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  • 1.
    Pemsel, Sofia
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Widén, Kristian
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Bengt
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Managing End User Requirements in Construction Projects2009Ingår i: Proceedings of 5th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organisation, Vol. 1, 2009, s. 44-55Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The research presented is the initial part of a project with the aim of increasing the use of end-user requirement through out the construction process. This initial part maps how Swedish real estate companies manage end-user requirements and evaluate the outcome.

    Methodological approach

    The focus of the study was on methods for capturing and managing end-user requirements and for measuring their satisfaction with the outcome. The study was conducted as a desktop study using literature databases and through interviews with key personnel from 12 different companies; from housing, office and school real estate management to health care facilities management.

    Results

    The literature review showed that there are a number of different methods that could be used for parts, but that there exist no method that cover the whole process. There are different ways to combine methods for achieving an end-user focus throughout the project. The Swedish real estate companies did, in most cases, measure end-user satisfaction; not in relation to construction projects, but on a general level. Feeding back the knowledge, gained from the evaluations, into construction projects were found difficult and thereby not done. The companies were all interested in new ways of working and thought that it would improve there business.

    Status

    The paper is based on work made in the spring of 2008 this initial part of the study is almost finished and will be completely finished by the time of full paper submission.

    Contribution

    The work identifies the problems of keeping an end-user approach through the whole building cycle; from briefing to evaluating the building in use. The paper gives a collection of different methods and indicators and how these could be combined to create greater value for the end-users as well as the state of the art of work methods in practice in Sweden.

  • 2.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Larsson, Bengt
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Decision making for sustainable rebuilding: a theoretical approach2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In facilities management, decisions regarding how and when maintenance and rebuilding are to be carried out are made on a regular basis. Typically, there is a compromise regarding cost, usability and the possibility of exploring new options. Many case studies indicate that a large number of these decisions are based on simple models and that they are not adequately investigated. This is a problem, especially in cases of public procurement, where a high level of transparency in decision making is desired. There is a need for a proper decision basis in order to build a society that is economically, socially and environmentally sustainable. A working method is proposed as a tool for the integration of costs and benefits in decision making on investments in sustainable re-building. The guideline gives an overview as to why, when and how impact assessments and project appraisals can be conducted on different levels on a scale from tactical decisions to strategic decisions. The proposed method can be used to prioritise actions that need attention and to decide which preventive measures are the most efficient from an economic point of view. This paper explores the practical application of the guideline and presents an economic analysis and valuation in sustainable rebuilding management. Finally, the prerequisites for impact assessment and project appraisal and how they can be used and accepted by the users and decision-makers are discussed.

  • 3.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Arkitekten och brukarmedverkan2008Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Working conditions and regulations encourage everyone to participate actively in shaping the surrounding environment in order to increase the social durability. End-users’ participation during the construction process will contribute to building better products that fulfil their needs and requirements. Meanwhile the real estate administrators will achieve a long term economic success if all renters are satisfied and prolonged their contracts. Contrary, for the individuals, both the social value and health aspects are possible to influence in shaping the living environment and working places. The aim of this study is to analyse how architects can transform and manage end-users’ demands, needs and requirements during the construction process where the construction documentation are formulated and followed-up. Emphasis will also be on how the architects’ education supports the profession’s role as facilitators in the process of involving end-users. Two case studies had been performed in order to highlight the architects’ role and involvement of end-user in the process. In order to gain an understanding on how the architect students and the professional architects view the research problems, questionnaires were used. A big asset in the construction industry is the individual knowledge gained and the mutual competence that are acquired during the construction project. For that knowledge to be useful, it requires the right working conditions, suitable organisation and above all time. Time and dialogue combined with the right tools will depict the right picture of what is to be built. Clients that work with the developed forms of cooperation provide resources at the early stage of the project which form a good condition for construction process. Both the students and the professional architects consider that it is necessary to be more participative as a society builder in the development of a durable society. A problem in the professional role is the experience feedback from end-users which results in knowledge gap about the end-users needs. A stronger cooperation between the architect and the engineer during the education period will lead to a better teamwork in the construction process. The development of a durable society requires a durable process.

