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  • 101.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ronkainen, Noora
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China & Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Transnational mobility and cultural transition2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 215-216Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of sport participants migrate within and between nations for a variety of reasons, such as athletic career development, sport tourism, and international assignments. During 2013, the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) estimated that 214 million individuals were considered to be migrants, which is one in every 33 persons worldwide. This presentation builds on the ISSP Position Stand on transnationalism, mobility, and acculturation in and through sport (Ryba et al., 2017) to introduce a transnational conceptual framework used in recent studies of athletic migrants’ career and life transitions. First, migration terminology will be reviewed to facilitate the attendees’ understanding of the experiential layers of athletes’ experiences discussed in the presentations comprising this symposium. Next, we focus on a study of transnational elite athletes’ careers to clarify the processes activated in cultural transition that produce psychosocial development through work, sport, and relationships in shifting cultural patterns of meaning. Having positioned the migrants’ experiences in critical acculturation literature (Bhatia & Ram, 2009; Ryba et al., 2015; Schinke et al., 2016), we derived at a temporal model of the cultural transition process consisting of three phases: pre-transition, acute acculturation, and sociocultural adaptation. The empirical model and three underlying mechanisms of cultural transition that assisted athletic career adaptability of transnational migrants will be discussed. We conclude with practical implications of this research for professionals working in the fields of career counseling and migrant support. 

  • 102.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Selänne, Harri
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Aunola, Kaisa
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Nurmi, Jan-Erik
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    ”Sport has always been first for me” but “all my free time is spent doing homework”: Dual career styles in late adolescence2017In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 33, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    In adolescence, personally meaningful autobiographical memories begin to integrate into cultural narrative structures to form a life story. We examined how and to what extent adolescent Finnish athletes narrate and integrate significant life events in sport and education into their identities and future narratives in order to delineate the different styles of athletes’ career construction.

    Design

    Longitudinal qualitative study.

    Method

    Ten female and eight male, elite junior athletes, aged 15–16 at baseline, participated in individual conversational interviews. The resulting interview data were analyzed using narrative analysis.

    Results

    Thirteen of 18 adolescent athletes drew primarily on the performance narrative plot to construct their life story and five of 18 athletes could not project into the future beyond their athletic selves. We identified three styles of athletes’ career construction. Employing musical terminology as a metaphor, the contrapuntal style entwines sport and education as harmonically related life-themes; monophonic style draws on a prominent athletic life-theme; and dissonant style is underpinned by discord of sport and education. We did not detect direct associations between narrative types (performance, discovery and relational) and career construction styles. We show the dominant style development within an exemplary story.

    Conclusion

    Exploration of the future and possible selves are critical for developing meaningful (dis)continuity of a dual career pathway from adolescence to adulthood. We conclude that dual career discourse is gaining traction in directing young athletes’ future thinking; however, a broader repertoire of exemplary success stories which allow athletes to imagine achieving excellence in diverse ways would enable them to channel action. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  • 103.
    Samuel, Roy D.
    et al.
    Department of Physical Education and Movement, Kibbutzim College of Education Technology and the Arts, Tel Aviv, Israel; ; School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ashkenazi, Yaniv
    Elite Sport Department, the Olympic Committee of Israel, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel.
    Cultural transition of the Israeli men’s U18 National handball team migrated to Germany: a case study2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study describes the cultural transition of the Israeli men’s U18 national handball team to train and compete in Germany for a competitive season. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected longitudinally as part of sport psychology services provided to the team. Data analysis was guided by an integrated career change and transition framework (ICCT). Results indicated that the transition demands covered on-court (e.g., increased training load) and off-court (e.g., residing at a hotel) issues. Players perceived this transition as significant and positive. In response to selection for this program, most players relied on consulting with others. The transition barriers were also related to on-court (e.g., injuries) and off-court (e.g., cultural differences) issues. Players varied in their conscious decision to change (i.e., apply all necessary adjustments) and coping effectiveness. Players exhibited several transition pathways, as suggested by the ICCT. Findings illustrate the dynamics and multifaceted nature of the cultural transition. © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 104.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Stambulova, NataliaHalmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Context-driven sport and exercise psychology practice: Special Issue2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Context-driven sport and exercise psychology practice: Widening our lens beyond the athlete2017In: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 71-75Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 106.
    Seanor, Michelle
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Ross, David
    Skyriders Trampoline Place, Richmond Hill, Canada.
    Giffin, Cole
    School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Catch the feeling of Flying: Guided walks through a trampoline Olympic development environment2019In: Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 2470-4849, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olympic podium performances represent peak accomplishments in athletes’ developments. Seanor, Schinke, Stambulova, Ross, and Kpazai (2017) identified environmental factors within a high-performance Canadian trampoline sport environment that developed decorated Olympic medalists. The current intrinsic case study was authored to further highlight the idiosyncrasies of a high-performance trampoline environment (re)presenting stories garnered from within this localized Canadian sport environment. Through guided walks, a mobile method of conversational interviews, three contextual experts engaged in Olympic athlete development provided tours of their sport environment. Each contextual expert’s guided walk played out uniquely inrelation to their ascribed role (i.e., Olympic coach, Assistant coach and Olympic champion). Three main themes were identified through interpretive thematic analysis: 1) creating lift (sub-themes: facility design; sport culture paragons), 2) providing a tailwind (sub-themes: establishing athlete-coach partnerships; team interactions), and 3) soaring onto the Olympic podium (sub-themes: preparing athletes to be untethered; competitive collaboration). Each theme is presented through three portrait vignettes, with discrete vantages derived from each contextual expert to illuminate the context from idiosyncratic ascribed roles within the environment. These stories create a fulsome (re)presentation of a high-performance sport environment through the interplay of the contextual experts’ narratives, their surrounding context, and their Olympic podium accomplishments.

