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  • 101.
    Arvidsson, Jessica
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Widén, Stephen
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin, Örebro Universitet, Örebro, Sverige.
    Tideman, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Upper secondary school – and then?: About young adults with an educational background in the upper secondary special school and the transition to work2013In: NNDR2013 – 12th Research Conference Nordic Network of Disability Research: May 30–31, 2013 in Turku, Finland: Abstract Book, Turku: Finnish Society for Disability Research , 2013, p. 17-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this ongoing study is to identify and analyze former pupils ́ relationship to the labor market after the graduation from the Swedish upper secondary school for pupils with intellectual disabilities. The study includes 10,517 former pupils who graduated between 2001-2010 and describes the former pupils ́ relation to the labor market as it was in 2010. The study is based on the cross classification of a newly created register combined with two Swedish national registers from Statistics Sweden and the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. One of the preliminary results from this study is that the assumption, presented in media as well as in previous research that the majority of the current pupils are going directly from school to the municipal or private organized daily activities do not seem to match reality. Our results indicate that 48% of the total population were in daily activities in 2010 and 20% of the total population were defined as “in paid work” during the same year and the actual picture of what the former pupils do after they have graduated from upper secondary school for pupils with intellectual disabilities is much more complex than the assumed. Analyses on the current data that are carried out at the moment will be presented at the NNDR-conference.

  • 102.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Aili, Katarina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health-Related Quality of Life among Young Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors in Sweden2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Department of Research and Development, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Department of Research and Development, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Chronic musculoskeletal pain and sleep disturbances as predictors for lower vitality measured by the short form 36 (SF-36) - A eight-year follow up study2006In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 65, no Suppl. 2, p. 656-656Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Subjects with chronic musculoskeletal pain or sleep disturbances have been shown to have a poor healthstatus as measured by the SF-36 health survey. Fatigue is commonly reported by subjects with chronic musculoskeletal pain and sleep disturbances. There is little known about the temporal relationship between chronic pain, sleep disturbances and changes of vitality.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of chronic musculoskeletal pain and sleep disturbances with regard to changes in vitality as measured by SF-36 over an eight year period.

    Method: An eight year follow up of 2 425 subjects aged 20-74 from the general population that in 1995 answered the same postal questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed chronic musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbances, and included the SF-36 health survey. Pain was considered "chronic" if persistent for three months or more. Sleep disturbances assessed were difficulty in falling asleep, frequent awakenings, early awakenings and not feeling rested. Main outcome measure was change of vitality as measured by SF-36 in those that at baseline reported vitality over the median value. Statistical analyses were done with use of logistic regression. Besides the studied variables, the logistic regression analyses also controlled for gender, age, socio-economic group, and the use of analgesics and sleeping pills.

    Results: At baseline 1212 subjects reported a vitality score on SF-36 above the median score of 75. There were 943 subjects (78%) responding at the eight-year follow up. Chronic pain at baseline predicted (OR=1,64, 95% CI 1,14-2,36%, p=0,01) worsening of vitality over time. Loss of vitality was also predicted by moderate problems with falling asleep (OR=2,17, 95% CI 1,31-3,60%, p<0,01), and problems with not feeling rested (moderate problems OR=2,08, 95% CI 1,23-3,50%, p=0,01, and major problems OR=4,76, 95% CI 1,53-14,78%, p=0,01).

    Conclusion: Loss of vitality in SF-36 over an eight-year period was predicted by chronic musculoskeletal pain, problems with falling asleep and problems with not feeling rested. Problems with frequent awakenings and early awakenings did not predict lower value of vitality over an eight-year period. It could thus be important to attend to sleeping problems and especially the feeling of not being rested in subjects with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  • 104.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    FoU Centrum, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sverige & Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU Centrum, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sverige.
    Factors promoting health-related quality of life in patients with rheumatic diseases 12 months after rehabilitation2010In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Riksstämma 2010: Program: Reumatologi, 2010, p. 3-3Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheumatic diseases have significant adverse impact on the individual from physical, mental and social aspects, resulting in a low estimation of health-related quality of life (HRQL). Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who receive a multi-disciplinary team-based care in a rheumatology clinic could get improved HRQL. Several factors can be supposed to promote health in patients with rheumatic diseases and in health-promoting work within the clinical practice it would be valuable to identify health factors that affect HRQL in a positive direction.

    This is a longitudinal cohort study in 185 patients with rheumatic diseases with test one week and 12 months after rehabilitation on a Swedish rheumatology clinic. HRQL was assessed by SF-36 together with suggested health factors (chronic musculoskeletal pain, sleep quality, food habits, exercise habits, leisure habits, sexual lust, sense of coherence (SOC), social support and socio-demographic variables). The association between SF-36 subscales and suggested health factors were estimated by OR and 95 % CI calculated by multivariable logistic regressions.

    Factors predicting better outcome in HRQL in one or several SF-36 subscales were being of younger ages or middle-ages, feeling painless, having good sleep structure, feeling rested after sleep, doing low effort of exercise more than twice a week, having strong SOC, having emotional support and practical assistance, having higher educational level, and having working capacity. The most important factors were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having working capacity, being of younger ages or middle-ages, and having no/small problem with sleep structure.

    The most important factors promoting HRQL in patients with rheumatic diseases 12 months after rehabilitation were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having working capacity, being of younger ages or middle-ages, and having no/small problem with sleep structure. These health factors are important to address in clinical work with rheumatic diseases to optimise treatment strategies.

  • 105.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre Spenshult, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Gjøvik University College, Faculty of Nursing Science, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences & Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre Spenshult, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Factors promoting health-related quality of life in people with rheumatic diseases: a 12 month longitudinal study2011In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 12, article id 102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatic diseases have a significant adverse impact on the individual from physical, mental and social aspects, resulting in a low health-related quality of life (HRQL). There is a lack of longitudinal studies on HRQL in people with rheumatic diseases that focus on factors promoting HRQL instead of risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health promoting factors at baseline and outcome in HRQL at a 12 month follow-up in people with rheumatic diseases.

    Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in 185 individuals with rheumatic diseases with questionnaires one week and 12 months after rehabilitation in a Swedish rheumatology clinic. HRQL was assessed by SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and the health factors were analysed by multivariable logistic regressions.

    Results: Factors predicting better outcome in HRQL in one or several SF-36 subscales were being younger or middle-aged, feeling painless, having good sleep structure, feeling rested after sleep, performing low effort of exercise more than twice per week, having strong sense of coherence (SOC), emotional support and practical assistance, higher educational level and work capacity. The most important factors were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having work capacity, being younger or middle-aged, and having good sleep structure.