  • 4.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Avdelningen för byggnadsekonomi, Lunds Tekniska Högskola, Lund Universitet.
    Brukarnas krav i byggprocessen: en fallstudie2005Licentiatavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1996, the artillery regiment, A4, in Östersund was disbanded. Their former premises underwent remodelling to serve as the new campus for the Mid Sweden University. The express intention was that the new occupiers would be allowed to take part in the planning process. During 1997 the company Vasallen became the owner of the premises, by direction of the Ministry of Finance. Vasallen was charged with the management of former military premises and increasing their value with the aim of selling the property.

    Thanks to their well-defined mission and good financial resources, Vasallen became a new actor on the property market. In the same year, a number of architectural firms were invited to take part in a competition. At the beginning of 1998, SWECO FFNS was chosen as the winner, and the planning process started immediately. The new campus was inaugurated on September 6, 2002 with the Swedish Prime Minister, Göran Persson, in attendance.

    The aim of this study was to monitor how well the demands of the new occupiers regarding quality and environment were met, and how these demands were managed during the construction process. My ambition was to study the process as a case study in order to better understand and reflect on what actually happens in the communication between partners. The material on which the study is based was gathered by participation in planning meetings and by following the construction process. The Campus Östersund project was unique in many ways. In the first place, the existing buildings form a sound basis as they were intentionally designed with the needs and well-being of the individual in mind. Many qualities were thus already incorporated into the buildings on the site.

    The strict regulations imposed by the fact that these were classed as historical buildings set certain limitations, while at the same time posing a challenge to be overcome. The stark contrast between a military regiment and the activities of a modern university placed high demands on those involved in the project. The user’s wishes and demands, working environment factors, structural issues and demands on comfort always have a tendency to take second place after financial factors. In this case, however, the owner’s and user’s joint ambition led to the reconsideration of priorities concerning, for example, the working environment. Finally, the project was unique as a fully comprehensive view of the process and final product was adopted by the two main partners. This includes, for example, observing environmental assets throughout the whole project.

    In 1996, the artillery regiment, A4, in Östersund was disbanded. Their former premises underwent remodelling to serve as the new campus for the Mid Sweden University. The express intention was that the new occupiers would be allowed to take part in the planning process. During 1997 the company Vasallen became the owner of the premises, by direction of the Ministry of Finance. Vasallen was charged with the management of former military premises and increasing their value with the aim of selling the property.

    Thanks to their well-defined mission and good financial resources, Vasallen became a new actor on the property market. In the same year, a number of architectural firms were invited to take part in a competition. At the beginning of 1998, SWECO FFNS was chosen as the winner, and the planning process started immediately. The new campus was inaugurated on September 6, 2002 with the Swedish Prime Minister, Göran Persson, in attendance.

    The aim of this study was to monitor how well the demands of the new occupiers regarding quality and environment were met, and how these demands were managed during the construction process. My ambition was to study the process as a case study in order to better understand and reflect on what actually happens in the communication between partners. The material on which the study is based was gathered by participation in planning meetings and by following the construction process. The Campus Östersund project was unique in many ways. In the first place, the existing buildings form a sound basis as they were intentionally designed with the needs and well-being of the individual in mind. Many qualities were thus already incorporated into the buildings on the site.

    The strict regulations imposed by the fact that these were classed as historical buildings set certain limitations, while at the same time posing a challenge to be overcome. The stark contrast between a military regiment and the activities of a modern university placed high demands on those involved in the project. The user’s wishes and demands, working environment factors, structural issues and demands on comfort always have a tendency to take second place after financial factors. In this case, however, the owner’s and user’s joint ambition led to the reconsideration of priorities concerning, for example, the working environment. Finally, the project was unique as a fully comprehensive view of the process and final product was adopted by the two main partners. This includes, for example, observing environmental assets throughout the whole project.