  • 107.
    Sebbens, Joshua P.
    et al.
    University of Canberra, Bruce, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    The mindful sport psychologist: Where did he come from?2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 55-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Serpa, Sidonio
    et al.
    Faculty of Human Kinetics, University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Bola Ikulayo (1948-2016) OBITUARY2016In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 188-193Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Serra de Queiroz, Fernanda
    et al.
    University och Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Evenly suspended attention: A psychodynamically oriented and mindful approach2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 77-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Sofie, Sivertsson
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Does one repetition maximun in clean correlate with 20 meter sprint and countermovement jump?2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Crossfit is a high-volume training form and is popular among society and military communities because of its metabolic and physical challenging conditioning program. Crossfit includes both aerobic and anaerobic training and performers of Crossfit use all three different metabolic pathways, the phosphagen system, glycolysis and oxidative system. Similarities in movement pattern clean, countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint running exist and also the use of stretch shortening cycle (SSC), which is a biomechanical function that is used in for example plyometric exercises. Recent research has reported correlation between weightlifting, countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint, however, few of these studies have used female Crossfit performers. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine if there is a correlation between the performances of a clean and linear sprint time in 20 meter and if there is a correlation between the performance of clean and height in CMJ. Method: To participate, the women had to be a member of a Crossfit gym since five months back, and have five month of experience of practicing the clean exercise. The study had two different test sessions were the first session was for one repetition max in clean and session two was for 20 meter sprint and CMJ. Result: Fifteen females participated in the study and the correlation between clean and CMJ showed a strong correlation (r =0,74, r2=0,55) and when controlling clean and CMJ for body mass, the result showed a very strong correlation (r=0.88). The associations between clean and sprint showed a moderate to strong negative correlation (r =-0,52, r 2=0,27) and when controlling for body mass the result was (r =-0.54). The association between CMJ and sprint showed a strong correlation (r=-0.69, r2=0,48) and when controlling for body mass the correlation was (r =-0.71). Conclusion:Findings from this current study showed that there is a strong relationship between CMJ and clean among female Crossfit participants. This indicate that weightlifting exercise, in this case clean, can improve power exercises as jump height, but not to forget the importance of practicing jump movements as well. For further research it would be interesting if the participants were divided in groups depending on how long they had practiced in Crossfit. To see if there would be any different in clean, sprint and jump among these measurements, and maybe use both squat jump and CMJ as a test for jump to see the different in the result it might give.

  • 111.
    Solstad, Bård Erlend
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Larsen, Torill Marie Bogsnes
    University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Holsen, Ingrid
    University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ronglan, Lars Tore
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Ommundsen, Yngvar
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Pre- to post-season differences in empowering and disempowering behaviours among youth football coaches: a sequential mixed-methods study2018In: Sport Coaching Review, ISSN 2164-0629, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 113-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in self-reported behaviours among youth football (i.e. European soccer) coaches from pre- to post-season, and additionally, their evaluative reactions to participation in the Norwegian arm of the Empowering Coaching™Training Programme (ECTP). A total of 193 coaches (174 males; 19 females; M = 41.99; SD = 6.32) completed a questionnaire concerning their use of empowering and disempowering behaviours at the beginning and end of the sport season. Moreover, 12 of these coaches (10 males; 2 females; M = 41.67; SD = 5.68) were interviewed at the end of the sport season using semi-structured interviews. Whereas coaches’ empowering and disempowering behaviours did not differ from pre- to post-season, post-season interviews showed that participation in the ECTP led coaches to reflect on their coaching practises, facilitating an increased focus on enabling autonomy and involvement for the athletes and more attention paid to the athletes’ feelings of mastery. © 2017 informa UK Limited, trading as taylor & Francis group

