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  • 1.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sverige.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Interaktiv innovation genom intervention2013Inngår i: Det mogna tjänstesamhällets förnyelse – affärsmodeller, organisering och affärsrelationer / [ed] Andersson, P., Axelsson, B., & Rosenqvist, C., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, 1, s. 275-285Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 2.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Chernetska, Diana
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Oskarsson, Steinthor
    Ramböll AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Innovation Through Interactions for Bathroom Suppliers2016Inngår i: Extending The Business Network Approach: New Territories, New Technologies, New Terms / [ed] Peter Thilenius, Cecilia Pahlberg & Virpi Havila, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan , 2016, s. 159-176Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies often build an innovation strategy that is mostly reliant on internal knowledge and resources. This can lead to failure to meet customer needs (von Hippel 1986). By interacting with customers, companies can obtain crucial information and have the opportunity to involve customers in innovation and product development processes (Füller and Matzler 2007; Hadjikhani and Bengtson 2004; Laursen 2011; von Hippel 2009).

  • 3.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Awuah, Gabriel
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Wictor, Ingemar
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Innovation in Internationalization of Born Global firms2012Inngår i: 15th McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference, 2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization and increased liberalization of markets have made it possible for many firms, large or Small and Medium –Sized Firms (SMEs), to be in many foreign markets, especially those in the global industries (Czinkota and Ronkainen, 2007; Doole and Lowe, 2008, 2004). Since trade barriers among markets have fallen dramatically, due to the effects of globalization, intense competition in many markets, and the spread of technological improvements in almost all sectors of any economy, many firms (small or large) seek to establish their presence in many foreign markets (Awuah, et. al., 2011; Doole and Lowe, 2008; Driffield and Love, 2007). Studies abound to shed light on why and how firms internationalize their business activities (Andersson, 2011; Moen, et al., 2004; Knight and Cavusgil, 1996; Johanson and Vahlne, 1990, 1977; Johanson and Wiedersheim-Paul, 1975). Although increased globalization, trade liberalization, and technological improvements do enable many firms (e.g. “Mininationals” or “Born Globals”) to serve several markets (Doole and Lowe, 2008; Czinkota and Ronkainen, 2007), there has emerged an intense competition among firms in all countries (Peng et al., 2008; Czinkota and Ronkainen, 2007; Beamish and Lu, 2004). For many SMEs, a number of factors (e.g. lower trade barriers, increased competition, rapid technological developments, shrinking market opportunities in domestic market, and firm-specific advantages combine to drive their rapid entry into foreign markets (Andersson, 2011; Peng et al., 2008; Moen, et al., 2004). SMEs that have, from the very inception of their establishment, had the drive to internationalize their business activities are termed “Born Global Firms”, in the subsequent sections to be addressed just as born globals (Andersson, 2011; Rialp et al., 2005; Knight and Cavusgil, 1996; Madsen and Servias, 1997). 

    Previous studies about a firm’s internationalization has predominantly concentrated on big multinational firms, where their motives for internationalization, the pace and pattern of their internationalization have been widely studied (Qian and Delios, 2008; Johanson and Vahlne, 1990, 1977; Johanson and Wiedersheim-Paul, 1975; Cavusgil, 1984; Coviello, 2006). In recent times studies have emerged, which have found out that the pace and pattern of the internationalization of big multinational firms are not in line with the pace and pattern, through which born globals, for example, internationalize their business activities (Andersson, 2011; Andersson and Wictor, 2003; Moen, et al., 2004; Rialp, et. al., 2005; Knight and Cavusgil, 1996; Madsen and Servais, 1997).  

    However, extant literature is virtually silent on what it takes for a born global (a small international player with limited resources, for example) to compete with big and resourceful multinational enterprises in many international markets. Our contention is that born globals’ ability to use innovative solutions to create sustainable competitive advantages as they aspire to expand and grow in international markets will be very crucial. The pace and pattern at which born globals internationalize their businesses, in the face of intense competition in almost all markets, in order to provide innovative solutions that enable them to achieve competitive advantages in the marketplace is under-researched. This has been an important reason for the study of the present phenomenon.   As stressed by Doole and Lowe (2008), products and services offered by firms, these days, are becoming ‘commodities’ (i.e. ‘me too’ products/services), if firms are not able to differentiate the core product benefit or service by offering a bundle of benefits for target customers or users in a target market. For Porter (1985), the competitive advantage of a firm grows fundamentally out of the value the firm can create for its customers, irrespective of the markets in which a firm operates.  Operating across borders, though offers opportunities, dealing with new set of macro-environmental factors (e.g. politics, laws, economics, cultures, and societies) and intense competition, will demand that a born global, for example, differentiates its products and services that will help it to meet similar needs and wants of its transnational customers, while it adapts to meet different market-specific requirements and/or needs of customers (e.g. Doole and Lowe, 2008). And for Doyle and Stern (2006), a firm that is good at satisfying customer needs, better than its competitors can do, has the best opportunities to grow and expand. Hence, Born Globals and their growth and expansion narratives are worth studying.