    Brukarmedverkan i byggprocessen –en fallstudie 12

    Building the “right product” is an important argument for including the end user in the project. By initiating a planning process in which the user’s demands and wishes are considered, one not only initiates the actual building process, but also a process in the client’s organisation. The capacity to participate in such a process within the organisation is, however, not always good. Clarity and respect for the processes initiated were not always particularly pronounced in this case. Lack of clarity sometimes led to confusion, which in turn led to complications in communication and thus delay in the project. The internal process in an organisation should, if possible, progress simultaneously with, and be firmly established before, meetings with the consultants. Theoretical studies have confirmed the importance of utilizing the process of change in internal organisational development in order to achieve a positive attitude among employees.

    Participation of the end user in a large organisation is often based on representatives in working parties. These representatives should be motivated, be given the time required within the framework of their job, and have the confidence of their colleagues. The opportunity to influence decisions is great in the initial stages. The user should have knowledge concerning the various phases of construction, the financial and legal framework, and the rules and regulations governing the project. Being able to participate in creating one’s own working environment elicits various degrees of commitment and levels of expectation in the user organisation. Both the occupants and the consultants should have the capacity for this kind of development, especially the latter as they constitute the “front line”. The user should understand the relation between desires and possible financial effects. The price tag for alternative demands/wishes and the effects these will have on the final rent should be clearly visible. It is an advantage if this is made clear very early on in the project. The dialogue between the parties should thus be supplemented by the architect explaining to the new occupiers where limitations and opportunities lie in the project. The parties involved must have a certain degree of pedagogical competence in order to explain and manage the project to everyone’s satisfaction. A good environment is seldom described in terms of formulated concepts outside the architectural community. Projects in which the end user is involved thus provide a unique opportunity to start building up a bank of knowledge including expressions used by non-experts to describe concepts of space. Difficulties are encountered when all these views are to be accepted and implemented in the building process through descriptions and drawings. Words are replaced by numbers, and more and more actors are involved, for example, engineering consultants. We simply do not have all the necessary tools with which to express wishes concerning the physical environment. We can, however, bridge the communication gap between users and consultants by using computer-aided information systems. The ideas expressed by the user can be transformed into three-dimensional video sequences, and thus be confirmed as being, “just what we meant”.

    It was apparent quite early on in this research that the technical terms available were not adequate to describe the events of this case. The end user’s feeling of not being able to keep up with the consultants’ technical concepts may lead them to feel that they are at a disadvantage, which certainly will not benefit the process. Here, the role of the architect as a pedagogue is important in leading the various participants into the planning process. One of the actors should perhaps have some kind of skills in behavioural science and Brukarmedverkan i byggprocessen –en fallstudie education. Perhaps changes should be made in the training of architects and other consultants.

    Respect for the common process is perhaps the most important factor for its success, together with clarity and openness. These are terms not traditionally used in construction projects. The interpretation of the customer’s wishes, explaining the opportunities and limitations of the building, and planning for future expansion are the responsibility of the architect. Does a single actor have a reasonable chance of coping with this in a large-scale project? All the participants should gain broad insight into each other’s jobs and roles early on in the project. Respect for the responsibilities and roles of others can be built up by concentrated efforts to exchange knowledge through dialogue early in the process. The incentive for participating varies from one actor to another. Theoretical studies, for example, give clear advice that each actor’s interests in the project be clarified. Trust is one of the most important mainstays in establishing good communication. Feelings of suspicion and unreliability can be disastrous in this kind of project. The development of legal issues and forms concerning contractors and their work is also desirable in order to aid the process.

    When the owner sees the opportunity to take an active part in the management of the premises, this leads to a continuous dialogue and process during and after the planning and construction phases. These studies have given me a greater respect for processes involving the end user, from planning to management. One of my most important personal  reflections, and a partly new realisation, is that the involvement of the user in the process has such a large influence on the building project. Communication and continuous information are essential in projects in which the user is involved.

    Communication can also be made easier if the parties regard each other as fellow partners and not opposing partners. The period spent in education and training is the most important in laying the foundation for these attitudes among professionals. A great deal of responsibility thus lies with teachers to ensure that end users have increased opportunity to participate in and influence the building process. There is no short cut to customer-focused working methods.