  • 112.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Athletes' careers and transitions2019In: Applied sport psychology: Personal growth to peak performance / [ed] J. M. Williams & V. Krane, New York: McGraw-Hill, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 113.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Athletes’ relationship crises: Case examples and resolution strategies2017In: Conference Abstracts: 32nd Annual Conference AASP2017, Orlando, FL, October 18-21, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2017, p. 130-130Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A body of knowledge exists in sport psychology about the dynamic social context of athletes’ development and the roles of the people involved (Jowett & Lavallee, 2007; Jowett & Poczwardowski, 2006). In many senses, other people (coaches, managers, parents, peers, opponents, sport psychology practitioners, etc.) make athletes’ careers possible and meaningful (Jowett, 2003; Stambulova, 2010). Therefore, harmonious relationships are key pre-conditions for successful careers, whereas problematic relationships often lead to deterioration in athletes’ well-being, performance, and non-sport life (Sandström, Linnér, & Stambulova, 2016). In this presentation athletes’ problematic relationships will be analyzed from a career transition perspective that is as crisis phases in their careers that athletes can’t cope with on their own and need proper interventions. One educational tool that can be used in working with athletes experiencing relationship crises is the mobilization model of counseling in crisis-transitions (Stambulova, 2011) that is aimed at helping the clients to analyze crisis situations, find possible ways to cope, and further develop their social and other coping skills. In this presentation a real case involving a young talented female swimmer who could not balance contrasting expectations of her coach, parents, and her boyfriend in term of her athletic role, and consequently experienced frustration and disharmony in the relationships with all of them will be shared and analyzed using the mobilization model. The analysis will follow six steps, including: (1) collecting and sorting out the client’s information, (2) identifying, prioritizing and articulating the problem issues, (3) analyzing the current status of the client’s coping resources and barriers, (4) discussing the transition alternatives and stimulating the client to make the strategic decision, (5) goal setting and planning relevant to the decision made, and (6) concluding and providing follow-ups. © 2017 by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology 

  • 114.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Innovations in athlete career research: Young scholars’ presentations and mentors’ panel2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 189-189Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athlete career research in sport psychology has evolved dramatically during the last decade, with several new trends emerging and young scholars across the world interested in and contributing to its development. This symposium brings together three young scholars from different countries (who are approaching the end of their doctoral project or just recently completed the degree) and their research mentors with the twofold purpose: (a) to introduce several recent trends in athlete career research through presentations of the young scholars, and (b) to discuss the projects and professional development of young researchers through the mentors’ panel. The organizer will begin with a brief overview of the recent and innovative trends in the athlete career topic (e.g., those derived from the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers paradigm; Stambulova & Ryba, 2013) and the content of the symposium. Following this, the first presenter will share results of a qualitative study aimed at investigating student-athlete and staff members’ perspectives of the challenges and support provided to British dual career athletes in their transition to university. The second presenter will share the experiences of creating an empirical career model of Swedish handball players based on the holistic athletic career model (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013) and in-depth interviews with the players. The third presenter will challenge the existing career development models in terms of their one-sided interpretation of athletic career termination by approaching this issue from the existential and narrative psychology perspectives. The symposium will be concluded by a mentors’ panel discussing the young scholars’ projects, their mentorship experiences, and strategies to establish and maintain cross-generation professional links to ensure sustainable development of the athlete career topic in future.

  • 115.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Olympic Games as career transitions2016In: Revista De Educado Fisica, ISSN 2322-9411, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 121-123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Theoretical Developments in Career Transition Research: Contributions of European Sport Psychology2016In: Sport and Exercise Psychology Research From Theory to Practice / [ed] Markus Raab, Paul Wylleman, Roland Seiler, Anne-Marie Elbe & Antonis Hatzigeorgiadis, London: Elsevier, 2016, 1, p. 251-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to review theoretical developments in the area of career transition, with a particular focus on contributions of European researchers. In this chapter I cover the development, current status, and future challenges of the European sport psychology discourse on career transition, drawing on 25 years’ experience as a career educator, researcher, and practitioner in both East and West European contexts. The major theoretical developments within this discourse can be summarized as follows: (1) the conception of an athlete as a whole person, (2) the holistic lifespan perspective and relevant frameworks, (3) the athletic career transition model, (4) the holistic ecological perspective and relevant frameworks, (5) the assistance in career transitions model, and (6) the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers paradigm. These theoretical contributions are briefly introduced and explained in regard to how they guide athletic career transition research and practice in Europe and beyond. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 117.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Setting up a Short International Experience for Students: Reflections from the Receiving Side2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, European Universities work on internationalization of their programs in response to the Europe 2020 Strategy, emphasizing a higher quality of education and employability of young people. During the last few years, fruitful collaboration was established between an American University and a European University. Culminating points of this collaboration were two visits of American students and staff to the host-university in Europe during 2013-15. In this presentation, representatives of the host-university will share their experiences and suggestions for organizing one week study abroad programs for American students and reflect on their pre-, during, and post-visit experiences. The preparatory period lasted for several months and included a visit to the American university to take part in marketing the study abroad trip, several meetings to design the program for the visit and ensure that all involved knew their responsibilities, discussing and receiving approval of the program from the two international departments. The program consisted of four educational modules (classes specially designed for the American students and classes together with local students involving teachers from both universities), sport events (e.g., practicing team handball with a local team, table tennis tournament), and social/cultural events (e.g., sightseeing tours). The American students also received a homework assignment to reflect on what they learned about the host-country’s higher education system, sport and exercise psychology at the host-university, and the host-country’s sport culture during their visit. Their assignments were collected post-visit and content analyzed. The summary (also shared with the American side) provided us with not only positive feedback, but also some insights into how to improve our work. Therefore, the benefits of the visits were mutual. This presentation will conclude with a list of suggestions to help promote the development of study a broad experiences for those universities that may host such programs.