    In view of the above, the purpose of the present study is to investigate a born global’s use of innovative solutions to create sustainable competitive advantages as it expands and grows in different international markets. To be able to achieve the above purpose, we seek to address the following research questions:

    1. Why and how does a born global firm enter any chosen foreign market?
    2. Which strategies does the firm develop and implement in order to provide innovative solutions that will help achieve sustainable competitive advantages as the firm strives to grow and expand in the marketplace?
    3. Does the firm use ‘go-alone’ strategies or does it use strategies that influence and are influenced by other actors and the effect thereof? 
  • 4.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai, China.
    Hanjun, Huang
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Success Factors in Western and Chinese Born Global Companies2015Inngår i: iBusiness, ISSN 2150-4075, E-ISSN 2150-4083, Vol. 7, nr 1, s. 25-38Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Born Global firms are becoming increasingly more important in terms of internationalization, innovation, ability to grow and providing employment. Most of the previous research about BornGlobals is done in North America, Europe or Australia, all these being developed industrialized countries but not developing countries or emerging markets. However, the emerging markets in general, and the Chinese in particular, have become very important for the world economy. Our aim is to investigate the differences between Western literature and literature from emerging markets, regarding internationalization process of Born Global firms. We also aim to discuss the various success factors, which underlie Born Globals’ internationalization process, particularly focusing on Born Globals firms in the China. Our methodology in this research has been literature review and interviews with Chinese CEOs of Born Global firms. However, this paper is only based on the litterateur part of our research. Our analysis shows that most of the Chinese Born Globals publications about the internationalization success factors are based on the Western literature and use them as the theoretical platform in the design of their own research strategy and research questions design. The consequence of this observation is important as it indicates that Chinese researchers are reproducing research under different contextual and situational conditions that might lead to unclear conclusions or maybe even wrong conclusions. Furthermore, compared to most Western Born Global companies, which treat innovation as core competence, the innovation culture becomes one of the biggest weaknesses of Chinese manufacturing Born Globals’ internationalization. China has special economic environment. Chinese manufacturing Born Globals not only need to follow the market but also the government policies, since the government greatly influences the industries and the whole economy. To foreign investors who want to exploit Chinese market, they also should take Chinese economic background and government policies into consideration. One important aspect of Chinese born Globals, neglected in previous research on Born Globals, that has been identified in our research, is the critical success factor of Chinese manufacturing Born Globals—the political and economic background and the role of the Chinese Government in the transformation process of Chinese business life, and the Guanxi network.

  • 5.
    Campbell, Derek
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Halila, Fawzi
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The Clash of Business Models in Emerging Economies: The Case of Wind Energy Industry in Africa2013Inngår i: The International Journal of Management Science and Information Technology, ISSN 1923-0265, nr 10, s. 10-50Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise of emerging economy EE as main engine of global growth, the intensified competition in the wind energy industry and internationalization to EE, enterprises need to rethink and innovate their business models in order to succeed. The overall purpose of this article is to increase our understanding of the drivers of business model innovation (BMI) in EE, particularly in the wind energy industry. Qualitative, multi-case design is applied, where three cases within the wind energy industry in Africa are studied - Siemens (Germany), Suzlon (India) and Goldwind (China). The results show that there is a difference between “Developed-country Multinational Enterprises” (DMNEs), such as Siemens, and “Emerging-country Multinational Enterprises”, such as Suzlon and Goldwind, in the way they approach BMI in EE. To gain a competitive advantage in EE requires capabilities to deal with the specific EE-related drivers of change: 1) fast growth and high demand combined with high uncertainty; 2) lower level of market-oriented socioeconomic development; 3) stronger governmental influence on the market; and 4) the need for simple, cheap and easy to maintain technologies. Therefore, it is important that managers position their enterprises in the EE first as local players and only then as multinationals. Our study indicates that future research should focus on the main elements and the drivers of change that would shape BMI by adding new variables, specifically related to EE.