    Conclusions: This study identified several factors that promoted a good outcome in HRQL to people with rheumatic diseases. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with rheumatic diseases in order to optimise treatment strategies. © 2011 Arvidsson et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 106.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Feeling rested predicts good health in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain2008In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 67, no Suppl. II, p. 552-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Musculoskeletal pain is a public health problem and a common cause for people to seek health care. It has also been shown that people with musculoskeletal pain estimates their health-related quality of life very low compared to a pain free population. Earlier studies have primarily looked at risk factors and there are little known about health predicting factors in a general population.

    Objectives: To investigate the associations between suggested health factors and health-related quality of life at baseline and in an eight-year follow up in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Methods: A longitudinal study in a Swedish general population (N=1 849) with a postal questionnaire at baseline 1995 and at a follow up 2003. Subjects were divided into two groups, according to their response about chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between the dependent variables (SF-36 subscales) and the independent variables (i.e. the suggested health factors; socioeconomic status, immigrant status, emotional support, regularly exercise, sleep structure, feeling rested, smoking and alcohol habits) were estimated by OR and 95% CI calculated by multivariable logistic regressions, with adjustment for all health factors, age, sex and baseline SF-36 values.

    Results: The most consistent finding for subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline and in the eight-year follow up was a statistical significant (p<0.05) better health outcome in SF-36 subscales for subjects that were feeling rested at baseline. At baseline feeling rested was associated with having a health status better than the mean score in seven SF-36 subscales for both subjects with chronic pain (OR 1.5 (95% CI 1.0-2.3) – OR 4.4 (95% CI 2.9-6.6)) and subjects without chronic pain (OR 2.6 (95% CI 1.6-4.1) – OR 4.4 (95% CI 3.0-6.5)). At the follow up feeling rested predicted a better outcome in five subscales for subjects with chronic pain (OR 1.6 (95% CI 1.0-2.4) – OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.4-3.6)) and in six subscales for subjects without chronic pain (OR 1.6 (95% CI 1.0-2.5) – OR 2.7 (95% CI 1.8-4.1)). Other factors that in some aspects predicted a better outcome were belonging to higher socioeconomic group, being an inborn Swede, having emotional support, having good sleep structure, never being or being a former smoker, and regularly drinking alcohol.

    Conclusion: ''Feeling rested'' was the most consistent factor predicting a good health outcome, both in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain, and should be attended to in health promotion work. Emotional support, sleep structure, smoking and alcoholic habits also appears to be important health factors to take into account.

  • 107.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Gjøvik University College, Faculty of Nursing Science, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Feeling rested predicts good health in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & School of Health Sciences & Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Gjøvik University College, Faculty of Nursing Science, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences & Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Health predicting factors in a general population over an eight-year period in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain2008In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 6, article id 98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many factors are proposed to be associated with health-related quality of life. Knowledge of health factors associated to development of a good health-related quality of life could be of use in clinical practice and public health work. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health factors and health-related quality of life at baseline and in an eight-year follow up in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain in a cohort from a general population.

    Methods: The study was designed as a longitudinal study in a Swedish general population (N = 1 849) with a postal questionnaire at baseline 1995 and at follow up 2003. Subjects were divided into two groups, according to their response about chronic musculoskeletal pain at baseline. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and suggested health factors were estimated by OR and 95% CI calculated by multivariable logistic regressions, with adjustment for all health factors, age, sex and baseline SF-36 values.

    Results: Although subjects without chronic musculoskeletal pain reported better health-related quality of life than subjects with chronic pain, similar health factors were found to be associated to higher scores in SF-36 at baseline and predicted a better outcome in the eight-year follow up. The most consistent finding was a better health outcome in the eight-year follow up for subjects that were feeling rested after sleep. Other factors that in some aspects predicted a better outcome were belonging to higher socioeconomic group, being a native Swede, having emotional support, having good sleep structure, never being or being a former smoker, and regularly drinking alcohol.

    Conclusion: The most important health factor in subjects with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain was feeling rested after sleep, but also emotional support, sleep structure, smoking and alcoholic habits appears to be important components. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with painful musculoskeletal disorders. Since several health factors are common in both subjects with and without pain there could be a common strategy to be formed in public health programmes.

  • 109.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Experiences of health-promoting self-care in people living with rheumatic diseases2011In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 1264-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This paper is a report of a study that explores and describes the meaning of the phenomenon of health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases.

    Background: People with rheumatic diseases estimate health status as low and health belief and health status influence self-care behaviours. Several self-care behaviours are used in the efforts to mitigate the diseases.

    Method: The study had a descriptive phenomenological approach based on a reflective life-world perspective. Data were gathered in 2007 by unstructured open-ended interviews with 12 individuals living with rheumatic diseases.

    Findings: The meaning of health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases was that self-care takes place against a background of continual hope and belief to influence health in positive ways. Self-care was a way of life and implied being ready to understand and respond to signals from the body. Three inter-related constituents elucidated their experiences: dialogue, power struggle and choice. Self-care was experienced as dialogues with the body and with the immediate environment. In order to respond to signals from the body, power struggles were required to be entered into when fighting the diseases. Choices were required to be made and things that were beneficial for the body were prioritized.

    Conclusion: In this study, the meaning of health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases was that self-care was a way of life. This meant to be ready to understand and respond to signals from the body. Self-care required dialogues, power struggles and choices. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 110.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita
    School of Health Sciences & Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    People with Rheumatic Diseases Experiences of Health-Promoting Self-Care2010In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 69, no Suppl. 3, p. 743-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: People with rheumatic diseases estimate their health status low. The health status and health belief are influencing the choice of self-care behaviours. Self-care behaviours are common and could prevent loss of valued life activities and health. Little is known of how people with rheumatic diseases experience self-care.

    Objectives: To describe people with rheumatic diseases experiences of health-promoting self-care.

    Methods: The study had a phenomenological approach based on a reflective life-world perspective. Data were gathered by unstructured and open-ended interviews with 12 individuals with various diagnoses of rheumatic diseases.

    Results: For people with rheumatic diseases, self-care was a way of life and implied being ready at all times to understand and respond to signals from the lived body. Self-care was experienced as an internal dialogue within the lived body but also as an external dialogue with the immediate environment. Self-care could also be described as a power struggle where the individuals strived and forced themselves to fight the diseases and its concrete consequences. The self-care also required that choices were made. Crucial for the choices were trust in oneself and belief in one's own ability to chosen health-promoting self-care. The individual prioritised self-care that was experienced as a beneficial and/or a reward for the lived body.