  • 118.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dual career competences of Swedish high school athletes2016In: AASP 2016: 31st Annual Conference: Phoenix, AZ, Sept. 28 - Oct.1: Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2016, p. 149-149Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden dual ‘sport and education’ career (DC) programs on the high school level are established at 51 settings across the country. Within these programs student-athletes practice their sport in sport clubs and in educational settings, and have supportive conditions at school (e.g., flexible scheduling). This study, investigating Swedish high school student-athletes’ DC competences, is a national project and also a part of the European project ‘Gold in Education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) with eight other countries involved.  In this presentation (approved by the ethical board of the GEES consortium) we briefly introduce the GEES project and then focus on Swedish research findings. The DC Competences Survey was used to explore student-athletes general as well as scenario-specific DC competences. The sample consisted of 909 high school student-athletes (mean age =18.2; 43% females) from various sports. In examining general competences, the participants were introduced to 38 c ompetences and asked to evaluate them in terms of possession and importance for a successful DC. The highest in possession was “ability to live independently”, and the top three in importance (also evaluated higher by females) included: “perseverance during challenging times and in the face of setbacks”, “understanding importance of rest and recuperation”, “ability to cope with stress in sport and study”. In examining scenario-specific competences the participants read six scenarios, each presenting a difficult DC situation (e.g., missing significant days of study, sacrifices in social life, living away from home, injury), and responded about coping experiences (including perceived effectiveness) and related competences. The competences significantly contributed to effectiveness of coping with DC scenarios. It was also possible to identify transferable competences used by student-athletes in four or more scenarios (e.g., “dedication to succeed in both sport and stu dies”). The findings have become useful in defining the content of DC support services in Sweden.

  • 119.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Elbe, Anne-Marie
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    ”We were sometimes invisible but never absent”: Women’s contribution to FEPSAC and European sport psychology2019In: Celebrating 50th anniversary of FEPSAC / [ed] A.-M. Elbe, N. Dedois and R. Seiler, Elsevier, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Samuel, Roy D.
    Kibbutzim college of education technology and the Arts, Tel Aviv, Israel; School of psychology, interdisciplinary center (iDc), Herzliya, Israel.
    Career transitions2019In: Routledge encyclopedia of sport and exercise psychology / [ed] D. Hackfort and R. J. Schinke, Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Schinke, Robert
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Van Raalte, Judy
    Springfield College, Springfield, USA.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Brewer, Britton
    Springfield College, Springfield, USA.
    Petitpas, Albert
    Springfield College, Springfield, USA.
    Blodgett, Amy
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Aunola, Kaisa
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Viljaranta, Jaana
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Selänne, Harri
    Mehiläinen Sports Medical Clinic, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Dual Career in Sport and Education: Context-Driven Research in North America and Europe2016In: Association for Applied Sport Psychology - 2016 Conference Program & Proceedings, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2016, p. 148-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the North American intercollegiate (school-based) sport context, the career development of student-athletes is an established research area focused on athletes’ transition to the university and their athletic, professional, and personal development, including preparation for the university graduation and termination in sports. In contrast, athletes’ simultaneous pursuits in sport and studies, termed a “dual career” (DC) (European Union Guidelines on Athletes’ DCs, 2012), is a relatively new research trend within Europe, where sport is mainly club-based. Therefore, special arrangements between sporting and educational institutions are needed to facilitate athletes’ DCs. European researchers adopt a holistic lifespan perspective (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013) to consider student-athletes’ athletic and academic pursuits as intertwined with their psychological, psychosocial, and financial developments. It is also emphasized that athletes (although supported) are  expected to take responsibility and develop competences to successfully initiate, maintain, and terminate their DCs. This symposium brings together North American and European researchers to discuss overlapping and specific features of DC research and applications in situ. The first presenter will briefly overview the US context of intercollegiate sports, introduce athletic identity foreclosure as a problematic issue and share a new sport-specific instrument to measure identity foreclosure. The second presenter will introduce a Canadian DC context and summarize four projects on how specific populations within it, that are immigrant and Aboriginal student-athletes, cope with DC challenges in conjunction with their acculturation processes. The third presenter will “transport” the audience to Finland and share a mixed-method project on achievement motivation of Finnish adolescent athletes, emphasizing a cultural construction of motivation. The fourth presenter will outline researc h findings on DC competences of Swedish adolescent athletes as a part of the European project titled “Gold and Education and Elite Sport”. The discussion will then be concentrated on DC intervention strategies, situated within national cultural contexts.

