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  • 101.
    Strömberg, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Karlsson, Jan Erik
    Department of Medicine, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Levin, Lars Åke
    Ctr. for Med. Technology Assessment, Department of Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Follow up at a nurse-led heart failure clinic after hospitalization, effects on morbidity, mortality and self-care behavior. Results from a randomized study2002In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 106, no 19, p. 488-489Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospital of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica G.
    Centre of Health Care Sciences Orebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    University College of Haraldsplass, Bergen, Norway.
    Baigi, Amir
    General Practice and Public Health, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Persson, Sylvi
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Rask, Mikael
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Alm-Roijer, Carin
    The Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of Krantz Health Opinion Survey2012In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 181-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of The Krantz Health Opinion Survey (KHOS). A convenience sample of 79 persons (47 men and 32 women) was recruited from The Heart and Lung Patients’ National Association at ten local meeting places in different areas in Sweden. The questionnaire was examined for face and content validity, internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The findings showed that the Swedish version of KHOS is acceptable in terms of face and content validity, internal consistency and test-retest reliability over time among 79 individuals >65 years of age and with a cardiac disease. In conclusion, wider evaluations of the psychometric use of KHOS for other populations and settings are recommended.

  • 103.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Division of Nursing Sciences, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden & Department of Cardiology, Linköping Heart Centre, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden & Faculty of Health Sciences, Molde University College, Molde, Norway.
    Persson, Sylvie
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden & University College of Haraldsplass, Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Baigi, Amir
    General Practice and Public Health, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Brunt, David
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Alm Roijer, Carin
    The Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Malm, Dan
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden & Department of Cardiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Rask, Mikael
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Centre of Heath Care Sciences Örebro County Council and School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Psychometric evaluation of ‘The 25-item Sex after MI Knowledge Test’ in a Swedish context2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 203-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patients’ sexual life after a myocardial infarction is important for his/her quality of life. In spite of this, many patients are in doubt regarding their sex life after a myocardial infarction (MI) and the sexual information received, and counselling from health care providers has been seen to be insufficient. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of ‘The 25-item Sex after MI Knowledge Test’ in a Swedish context. A convenience sample was recruited. The scale was translated into Swedish and completed by 79 former patients from The Heart and Lung Patients’ National Association on two occasions, with an interval of 2 weeks. The scale was tested for face and content validity, internal consistency and test–retest reliability. The result in this study indicates that the instrument has good face and content validity and displayed a moderate internal consistency (alpha 0.61). The instrument showed some level of instability in test–retest reliability with 60% of the items presenting moderate or strong agreement between the test and retest. Further studies that use this instrument in larger and more diverse samples are thus needed.

  • 104.
    Von Bothmer, Margareta
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Promoting a tobacco-free generation: who is responsible for what?2001In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 784-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate how adolescents, parents and school staff look upon different agents' responsibilities in relation to the goal 'a tobacco-free generation'. This study was part of a larger study and used a descriptive, cross-sectional three-group design with questionnaires as the means of data collection. The sample comprised 216 pupils in grade five (11 years old) and 225 pupils in grade eight (14 years old) in a south-western county in Sweden, 293 of their parents and 119 school staff (headteachers, teachers, school nurses). All respondents agreed that adults should take a clear stand against adolescent tobacco use. The adolescents ranked their parents as the number one source of tobacco information, while pupils, parents, teachers and headmasters ranked school nurses at the bottom rank, The teaching at school focused on risks from tobacco use. The non-smoking norm at school was viewed differently by pupils, parents and school staff. The actions of family, school and society reflect the norms and these do influence adolescent smoking. The conclusion was that the responsibility to promote a tobacco-free generation was viewed differently by the categories involved in this study. The adolescents put the responsibility mainly on parents, while parents put it on the school, and the school staff on special health educators. Both parents and school staff need to recognize their importance in creating a non-smoking culture. To contribute to the creation of a non-smoking generation, school nurses should abandon their passive role in health promotion, as shown in this study, and instead engage in encouraging pupils, parents and teachers to remain or become tobacco-free.