  • 6.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, P.O. Box 1026, SE-551 11 Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bring Your Suppliers into Your Projects – Managing the Design of Work Packages in Product Development2006Inngår i: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, Vol. 12, s. 246-257Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Early supplier involvement and integration is important in product development on strategic as well as on operational, project and team levels. Saab Aerospace intended to achieve early supplier involvement and high level of integration on all levels in the redesign of the aircraft JAS 39 Gripen. The research underlying this article shows that the intended strategy was only achieved on the strategic level and not on the operational project and team levels. One major reason for this was that the design of the work breakdown structure (WBS) and work packages (WP) in the product development followed the functional and departmental logic within each company resulting in incompatible structures and preventing communication and information exchange. This article intends to explore how prevailing functionally designed WBS and WP structures created barriers and to demonstrate how supplier integration can be improved by designing collaborative WBS and integrated WP. The Dependence Structure Matrix (DSM) is introduced in order to analyze, visualize and manage interdependencies and information exchange between Saab Aerospace and its supplier on different levels of the WBS and in different phases of the development process, following the logic of interdependencies and information flow, in order to support a strategy focusing on integration of suppliers on the project and team level.

  • 7.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Supplier Integration in Product Development – A Matter of Designing the Project Structure.2006Inngår i: South African Journal of Transportation and Supply Chain Management, Vol. 1, nr 1, s. 18-37Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In product development close collaboration between systems integrators and suppliers is important. The purpose of this article is to investigate the impact of the work breakdown structure (WBS) and work packages (WP) in product development on the possibilities to carry through the strategy of supplier involvement into collaborative practice and to investigate how supplier involvement can be improved by altering the design of collaborative WBS and WP structures. Dependence Structure Matrix (DSM) is introduced in order to analyze, visualize and manage interdependencies, in terms of information exchange between systems integrator and supplier. This article shows how DSM can support alternative design of integrated and collaborative WBS and integrated WP following the logic of dependencies and the flow of information in order to support a strategy focusing on integration of suppliers on the project and team level.

  • 8.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Asamoah-Barnieh, Raymond
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Multi-Domain Matrices: Another Perspective2008Inngår i: Proceedings of the 10th International DSM Conference: Stockholm, 11 and 12 November 2008 / [ed] Matthias Kreimeyer, Udo Lindemann & Mike Danilovic, Munich: Carl Hanser Verlag GmbH, 2008, s. 55-67Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    With ever increasing competition, companies are collaborating in networks with projects increasingly spanning across different teams in companies with divisions in different geographical locations and with partner companies with different specializations. This creates the situation in which different companies must interact effectively to achieve a common goal in a multi-domain network environment. In this paper, a new approach for Multi-Domain Matrix (MDM) analysis based on empirical research on 4 companies in a network is presented. The approach builds on the perspective that the MDM consists of several matrices whose interrelationships can be explored. The perspective leads to the formulation of an aggregation of novel concepts for Multi-Domain Analysis which in turn leads us to a novel MDM phenomenon of managerial importance which has been named supercircuit in this paper.

  • 9.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Browning, Tyson
    M.J. Neeley School of Business, Texas Christian University (TCU), Fort Worth, TX, United States.
    Managing complex product development projects with designstructure matrices and domain mapping matrices2007Inngår i: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 300-314Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Complexity in product development (PD) projects can emanate from the product design, the development process, the development organization, the tools and technologies applied, the requirements to be met, and other domains. In each of these domains, complexity arises from the numerous elements and their multitude of relationships, such as between the components of the product being developed, between the activities to develop them, and among the people doing the activities. One approach to handing this complexity is to represent and analyze these domains' design structures or architectures. The design structure matrix (DSM) has proved to be a very helpful tool for representing and analyzing the architecture of an individual system such as a product, process, or organization. Like many tools, the DSM has been applied in a variety of areas outside its original domain, as researchers and practitioners have sought to leverage its advantages. Along the way, however, its fundamental rules (such as being a square matrix) have been challenged. In this paper, we formalize an approach to using a domain mapping matrix (DMM) to compare two DSMs of different project domains. A DMM is a rectangular (m × n) matrix relating two DSMs, where m is the size of DSM1 and n is the size of DSM2. DMM analysis augments traditional DSM analyses. Our comparison of DSM and DMM approaches shows that DMM analysis offers several benefits. For example, it can help (1) capture the dynamics of PD, (2) show traceability of constraints across domains, (3) provide transparency between domains, (4) synchronize decisions across domains, (5) cross-verify domain models, (6) integrate a domain with the rest of a project or program, and (7) improve decision making among engineers and managers by providing a basis for communication and learning across domains. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd and IPMA.

