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  • 101.
    Tontini, Gerson
    et al.
    School of Business Management, Regional University of Blumenau (FURB), Rua Paraguai 436 #101, Blumenau, SC 89050-020, Brazil.
    Solberg Söilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Silveira, Amélia
    Graduate Program in Business Management, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Rua Tucuna 600 #132, São Paulo, SP 05021-010, Brazil.
    How do interactions of Kano model attributes affect customer satisfaction? An analysis based on psychological foundations2013In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 24, no 11-12, p. 1253-1271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses how the interactions of services' attributes, classified by the Kano model, affect customer satisfaction. The present research argues that foundations of the attributes interactions' impact on customers' satisfaction are similar to interactions between intrinsic and extrinsic psychological motivators. To carry out this research, data were collected by interviewing a sample of 119 customers of pizzerias and 152 customers of video rental stores. The results show that the impact of a superior level of ‘attractive’ and ‘one-dimensional’ attributes on customer satisfaction, decreases from 30% to 70% if ‘must-be’ or ‘one-dimensional’ attributes are unfulfilled. These findings support the assumption that it is important to achieve adequate performance of ‘must-be’ and ‘one-dimensional’ attributes before offering ‘attractive’ attributes or hoping to achieve superior performance of ‘one-dimensional’ attributes. It is important for a company to be able to identify the Kano model category for each attribute. The managerial implication suggests that companies should identify and keep ‘must-be’ and one-dimensional attributes on an adequate performance level. Only in this way attributes classified as ‘attractive’ or ‘one-dimensional’ can bring differentials in the market and have full effect on customer satisfaction. No previous papers have studied how the interaction of attributes with different Kano model classifications impact on customer satisfaction and relate it with psychological aspects. This study may lead to the development of more refined methods to design, manage and improve services and products, finding not only attributes relevancy, but also their best combination.

  • 102.
    Tontini, Gerson
    et al.
    Department of Business Management, Regional University of Blumenau, Blumenau, Brazil.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    How to Use Improvement Gap Analysis to Identify Which Incremental Innovations Should be Incorporated into Products: Managerial Recommendations2014In: 2014 IEEE International Conference on Management of Innovation and Technology (ICMIT), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2014, p. 48-53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to show how the Improvement Gap Analysis method (IGA) evaluates the possible impact of incremental innovations on customer satisfaction, and to give guidelines about applying this technique in practice. Customers of two different products, that are used at home, answered questions about their current satisfaction, expected satisfaction, and expected dissatisfaction, with attributes for each product. The results show that IGA can suggest incremental innovations that could be offered in final products, and which ones may not.

  • 103.
    Tontini, Gerson
    et al.
    Regional University of Blumenau–FURB, Blumenau, Brazil.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Innovation Management2015In: The SAGE Encyclopedia of Quality and the Service Economy / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2015, p. 305-312Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Tontini, Gerson
    et al.
    Universidade Regional de Blumenau - FURB, Brazil.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Silveira, Amélia
    Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Brazil.
    How do the interactions of service attributes affect customer satisfaction? A study of Kano Model’s attributes2013In: Integrating Practice In Pom Research And Teaching: POMS 2013 Conference Program, University of South Carolina , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper objective is analyzing how interactions of services’ attributes, depending on Kano Model attributes's classification, do affect customer satisfaction. The results show that the impact of a superior level of “Attractive” and “One-dimensional” attributes, on customer satisfaction decreases 60% to 70% if "Basic" attributes are unfulfilled.

  • 105.
    Tontini, Gerson
    et al.
    Regional University of Blumenau, Blumenau, Brazil.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Zanchett, Ricardo
    Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil.
    Nonlinear antecedents of customer satisfaction and loyalty in third-party logistics services2017In: Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, ISSN 1355-5855, E-ISSN 1758-4248, no 5, p. 1116-1135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study the nonlinear impact of quality dimensions of third-party logistics (3PL) services on customer satisfaction and loyalty. Design/methodology/approach: By interviewing 167 small-size companies, and using penalty and reward contrast analysis, the paper explores the nonlinear impact of seven dimensions of 3PL services (safety, fault’s recovery, reliability, speed, flexibility, communication, and friendliness) on customer satisfaction and loyalty. Findings: The results confirm the existence of the dimensions’ nonlinear impact on customer satisfaction. It also shows that some quality dimensions have a direct and nonlinear impact on loyalty. The dimension “friendliness” has a direct impact on loyalty if the company has a below market average performance, which may lead customers to switch service providers. “Flexibility on collection and delivery” has a direct impact if the company has a higher performance, contributing to customers’ intention to continue using the service. Another finding is that, if the company delivers good service recovery after the customer found faults in the service, and if customers trust the company service, they say they intend to continue to work with the company. Research limitations/implications: The present research focused only on small companies in one country (Brazil). Further studies should be carried out to explore different countries, with different realities, and different size of companies. Practical implications: 3PL companies should not only deal with customers’ satisfaction, but also with other quality aspects that directly affect customer intention to continue doing business with the 3PL service provider. These are friendliness, flexibility regarding time and frequency of collection and delivery and faults’ recovery. Originality/value: The present research confirms that the personal relationship is a crucial aspect to be managed in order to keep customers in the long term. In addition, as opposed to most research looking for the antecedents of satisfaction and loyalty of 3PL customers, the present research shows that there is a direct nonlinear impact of the dimensions’ performance on customers’ loyalty, what should be taken in consideration by 3PL managers. It also shows how penalty-reward contrast analysis may reveal nonlinear antecedents that could be used for better understandings companies’ success in the long term. © 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 106.
    Vriens, Dirk
    et al.
    Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Disruptive intelligence - How to gather information to deal with disruptive innovations2014In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 63-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disruptive innovations are innovations that have the capacity to transform a whole business into one with products that are more accessible and affordable (cf. Christensen et al. 2009). As Christensen et al. argue no business is immune to such disruptive innovations. If these authors are right, it might be relevant to be able to recognize these innovations before they disrupt a business. Incumbents may use this information to protect their business and others may use it to participate in the disruption. Either way, gathering information about potential disruptive innovations is a relevant activity. The production of this information (we call this information "disruptive Intelligence") is the topic of this paper. In particular, we analyze disruptive innovation theory and formulate several intelligence topics which may help in predicting disruptive innovations. In addition, we formulate several ’biases’ which may impair the production of ’disruptive intelligence’.

123 101 - 106 of 106
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  • de-DE
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