  • 122.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Wylleman, Paul
    Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels, Belgium.
    Psychology of athletes’ dual careers: A state-of the art critical review of the European discourse2019In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 42, p. 74-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: (a) To provide a state-of-the-art critical review of European dual career (DC) research (2015-2018, English language), (b) to position the current DC (psychological) research within the athlete career sport psychology discourse and within the European DC discourse, and (c) to identify research gaps and future challenges. These objectives were formulated after an appraisal of nine existing review-type papers contributed to the European DC discourse.

    Methodology: This review has been informed by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta Analyses (Moher, Liberati, Tetzlaff, Altman et al., 2010) and recommendations on presenting results of the state-of-the-art critical review by Grand and Booth (2009).

    Results: Following an extensive literature search across several databases, 42 research papers were used for appraisal, synthesis, and critical analysis of the current DC research. Major tenets of the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013; 2014) were used as a critical lens in the analysis.

    Conclusions: DC research contributes to and connects the European DC discourse and the athlete career sport psychology discourse. DC in sport and work, DC “costs”, DC development environments, DC athletes’ mental health and well-being, DC support and training of the support providers constitute the major gaps in current DC research. Filling these gaps presents future challenges for DC research to adequately support practice and policy making within the European DC discourse. 

  • 123.
    Stenling, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Hassmén, Peter
    School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, Australia.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Psychology & Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Longitudinal associations between athletes’ controlled motivation, ill-being, and perceptions of controlling coach behaviors: A Bayesian latent growth curve approach2017In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 30, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although many scholars have argued that leadership is a dynamic process jointly produced by leaders and followers, leadership in sports is most often researched as a unidirectional process from coaches to athletes. Within self-determination theory (SDT), individual characteristics are suggested to influence how people perceive external events such as coaches' behaviors. In the present study, we examined this jointly produced leadership process by investigating longitudinal associations between athletes' controlled motivation, ill-being, and perceptions of coaches' controlling behaviors at the between- and within-person levels. The participants were 247 young elite skiers enrolled at Swedish sport high schools who responded to self-report questionnaires at three time points over the course of an athletic season. At the between-person level, increases in perceptions of coaches' controlling behaviors over the season positively predicted controlled motivation at the end of the season, and controlled motivation at the beginning of the season positively predicted ill-being at the end of the season. At the within-person level, athletes' controlled motivation positively predicted perceptions of coaches’ controlling behaviors. The results at the between-person level support the unidirectional perspective and the tenets of SDT. The results at the within-person level suggest that individual characteristics such as motivation can influence how athletes perceive external events, which has been proposed theoretically but seldom examined empirically. Three plausible explanations for this reversed association are presented in the discussion.

  • 124.
    Stenling, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden & University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand & University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gucciardi, Daniel F.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Exploring longitudinal measurement invariance and the continuum hypothesis in the Swedish version of the Behavioral Regulation in Sport Questionnaire (BRSQ): An exploratory structural equation modeling approach2018In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 36, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aims of the present study were to: (a) examine longitudinal measurement invariance in the Swedish version of the Behavioral Regulations in Sport Questionnaire (BRSQ) and (b) examine the continuum hypothesis of motivation as postulated within self-determination theory.

    Design

    Two-wave survey.

    Method

    Young competitive athletes (N = 354) responded to the BRSQ early in the season (November) and at the end of the athletic season (April). Data were analyzed using exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) and bifactor ESEM.

    Results

    We found support for strict longitudinal measurement invariance in the BRSQ. Latent mean comparisons showed an increase in external regulation and amotivation across the season. The latent factor correlations indicated some deviations from a simplex pattern related to amotivation, external regulation, and introjected regulation. In the bifactor model, intrinsic motivation items had negative factor loadings on the global factor, identified regulation items had factor loadings approaching zero, and introjected and external regulation and amotivation items all had moderate to strong positive factor loadings.

    Conclusion

    The present study adds longitudinal measurement invariance to the psychometric evidence of the BRSQ. Research on why the latent means of the behavioral regulations changed over the athletic season is warranted. The continuum hypothesis was partially supported. Latent factor correlations and factor loadings on the global factor in the bifactor ESEM highlighted that the discriminant validity of the controlled regulations and amotivation needs further investigation. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