    Conclusion: People with rheumatic diseases experienced self-care as a way of life and that it meant to be ready at all times to understand and respond to signals that the lived body sends out. Self-care required dialogue, power struggle and choice. This knowledge ads to a fuller understanding of factors that from a patient perspective are important for health when living with a chronic rheumatic disease.

    Disclosure of Interest: None declared

  • 111.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Research and Development Centre, Spenshult hospital for rheumatic diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita
    School of Health Sciences & Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    People with Rheumatic Diseases Experiences of Health-Promoting Self-Care2010In: QMSH 10: 6th Nordic Interdisciplinary Conference on Qualitative Methods in the Service of Health: May 2-4, 2010 • Uppsala, Sweden: Program and Abstracts, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2010, p. 67-67Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    FoU Centrum, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sverige & Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU Centrum, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sverige.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norge.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita
    School of Health Sciences & Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Upplevelse av hälsobefrämjande egenvård vid reumatisk sjukdom2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bakgrund

    Personer med reumatiska sjukdomar skattar sitt hälsostatus lågt. Hälsostatus och tron på den egna förmågan att kunna påverka hälsan påverkar i sin tur valet av egenvårdsbeteenden. Egenvårdsbeteenden är vanliga och kan förhindra försämrad hälsa och förlust av värdefull fysisk och psykisk aktivitet. Kunskaperna är små om hur personer med reumatiska sjukdomar upplever att utföra egenvård. Syftet är därmed att beskriva hur personer med reumatiska sjukdomar erfar att utföra egenvård för att nå hälsa.

    Metod

    Studien har en kvalitativ design med en fenomenlogisk ansats och en livsvärldsteoretisk grund. Data har samlats in genom ostrukturerade och öppna intervjuer med 12 personer med olika diagnostiserade reumatiska sjukdomar.

    Resultat

    Personer med reumatiska sjukdomar upplever att egenvård är ett sätt att leva och att det innebär att ständigt vara redo för att förstå och reagera på signaler från den levda kroppen. Egenvård upplevs som en inre dialog inom den levda kroppen, men också en yttre dialog med närmiljön. Egenvård beskrivs också som en maktkamp där personen strävar efter och tvingar sig att kämpa mot sjukdomen och dess konkreta konsekvenser. Egenvården kräver också att val görs. Avgörande för valet är att personen har tillit till sig själv och tror på sin egen förmåga att välja hälsobefrämjande egenvård. Personer med reumatiska sjukdomar prioriterar egenvård som upplevs som positiv och/eller ger en belöning till den levda kroppen.

    Sammanfattning

    Personer med reumatiska sjukdomar upplever egenvård som ett sätt att leva och det innebär att vara i beredskap för att förstå och reagera på signaler som den levda kroppen sänder ut. Egenvård kräver dialog, maktkamp och val. Denna kunskap bidrar till en mer fullständig förståelse av faktorer som från ett patientperspektiv är viktiga för hälsan vid kronisk reumatisk sjukdom.

  • 113.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden & Faculty of Health Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    The Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme in people with rheumatic diseases: a randomized controlled study2013In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 1500-1514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of a self-care promoting problem-based learning programme for people with rheumatic diseases in terms of health-related quality of life, empowerment, and self-care ability.

    Background: Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis express a great need for education and support in adapting to the disease, but the average qualities of studies about patient education interventions are not high. There is no evidence of long-term benefits of patient education.

    Design: Randomized controlled trial.

    Methods: A randomized controlled design was selected with test at baseline, 1-week and 6-month post-interventions after completed the 1-year programme. The tests consisted of validity and reliability tested instruments. The participants were randomly assigned in spring 2009 to either the experimental group (n = 54) or the control group (n = 148). The programme was running alongside the standard care the participants received at a rheumatology unit. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used in the analyses.

    Results: The participants in the experimental group had statistically significant stronger empowerment after participation in the self-care promoting problem-based learning programme compared with the control group, at the 6-month post-intervention. Approximately, two-thirds of the participants in the experimental group stated that they had implemented lifestyle changes due to the programme.

    Conclusion: The self-care promoting problem-based learning programme enabled people with rheumatic diseases to improve their empowerment compared with the control group. It is important to continue to develop problem-based learning in patient education to find the very best way to use this pedagogical method in rheumatology care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 114.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    FoU Centrum, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sverige & Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Bergman, Stefan
    FoU Centrum, Spenshult, Halmstad, Sverige.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norge.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, Sverige.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Psychometric Properties of the Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale, SWE-RES-232010In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Riksstämma 2010: Program: Reumatologi, 2010, p. 3-3Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empowerment is a central concept in a patient-focused rheumatology care. WHO describes empowerment as a process in which the person receives more control over decisions and actions that affect the own life and health. Today there is no Swedish empowerment instrument for rheumatic diseases created or transl[...]

    The already existing questionnaire, Swedish Diabetes Empowerment Scale (SWE-DES-23), was adapted for use in patients with rheumatic diseases by exchanging the word diabetes with rheumatic disease in all the questions. No items were added or removed. The adapted questionnaire was called SWE-RES-23. In 2009, 260 patients with rheumatic diseases from a rheumatology unit in the southwest of Sweden completed the questionnaire.

    In order to establish discriminant validity, a question about self-perceived health from SF-36 was used in addition to SWE-RES-23.

    Construct validity was tested by using exploratory factor analysis. In order to determine unidimensionality of the empowerment subscales, inter-item correlations were calculated. Internal consistency reliability was tested by the use of the Cronbach-α coefficient.

    The exploratory factor analysis resulted in five factors (empowerment subscales) with Eigenvalues >1 explaining 64.1% of the variance. The five empowerment subscales were: Goal achievement and overcoming barriers to goal achievement, Self-awareness, Managing stress, Assessing dissatisfaction and readiness to change, and Support for caring. The Cronbach-α values ranged from 0.59 to 0.91 and for the total score 0.92. All inter-item correlations were significant. Patients with very good and good self-reported health scored significantly higher on three empowerment subscales (Goal achievement, Self-awareness and Managing stress). The same patterns were seen in the other two empowerment subscales (Readiness to change and Support for change), but did not reach significance.

    The SWE-RES-23 was a first step in developing a questionnaire for assessment of empowerment of patients with rheumatic diseases. The questionnaire possesses acceptable validity and reliability. To fully validate the SWE-RES-23 further studies are needed, but the instrument is even now possible to use in empowerment education programmes for patients with rheumatic diseases.

