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  • 1.
    Chan, Derwin K. C.
    et al.
    University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong & Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Yang, Sophie X.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia & Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
    Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Hagger, Martin S.
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Response-Order Effects in Survey Methods: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Study in the Context of Sport Injury Prevention2015Ingår i: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, nr 6, s. 666-673Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Consistency tendency is characterized by the propensity for participants responding to subsequent items in a survey consistent with their responses to previous items. This method effect might contaminate the results of sport psychology surveys using cross-sectional design. We present a randomized controlled crossover study examining the effect of consistency tendency on the motivational pathway (i.e., autonomy support → autonomous motivation → intention) of self-determination theory in the context of sport injury prevention. Athletes from Sweden (N = 341) responded to the survey printed in either low inter-item distance (IID; consistency tendency likely) or high IID (consistency tendency suppressed) on two separate occasions, with a one-week interim period. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups, and they received the survey of different IID at each occasion. Bayesian structural equation modeling showed that low IID condition had stronger parameter estimates than high IID condition, but the differences were not statistically significant. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 2.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet. Department of Psychology, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science & Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Things We Still Haven’t Learned (So Far)2015Ingår i: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, nr 4, s. 449-461Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) is like an immortal horse that some researchers have been trying to beat to death for over 50 years, but without any success. In this article we discuss the flaws in NHST, the historical background in relation to both Fisher’s and Neyman-Pearson’s statistical ideas, the common misunderstandings of what p < .05 actually means, and the APA Manual’s (2010) clear, but most often ignored, instructions to report effect sizes and interpret what they all mean in the real world. Also, we discuss how Bayesian statistics can be used to overcome some of the problems with NHST. We then analyze quantitative articles in two of the highest impact factor journals in sport and exercise psychology in the last three years (2012–2014) to determine if we have learned what we should have learned decades ago about the use and meaningful interpretations of the statistics we use. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 3.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Ekengren, Johan
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Andersen, Mark B.
    Victoria University, Australia.
    Injury Prevention in Sweden: Helping Soccer Players at Risk2005Ingår i: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 27, nr 1, s. 32-38Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the effectiveness of a prevention intervention program to lower the incidence of injury for soccer players with at-risk psychosocial profiles. The Sport Anxiety Scale, the Life Event Scale for Collegiate Athletes, and the Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28 were used to screen for psychosocial risk factors outlined in the stress and injury model (Williams & Andersen, 1998). Thirty-two high injury-risk players were identified and randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. Injuries of participants were reported by their coaches. The intervention program consisted of training in 6 mental skills distributed in 6 to 8 sessions during 19 weeks of the competitive season. The results showed that the brief intervention prevention program significantly lowered the number of injuries in the treatment group compared with the control group. © 2005 Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.

  • 4.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Dept. of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Factorial validity and invariance testing of the Swedish social physique anxiety scale: arguments for gender-specific scales2004Ingår i: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 26, nr 3, s. 492-499Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the factorial validity and factorial invariance across gender of the 9-item and two 7-item previously supported unidimensional factor models of the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS; Hart, Leary, & Rejeski, 1989) in two samples of Swedish male and female university students. Results demonstrated that the Motl and Conroy (2000) 7-item model made the closest fit to data in both the male and female samples. None of the two 7-item models demonstrated invariant factor variances or item uniqueness across gender. Moreover, the factor loadings were not invariant in the Motl and Conroy models. Gender differences in SPAS factor structure, linked to cultural variations in measurement equivalence and future development of gender specific scales, are discussed.

  • 5.
    Stenling, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet. Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Idrott, hälsa och fysisk aktivitet.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bayesian Structural Equation Modeling in Sport and Exercise Psychology2015Ingår i: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 37, s. 410-420Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Bayesian statistics is on the rise in mainstream psychology, but applications in sport and exercise psychology research are scarce. In this article, the foundations of Bayesian analysis are introduced, and we will illustrate how to apply Bayesian structural equation modeling in a sport and exercise psychology setting. More specifically, we contrasted a confirmatory factor analysis on the Sport Motivation Scale II estimated with the most commonly used estimator, maximum likelihood, and a Bayesian approach with weakly informative priors for cross-loadings and correlated residuals. The results indicated that the model with Bayesian estimation and weakly informative priors provided a good fit to the data, whereas the model estimated with a maximum likelihood estimator did not produce a well-fitting model. The reasons for this discrepancy between maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation are discussed as well as potential advantages and caveats with the Bayesian approach. © 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 6.
    Weman Josefsson, Karin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Hälsa och idrott.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moderating effects of gender and age within the mechanisms of the self-determination theory process model: Examining exercise motivation in a digital context2017Ingår i: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 39, nr Suppl. 1, s. 330-330Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise-related goals and values are likely to differ between people based on factors such as gender, age and culture, and there are reasons to believe that the mechanisms between motivation and exercise behavior presented in the self-determination theory (SDT) process model also could vary as a function of such influences.

    This study is part of a digital exercise intervention (see Weman-Josefsson et al., 2016) in a sample of 318 adult women (n = 278) and men (n = 40) aged 23-67 years (M = 46.7; SD = 9.4) joining a digital work-site based step contest. Behavioral regulations, psychological need satisfaction and exercise behavior was measured using a three wave web based questionnaire (T1 = baseline; T2 = post-intervention, week 3; and T3 = follow up, week 6). Moderation analyses were done in the SPSS macro PROCESS using a bootstrapping resampling approach.

    The moderation analyses showed gender and age differences in the relations of behavioral regulations, psychological need satisfaction and exercise behavior within the SDT process model. Controlled motivation was for example a significant positive predictor for exercise in men showing external regulation at T2 to moderate the relation between psychological need satisfaction and exercise in men (beta = 11.29, p < .01) at T3 in appositive direction, while this path was negative and non-significant for women. Also Intrinsic regulation at T2 positively predicted relatedness need satisfaction for women at the same time-point (beta = 0.47, p < .05), but this path was negative and non-significant for men. In terms of age differences, the negative association between external regulation at T2 and strenuous exercise at T3 was stronger and significant for older adults compared to middle-aged adults (beta = -8.90, p < .01) and was positive (but non-significant) for younger adults.

    We found gender and age to moderate several paths of the self-determination process model, suggesting more comprehensive analyses of potential moderators in exercise behavior to be an interesting avenue for future studies. 

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