  • 125.
    Storm, Louise
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Carsten
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Comparing interventions with youth and senior elite athletes: Insights from expert sport psychology practitioners2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 492-492Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meaningful sport psychology practice requires a context-sensitive approach. Competitive youth sport and senior elite (professional) sport can be seen as two different contexts that require different applied approaches; however we know little about the differences, and we are in lack of studies that directly compare interventions from these two contexts (Henriksen, Larsen, Storm & Ryom, 2014). Literature on applied sport psychology with senior athletes is far richer than corresponding literature on working with youth athletes. The objectives were: (1) to identify key themes that expert practitioners used to communicate their experiences of sport psychology interventions, and to integrate them into an empirical framework, and (2) to explore the experiences of these practitioners in their successful and less successful interventions in youth and senior sports using the framework. Twelve internationally recognized sport psychology practitioners (SPPs) were involved in semi-structured interviews (Smith & Sparkes, 2016). The data were thematically analyzed (Braun, Clarke & Weate, 2016). The SPPs’ intervention narratives contains eight themes integrated into two categories: (1) content and focus, with themes concerning e.g., adaptation of content, targeted mental skills, and beyond mental skills. (2) The organization and delivery with themes concerning e.g. the settings and ways of delivery, the nature of the athlete-practitioner relationship, the involvement of the athletes’ significant others. There were significant qualitative differences between competitive youth and elite senior contexts regarding how the interventions goes beyond mental skills and in how the SPPs involved the athletes’ significant others. From an overall perspective, the present study supports a key notion: talented youth athletes are not miniature versions of their elite adult counterparts. Working in these two different contexts requires specific approaches and should follow different guidelines.

  • 126.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Hutton, Katrin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Self-reported objective and subjective indicators of socio-economic status and mental health between two adolescent age groups in Sweden2014In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 24, no Suppl. 2, p. 31-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research has shown that socio-economic status (SES) contributes to the mental health of adolescents; however the causality of this effect is debated. SES among adolescents is methodologically difficult to assess and SES indicators differ between age groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate objective and subjective indicators of SES and their relation to mental health in two adolescent age groups.

    Methods: This is a cross-sectional study based on data collected by self- report questionnaires from 11-13 years old n = 457 (younger age group) and 14-16 years old n = 462 (older age group) adolescents at schools in a rural town in south western Sweden. The Family Affluence Scale (FAS) (high, medium, low) and Perceived Wealth (PW) (high, medium, low) were used as measurement for objective and subjective socio-economic wealth. The domain psychological functioning health from the Minneapolis Manchester Quality of Life instrument (MMQL-PF) (continuous variable) was used to measure self-rated mental health.

    Results: When measuring SES using the two different scales, the proportion of adolescents in the younger age group stating a low SES was 28.1% using FAS and 12.1% using PW. In the older age group the proportion was 21.4% in FAS and 15.5% in PW. There was a positive significant relation between PW and self-rated mental health in both age groups, by 0.112 (95% CI.0.024; 0.199) in the younger age group and by 0.140 (95% CI.0.051; 0.223) in the older age group. This relation was not seen regarding FAS.

    Conclusion: In the search for SES’ relation to mental health, different aspects of adolescents’ socio-economic conditions should be considered. In this study we suggest that the subjective experiences of adolescents regarding the wealth of the family might be a stronger indicator of SES influencing mental health. This might be taken into consideration when planning for public health interventions and effective prevention programs suited for adolescents with lower SES. 

    Key message:

    • In the search for SES’ relation to mental health, different aspects of adolescents’ socio-economic conditions should be considered.

    © The Author 2014

  • 127.
    Svedberg, Petra
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Källstrand Eriksson, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Håman, Linn
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Utvärdering: Välmående ger Resultat2019Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 128.
    Tibbert, Stephanie J.
    et al.
    Victoria University & Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Overtraining in professional sport: Exceeding the limits in a culture of physical and mental toughness2015In: Doing exercise psychology / [ed] Mark B. Andersen & Stephanie J. Hanrahan, Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2015, p. 233-257Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Tod, David
    et al.
    Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Morris, Robert
    Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Eubank, Martin
    Liverpool John Moore University, Liverpool, UK.
    Ensuring sustainable development of athlete career research: Mentors’ panel2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, p. 191-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The panel will consist of four mentors led by a moderator (discussant). The panellists will be invited to elaborate on: (a) innovations in athlete career research in general, and particularly on the projects and presentations of the young scholars, (b) their mentorship experiences and how they help young scholars to navigate their careers, and (c) strategies on improving international collaboration and cross-generation professional links to ensure continuity and integrity in further development of the athlete career topic in sport psychology. The moderator will encourage discussion between the panellists and facilitate audience questions and feedback.

  • 130.
    Tranaeus, Ulrika
    et al.
    Performance and Training, The Swedish School of Sport and Health, Stockholm, Sweden & Musculoskeletal & Sports Injury Epidemiology Center, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stress and injuries in elite sport2018In: Handbuch Stressregulation und Sport / [ed] Reinhard Fuchs, Markus Gerber, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2018, p. 451-466Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter begins with an overview of research on psychological risk factors, “predictors”, for injury outcome focusing on competitive and elite sport populations. Based on this presentation, a summary of psychological studies with a special attention on prevention of injury outcome will be highlighted. The final part of the chapter sets the rehabilitation phase in the centre, specifically emphasising personal and situational factors influencing athletes’ injury reactions including return to sport aspects. © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG

  • 131.
    Van Raalte, Judy L.
    et al.
    Springfield College, Ithaca, NY, USA.
    Petitpas, Albert J.
    Springfield College, Springfield, MA, USA.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Rizzo, Julia
    Springfield College, Springfield, MA, USA.
    Using Technology in Supervision and Training2016In: Global Practices and Training in Applied, Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology: A Case Study Appraoch / [ed] J. Gualberto Cremades & Lauren S. Tashman, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 352-359Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 132.
    Waterson, Andrew K.
    et al.
    High Performance Sport New Zealand, North Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Andersen, Mark
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    One shot at a time: A mindfulness-based case study in golf2017In: Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students / [ed] Sam J. Zizzi & Mark B. Andersen, Morgantown: FiT Publishing , 2017, p. 247-267Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 133.
    Watson II, Jack
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Clement, Damien
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The Internationalization of Training in Sport and Exercise Psychology2016In: AASP 2016: 31st Annual Conference: Phoenix, AZ, Sept. 28 - Oct.1: Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2016, p. 164-164Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University faculty are often encouraged by administrators through strategic plans to develop international exchange opportunities to help students expand ideas and forms of thought (Lumby & Foskett, 2016). Given the educational, practical, and legal issues associated with the provision of sport psychology around the world, such a charge could be very helpful for the development of the field of sport and exercise psychology. This encouragement to internationalize programs makes sense in terms of the potential benefits for the educational, social, cultural and professional development of students, as well as the professional development of faculty. However, the logistical challenges of developing such programs can be overwhelming, especially when added on to the other pressures and time demands facing faculty in the current structure of higher education. This symposium will provide attendees with an overview of a specific exchange program developed between an American and European  university with the goal of enhancing the educational opportunities for students at both institutions. Individual presentations will address: 1) the benefits and challenges associated with internationalization of programs, 2) the steps associated with moving from concept development to actual travel, 3) the process of coordinating the receipt of study abroad students and faculty, and 4) future perspectives about international collaboration in the education of sport and exercise psychology students. The primary goals of this symposium will be to provide the audience with an understanding of the benefits and challenges of establishing and carrying out such a program from both the sending and receiving institutions, the provision of suggestions for moving forward with such a program from the perspective of both the sending and receiving institutions, and the identification of future directions with regard to the internationalization of sport and exercise psychology programs.

  • 134.
    Watson, Jack
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Clement, Damien
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Future perspectives on international collaboration in sport and exercise psychology education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After two successful experiences of organizing study abroad trips, the American and the European Universities now work to continue and expand the collaboration for the benefit of both sides’ students and staff. Strategic planning for the future development of this internationalization initiative now includes the development of bi-direction exchanges, semester long study abroad opportunities, the development of a shared online learning platform for the creation of discussion boards and learning modules that would be available to both the American and European students, and the development of a joint on-line course on selected topics in international sport and exercise psychology related to major expertise areas at both universities. The focus of this presentation will be to reflect on the potential strategies in place to meet the current challenges of internationalization. This portion of the presentation will utilize a discussion based format and include the audience to help facilitate the achievement of the stated goals.  Such a discussion will include an overview of the lessons learned in the past, a discussion of the future vision for internationalization, and a discussion about problem solving strategies that can be used within university settings to enhance the likelihood of creating a successful internationalization experience for both students and faculty within sport and exercise psychology. As an outcome, the benefits and challenges of developing such an initiative will be outlined.

  • 135.
    Weman Josefsson, Karin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Back, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Projekt elcyklist – ett motivationsperspektiv2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Krister Hertting & Urban Johnson, Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 39-39Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Weman Josefsson, Karin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moderating effects of gender and age within the mechanisms of the self-determination theory process model: Examining exercise motivation in a digital context2017In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 39, no Suppl. 1, p. 330-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise-related goals and values are likely to differ between people based on factors such as gender, age and culture, and there are reasons to believe that the mechanisms between motivation and exercise behavior presented in the self-determination theory (SDT) process model also could vary as a function of such influences.

    This study is part of a digital exercise intervention (see Weman-Josefsson et al., 2016) in a sample of 318 adult women (n = 278) and men (n = 40) aged 23-67 years (M = 46.7; SD = 9.4) joining a digital work-site based step contest. Behavioral regulations, psychological need satisfaction and exercise behavior was measured using a three wave web based questionnaire (T1 = baseline; T2 = post-intervention, week 3; and T3 = follow up, week 6). Moderation analyses were done in the SPSS macro PROCESS using a bootstrapping resampling approach.

    The moderation analyses showed gender and age differences in the relations of behavioral regulations, psychological need satisfaction and exercise behavior within the SDT process model. Controlled motivation was for example a significant positive predictor for exercise in men showing external regulation at T2 to moderate the relation between psychological need satisfaction and exercise in men (beta = 11.29, p < .01) at T3 in appositive direction, while this path was negative and non-significant for women. Also Intrinsic regulation at T2 positively predicted relatedness need satisfaction for women at the same time-point (beta = 0.47, p < .05), but this path was negative and non-significant for men. In terms of age differences, the negative association between external regulation at T2 and strenuous exercise at T3 was stronger and significant for older adults compared to middle-aged adults (beta = -8.90, p < .01) and was positive (but non-significant) for younger adults.