  • 10.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2). Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai, China.
    Halila, Fawzi
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Lihua Liu, Jasmine
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2). Shanghai Dianji University, School of Business, Shanghai, China.
    Business Model Innovation for the Internationalization of Chinese Wind Power Industry2014Inngår i: Global Business Model Innovation: An International Conference, Shanghai: Shanghai Dianji University , 2014, s. 48-73Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy consumption, pollutions and sustainable approaches to energy is one of the most important issues today. The transformation of energy from old to renewable has been in focus for many years and wind power energy production is one important source of energy that is renewable. With the rise of emerging economy (EEs) as main engine of global growth, the intensified competition in the wind energy industry and internationalization to EEs, enterprises need to rethink and innovate their business models in order to succeed in innovative technologies and commercializing their innovative technologies to customers. The overall purpose of this article is to explore the drivers of business model innovation (BMI) in emerging-country multinational enterprises (EMNEs) in the context of an EE markets particularly Chinese wind energy industry and with special focus on inclusive business activities in Africa. For this purpose a single case study of Goldwind (China), one of the most important actors in the wind power industry, was applied. The results of this research show that to gain a competitive advantage in EEs requires capabilities to deal with the specific EEs related drivers of change: 1) fast growth and high demand combined with high uncertainty; 2) lower level of market-oriented socioeconomic development; 3) stronger governmental influence on the market; and 4) the need for simple, cheap and easy to maintain technologies. Therefore, it is important that managers position their enterprises in the EEs first as local players and only then as multinationals. Our research identifies a symbiotic business model in which industry and political actors on national, province and city level collaborate intensively for mutual benefits and for commercializing wind power technology. Our study indicates that future research should focus on the main elements and the drivers of change that would shape BMI by adding new variables, specifically related to EE.

  • 11.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Hensbergen, Marleen
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Zadayannaya, Liudmila
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Exploring Diffusion and Dynamics of Corporate Social Responsibility2015Inngår i: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 22, nr 3, s. 129-141Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the evolution of the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in academia. The process of evolution is conceptualised to consist of diffusion and dynamics. Bibliometrics were applied for data collection and visualisation of the evolution of CSR. The findings show increasing complexity and progression in the research on the concept of CSR fuelled not only by the efforts for intellectual refinement in the field but also reflecting the changing priorities of society and businesses. The growth of this field of research both in number of publications (i.e. diffusion) and in terms of different fields in academic usage (i.e. dynamics), is an indicator for growing complexity and widening acceptance of the CSR concept across various academic disciplines in the future. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.

  • 12.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School (JIBS), Jönköping, Sweden.
    Leisner, Peter
    Jönköping School of Engineering (JTH), Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Analyzing core competence and core products for developing agile and adaptable corporation2007Inngår i: Proceedings of the 9th International DSM Conference, Aachen: Shaker Verlag, 2007, s. 49-59Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The core competence concept was introduced by Prahalad and Hamel in 1990, and the concept received much attention particularly in the management field. They were arguing that in short run, a company’s competitiveness derives from the price/performance attributes of current products. On the other hand, in the long run the competitiveness derives from an ability to build the core competencies that spawn unanticipated products. The real source of corporate advantage is the abilities to consolidate corporate technologies and products in order to adapt quickly to changing business opportunities (Prahalad & Hamel, 1990).

    Core competencies are seen as collective learning in the organization, not individually based learning or skill (Gallon, Stillman & Coates, 1995). Core competence is the way of work is performed, the ability to coordinate diverse production skills, to integrate and harmonize multitude of skills and technologies into products that deliver value to customers. Core competencies are the glue that binds existing business and also the engine for new business development (Prahalad & Hamel, 1990). Core competence is a combination of complementary skills and knowledge bases embedded in a group or team providing a superior product (Coyne, Hall & Clifford, 1997). Core competence has to be linked with end products. In between core competencies and end products we can identify a set of core products that can be used in a number of different combinations and finally different end products.  Therefore there are numerous relations between core competencies, core products and end products.

    Global competition and the dynamic changes of markets and customers puts pressure on corporations to identify their core competencies in order to develop capabilities to adopt to changing environment and technological development. The crucial issue for management is to perform analysis of what the core competence is in their corporation and how those core competencies can be related to core products and end products. If management does not find those answers they can not put focus in developing long run competencies and technologies that can be combined in a set of core products and strategic end products.

  • 13.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2). Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Lind, Carl
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Liu, Lihua
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Business Model Innovation for Internationalization: The Case of the Chinese Wind Turbine Manufacturer Envision2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Envision Energy is an emerging energy solution provider from China which entered the wind power market in 2007. Envision became the 3th biggest turbine manufacturer in China and the 9th largest in the world in 2015. Thus, the purpose of our research is to explore the underlying factors to Envision’s successful business model for internationalization. This qualitative research is based on interviews with key personnel at Envision. Our analysis has identified four major elements of their business model for internationalization that are crucial in the success of Envision. Those four are grouped on two major clusters:Upfront elements representing the face of the Envision to market and customers:

    1. Market positioning by the clear positioning of Envision on the market areas left open by the lack of understanding of the market logic by competitors.

