hh.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 9 av 9
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Brooks, Eva
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    A designerly approach as a foundation for school children's computational thinking skills while developing digital games2020Ingår i: IDC '20: Proceedings of the Interaction Design and Children Conference, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, s. 87-95Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the contemporary debate on the increasing use of computational thinking (CT) in primary schools. It is based on an empirical study in which 28 Swedish third-grade school children (9-10 years of age) participated in a creative workshop where they were challenged to design a digital game using stop-motion film technique, working in groups. The study applies a designerly approach to game design activities to investigate what aspects of computational skills can be identified when children employ stop motion filmmaking as a means to envision a digital game design idea and how a designerly approach can enable them to enact dimensions of their computational skills The data included video observations, casual conversations, and stop-motion videos representing the children's game design ideas. The analysis identified three aspects of computational thinking strategies while children produced stop-motion films: step-by-step procedural skills; design and arrangement skills; and computationalperspectives. © 2020 ACM.

  • 2.
    Brooks, Eva
    et al.
    Aalborg university, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Children’s programming of robots by designing fairytales2021Ingår i: Digital Learning and Collaborative Practices: Lessons from Inclusive and Empowering Participation with Emerging Technologies / [ed] Eva Brooks; Susanne Dau; Staffan Selander, New York: Routledge, 2021, s. 158-174Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we seek to highlight the importance of allowing and including imagination and creativity in schoolchildren's work with programming robots to enhance learning and to generate interest in programming as such, using classic fairytales as a frame. Theoretically, the chapter draws on Vygotsky’s concepts of imagination and creativity to argue the case that programming embraces imaginative and emotional interactions, which children learn within creative activities, based on examples from an empirical study of children’s learning of programming through representation of fairytales. 

  • 3.
    Brooks, Eva
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle.
    Pedagogical Integration of Digital Game-based Learning - Processes Involved2022Ingår i: Design, Learning and Innovation: 6th EAI International Conference 2021, Virtual Event, December 10-11, 2021, Proceedings / [ed] Eva Brooks; Jeanette Sjöberg; Anders Kalsgaard Møller, Cham: Springer, 2022, s. 195-212Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aligned with the digital development in society, the use of digital game-based learning (DGBL) as a pedagogical enhancement has increased markedly in schools recently. However, due to various reasons, teachers are not always as enthusiastic to adopt the new technology in their classroom. In this paper we apply Engeströms activity system as an analytical approach to understand teachers’ considerations of opportunities, resistance or barriers and pedagogical functions of digital game-based learning as a teaching method. As related research has shown, there is a lack of research answering the question of how DGBL could be designed to structure and facilitate learning as well as of considering the classroom settings and barriers of implementing DGBL. We attempt to contribute to these problems by applying the activity system framework in the context of digital game-based learning (DGBL), in particular the interplay between resistance as an obstruction or opportunity and design of teaching activities by means of digital games. The research questions posed in the study are: 1) How do teachers evaluate the designs of digital games in relation to how they support or hinder learning? and 2) What kind of constraints do teachers identify while translating educational games? The study applies a qualitative approach and includes cases of two separate workshops with a total of twelve participating teachers and one toy- and game designer. The workshops were designed to provide a framework for preschool- and primary school teachers to evaluate challenges and potentials of DGBL. Findings show, among other things, that when a game does not offer exploration or encourage curiosity, a game’s design becomes simplistic and children lose their interest, revealing a gap between game mechanics and a game’s pedagogical relevance and usefulness. Furthermore, by starting to question the relevance of games, the teachers were able to appropriate digital educational games while assessing the game’s value in relation to a subject-specific area.