  • 105.
    von Bothmer, Margareta I. K.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden & Department of Nursing Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS). Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden & Department of Nursing Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Self-rated health among university students in relation to sense of coherence and other personality traits2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 347-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to determine students' self-rated health in relation to sense of coherence and other personality traits. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used with questionnaires as the means of data collection. The study population comprised a randomized stratified sample of students from a small university in southern Sweden. Ethical approval was obtained from the vice chancellor, and the issues of informed consent, confidentiality, privacy and self-determination were respected. Two instruments were used for data collection; the 29-item Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, and an instrument created for this Study, named Personality and Health Instrument, containing 52 questions. Self-rated health was estimated by inverse number of health complaints. A factor analysis identified seven factors related to personality traits; the three most important were hardiness, positive affect/optimism and Type A personality. The personality trait variables were tested for correlation with each other as well as with self-rated health. The mean score for SOC was similar for female and male students, but a positive association between SOC and self-rated health was found only among women. Optimism was associated with less health complaints among female students. Type A personality was associated with poorer health both among women and men. The personality traits SOC, positive affect/optimism, hardiness and alienation showed high internal correlations. The SOC scale is discussed in relation to gender specificity and in relation to methodological and conceptual confounding. Further research is needed to explore the relation between SOC, optimism, hardiness, hostility and health. The significance of the study is that it raises questions about the validity and specificity of the SOC instrument and provides ideas for future research to develop the sense of coherence concept and instrument.

  • 106.
    von Bothmer, Margareta I. K.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mattsson, B.
    Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Influences on adolescent smoking behaviour: siblings' smoking and norms in the social environment do matter2002In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of smoking among adolescents has stopped declining in spite of all preventative efforts. There is a need for further knowledge and understanding of why adolescents initiate and continue tobacco use. The aim of the present study was to investigate important facets of adolescents' tobacco use, such as their reasons for smoking, and their smoking patterns in relation to smoking habits in the family and the social environment. This study was part of a larger one that used a descriptive, cross-sectional design with questionnaires to 216 pupils in grade 5 (11 years of age) and 225 pupils in grade 8 (14 years of age) in a south-western county in Sweden. Thirteen per cent of the pupils in grade 8 were regular tobacco users. Smoking habits by relatives, especially siblings, influenced tobacco use by adolescents. An association was found between smoking by adolescents and mother's employment, and between the smoking status of girls and family status. The pupils valued their parents opinions, and wanted parents and other adults to take a clear stand against tobacco. The present study reinforces the importance of norm setting by parents and siblings for adolescents tobacco use. Preventive measures may be more appropriately directed towards those with the highest risks, i.e. pupils with smoking siblings and smoking peers.

  • 107.
    Wahlin, Ulla
    et al.
    Falkenberg Ambulance Service, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Wieslander, Inger
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Loving care in the ambulance service1995In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 306-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ambulance service should offer good care signified by humane and individual treatment of the patients, based on love to our fellow man. The aim of this study was to find out how loving care was practised in one ambulance service. The method for the study was the critical incident technique. Twelve paramedics, the majority of whom are qualified nurses, took part in the study; they were asked to describe, in writing, critical incidents in which they had acted with loving care. The paramedics’ writings disclosed their ability to do their job with loving care, bearing on their cognizance, solicitude and empathy. On the whole, subject cognizance, the ability to judge and treat based upon the monitored symptoms of the patients, was apparent. In the main, subject solicitude loving care was shown through humbleness, consideration, closeness and being in rapport, and generally subject empathy, the paramedic’s empathic capacity and his knowledge about man’s behaviour in a crisis, became evident. From a clinical standpoint the study shows the importance of the paramedics possessing professional skill. As a contribution to science the study adds to continued research based upon descriptions made by other groups of personnel about the phenomenon to be studied; namely, loving care. © 1995 Pearson Professional Ltd.