    2. Customer orientation by clear focus on identified customer needs and desire for quality products also here left aside by competitors.

    Backend elements representing the value creation and value deliverance elements:

    3. Human resources as the key element through interaction with customers, creating bond and relations with customers and delivering promised values to customers and delivering.

    4. Supply chain by the capacity of Envision to utilize the entire supply chain to create and deliver high quality products synchronized with Envision’s offerings to customers and customer’s expectations.

    Our research shows that Envision represents a new kind of high-tech Chinese company which works systematically to develop new business models that can enable high growth and high level of internationalization that goes beyond the capacity of technology, products as tradition goes.

  • 14.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Lind, Carl
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Liu, Lihua
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Business Model Innovation for Internationalization: The Case Of The Chinese Wind Turbine Manufacturer Envision2016Inngår i: Asia Pacific Journal of Advanced Business and Social Studies, ISSN 2205-6033, Vol. 2, nr 3, s. 57-68Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Envision Energy is an emerging energy solution provider from China which entered the wind power market in 2007. Envision became the 3th biggest turbine manufacturer in China and the 9th largest in the world in 2015. Thus, the purpose of our research is to explore the underlying factors to Envision’s successful business model for internationalization. This qualitative research is based on interviews with key personnel at Envision. Our analysis has identified four major elements of their business model for internationalization that are crucial in the success of Envision. Those four are grouped on two major clusters:Upfront elements representing the face of the Envision to market and customers:

    1. Market positioning by the clear positioning of Envision on the market areas left open by the lack of understanding of the market logic by competitors.

    2. Customer orientation by clear focus on identified customer needs and desire for quality products also here left aside by competitors.Backend elements representing the value creation and value deliverance elements:

    3. Human resources as the key element through interaction with customers, creating bond and relations with customers and delivering promised values to customers and delivering.

    4. Supply chain by the capacity of Envision to utilize the entire supply chain to create and deliver high quality products synchronized with Envision’sofferings to customers and customer’s expectations.

    Our research shows that Envision represents a new kind of high-tech Chinese company which works systematically to develop new business models that can enable high growth and high level of internationalization that goes beyond the capacity of technology, products as tradition goes.

  • 15.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sandkull, Bengt
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden .
    Managing Complexity and Uncertainty in a Multiproject Environment2002Inngår i: Proceedings of the 2002 5th International Conference of the International Research Network on Organizing By Projects, Rotterdam, Rotterdam: Erasmus University , 2002Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In complex product development, corporations are running product development in many different projects. The number of more or less interdependent projects creates a web-like multiproject situation. It is characterized by the multitude of relations and dependencies that exist among projects, comprising tasks, people, knowledge, technologies, products, and components. In this paper we present a tentative framework, built on the assumption that complexity creates uncertainty that management has to handle. In multiproject situation the sources of complexity are: functionality of the product, people performing management and engineering work, chosen technology to fulfill functional demands, and shared resources in projects. The dimensions of uncertainty in multiproject situation that management has to handle are: the design of the process to transform functionality and technology to complete product design, organizing people in dual organizational settings basic as well as temporary projects, designing the product architecture based on functionality, technology and project interdependencies.

    This paper will shed some light on these problems and investigate how a participatory approach based on the Dependence Structure Matrix (DSM) as a process enabling tool can be used to manage complex multiproject situations. The results show that even a single project needs to be understood in the light of the situational and organizational complexity that is the actual outcome of project-based product development work. The analysis shows Who, What, Where, When, and Why coordination and integration need to take place in a complex multiproject situation on different levels of the organization. The process of communication among people creates a mutual understanding of the situational visibility and of why communication is essential in problem solving.

  • 16.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, P.O. Box 1026, SE-551 11 Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sandkull, Bengt
    Malmö University, School of Teacher Education, SE-205 06 Malmö, Sweden.
    The Use Of Dependence Structure Matrix and Domain Mapping Matrix in Managing Uncertainty in Multiple Project Situations2005Inngår i: International Journal of Project Management, Vol. 23, s. 193-203Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of complex products is performed in multi-project environment in which it is crucial to explore interdependencies and manage the uncertainty with the information exchange and the understanding of the context. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a dependence structure matrix and domain mapping matrix approach that enables the systematic identification of inter- dependencies and relations in a Multi-project environment. These approaches enables clarifications of assumptions, the tractability of dependencies, explores the information needed within and between different departments, projects and people. This creates a transparency and enables the synchronization of actions through transformation of information and exploration of assumptions within and between domains. The outcomes of this process are situational visibility creating direction and accountability and the learning that takes place through communicating, reflecting, understanding, and acting.

  • 17.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköping Sch. of Eng., Jonkoping Univ./Linkoping Univ., P.O. Box 1026, SE-551 11 Jönköping, Sweden .
    A tentative framework for analyzing integrationin collaborative manufacturing network settings: a case study2005Inngår i: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 22, nr 1-2, s. 141-158Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important for small and medium-sized corporations to collaborate in networks in order to develop capacity, capability, and competence to perform product development and become suppliers of complete systems. The purpose of this case study is to identify barriers and to develop an analytical framework of inter-organizational collaboration in network settings. In this paper we present a tentative four-dimensional framework in terms of surface of integration, scope of integration, time horizon of integration, and intensity of integration. This framework can be used to analyze how network settings are developed, in terms of structural design of the network, the design of the workflow in collaborative settings, and the aspects of handling the psychological and social boundaries between people.

  • 18.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Box 1026, SE-551 11 Jönköping, Sweden .
    Winroth, Mats
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Box 1026, SE-551 11 Jönköping, Sweden .
    Corporate Manufacturing Network – From Hierarchy To Self-Organizing System2006Inngår i: The International Journal of Integrated Supply Management, ISSN 1477-5360, E-ISSN 1741-8097, Vol. 2, nr 1/2, s. 106-131Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important for small and medium-sized corporations to collaborate in networks in order to develop capacity, capability, and competence to perform product development and become suppliers of complete systems. The purpose of this case study is to identify barriers and to develop an analytical framework of inter-organizational collaboration in network settings. In this paper we present a tentative four-dimensional framework in terms of surface of integration, scope of integration, time horizon of integration, and intensity of integration. This framework can be used to analyze how network settings are developed, in terms of structural design of the network, the design of the workflow in collaborative settings, and the aspects of handling the psychological and social boundaries between people.

  • 19.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kalmar Industries Supplier Network2012Inngår i: Design Structure Matrix Methods and Applications / [ed] Steven D. Eppinger & Tyson R. Browning, Boston: MIT Press, 2012, s. 317-324Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Kalmar Industries produces heavy-duty materials handling equipment such as reach-stackers that are used in port and transportation operations. To deliver anticipated large customer orders of reach-stackers in a limited time frame, Kalmar worked to strengthen and intensify its collaboration with three major suppliers, Hiflex, Euromaster, and Kone, in a joint, co-located industrial network. The major challenge was to design the collaborative and information exchange processes between the four companies.

  • 20.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Winroth, Mats
    Division of Operations Management, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Managing dynamics in corporate networks2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A crucial issue in corporate networks is however to identify to what extent different strategic and operational decisions need to be coordinated between the involved companies. In this paper we elaborate on the issue of synchronization of information flow based on interconnectivities between companies in order to coordinate a corporate network by the means of DSM, Dependence Structure Matrix. The results show that DSM can be used to identify interconnectivities among actors in a network and to identify which information that needs to be transferred between companies in the network.

  • 21.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    Chalmers Institute of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Rethinking the platform approach in automotive industry2009Inngår i: POM 2009: 20th Annual Conference of the Production and Operations Management Society : Programs and proceedings, May 1-4, Orlanda, Florida, U.S.A. / [ed] Mark D. Hanna, Orlando, FL: Production and Operations Management Society , 2009, , s. 17s. 1-17Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In many industrial areas, such as in automotive industry, the development of joint technology platforms is seen as an enabler for improving efficiency, facilitating frequent and rapid new product and technology introductions, as well as transfer of production between units.

    During the present financial recession especially in the automotive industry, it has become obvious that there might be extensive drawbacks from using integrated platforms for several brands if different companies within large industrial groups are extremely integrated in terms of organization, technology, and know-how. In integrated product structures, major product changes, however, become more difficult and more expensive to carry out. If companies have products based on very different technologies, integration is also not easily achieved and it may be almost impossible to merge several brands into one group and one platform.

    In this paper we identify implications of widely implemented integrated technology platform thinking in automotive industry.

  • 22.
    Danilovic, Mike
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Winroth, Mats
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ferrándiz, Javier
    The School of Industrial Engineering of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Josa, Oriol
    The School of Industrial Engineering of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Platform thinking in the automotive industry – managing the dualism between standardization of components for large scale production and variation for market and customer2007Inngår i: Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference of The Production and Operations Management Society, POMS 2007, May 4-7, 2007, Fairmont Hotel, Dallas, Texas, USA, 2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Automotive industry faces two major problems. One is to develop standard platforms to reach high volumes and low cost. The other is to use platforms for enabling variation of models that suit customer needs, local market demands, and restrictions. Platform thinking embraces several industrial levels, systems integrators, global and local suppliers, and markets. How can the dualism between standardization of components and model variation be managed and which trade-offs need to be made?