  • 115.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Oskarström, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tingström, Pia
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Psychometric Properties of the Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale, SWE-RES-232012In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Empowerment is a central concept in both rheumatology and diabetes care. A Swedish empower- ment instrument for patients with rheumatic diseases has not been created before now. The aim of the present study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale, SWE-RES-23, such as construct validity, internal consistency reliability, inter-item correlations and discriminant validity.

    Methods. The already existing instrument, the Swedish Diabetes Empowerment Scale (SWE-DES-23), was adapted for use in patients with rheumatic diseases. The adapted instrument was called the SWE-RES-23. In 2009, 260 patients with rheumatic diseases from a rheumatology unit in Sweden completed the instrument. Construct validity was tested by using exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency reliability was tested by the use of Cronbach’s a-coefficient. In order to determine unidimensionality of the empowerment subscales, inter-item correlations were calculated. To establish discrim- inant validity, an item about self-perceived health from the Short Form (SF) 36 was used in addition to the SWE-RES-23.

    Results. The exploratory factor analysis resulted in five factors (empowerment subscales) with eigenvalues >1, explaining 64.1% of the total variance: Goal achievement and overcoming barriers to goal achievement; Self- knowledge; Managing stress; Assessing dissatisfaction and readiness to change; and Support for caring. Cronbach’s a values ranged from 0.59 to 0.91, and the value for the total score was 0.92.

    Conclusion. The results support the possibility of adapting the SWE-DES-23 for use in patients with rheumatic diseases. The SWE-RES-23 shows acceptable psychometric properties, in terms of construct validity and internal consistency reliability. To validate the SWE-RES-23 fully, further studies are needed, with a focus on test-retest correlations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 116.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Gilljam, Britt-Mari
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing. Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Ruland, Cornelia Maria
    The Centre for Shared Decision Making and Collaborative Care Research (CSDM), Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway & University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Nordby-Bøe, Trude
    The Centre for Shared Decision Making and Collaborative Care Research (CSDM), Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Redesign and Validation of Sisom, an Interactive Assessment and Communication Tool for Children With Cancer2016In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 4, no 2, article id e76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Children with cancer undergo intensive and long treatment periods that expose them and their families to a number of difficult physical, mental, and social challenges. Empowering children by actively involving them in their care can help them to cope with these challenges. It can, however, be difficult for children to be involved and talk about their illness experiences in a "traditional" conversation with health care professionals, especially for younger children. Sisom (Norwegian acronym "Si det som det er" or "Tell it how it is") is an interactive computer-based assessment and communication tool to give children (aged 6-12 years) with cancer a "voice" in their care. Because of technological advances and widespread use of mobile devices Sisom had to be redesigned to better meet the needs of children of today.

    OBJECTIVE: To redesign Sisom for use on mobile devices and to validate and adapt it for use in a Swedish population of children with cancer.

    METHODS: A user-experience design was used. Content adaptation included forward-backward translation by Swedish and Norwegian translators. Healthy children (n=5), children with experiences of cancer treatment (n=5) and their parents (n=5), and pediatric nurses (n=2) were then involved in culturally adapting Sisom to the Swedish context. The iterative low- and high-fidelity evaluation was supported by a think aloud method, semistructured interviews, and drawings to capture children's views of Sisom. The redesign and evaluation continued until no further changes or improvements were identified by the participants or the researchers.

    RESULTS: Children, parents, and pediatric nurses offered many suggestions for improvements to the original version in terms of content, aesthetics, and usability of Sisom. The most significant change that emerged through user input was a modification that entailed not using problem-focused statements in the assessment items. The parents and pediatric nurses considered the revised assessment items to be general and less diagnosis specific. The evaluation of aesthetics resulted in brighter colors and more positive and exciting details in the animations. The evaluation of usability included improvements of the verbal instructions on how to navigate in Sisom 2, and also that the answers to assessmentitems in Sisom 2 should be saved to provide the children with the option to pause and to continue answering the remaining assessment items at a later stage.

    CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this paper describes the process of using user-experience design with children in order to redesign and validate an interactive assessment and communication tool and how the outcomes of this process resulted in a new version, Sisom 2. All participants confirmed the usability and qualities of using the final version. Future research should be directed toward the implementation of Sisom 2 in clinical practice and to evaluate outcomes from individual and organizational levels.

  • 117.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Nylander, Maria
    Spenshult Research and Development Centre, Halmstad, Sweden & Swedish Rheumatism Association, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Spenshult Research and Development Centre, Halmstad, Sweden & The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Callers´perceptions of their contact with a rheumatology telephone helpline2019In: Musculoskeletal Care, ISSN 1478-2189, E-ISSN 1557-0681, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Telephone helplines are useful for improving patients' access to healthcare services and reducing the need for frequent face‐to‐face contact with healthcare professionals. Little is known about how people who phone a helpline perceive the encounter.

    Objectives: The aims of the present study were to describe the variation in how callers perceive their encounter with a rheumatology telephone helpline.

    Methods: The  study  had  a  descriptive,  qualitative  design  and  used  a phenomenographic approach, comprising 27 semi‐structured telephone interviews with callers to Rheuma Direct, a rheumatology telephone helpline with specially trained nurses. The callers comprised 22 women and five men, aged 22–89 years (mean 54 years).

    Results: The callers phoned Rheuma Direct when they had problems obtaining answers to questions on the internet or from healthcare professionals. Three descriptive categories emerged: constructive dialogue, specialized competence and applicability. The callers perceived that it was a constructive dialogue when they were able to discuss their concerns with someone, received emotional support, felt reassured and were satisfied with the information provided. They perceived specialized competence when the nurses were experienced and skilful, the advice provided complemented previously received information and when they had more knowledge after the call. The callers perceived that Rheuma Direct had applicability because it was easy to access and they could make different choices before, during and after the telephone call. 

    Conclusions: Callers to a rheumatology telephone helpline perceived it as a valuable complement to other sources of information, and felt that it could provide them with the tools to manage their disease better, as well as future contacts with healthcare professionals. © 2018 The Authors Musculoskeletal Care published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 118.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Spenshult Research and Development Centre, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nylander, Maria
    Spenshult Research and Development Centre, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Bergman, Stefan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Spenshult Research and Development Centre, Halmstad, Sweden & The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    People's perceptions of their phone call with rheuma directly, a rheumatic diseases helpline2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, no Suppl. 2, p. 1544-1545, article id AB1238-HPRArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Information on rheumatic diseases is often complex to understand or scary, and additional support is often necessary. Rheuma Directly (RD) is a helpline with specially trained nurses on rheumatic diseases, funded by the Swedish Rheumatism Association and Spenshult Research and Development Centre. Little is known of how people calling a helpline perceive the contact.

    Objectives To describe the variation in how people perceive the contact with the helpline RD.

    Methods The study had a descriptive, qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach and was carried out by means of 27 semi-structured telephone interviews. The informants were 22 female and 5 men, and their ages ranged from 22 to 89 years (mean 54 years).

    Results The informants called RD when they had problems getting answers to their questions through the Internet or from healthcare professionals. Three different description categories emerged: Specific competence, Constructive dialogue, and Applicability. The informants' perceived Specific competence when the nurses were knowledgeable, the call was complementary to previously received information and when the informants had greater knowledge after the contact with RD. They perceived that it was a Constructive dialogue when they got someone to discuss with, a “sounding board”, and perceived emotional support, felt reassured and were satisfied with the answer. The informants perceived Applicability because RD was available and they could make different choices according to their own desire; before (how and when they would contact RD), during (what to tell and what question they would ask) and after (how and what they would do after the contact with RD).

    Conclusions People calling RD perceived that the telephone call with the nurses meant meeting specific competence, gaining constructive dialogue and that the helpline was applicable. This knowledge ad to a fuller understanding of factors that from a caller's perspective, are important when calling a helpline with specially trained nurses on rheumatic diseases. © 2017, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited.

  • 119.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Logoped Phoniatr & Audiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Akerlund, Viktoria
    Lund Univ, Dept Logoped Phoniatr & Audiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Skoglund, Cecilia
    Helsingborg Hosp, Dept Logoped, Helsingborg, Sweden..
    Ek-Lagergren, Ingela
    Lund Univ, Dept Logoped Phoniatr & Audiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sahlen, Birgitta
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Spoken and Written Narratives in Swedish Children and Adolescents With Hearing Impairment2012In: Communication Disorders Quarterly, ISSN 1525-7401, E-ISSN 1538-4837, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 131-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty 10-to 18-year-old children and adolescents with varying degrees of hearing impairment (HI) and hearing aids (HA), ranging from mild-moderate to severe, produced picture-elicited narratives in a spoken and written version. Their performance was compared to that of 63 normally hearing (NH) peers within the same age span. The participants with HI and NH showed similar patterns regarding intragroup correlations between corresponding measures of spoken and written narratives. However, the participants with HI had significantly less diverse language than the NH group. The participants with poorer hearing (higher best ear hearing level [BEHL]) produced spoken and written narratives comprising more content words and they also produced written narratives that were less lexically diverse than the participants with better hearing (lower BEHL). The difference as to lexical skills emphasizes the importance of focusing on these skills in the group of children with HI. However, the results give support for a quite optimistic view on the development of narration in children with HI with HA, at least for picture-elicited narratives.

  • 120.
    Axelsson, Åsa B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Zettergren, Margaretha
    Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Christer
    Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Good and bad experiences of family presence during acute care and resuscitation. What makes the difference?2005In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Family presence (FP) in the resuscitation room is still controversial, and its appropriateness for patient and family has been discussed. We examined both positive and negative experiences in order to establish the reasons for the difference.

    Aim:

    The aim of the present literature review was to describe patients', relatives' and staff's opinions and experiences of FP during invasive procedures and resuscitation.

    Method:

    12 original papers, published between January 1995 and February 2003, were reviewed. Most patients and relatives agreed that they had positive experiences of FP. They described how FP enhanced the feeling of support and connectedness within the family. Family members believed that FP helped them in their grieving process. Most staff members without FP experience felt that FP would increase the risk of psychological distress for the family. Those who had participated in an FP programme believed that FP was not only beneficial for the family but also for staff.

    Conclusion:

    Family presence during resuscitation and acute care has the potential to enhance the care of the patient and to benefit everyone involved. However, implementation of FP during resuscitation must take account of potential problems.

  • 121.
    Back, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Mechanisms of Exercise Dependence – A person centred approach to study the predictiveability of anxiety, obsessive passion and appearance orientation on exercise dependence2017In: Sport Psychology: Linking theory to practice / [ed] Gangyan, S., Cruz, J., & Jaenes, J.C., 2017, p. 537-538Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise dependence is a maladaptive pattern of exercise with a craving for physical activity that results in extreme exercise that may generate mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. Previous research suggests that individuals with certain personality traits are more prone to develop exercise dependence. However, research on personality traits and exercise dependence is still limited. In the current study, predictive abilities of anxiety, obsessive passion and appearance orientation on exercise dependence were investigated. A longitudinal design was adopted to investigate if personality related factors could predict exercise dependence. The sample consisted of 206 regular exercisers (100 males and 106 females) from various exercise groups, sport clubs and sport science classes in Sweden (Mage = 28,5 years; SD = 9,97). The LPA (Latent Profile Analysis) showed that a model with two profiles provided best fit to the data, and that profile belonging at T1 could predict measures of exercise dependence at T2. Profile 1: “high risk exercisers” reported significantly higher levels of exercise dependence, anxiety, obsessive passion and appearance orientation compared to Profile 2: “low risk exercisers”. This study highlights factors that may characterize people who develop exercise dependence. High-risk exercisers are obsessively passionate about their training and exercise may function as a tool to cope with anxiety. If the individual for some reason is prevented from training, feelings of anxiety and guilt are often experienced. Furthermore, these individuals tend to be self-conscious about how they look and appear to other people. To them, exercise may also work as a way to achieve body ideals. The results of the current study suggest plausible mechanisms of why exercise behaviours become unhealthy and uncontrollable for some exercisers whereas others manage to remain healthy.

  • 122.
    Back, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and sports.
    Profiles of Exercise Dependence – A person centred approach to study potential mechanisms2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 123.
    Back, Jenny
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Who becomes exercise dependent? Exploring psychological risk factors for exercise dependence through a person centred approach2017In: Proceedings of the Nordic Sport Science Conference – ‘The Double-Edged Sword of Sport: Health Promotion Versus Unhealthy Environments’ / [ed] Hertting, K. & Johnson, U., Halmstad: Halmstad University Press, 2017, p. 65-66Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Backe, Marita
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Halmstad County Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Larsson, Kerstin
    Department of Medicine, Halmstad County Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Patients’ conceptions of their life situation within the first week after a stroke event: A qualitative analysis1996In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 285-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to find out how stroke patients conceived their life situation within the first week of the acute care phase as seen from the nurses’ viewpoint. Six patients were interviewed within 3 weeks from their first stroke, using questions based on a holistic philosophy and analysed with the phenomonographic approach. Two main categories emerged from the results: the feeling of unreality and the awareness of a changed role in life, together with six subcategories; feeling of a changed perception of the body; feeling of being confused; loss of capability; awareness of confined life space; the importance of support and encouragement; and the will to look for new opportunities. The study concludes that the body change resulting from a stroke leads to both physical and psychological trauma, in which the psychological crisis can be very deep and best described as a personal catastrophe. The patient’s capability to receive and understand information becomes blocked, which influences both the nurse and the patient’s next of kin with regard to their care of the patient. Conversations with the patient must be frequent so that the acute care can be evaluated and agreement reached between the patient’s wishes and the nurses’ objectives. The results indicate the significance of intervention programmes based on crisis theory within the first week of a stroke event.

  • 125.
    Backlund, Åsa
    et al.
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skolan som arena för integration?: Begrepp, perspektiv och dilemman2017In: Skolsocialt arbete: Skolan som plats för och del i det sociala arbetet / [ed] Åsa Backlund, Sara Högdin & Ylva Spånberger Weitz, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, p. 125-135Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Backlund, Åsa
    et al.
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Spånberger Weitz, Ylva
    FoU-Nordväst & Institutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Skolsocialt arbete – en introduktion2017In: Skolsocialt arbete: Skolan som plats för och del i det sociala arbetet / [ed] Åsa Backlund, Sara Högdin & Ylva Spånberger Weitz, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, p. 15-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 127.
    Backlund, Åsa
    et al.
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Spånberger Weitz, Ylva
    FoU-Nordväst & Institutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Socialt arbete i skolan – uppgifter, perspektiv och dilemman2017In: Skolsocialt arbete: Skolan som plats för och del i det sociala arbetet / [ed] Åsa Backlund, Sara Högdin & Ylva Spånberger Weitz, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, p. 221-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Backman, Ellen
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Ätutveckling hos barn – en gemensam utmaning för barn och dess vårdnadshavare2016In: Små & stora nyheter, ISSN 1400-4186, no maj, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 129.
    Backman, Ellen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Regional Habilitation Centre, Region Halland, Kungsbacka, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    CHILD Research group, SIDR, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Department of Research and Development, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Documentation of everyday life and health carefollowing gastrostomy tube placement in children: a content analysis of medical records.2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Everyday routines play a vital role in child functioning and development. This study explored health professionals’ documentation of everyday life and health care during the first year following gastrostomy tube placement in children and the content of intervention goals. Methods: The medical records of 39 children (median age 38 months, min–max: 15–192) in one region of Sweden were analysed. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive qualitative analysis supplemented by a deductive, quantitative analysis of documented intervention goals following the ICF-CY. Results: One overall theme, “Seeking a balance”, captured the view of life with a gastrostomy and the health care provided. Two categories, “Striving for physical health” and “Depicting everyday life” with seven sub-categories, captured the key aspects of the documentation. Twenty-one children (54%) had intervention goals related to the gastrostomy, and these goals primarily focused on the ICF-CY component “Body functions”. Conclusions: To some extent the medical records reflected different dimensions of everyday life, but the intervention goals clearly focused on bodily aspects. Understanding how health care for children using a gastrostomy is documented and planned by applying an ecocultural framework adds a valuable perspective and can contribute to family-centred interventions for children using a gastrostomy.Implications for Rehabilitation There is a need for increased awareness in healthcare professionals for a more consistent and holistic healthcare approach in the management of children with gastrostomy tube feeding. This study suggests that an expanded focus on children’s participation in everyday mealtimes and in the healthcare follow-up of gastrostomy tube feeding is important in enhancing the intervention outcome. Multidisciplinary teams with a shared bio-psycho-social understanding of health would contribute to a situation in which the everyday lives of households adapt to living with gastrostomy. Routine care for children with gastrostomy should follow a checklist combining crucial physiological aspects of gastrostomy tube feeding with seemingly mundane family functions in order to achieve a successful gastrostomy tube feeding intervention.  © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 130.
    Backman, Ellen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Regional Habilitation Center, Region Halland, Kungsbacka, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Department of Research and Development, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Sjögreen, Lotta
    Mun-H-Center Orofacial Resource Center for Rare Diseases, Public Dental Service, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gastrostomy tube feeding in children with developmental or acquired disorders: A longitudinal comparison on health care provision, and eating outcomes four years after gastrostomy2018In: Nutrition in clinical practice, ISSN 0884-5336, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 576-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies on long‐term feeding and eating outcomes in children requiring gastrostomy tube feeding (GT) are scarce. The aim of this study was to describe children with developmental or acquired disorders receiving GT and to compare longitudinal eating and feeding outcomes. A secondary aim was to explore healthcare provision related to eating and feeding.

    Methods: This retrospective cohort study reviewed medical records of children in 1 administrative region of Sweden with GT placement between 2005 and 2012. Patient demographics, primary diagnoses, age at GT placement, and professional healthcare contacts prior to and after GT placement were recorded and compared. Feeding and eating outcomes were assessed 4 years after GT placement.

    Results: The medical records of 51 children, 28 boys and 23 girls, were analyzed and grouped according to “acquired” (n = 13) or “developmental” (n = 38) primary diagnoses. At 4 years after GT placement, 67% were still using GT. Only 6 of 37 (16%) children with developmental disorders transferred to eating all orally, as opposed to 10 of 11 (91%) children with acquired disorders. Children with developmental disorders were younger at the time of GT placement and displayed a longer duration of GT activity when compared with children with acquired disorders.

    Conclusions: This study demonstrates a clear difference between children with developmental or acquired disorders in duration of GT activity and age at GT placement. The study further shows that healthcare provided to children with GT is in some cases multidisciplinary, but primarily focuses on feeding rather than eating.

  • 131.
    Backman, Ellen
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Department of Research and Development, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Sjögreen, Lotta
    Mun-H-Center Orofacial Resource Center for Rare diseases, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The use of gastrostomy in Swedish children – indications, and trends between 2005 and 20152017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with complex medical needs requiring nutritional support are growing in number. This presentation will add new knowledge regarding gastrostomy in children by reporting primary diagnosis, and indications for the use of gastrostomy. Furthermore, the presentation will discuss and analyse data evolution trends from 2005 to 2015 in Sweden.

    Methods: The first part of the study used national statistics to provide a broad picture of gastrostomy use in Swedish children. The second part applied a retrospective observational study design, reviewing medical charts in order to obtain an in-depth picture of the children in need for gastrostomy, and its use in a five-year perspective.

    Results: The number of gastrostomy cases recorded in the national database was 3 946, 53% male, and 47% female. The distribution of age groups was: 0-4 years: 61% , 5-9 years: 17%, 10-14 years: 12%, and 15-19: years 10%.  When observing trends on a national level, the number of children receiving gastrostomy increased in average by 13% per year. Changes in the separate age groups were analysed. An increase was noted for children aged 0-4 years and for children aged 5-9 years. In the age groups 10-14 years and 15-19 years, there was no progressive increase. The results from the national statistics database will be discussed in relation to the medical chart-analyses of 75 children receiving gastrostomy in one Swedish administrative region between 2005 and 2015. 

    Conclusions: As in many parts of Europe, the number of children in need for gastrostomy is also growing in Sweden, with the youngest children seeming to be the group increasing most.

    Clinical implications: Nutritional support in Sweden is publicly financed, therefore these findings may be useful when planning both monetary and human resources in meeting the future challenges of paediatric health care.

  • 132.
    Baigi, Amir
    et al.
    FoU-enheten, Primärvården Halland.
    Bergh, Håkan
    FoU-enheten, Primärvården Halland.
    Haraldsson, Katarina
    FoU-enheten, Primärvården Halland.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lydell, Marie
    FoU-enheten, Primärvården Halland.
    Månsson, Jörgen
    FoU-enheten, Primärvården Halland.
    Wendt, Eva
    FoU-enheten, Primärvården Halland.
    Hälsa på lika villkor? Hallands resultat från en nationell folkhälsoenkät2005Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    N/A

  • 133.
    Baigi, Amir
    et al.
    R and D Unit, Primary Health Care, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Bering, Charlotte
    Department of Medicine, Visby Hospital, Visby, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Almerud, Sofia
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Non-attendees' attitudes to the design of a cardiac rehabilitation programme focused on information of risk factors and professional involvement2009In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 62-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Enhancing the accuracy of the content of cardiac rehabilitation programmes (CRPs) and providing the mediators preferred by patients can increase attendance rates in line with secondary prevention goals. The aim of this study was therefore to explore non-attendees' attitudes to the design of a CRP focused on information of risk factors and professional involvement. Method: Consecutive patients with coronary heart disease (n = 100) who declined to participate in a CRP answered a questionnaire focusing on patients' attitudes to risk factors and cardiac rehabilitation. Results: Non-attendees considered that information of hypertension and information of sedentary lifestyle constituted the most important content of a CRP. Physicians, nurses and social workers were considered the most suitable professional categories. Females preferred nurses when discussing smoking issues while males preferred physicians. More males compared to females preferred occupational therapists for dealing with stress, physicians for depression and social workers for social isolation. Conclusions: Non-attendees' attitudes are similar to those of attendees and quite traditional in that they favour physician or nurse-led activities. There is a difference in attitude between male and female.

  • 134.
    Baigi, Amir
    et al.
    Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Virdhall, Helen
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sense of coherence as well as social support and network as perceived by patients with a suspected or manifest myocardial infarction: a short-term follow-up study2008In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 646-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    To compare sense of coherence as well as social support and network as perceived by ischaemic heart disease patients at baseline and two weeks post-discharge in terms of age, sex, educational and marital status.

    Design:

    Multicentre study with a prospective short-term follow-up design.

    Setting:

    A university hospital, a central hospital and a district hospital in southern Sweden.

    Subjects:

    Consecutive sample of 246 patients with a suspect or manifest myocardial infarction.

    Main measures:

    The Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS-R), the Medical Outcome Study (MOS) Social Support Survey and the Sense of Coherence Scale were included in a self-administered questionnaire and answered twice, together with sociodemographic variables.

    Results:

    Bivariate analyses indicated changes in social support (practical support increased in men and decreased in women; both P= 0.003) and social network (family network increased among >65 year olds; P= 0.001, men; P= 0.013, and women; P= 0.033, those with a low; P=0.017, and intermediate; P= 0.033, educational level, as well as those cohabiting; P= 0.0001), but did not reveal any difference in sense of coherence.

    Conclusions:

    Sociodemographic variables have no influence on sense of coherence but do affect social support (i.e. practical support and social network, family). Ischaemic heart disease patients' short stay in hospital implies that the network outside the hospital has to assume responsibility, but at the same time it is important for health care professionals to have sufficient knowledge to be able to support the specific needs of patients and their family members.

  • 135.
    Baigi, Amir
    et al.
    Primary Health Care Research and Development Unit, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The association between socio-economic status and chest pain, focusing on self-rated health in a primary health care area of Sweden2001In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 420-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study objective: The study objective was to determine, first, the association between men's and women's chest pain and their socio-economic status (occupation, smoking) and, secondly, the association between their socio-economic status and self-rated health, in a primary health care area. Design and setting: A population-based cross-sectional survey was made in a primary health care area of Sweden. Primarily based on occupation according to Swedish standards, 4,238 men and women were divided into two socio-economic groups; blue-collar and white-collar workers. Methods: Odds ratios with 95% Cl were calculated by multivariate logistic regression, controlling for the variable age as confounding factor. Student's t-test was used to compare self-rated health, and the chi (2)-test to determine any difference in smoking habits between the two groups. Main results: Both male and female blue-collar workers showed significantly more chest pain when excited than white-collar workers. In six of eight health indices, they also reported significantly worse self-rated health than the white-collar workers. Conclusions: These findings show that there are socio-economic inequalities in self-reported chest pain. Furthermore, socio-economic status has a major influence on self-rated health, acting across the working life of both sexes.

  • 136.
    Baldauf, Sara
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Onken, Jennifer
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Sjuksköterskans stöd till anhöriga: En studie om anhörigas upplevelser av stöd inom intensivvård2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The attention and support given to family members at the Intensive Care Unit can sometimes be limited due to that the nurses often focus on the patient's needs and forget about family members needs. Since nurses meet family members on a daily basis it is important for them to know what family members find supportive. The condition of patients at the intensive care unit is often critical and family members need support to cope, understand and adapt to the situation. The aim of the study was to highlight family members´ experiences of support from nurses at the intensive care unit. A structured literature review was conducted in which 10 articles with both qualitative and quantitative design underwent thematic analysis. The analysis gave four categories: Trust and reliance, Presence and participation, Comfort and empathy and Availability and continuity. To sum up; family members at the Intensive Care Unit have a great need of support. Family members are in general satisfied with the support, but there is need for more research in what kind of support they require and how family members experience the support.