  • 108.
    Wendt, Eva
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Trust and confirmation in a gynecologic examination situation: A critical incident technique analysis2004In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 83, no 12, p. 1208-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gynecologic examination is a common measure in reproductive health care. Many women experience the examination as a more or less negative event, with shortcomings in the examiner's behavior. The aim of the study was to describe, in terms of critical incidences, women's experiences concerning the personnel's behavior in the situation of gynecologic examination. Methods. The informants were strategically chosen and consisted of 30 Swedish women between the ages of 18-82 years old. The data collection method was qualitative research interviews analyzed by critical incident technique. Results. The result consisted of 30 subcategories, five categories, and two main areas - trust and confirmation. The personnel enabled trust when they promoted participation, created confidence, and were supportive. The opposite behavior contributed to the lack of trust. Confirmation described behavior that confirmed, respectively, did not confirm the women. This was shown through the presence or lack of respect and engagement. Conclusion. The personnel's positive behavior enabled trust and confirmed the women as individuals, while negative behavior was decisive in an unfavorable way. A complexity of patterns of knowing in nursing was identified. Participation through information that contributed to trust was important and amounted to one fourth of the incidents in the material. Respect and engagement, which confirmed the women, facilitated a positive caring relationship. The examination situation can be improved through reflection of the personnel's own behavior and further research about women's own experiences.

  • 109.
    Wieslander, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Cardiac rehabilitation efforts for patients with ischaemic heart disease - a 5-year comparative review in five counties in western Sweden2001In: Coronary Health Care, ISSN 1362-3265, E-ISSN 1532-2025, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 16-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s cardiac rehabilitation programmes are multiphase and interdisciplinary. The aim of the study was to compare different cardiac rehabilitation approaches available to patients with ischaemic heart disease and their next-of-kin during a 5-year period in five counties in Western Sweden. Questionnaires were answered on two occasions, in 1993 and 1998, dealing with the cardiac rehabilitation organization, the target groups invited, rehabilitation efforts, and the health-care professionals involved in the cardiac rehabilitation. The results show that patients with myocardial infarction and their next-of-kin were offered a well-functioning cardiac rehabilitation, both in 1993 and in 1998, at the university, county and district county hospitals. For patients who had undergone bypass surgery and their next-of-kin, cardiac rehabilitation was only available to a lesser extent. Patients with angina pectoris and their next-of-kin had the least possibility of receiving cardiac rehabilitation during the 5-year period. No cardiac rehabilitation programmes were specially designed for women, and an age limit existed in some cases. The most developed cardiac rehabilitation effort was the stress management education. The health-care professionals most frequently included in the cardiac rehabilitation teams at the university and district hospitals were dieticians, cardiologists, physiotherapists and nurses, both in 1993 and in 1998. The corresponding health-care professionals at the county hospitals were cardiologists, social workers, clergymen, physiotherapists and nurses. A research implication can be to identify who the next-of-kin are, what their experiences are of participating in a cardiac rehabilitation programme and how important they are to these patients.

  • 110.
    Wieslander, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Cardiac Rehabilitation Nurses’ Experiences of Factors Influencing Female Patients’ Recovery After Their First Myocardial Infarction2013In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, London: Sage Publications, 2013, Vol. 12, p. S77-S78Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Secondary prevention care after a Myocardial Infarction (MI) has not improved during the last 15 years at the same rate as acute MI care. One reason could be that research and health care focus more on treatment, symptoms and risk factors and not on the individuals’ perceptions of the recovery process after an MI. Most previous research focuses on recovery from the women’s and their partners’ point of view. Since cardiac rehabilitation nurses meet many women after MI, their experiences of the women’s recovery process may be an important complement perspective.

    Purpose

    The aim was to explore cardiac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first MI.

    Method

    The study was conducted using qualitative content analysis. Twenty cardiac rehabilitation nurses were interviewed and the study was carried out at 10 hospitals in Sweden.

    Conclusions

    Cardiac rehabilitation nurses experienced that women’s recovery after an MI was influenced by factors that were both related to their own individual as well as by their surroundings factors. The underlying meaning of women´s recovery is characterized as the transition process to the recovery to health.

  • 111.
    Wieslander, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden Jönköping.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Female patients' recovery after their first myocardial infarction2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Secondary prevention care after a Myocardial Infarction (MI) has not improved during the last 15 years at the same rate as acute MI care. One reason could be that research and health care focus more on treatment, symptoms and risk factors and not on the individuals’ perceptions of the recovery process after an MI. Most previous research focuses on recovery from the women’s and their partners’ point of view. Since cardiac rehabilitation nurses meet many women after MI, their experiences of the women’s recovery process may be an important complement perspective.

    Purpose

    The aim was to explore cardiac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first MI.

    Method

    The study was conducted using qualitative content analysis. Twenty cardiac rehabilitation nurses were interviewed and the study was carried out at 10 hospitals in Sweden.

    Conclusions

    Cardiac rehabilitation nurses experienced that women’s recovery after an MI was influenced by factors that were both related to their own individual as well as by their surroundings factors. The underlying meaning of women´s recovery is characterized as the transition process to the recovery to health.

  • 112.
    Wieslander, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Högskolan Jönköping, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Högskolan Jönköping, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first myocardial infarction as experienced by cardiac rehabilitation nurses2013In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 230-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the developed part of the world, coro- nary heart disease is the major cause of death and is one of the leading causes of disease burden. In Swe- den, more than 30,000 people per year are affected by myocardial infarction and out of these approximately 40% are women. Nearly 70% of the women survive and after a myocardial infarction a recovery process follows. Today’s health care focuses more on treat- ment, symptoms and risk factors than on the indi- viduals’ perceptions of the recovery process. Aim: To explore cardiac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing female patients’ recovery after their first myocardial infarction. Methods: Twenty cardiac rehabilitation nurses were interviewed. The study was conducted using qualitative content analy- sis. Results: The cardiac rehabilitation nurses experi- enced that women’s recovery after a first myocardial infarction was influenced whether they had a suppor- tive context, their ability to cope with the stresses of life, if they wanted to be involved in their own per- sonal care and how they related to themselves. Con- clusions: Women’s recovery after a myocardial in- farction was influenced by factors related to sur- roundings as well as own individual factors. The un- derlying meaning of women’s recovery can be de- scribed as the transition process of a recovery to health. Our findings suggest that a focus on person- centered nursing would be beneficial in order to promote the every woman’s personal and unique re- covery after a myocardial infarction. Finally, the car- diac rehabilitation nurses’ experiences of factors influencing male patients’ recovery after their first myo- cardial infarction should be important to investigate. 

  • 113.
    Wieslander, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Women’s experiences of how their recovery process is promoted after a first myocardial infarction: Implications for cardiac rehabilitation care2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11, article id 30633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A rapid improvement in the care of myocardial infarction (MI) in the emergency services has been witnessed in recent years. There is, however, a lack of understanding of the factors involved in a successful recovery process, after the initial stages of emergency care among patients, and in particular those who are women. Both preventive and promotive perspectives should be taken into consideration for facilitating the recovery process of women after a MI.

    Aim: To explore how women’s recovery processes are promoted after a first MI.

    Methods: A qualitative content analysis was used.

    Findings: The women’s recovery process is a multidirectional process with a desire to develop and approach a new perspective on life. The women’s possibility to approach new perspectives on life incorporates how they handle the three dimensions: behaviour, that is, women’s acting and engaging in various activities; social, that is, how women receive and give support in their social environment; and psychological, that is, their way of thinking, reflecting, and appreciating life.

    Conclusions: The personal recovery of women is a multidirectional process with a desire to develop and approach a new perspective on life. It is important for cardiac rehabilitation nurses to not only focus on lifestyle changes and social support but also on working actively with the women’s inner strength in order to promote the recovery of the women.

  • 114.
    Winberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Self-reported behavioural and medical changes in women after their first myocardial infarction: a 4-year comparison between participation and non-participation in a cardiac rehabilitation programme2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 101-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Women's recovery following a myocardial infarction (MI) has not yet been studied in a thorough manner.

    AIM: Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare women's self-reported behavioural and medical changes, both in those women who voluntarily participated and those women who did not participate in a cardiac rehabilitation programme (CRP).

    METHODS: A non-randomised comparative study design, including pre- (baseline) and post-tests (1 and 4 years after), was implemented in 18 hospitals in Sweden. Consecutively chosen women suffering their first MI (N=240) completed a questionnaire regarding behavioural and medical factors.