    In this paper we have identified and analyzed different approaches to platform concept from technical as well as organizational, production, and product development perspectives. Platform technology improves flexibility in production and product development. However, when radical changes are made, new design of platform is not easily made, i.e. propagation of requirements and changes in models vs. platforms. When this happens, several production systems have to be entirely rebuilt causing major capital investments, redesign at suppliers etc. Hence, platform technology reduces product development flexibility.

  • 23.
    Grönevall, Richard
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL). Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai, China.
    Designing an integrated project, program and portfolio system: A case study of healthcare2014Inngår i: Risk and change management in complex systems: Proceedings of the 16th International DSM Conference, Paris, France, 2-4 July 2014 / [ed] Marija Jankovic, Maik Mauer, Frank Marle, Danilo Marcello Schmidt, Udo Lindemann, München: Carl Hanser Verlag GmbH, 2014, s. 309-318Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare organizations are subject to an increasing complexity in the management of patient information. The modern healthcare system is developed through projects in large scale. The complexity is rapidly increasing and lack of coordination between projects is crucial in relation to performance. The contemporary approach following the traditional project related approach is insufficient and obsolete and the underlying interconnectivity between elements in a multi-project environment can be used to explore new compositions of projects, programs and portfolios. By a systematic approach in managing interdependencies based on exploring the flow of information between projects on three different levels two major outcomes can be concluded. In our systematic DSM/DMM approach we explore how projects can be organized in programs and in portfolios.

  • 24.
    Grönevall, Richard
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL). Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai, China.
    Designing an Integrated Project, Program and Portfolio System: A Case Study of Healthcare2014Inngår i: Journal of Modern Project Management, ISSN 2317-3963, E-ISSN 1747-0862, Vol. 2, nr 2, s. 78-85Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare organizations are subject to an increasing complexity in the management of patient information. The modern healthcare system is developed through large-scale projects. The complexity is rapidly increasing but the lack of coordination between projects in relation to performance is critical. The contemporary approach following the traditional project related approach is insuffi cient and obsolete and the underlying interconnectivity between elements in a multi-project environment can be used to explore new compositions of projects, programs and portfolios. By a systematic approach in managing interdependencies based on exploring the fl ow of information between projects at three different levels and two major outcomes can be concluded. In our systematic DSM/DMM approach we explore how projects can be organized in programs and in portfolios.

  • 25.
    Grönevall, Richard
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Managing Project Portfolios: The Next Step2011Inngår i: Invest on Visualization: Proceedings of the 13th International DSM Conference / [ed] Steven D Eppinger, et al, München: Carl Hanser Verlag GmbH, 2011, s. 203-213Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing the portfolio management process for your projects in a complex environment is a task that puts all your capabilities on the line. The steps that need to be taken all stems from having a sufficient knowledge of your planned and ongoing projects. If you don’t, the output will be irrelevant. The use of methods in arranging information and analyzing it is so far only presented on a conceptual level or as a top-down selection method, this article presents the actual output of a case that will be used as input to a larger and forthcoming study of how a process for project portfolio management develops with the use of dependency structure- and domain mapping matrices.

  • 26.
    Halila, Fawzi
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Olofsson, Sandra
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Managing Business Model Innovation: The Case of a Social Enterprise in the Electricity Market2017Inngår i: Exploring a changing view on organizing value creation: Developing New Business Models. Contributions to the 2nd International Conference on New Business Models / [ed] Rauter, R., Zimek, M., Kiesnere, A.L., Baumgartner, R.J., Graz: Institute of Systems Sciences, Innovation and Sustainability Research , 2017, s. 313-319Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 27.
    Hoveskog, Maya
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Halila, Fawzi
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Sektionen för ekonomi och teknik (SET), Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2). Shanghai Dianji University Shanghai, China.
    Business Model Innovation in the Chinese Wind Power Industry: The Case of Goldwind in the Emerging Economy of Africa2013Inngår i: Strategic Management Forum 2013: The Internationalization Strategy of Chinese Firms – Dialogue Between Entrepreneurs and Scholars, Euromed Management/KEDGE Business School – Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai: Shanghai Jiaotong University , 2013, s. [29]-[29]Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise of emerging economy (EEs) as main engine of global growth, the intensified competition in the wind energy industry and internationalization to EEs, enterprises need to rethink and innovate their business models in order to succeed. The overall purpose of this article is to explore the drivers of business model innovation (BMI) in emerging-country multinational enterprises (EMNEs) in the context of an EE market, particularly in the wind energy industry and with special focus on inclusive business activities. For this purpose a single case study of Goldwind (China), one of the most important actors in the wind power industry, was applied. The results of this research show that to gain a competitive advantage in EEs requires capabilities to deal with the specific EEs related drivers of change: 1) fast growth and high demand combined with high uncertainty; 2) lower level of market-oriented socioeconomic development; 3) stronger governmental influence on the market; and 4) the need for simple, cheap and easy to maintain technologies. Therefore, it is important that managers position their enterprises in the EEs first as local players and only then as multinationals. Our study indicates that future research should focus on the main elements and the drivers of change that would shape BMI by adding new variables, specifically related to EE.