  • 4.
    Brooks, Eva
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle.
    Playfulness and Creativity as Vital Features when School Children Develop Game-based Designs2022Ingår i: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 14, nr 1, s. 137-150Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of digital technologies in classroom settings is relentlessly getting stronger and has shown to have powerful playful qualities. In recent years, digital game-based learning (DGBL) has been introduced in schools. In this paper we explore game-based design activities to unfold playful and creative actions and interactions among children. The study is based on two cases, where game design activities were applied in both analogue and digital form. The unit of analysis is game design activities. The research questions posed in this study are: (1) What activities develop when school children design games in two similarly framed workshop cases, where one included analogue material and the other a combination of analogue and digital material?, and (2) How do children interact in a learning environment framed by purely analogue-based material as opposed to a learning environment framed by a combination of analogue and digital material? A thematic analysis identified three themes: exploratory activities; combinational activities; and transformative activities. These themes suggest that the game design workshop sessions including only analogue material facilitated playfulness promoting creative actions in children’s production of different ideational considerations. In a mixed activity combining analogue and digital material, creativity in the form of fluency was represented by the way the children produced their ideas, which opened up for playfulness, e.g. in the form of humour. The analysis showed that a procedural activity design including pre-designed theme framing children’s constructions facilitated an open-ended activity. © The Authors

  • 5.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle.
    Brooks, Eva
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Collaborative interactions in problem-solving activities: School children’s orientations while developing digital game designs using smart mobile technology2022Ingår i: International Journal of Child-Computer Interaction, ISSN 2212-8689, E-ISSN 2212-8697, Vol. 33, artikel-id 100456Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technologies in combination with creative activities have been introduced in schools as a strategy for learning and teaching activities offering scaffolding opportunities. Additionally, digital game-based learning (DGBL) activities have also been tried out in schools in recent years, as well as different mobile technologies, with the ambition to create smart learning. In this study, we aim to explore how school children’s collaborative interactions, while engaged in problem-solving activities using smart and mobile technology, unfolds. Drawing from a contextual perspective on learning, our study combines theoretical views on joint participation, affordances and sense of community in relation to collaborative interactions. Questions posed in this study are: (1) In what ways do children’s digital game design activities drive and/or support collaborative interactions while engaged in problem-solving activities? and (2) How are children’s digital game design ideas manifested during game design activities involving smart mobile technology? The study is based on a case where a creative workshop involving 22 Swedish third-grade children (9–10 years of age) participating in game design activities carried out in a pedagogical lab setting. By employing a thematic analysis, the results of the study show that the children deployed different orientations in their collaborative interactions, and that a sense of community emerged when the children worked on solving the problem of designing and producing a joint digital game idea, using mobile technology. On the basis of this, we argue that, when designing for educational activities involving smart mobile technology, it is pivotal to be aware of the pedagogical context, since this aspect of the design creates meaningful collaborative interactions; it is only then smart mobile technology becomes smart. These results have important implications for the methodological field of including smart mobile technology in learning situations. © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 6.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle.
    Brooks, Eva
    Aalborg University.
    Discourses of Digital Game Based Learning as a Teaching Method: Design Features and Pedagogical Opportunities Associated with Teachers’ Evaluation of Educational Game Apps2021Ingår i: Design, Learning and Innovation: 5th EAI International conference, DLI 2020Virtual Event, December 10-11, 2020Proceedings, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2021, s. 120-139Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, digital games have increasingly become an importantpart of children’s lives. As a consequence, digital game-based learning (DGBL)activities have also been merged into the school context and tried out by teachersin various ways. The pedagogical and didactical values of integrating DGBL ineducation are however not yet concluded. In this paper we examine how groups ofteachers construct ideas about digital game-based learning as a teaching methodand base for developing teaching activities. The study is drawn from a couple ofcreative workshops with Swedish and Danish school- and preschool teachers, inwhich their pedagogical design processes while evaluating and trying out differentgame apps have been studied. The research questions we ask in this paper are: 1).In what ways do teachers concretise their comprehension of digital game-basedlearning in their discussions of educational games for school children? And; 2).How are different discourses about the learning process and/or didactical potentialin relation to digital games constructed in teachers’ discussions while assessinggame apps? Using a discourse analytical approach, the results of the study showthat the teachers’ were stuck by their preconceptions about games as offering differentlearning qualities compared to their traditional teaching practice. Teachersacknowledged that DGBL is a complex issue as also designers’ preconceptionsare tied to traditional qualities of game design.