    RESULTS: At baseline, significant differences existed between the groups regarding time stress (increased in the CRP group) and hypertension (increased in the non-CRP group). The behavioural factors improved, irrespective of CRP participation or not, with the exception of time stress, which was consistently high in the CRP group both 1- and 4-years after the MI. Regarding the medical factors, the significant difference in hypertension disappeared after 1 year. Four years after the MI, the CRP group reported significantly less rehospitalisation and more interventive cardiology compared to the non-CRP group.

    CONCLUSION: The women benefited from CRP participation in relation to medical factors, but not at all in relation to behavioural factors. Accordingly, randomised clinical trials are necessary to perform in order to determine the effects of a long-term individual-based supportive CRP, performed by well-educated healthcare professionals.

  • 115.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Medicine, Central Hospital Halmstad, S-301 85 Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Conceptions of life situation among next-of-kin of haemodialysis patients2001In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of renal disease in a family is a strain on both the patient and the next-of-kin, affecting their life situations. Surprisingly, few studies dealing with the ways that the next-of-kin experience their situation are available. The aim of this study was to describe how the next-of-kin of haemodialysis patients conceive their life situation. Data were collected by interviewing 12 people who live with someone with dialysis-treated renal disease and analysed according to a qualitative method inspired by the phenomenographic approach. Six description categories of how the subjects construed their life situation emerged: a feeling of confinement; a feeling of social isolation; a feeling that the way of life has changed; a feeling of security in life; a feeling of a threatening future; and promoting health. The next-of-kin generally expressed a large degree of commitment to and concern for the sick person. In spite of their life situation having been dramatically changed, the next-of-kin described an ability to adapt. With the help of society the feelings of confinement and social isolation can be dispersed, enabling the next-of-kin to promote the health of the sick person. A suggestion for further research is to study what adaptation strategies next-of-kin use in their life situation.

  • 116.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Professional support for next of kin of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment: a content analysis study of nursing documentation2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 353-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives. The aim of this study was to examine the content of nursing documentation with a focus on professional support for next of kin (NoK) of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment. Background. Professional support in nursing focuses on promotion, maintenance and restoration of health and prevention of illness. Design. The study had a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used to search for themes based on descriptions contained in the collected nursing documentation. Methods. The total number of nursing records of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment (n = 50) for the 5-year period 1998–2002 was included. All nursing documentation was systematic in accordance with the VIPS-documentation model. Results. The professional support could be described within the framework of three themes: to explore NoK's supportive resources, to enable NoK' readiness in caring for the patient and to co-operate with NoK in the care of the patient in the home, captured by the core theme which described the professional support as a continuous process. Conclusions. Next of kin are a supportive resource in the nursing care of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment and professional support for NoK focuses on planning their participation in the care of patients in the home. Relevance to clinical practice. Professional support for NoK should be documented in family focused nursing diagnoses, which would make it possible to search for different types of support. Future research might explore nurses' or NoK's views on carer support.

  • 117.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högstedt, Benkt
    Dept. of Development and Research, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden .
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Time distribution factors of hospital and home care among chronic haemodialysis patients2004In: EDTNA-ERCA journal, ISSN 1019-083X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, many studies are available that focus on haemodialysis; however studies on the time distribution factor involved are lacking. It is therefore important to study the distribution of time, taking into account outpatient care, inpatient care and home care. The aim of the study was to chart over a five-year period, the time distribution factors of hospital care and home care among chronic haemodialysis patients. The design of the study was descriptive, and the data material was drawn from a patient register (N = 61). The data analysis was performed by means of both descriptive and inferential statistics.

  • 118.
    Åkerlund, Ejvor
    et al.
    Health Care Center, Varberg, Sweden.
    Odams, Eva
    Maternal Care Center, Varberg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Irene
    Health Care Center, Veddige, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nipple necrosis after reduction mammaplasty: A case report1995In: International Journal of Rehabilitation and Health, ISSN 1068-9591, E-ISSN 1573-1537, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 285-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this case report was to describe a rare complication in the rehabilitative phase: nipple necrosis resulting from reduction mammaplasty. the patients in the two cases presented, having systemic disease, did not receive optimal treatment for the prevention of pyoderma gangraenosum; a plausible cause of the complication. Patients having systemic disease ought to undergo thorough examinations before submitting to any reduction mammaplasty. © 1995 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

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