  • 5.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Communication vs Information in the Building Process2011Ingår i: Proceedings of the CIB-W096 conference Vienna 2011: Architectural Management in the Digital Arena / [ed] Ad den Otter, Stephen Emmitt & Christoph Achammer, Eindhoven: University Press, Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) , 2011, s. 232-240Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 6.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Designing quality with a sustainable process2009Ingår i: Proceeding from the international conference Changing Roles; New Roles, New Challenges. Noordwijk an Zee, The Netherlands, 5-9 October 2009, 2009Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the necessity to build a sustainable society the process and the interaction between the actors involved must also be sustainable. The actors involved need to work together with a joint ambition. How can the actors involved communicate and collaborate in a better way to achieve a good product?The objective of this paper is the question of how the actors involved can achieve better results if the right orders and resources are given by the Construction Client. A discussion about how the architectural education in Sweden supports the architects to take a leading role in the development of a sustainable society will also be a part of this paper.The method of performance of this research contains literature reviews and a summary from performed questionnaires and interviews. The result is an overview of how different factors can support a better communication and collaboration between the actors involved in a sustainable building process. The contribution of this research is a proposal of how architectural knowledge and collaborative work can be used designing a sustainable built environment.

  • 7.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    How architectural education in Sweden supports the role of handling the user involvement in the building process2005Ingår i: Special meeting on Designing value: new directions in architectural management : proceedings of the CIB W096 Architectural Management : Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark 2, 3 & 4 November 2005 / [ed] Stephen Emmitt, Matthijs Prins, Lyngby: Technical university of Denmark , 2005, s. 459-466Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 8.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    The Architect's role2009Ingår i: Architectural management: International research and practice / [ed] Stephen Emmitt, Matthijs Prins, Ad den Otter, Chichester, U.K.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009, s. 284-296Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter contains sections titled:

    • Introduction
    • The architect as enabler
    • Learning
    • Architectural education in Sweden
    • Conclusion
    • References
  • 9.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    The architect's role in the dynamic design process-possibilities and obstacles2006Ingår i: Adaptables'06 "Adaptability in Design and Construction" on July 2006 in Eindhoven, The Netherlands / [ed] Frits Scheublin, Jan Westra & Arno Pronk, Rotterdam: Eindhoven university of technology , 2006, s. 12-95-12-102Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The building process involves both dynamic processes and professional teamwork, a combination that confers on all the actors great economic and technical responsibilities. There are arguments for involving the user in the design process, so as to achieve appropriate outcomes. It is important to maintain a creative and generous working climate early on in a building-project, especially if users are involved: users may not be used to the aim of the process or the language used in the dialogue between the actors involved. It can be difficult to keep a dynamic process "alive" when a host of regulations and laws is directing and controlling both the actors' roles and their responsibilities to society and the project. There are also cultural factors and traditional working methods that can restrict the innovative design process. The architect can be the actor who guides the users through this dynamic process, keeping it alive. To achieve good results the architect needs certain skills and experience and need to draw on various models and methods to support the process. Which are the possibilities for and obstacles to steer the dynamic process? And what are the qualifications and working models needed to ensure success in this task?

  • 10.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    The role of the architect-interpreter of the clients and user's needs2006Ingår i: Construction in the XXI century: local and global challenges : Joint 2006 CIB W065/W055/W086 International Symposium proceedings / [ed] Roberto Pietroforte, Enrico De Angelis, Francesco Polverino, Napoli: Edizione Scientifiche Italiane , 2006, s. 316-317Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 11.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    The user's requirements in the building process regarding environmental and quality demands: a case study on the Östersund Campus2003Ingår i: Construction Economics and Organization: proceedings of the 3rd Nordic Conference 23-24 april 2003 / [ed] edited by Bengt Hansson and Anne Landin, Lund: Lund Institute of Technology , 2003, s. 353-360Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 12.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Working in a process with a joint ambition- Maria Sofia a case study from Helsingborg2008Ingår i: Proceedings of joint CIB Conference: Performance and Knowledge Management, Helsinki: Finnish association of Civil Engeneering RIL , 2008, s. 53-54Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study will give an example of how to work together in the building process with a joint ambition. The role of the architect will be in focus and will be described in the perspective of developing the future role. In this project a housing area with 200 apartments was planned to be built near Helsingborg in the south of Sweden by Helsingborgshem, the municipal housing firm. The actors involved started up the process with several meetings and with a precise goal concerning the costs of producing each square meter. The involved actors such as: The local authorities, the architects, the caretaker, the construction firm and representatives for the future tenants worked together in the early stages at workshops and meetings. In these early discussions the knowledge and experience from each part were used in favour for the planning process. The role of the architect in this process is interesting because of the possibilities to develop the future role. When involving the user in the building process several skills are required. The pedagogical role as well as good communication skills can be useful. Interpretation is also needed when the experts are using all the difficult terms when formulating the plans for the product. To be more responsible of the economical frames as well as keeping up the collaborative work is a challenge. More time and efforts in the early stages can be an investment with good results. Using the knowledge from the group in a safe atmosphere may also have a positive effect on the final product. The chance to create the "right product" with a higher constructability can also give good economical effects. The winners are the actors involved, the end-users and future tenants because of the possibilities to lower the rent. This case study will describe the actors involved, their common goal and their way of working together. It will also discuss the role of the architect and the possibilities to learn from this case study. The attitudes towards the different roles are shaped during the time of education. In which direction is the Swedish architectural education going? Does it support the collaborative process found in this case study?

  • 13.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Johnsson, Mats
    Lund Technical University, Lund, Sweden.
    Managing Resources in a Sustainable Building Process2013Ingår i: Proceedings of SB13 – Oulu, Finland: Sustainable procurement in urban regeneration and renovation Northern Europe and North-West Russia, 21–25 May 2013, Helsinki: RIL - Finnish Association of Civil Engineers, 2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Managing resources efficiently in a building process is of great importance in a sustainable development. The framework in a building process contains legislations and rules from a societal perspective combined with demands of a more efficient way of working within the companies involved. The knowledge of all actors involved must be used in order to solve this complex task. The quality of new buildings does not always match the expectations from the clients today so efforts must be done to improve the process. Another urgent issue is to deal with existing buildings. Participatory governance can describe the citizens’ democratic right to participate in decision-making concerning building or renovation processes. The public sector in Sweden discusses the possibilities of working more systematically with the ambition to use all the resources in a better way and with an end-user perspective. Today different processes seem to be parallel and do not always support one another. How can we achieve the best quality in the integrated process and in the end-product? Can a genuine dialogue and integrated processes be one way to achieve a better result? The case study evidence suggests that the primary focus of the logistics concept in construction is to improve coordination and communication between project participants during the design and construction phases, particularly in the materials flow control process.

    Problem

    The Building Industry faces challenges both in new building projects as well as when dealing with existing housing areas. The economical resources are limited and the regulations and restrictions are many. Examples from the Swedish building industry show severe problems with quality and how to manage the financing of the damages. The knowledge and awareness ought to be within all actors involved in the process but the question is if there are obstacles for using it? Where and when shall the resources be adopted to the process and which are the effect of a more integrated way of working? A gap can often be indentified between different processes and actors involved in this complex industry dealing with governing the built environment:

    Theoretical framework

    In the planning- and building process several kinds of flows are managed simultaneously. The flows are governed within and between the companies involved, the residents and the governmental framework of regulations and laws. If using a combination of theories from transport logistics, design methods and quality management maybe some of the existing gaps in the process could be avoided. The challenge is to see the possibilities in new demands in services and products. New skills, competences and attitudes are required when working with processes. It is also of great importance to create an understanding and acceptance for the changes. Starting with defining and focusing on the end-user in the process can be an important unifying force. Customer driven processes and a modern perspective on quality puts the end-users needs, expectations and requirements in focus. Using theories from the design area one could start with looking into Architectural design where decisions influence the artificial environment in our every day life. The act of designing is a complex activity undertaken a close cooperation with many other actors. There is a growing recognition of the importance to think more creative and dynamic by adding values and culture into the process If implementing the lean thinking philosophy and tools into construction industry one must include lean ideals and tools into the participating organisations. Eliminating waste and maximising value must be applied into the processes within the organisations as well as on site-based construction. Logistics activities commonly involve movement and storage for the purpose of having the desired object of at the right place at the right time. Transport, storage and distribution are cornerstones of logistics and its most visible manifestations. For the construction industry, logistics comprise planning, organization, coordination, and control ofthe materials flow from the extraction of raw materials to the incorporation into the finished building Several Swedish laws emphasize the importance of the involvement of residents and end-users in the planning- and building process. Communication and knowledge transfer can be used as a tool for combining parallel processes. Digital communication networks offer the possibility of better links between clients, designers, construction organizations and suppliers

    Case study results

    Three case studies are used to exemplify different levels of collaboration and integration between parallel processes. Case I and II was part of a doctoral thesis and the third case is an ongoing research project not yet documented.

    Case study analysis

    Case studies on large scale projects in Sweden shows that working with the end-users needs and requirements in focus can support the complex building process. Working in a more integrated way can support the complex mix of technology, people and decisions involved. Recourse logistics models and customer driven process methods can support the integration of parallel levels and phases in the process. The dialogue between the actors involved where experiences are shared can also give new and useful knowledge if it can be developed in a generous atmosphere.

    Conclusions

    Some experiences from three different case studies in Sweden shows that it could be possible to use more of logistic models and “Considerate Lean” models in the building and planning process. There is an opportunity to get long term sustainable housing by involving the residents and end-users and by using their knowledge in the process. Logistics require that all involved processes are communicating with each other. If not, the lean model will be hard to apply. Lean is about taking away all waste that is not used in the value added process. It concerns time, products, costs, etc. If this is done in a proper way it is possible to make a shift to a more value added process i.e. storing activities can be used for more productive and value adding work.

  • 14.
    Svetoft, Ingrid
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Jonasson, Mikael
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Falk, Magnus
    Energi- och Miljöcentrum (EMC), Varberg, Sverige.
    Jeppsson, Kajsa
    Energi- och Miljöcentrum (EMC), Varberg, Sverige.
    Boström, Ida
    Alexandersoninstitutet, Varberg, Sverige.
    Arnesten, Helena
    Varbergs kommun, Varberg, Sverige.
    Hjort, Mattias
    Falkenbergs kommun, Falkenberg, Sverige.
    Thuresson, Roger
    Peterson & Hansson Bygg AB, Falkenberg, Sverige.
    Christiansson, Per
    Peterson & Hansson Bygg AB, Falkenberg, Sverige.
    Kylin, Christian
    Derome AB, Veddige, Sverige.
    Axelsson, Dennis
    Kulturmiljö Halland, Halmstad, Sverige.
    Hansson, Charlotta
    Laholms kommun, Laholm, Sverige.
    Nilsson, Fredrik
    Laholms kommun, Laholm, Sverige.
    Rapport 2014 – den goda och hållbara plan- och byggprocessen2014Rapport (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns flera olika anledningar till att förstudien “Den goda och hållbara plan-och byggprocessen” startades upp under våren 2014. Ett flertal aktiviter arrangerade av det halländska företagsnätverket Energi-och Miljöcentrum (EMC) i Varberg har sammanfört ett antal olika aktörer som annars inte vanligtvis möts. I dessa möten har idéer och inspirerande samtal förts som lett till en gemensam vilja att samverka i olika frågor. I denna rapport beskrivs bakgrund och genomförande av förstudien samt några sammanfattande resultat. Ett antal reflektioner om framtida möjligheter presenteras i slutet av rapporten. Alexandersoninstitutet har med sitt uppdrag gett möjligheten till oss på Högskolan i Halmstad att samordna ett antal möten och problemformulera processer och dialoger med koppling planering och byggande. Uppdraget har finansierats av Europeiska Regionalfonden via projektet Efterfrågad Utveckling. Resultatet har blivit ett antal temaformuleringar och case som nu kan användas för fortsatt arbete med forskningsansökningar och spridning av erfarenheter.

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