  • 7.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Brooks, Eva
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Gender Differences When School Children Develop Digital Game-based Designs: A Case Study2020Ingår i: HCI in Games: Second International Conference, HCI-Games 2020, Held as Part of the 22nd HCI International Conference, HCII 2020, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 19–24, 2020, Proceedings / [ed] Xiaowen Fang, Heidelberg: Springer, 2020, Vol. 12211, s. 186-201Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increased emergence of digital technology in the school context it is important to be aware of the fact that children’s use of digital technologies is conditioned by gender. In this paper we investigate how gender differences emerge in collaborative interactions between 9 to 10-year-old school children while collaboratively working on developing digital game-based designs. The unit of analysis is game design activities with a focus on children’s gendered actions, positionings and agency while collaborating and working with problem solving activities. The research questions posed in the study are: (1) What gender-related patterns emerges in collaborative interaction exhibited by 9 to 10-year-old school children while collaboratively engaged in a digital game-based design workshop involving problem solving activities? (2) How do 9 to 10-year-old girls and boys position themselves while collaboratively engaged in a digital game-based design workshop involving problem solving activities? (3) How do 9 to 10 year-old girls and boys employ their agency while collaboratively engaged in a digital game-based design workshop involving problem solving activities? The results of this study imply that children’s agency oscillate between individual freedom and the constraint of traditional gender patterns while collaboratively engaged in a digital game-based design workshop involving problem solving activities. As a consequence, this tends to affect the children’s participation and contribution to the given task. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020.

  • 8.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Brooks, Eva
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Problem Solving and Collaboration when School Children Develop Game Designs2020Ingår i: Interactivity, Game Creation, Design, Learning, and Innovation: 8th EAI International Conference, ArtsIT 2019, and 4th EAI International Conference, DLI 2019, Aalborg, Denmark, November 6–8, 2019, Proceedings / [ed] Anthony Brooks and Eva Irene Brooks, Heidelberg: Springer, 2020, Vol. 328, s. 683-698Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technologies in combination with creative activities have been introduced in schools as a strategy for learning and teaching activities offering scaffolding opportunities. In recent years digital game-based learning (DGBL) activities also has been tried out in schools. In this paper, we examine how collaboration between school children is configured in problem solving activities whilst developing digital game designs. The study is based on a case of a creative workshop with school children (9-10 years of age) where game design activities were applied. Game design activities with the participating children, creative materials and technologies and children’s actions as well as interactions are analysed by using interaction analysis and parts of content analysis. The research questions concern the patterns, features, and challenges emerge among 9 to 10-year-old school children when collaboratively engaged in problem solving activities? The results of the study show that a sense of community emerged when the children worked on solving the problem of designing and producing a digital game. Hence, when designing for mutuality, the design should allow for the participants’ experience acknowledging an affective awareness of a shared purpose. © ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2020.

  • 9.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för lärande, humaniora och samhälle.
    Brooks, Eva
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Understanding School Children’s Playful Experiences Through the Use of Educational Robotics - The Impact of Open-Ended Designs2022Ingår i: HCI in Games: 4th International Conference, HCI-Games 2022, Held as Part of the 24th HCI International Conference, HCII 2022, Virtual Event, June 26 – July 1, 2022, Proceedings / [ed] Xiaowen Fang, Cham: Springer, 2022, Vol. 13334, s. 456-468Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of digital technology in school settings is increasing every year, where one aspect of digital technology is robotics in education. In relation to that and of uttermost importance is the issue of how to design teaching and learning activities that includes robot technology in education. In this paper we investigate how open-ended designs can allow children to playfully explore robotics in educational settings, drawing from workshops carried out with three third grade classes of Danish school children, aged 9–10 years old, that interact with robotics in a cross-case study. By the use of video recordings, the unit of analysis focuses on the activities with a special interest on children’s interactions with the robots and with each other. The research questions posed in the study are: (1) What happens when school children use robotics designed for open-ended interactions? And (2) In what ways do children’s playful experiences unfold while engaged with robotics? The study applies a qualitative approach and the theoretical framework used describes open-ended designs as resources to develop playful experiences. In doing so, Vygotsky’s theory on mediation, Hutt’s studies into children’s play with novel objects, and Bird and Edwards’ digital play framework are used as an analytical framework. The results of this study imply that by using an open-ended design in the teaching activity with the robot, which included an exploratory and problem-solving approach, conditions were created for playful and collaborative learning.

1 - 9 av 9
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf