In: 2014 IEEE International Conference on Management of Innovation and Technology (ICMIT), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2014, p. 48-53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to show how the Improvement Gap Analysis method (IGA) evaluates the possible impact of incremental innovations on customer satisfaction, and to give guidelines about applying this technique in practice. Customers of two different products, that are used at home, answered questions about their current satisfaction, expected satisfaction, and expected dissatisfaction, with attributes for each product. The results show that IGA can suggest incremental innovations that could be offered in final products, and which ones may not.

  • 158.
    Tontini, Gerson
    et al.
    Regional University of Blumenau–FURB, Blumenau, Brazil.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Innovation Management2015In: The SAGE Encyclopedia of Quality and the Service Economy / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2015, p. 305-312Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 159.
    van den Brink, Jakob Jan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Martensson, Jesper
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Entry mode decision for Swedish business-to-business firms internationalizing to India2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractTitleEntry mode decision for Swedish business-to-business firms internationalizing to India. AuthorsJesper Mårtensson, Joep van den BrinkSubjectMaster Thesis in International Marketing KeywordsInternationalization, Entry Mode, BRIC-markets, Internal & External Factors, Effectuation & Causation. Question(s)How do internal and external factors influence the entry mode decision for Swedish business-to-businessfirms internationalizing to India?How can the entry mode decision process be characterized for Swedish business-to-businessfirms when internationalizing to India?How does the entry mode, used by Swedish business-to-business firms in India, follows the Transaction Cost Approach to entry modes and the Resource Based Approach to entry modes?PurposeThe purpose of this study is to get a deeper understanding of how internal and external factors influence the entry mode decision forSwedish business-to-business firms that internationalize to India. Furthermore, the study aims at bringing in a process-based view of the entry mode decision literature.The study also aims to investigate entry modes used in India to see how it followsthe recommendations of the transaction cost and the Resource Based explanation to entry mode choice. MethodQualitative multiple case study consisting of three cases. The data was collected through personal interviews. The cases have been analyzed using a within-case analysis and a cross-case analysis.ConclusionThe findings of our study show that firms evaluate just a few internal and external factors when internationalizing to India. As can be derived from our study, the product has an importantinfluence on the entry mode decision for the investigated firms. The more standardized a product is, the easier it is to penetrate the Indian market using low-control entry modes. The higher the complexity of the product, the more knowledge is required from the firm and thus, the higher the likelihood for a firm to internationalize to the Indian market using high-control entry modes. It is also shown that firms tend to rely on earlier experiences when internationalizing to India, whereas this could limit the firms for choosing the right entry mode. Furthermore, the specific market barriers for the Indian market have an influence on the entry mode decision as well. It is also found that firms that have a causational approach to foreign entry mode will not allow for a rapid switch in the level of foreign involvement before they have reliable information as a base for the decision. The firms with an effectual approach made their entry mode decision based on selecting an entry mode with low resource commitment, seeing their achieved turnovers in India as a bonus.

  • 160.
    Vriens, Dirk
    et al.
    Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Disruptive intelligence - How to gather information to deal with disruptive innovations2014In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 63-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disruptive innovations are innovations that have the capacity to transform a whole business into one with products that are more accessible and affordable (cf. Christensen et al. 2009). As Christensen et al. argue no business is immune to such disruptive innovations. If these authors are right, it might be relevant to be able to recognize these innovations before they disrupt a business. Incumbents may use this information to protect their business and others may use it to participate in the disruption. Either way, gathering information about potential disruptive innovations is a relevant activity. The production of this information (we call this information "disruptive Intelligence") is the topic of this paper. In particular, we analyze disruptive innovation theory and formulate several intelligence topics which may help in predicting disruptive innovations. In addition, we formulate several ’biases’ which may impair the production of ’disruptive intelligence’.

  • 161.
    Wagner, Beverly
    et al.
    Department of Marketing, Strathclyde Business School, Glasgow, UK.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    A framework to navigate sustainability in business networks: The transformative business sustainability (TBS) model2014In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 340-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – The purpose of this paper is to describe a transformative business sustainability (TBS) model of stakeholders and sources in sustainable business practices with an interface and exchange node of resource residuals.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – The research is based upon a grounded methodology drawn from four in-depth case studies, spanning over six years in different countries and industries. Data were gathered from multiple sources, and interview transcriptions were returned to interviewees for clarification, accuracy, final proofreading and approval.

    Findings

    – The TBS model complements existing research by emphasising the importance of commitment to an overarching vision through corporate leadership assigning areas of strategic priority that respond to current and future environmental regulation and social needs.

    Research implications/limitations

    – Efforts aimed towards business sustainability and application of sustainable business practices in business networks include interfaces and interactions between involved stakeholders and sources. We argue that stakeholders and sources should be recognised as intertwined, where resources used in activities in a business network causing resource residuals may be recovered and reused by other actors in the business network.

    Practice implications

    – The TBS model can be used by managers to plan, implement and assess practices to provide a holistic view of sustainable business activities that supports the development of a company and its network. It may also be used to map and navigate interactions between elements within and external to the company.

    Originality/value

    – The principal contribution of the current research is twofold, a TBS model and a tool to map and navigate corporate sustainability efforts. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 162.
    Waters, Rupert
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Clusters and resilience: economic growth in Oxfordshire and Cambridgeshire2015In: International Journal of Global Environmental Issues, ISSN 1466-6650, E-ISSN 1741-5136, Vol. 14, no 1/2, p. 132-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxfordshire and Cambridgeshire are two of the most important knowledge economies in the UK. Home to world class research universities and public and private research laboratories as well as a full range of business and professional services to support the development of the knowledge economy, they have been identified as exemplars of high technology local economies by both policy makers and academics (see for example, DTI, 2002; Garnsey and Lawton Smith, 1998). This paper draws on national datasets relating to economic issues such as new firm formation, sectoral composition and gross value added to review the continued development of these centres, before conclusions are drawn on the extent to which the presence of successful clusters (Spencer et al., 2010) influences outcomes for the local economy more generally, and how Oxfordshire and Cambridgeshire have performed over the last ten years. Copyright © 2015 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 163.
    Waters, Rupert
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Birkbeck, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Lawton Smith, Helen
    Birkbeck, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Global economic crises and local fortunes: The case of Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire2016In: Global Economic Crisis and Local Economic Development: International cases and policy responses / [ed] Jason Begley, Dan Coffey, Tom Donnely & Carole Thornley, New York, NY: Routledge, 2016, p. 30-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 164.
    Wood, Greg
    et al.
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Singh, Jang
    Odette School of Business, University of Windsor, Canada.
    Carasco, Emily
    University of Windsor, Canada.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Implementing the Ethos of Corporate Codes of Ethics: Australia, Canada and Sweden2004In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 389-403Article in journal (Refereed)
1234 151 - 164 of 164
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