    We found gender and age to moderate several paths of the self-determination process model, suggesting more comprehensive analyses of potential moderators in exercise behavior to be an interesting avenue for future studies. 

  • 137.
    Winterling, Jeanette
    et al.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden & Center of Haematology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wiklander, Maria
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Micaux Obol, Claire
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden & Stress Rehabilitation Research, Department of Clinical Sciences Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Lars E
    Medical Management Center, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden & Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, City University London, London, United Kingdom.
    Pelters, Britta
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Development of a Self-Help Web-Based Intervention Targeting Young Cancer Patients With Sexual Problems and Fertility Distress in Collaboration With Patient Research Partners2016In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 5, no 2, p. e60-, article id e60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Internet should be suitable for delivery of interventions targeting young cancer patients. Young people are familiar with the technologies, and this patient group is small and geographically dispersed. Still, only few psycho-educational Web-based interventions are designed for this group. Young cancer patients consider reproductive health, including sexuality, an area of great importance and approximately 50% report sexual problems and fertility-related concerns following cancer treatment. Therefore, we set out to develop a self-help Web-based intervention, Fex-Can, to alleviate such problems. To improve its quality, we decided to involve patients and significant others as research partners. The first 18 months of our collaboration are described in this paper. The intervention will subsequently be tested in a feasibility study followed by a randomized controlled trial.

    Objective: The study aims to describe the development of a Web-based intervention in long-term collaboration with patient research partners (PRPs).

    Methods: Ten former cancer patients and two significant others participated in building the Web-based intervention, using a participatory design. The development process is described according to the design step in the holistic framework presented by van Gemert-Pijnen et al and evaluates the PRPs’ impact on the content, system, and service quality of the planned intervention.

    Results: The collaboration between the research group and the PRPs mainly took place in the form of 1-day meetings to develop the key components of the intervention: educational and behavior change content, multimedia (pictures, video vignettes, and audios), interactive online activities (eg, self-monitoring), and partial feedback support (discussion forum, tailored feedback from experts). The PRPs influenced the intervention’s content quality in several ways. By repeated feedback on prototypes, the information became more comprehensive, relevant, and understandable. The PRPs gave suggestions concerning the number of exercises and pointed out texts and pictures needing revision (eg, experienced as normative or stereotypical) to increase the persuasiveness of the program. The system quality was improved by PRPs’ feedback on design, technical malfunctions, and navigation on the website. Based on feedback about availability of professional support (technical problems and program content), the organization for support was clarified, which increased service quality. The PRPs also influenced the research project on an overall level by suggesting modifications of inclusion criteria for the RCT and by questioning the implementation plan.

    Conclusions: With suggestions and continuous feedback from PRPs, it was possible to develop a Web-based intervention with persuasive design, believed to be relevant and attractive for young persons with cancer who have sexual problems or fertility distress. In the next step, the intervention will be tested in a feasibility study, followed by an RCT to test the intervention’s effectiveness in reducing sexual problems and fertility distress.

  • 138.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Kristén, Lars
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Dancing Together for Social Sustainability from a Life Course Perspective - Integrating Children and Senior Citizens in Action Research Project2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This project has its starting-point in dance project with children and senior citizens. Children and senior citizen have their own health challenges. The Swedish culture does not encourage intergenerational activities in organizations and communities. Intergenerational contacts are in many terms referred to within families, except certain environments such as the educational institutions. Especially, the intergenerational contacts between children and senior citizens are neglected as an important factor in promoting knowledge and health in society. It does not need to be questioned, that both knowledge and health contributes to the sustainability in society. If individuals from different generations have the opportunity to exercise physical activities together, it is likely that it generates positive values for social sustainability. Social constructivism combined with a life course perspective is the fundamental theoretical standpoint for this project.  We will explain the complex matter of how theses processes of “constructed realities” are accomplish before approaching the central ideas of social constructivism in relation to our project.

    The overall aim was to understand the knowledge of the social value of intergenerational physical activities, and how different age groups communicate their experiences in a life course perspective. There were many things we could learn in a life course perspective through activities among children and senior citizens, and how we could make use of this knowledge for implementations for social sustainability in general. This study included a three-stage process qualitative data from 48 stakeholders describing in individuals diaries about daily exercise, collected during one and a half year, with focus groups interviews with 24 children and 24 senior citizens. The third stage dancing activities was conducted, and follow up interviews with both participants. The thematic analysis was used emerge the results. We found a common joy for both children and senior citizens when performing the physical activities. Women believed physical activities improved their inclusion and social networks. The men found that the physical activities improved their wellbeing and health.

  • 139.
    Zizzi, Sam J.
    et al.
    West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA.
    Andersen, Mark B.Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Being mindful in sport and exercise psychology: Pathways for practitioners and students2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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