  • 137.
    Barnes, Colin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Barker, Clare
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Book reviews: Arguing about disability: philosophical perspectives2010In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 123-127Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Barnes, Colin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Sheldon, Alison
    Centre for Disability Studies, School of Sociology and Social Policy, The University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Disability, Politics and Poverty in a Majority World Context2010In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 771-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that the spread of free market economics throughout the world has generated unprecedented inequalities within and between nation states. This has led to the systematic exclusion of people with perceived impairments from the mainstream of economic and community life in almost all societies, the generation of an international disabled people’s movement, and their demand for legal frameworks with which to address the multiple deprivations encountered by people viewed as ‘disabled’. It is argued that the poverty and exclusion encountered by disabled people and other oppressed groups in all societies will not be eliminated without fundamental structural change at the international level

  • 139.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Die Entwicklung einer inklusiven Schule – das Beispiel Essunga, Schweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Informelles und formelles Lernen betrifft nicht nur die Schülerinnen und Schüler im Unterricht, sondern auch die Schule als lernendes System. In dem Symposiums-Beitrag wird die Schulentwicklungsarbeit in der schwedischen Gemeinde Essunga dargestellt und analysiert. In den dortigen Schulen konnten unterdurchschnittliche Leistungen in nationalen Rankings innerhalb weniger Jahre in Toppositionen gewandelt werden. Die Ausführungen basieren auf einer schwedischen Studie (Persson/Persson 2012), in der pädagogisches und administratives Personal, Schülerinnen und Schüler sowie Eltern zu den Wandlungen in Essunga interviewt wurden; zudem wurden teilnehmende Beobachtungen durchgeführt. Die Untersuchung ist an Ludwik Flecks wissenschaftstheoretische Überlegungen zur Ergänzung, Erweiterung und Umwandlung von Denkstilen angelehnt (Fleck 2012). Kennzeichnend für die Veränderungsprozesse in Essunga waren insbesondere die Auflösung gesonderter Fördergruppen, eine autoritative pädagogische Leitung und auf wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen aufbauende Lehrerfortbildungen. In der Fallstudie wird unterstrichen, dass Inklusion und hohe Leistungsfähigkeit keinen Widerspruch darstellen, sondern sich ergänzen.

  • 140.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Inklusive Bildung im schwedischen Bildungssystem auf der kommunalen Ebene: Chancen, Spannungen, Hindernisse2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 141.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Inklusive Bildung in Kenia zwischen politischer Rhetorik und pädagogischer Realität2013In: Sonderpädagogische Förderung heute, ISSN 1866-9344, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 262-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents and discusses the discrepancies between the declared education policy and everyday implementation of inclusive education in Kenya. On the policy level orientation towards the aim of inclusion can be observed. However, this concept of inclusion is fragmented and rooted in a deficit-oriented model of disability. On the level of educational practice major problems in realisation of inclusion exist. These can be explained by lack of acceptance and prejudices, unadjusted didactics, and practical difficulties such as lack of resources and over-crowded classrooms. Considering this situation, the improvement of education opportunities and life chances of persons with disability in Kenya forms an enormous challenge.

  • 142.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Lernen im Schatten der Gymnasialreform in Schweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    In den letzten Jahren hat sich das schwedische Bildungswesen grundlegend gewandelt. So wurde 2011 eine Gymnasialreform durchgeführt, die unter anderem striktere Aufnahmekriterien vorsieht. Zugleich wurden fünf Einführungsprogramme implementiert, die Schülern den Übergang in ein Nationales Programm oder in den Arbeitsmarkt ermöglichen sollen. Im Beitrag wird deutlich, dass die Schülerzahl in speziellen Programmen zunimmt, ohne dass bislang eine verbesserte Eingliederung in den Arbeitsmarkt zu erkennen ist.

  • 143.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Mångfald, differentiering, inkludering – en introduktion2013In: Mångfald och differentiering: Inkludering i praktisk tillämpning / [ed] Thomas Barow, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 17-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Mångfald och differentiering : Inkludering i praktisk tillämpning2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Mångfaldens didaktik2013In: Mångfald och differentiering: Inkludering i praktisk tillämpning / [ed] Thomas Barow, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 107-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Stationslärande, verkstäder och expertsystemet2013In: Mångfald och differentiering: Inkludering i praktisk tillämpning / [ed] Thomas Barow, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 253-266Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Vår rädsla för "de andra"2013In: Intra, ISSN 1102-4143, no 4, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 148.
    Barow, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Övergång från skola till arbete i ett historiskt perspektiv: den svenska ”sinnesslövården” under 1900-talets första hälft2015In: Vägval i skolans historia, ISSN 2002-0147, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Barow, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Bernhard, Dörte
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lernen im Schatten der Gymnasialreform in Schweden2015In: Die UN-Behindertenrechtskonvention und ihre Umsetzung: Beiträge zur Interkulturellen und International vergleichenden Heil- und Sonderpädagogik / [ed] Annette Leonhardt, Katharina Müller & Tilly Truckenbrodt, Bad Heilbrunn: Verlag Julius Klinkhardt, 2015, p. 266-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    In den letzten Jahren hat sich das schwedische Bildungswesen grundlegend gewandelt. So wurde 2011 eine Gymnasialreform durchgeführt, die u.a. striktere Aufnahmekriterien vorsieht. Zugleich wurden fünf Einführungsprogramme implementiert, die Schülern den Übergang in ein Nationales Programm oder in den Arbeitsmarkt ermöglichen sollen. Im Beitrag wird deutlich, dass die Schülerzahl in speziellen Programmen zunimmt, ohne dass bislang eine verbesserte Eingliederung in den Arbeitsmarkt zu erkennen ist.

  • 150.
    Batory, Agnes
    et al.
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Svensson, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Regulating Collaboration: The Legal Framework of Collaborative Governance in Ten European Countries2019In: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many scholars have considered when and why collaboration between government agencies and societal actors occurs. This article argues that a simple but largely overlooked answer to these questions is that a formal legal or administrative requirement to do so is in place. Therefore, the objective is to substantiate whether there are legal requirements to collaborate and in what type of source and context this obligation applies in ten European countries. The main finding is that collaboration is underpinned by an extensive range of legal requirements in Europe, although imposing these requirements is generally not the main objective. © 2019 The Author(s).

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