  • 28.
    Hoveskog, Maya
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Halila, Fawzi
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Early Phases of Business Model Innovation: An Ideation Experience Workshop in the Classroom2015Inngår i: Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, ISSN 1540-4595, E-ISSN 1540-4609, Vol. 13, nr 2, s. 177-195Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    As the mantra "innovate your business model or die" increases in popularity among practitioners and academics, so does the need for novel and feasible business models. In this article, we describe an ideation experience workshop, conducted in an undergraduate business course, in which students, guided by their lecturers and two industry representatives, developed business models in the early phases of a company's new blood alcohol level testing device. The students based their business models on the nine building blocks of a Business Model Canvas tool. The workshop confirmed that the three learning objectives were achieved as students acquired knowledge, created problem solutions, and presented results. The success of the workshop is attributable to the opportunity it gives students to work with an actual company, to experiment with business model innovation, and to learn from evaluators' feedback. © 2015 Decision Sciences Institute.

  • 29.
    Hoveskog, Maya
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Halila, Fawzi
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai, China.
    Learning Networks for Knowledge Coproduction on Business Model Innovation in Wind Energy Industry2014Inngår i: Proceedings from British Academy of Management Conference, BAM 2014, Belfast: British Academy of Management , 2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Established firms find it difficult to innovate their business models. However, research suggests different approaches to overcome this. One of those is learning network. Research has also shown that learning networks can be used as an arena to coproduce knowledge between academia and industry. In this article, the authors provide an understanding of how learning networks can be used to improve the quality of knowledge coproduction on business model innovation and suggest a framework that can be used to facilitate knowledge coproduction related to business model innovation in the context of maintenance services for wind energy industry. The article suggests that learning networks are an appropriate approach not only to address practical problems but also to develop theoretical understanding of how organizational inertia related to business model innovation could be overcome and what are the benefits for the involved participants.

  • 30.
    Khudyakova, Tatyana
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    System-level based IDM/DSM/DMM dataset for multi-project coordination2007Inngår i: Proceedings of the 9th International DSM Conference: Munich: 16 - 18 October 2007 / [ed] Udo Lindemann, Mike Danilovic, Frank Deubzer, Maik Maurer & Matthias Kreimeyer, Aachen: Shaker Verlag, 2007, s. 393-402Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    For many product development companies a multi-project situation is reality driven by competitive environment: offering customers a variety of new, more complex, high performing yet flexible products at a shortest possible time and lowest cost. Customers’ product complexity is however not an equivalent of the product development complexity and, while striving to deliver highly sophisticated products, development companies use various complexity management techniques in order to control and minimize it internally. High level of modularization, well-defined interfaces between the modules and components commonality & standardization are some factors contributing to complexity reduction. The benefits (according to Anderson, 1997) would be a capability to rapidly introduce incremental product improvements which can be called "new" products — that are really planned "variations on a theme," based on common parts and modular product architecture. Independent design of system components allows for clear definition of project boundaries and scopes within a project development portfolio, minimization of uncertainty and results in reduction of development cycle and ultra-fast time-to- market. However, according to Kentaro & Cusumano (1993) “…focusing on design modification is not advantageous strategy either in terms of the new product introduction rate or average platform design age”. 

    According to Whitney, some products, like high power mechanical ones, as opposed to low power signal processor type products, would benefit from more integral design if technical performance is a priority. Technical constraints, such as light weighting, low power consumption etc. drive designers towards more integral architectures (adopted from Hölttä-Otto, 2005). Integral architecture is characterized by multiple dependencies between system entities (where entities could be functions, physical or non-physical elements), when interfaces are difficult to define clearly.  Kentaro & Cusumano (1993) demonstrated that system-level co-ordination is required between different projects when composing and optimizing a project portfolio for complex products with integrated architecture. A practice of early enforcement of restrictions upon the project scope /requirements in order to avoid potential system-level dependency conflicts with other projects makes further development process less flexible and responsive to changing business requirements such as costs, product flexibility etc. Resolving system-based interdependency-related issue has traditionally been seen as system architect’s task: ”...architects’ greatest concerns and leverage are still, …with the systems’ connections and interfaces because (1) they distinguish a system from its components; (2) their addition produce unique system-level functions, a primary interest of the systems architect; (3) subsystem specialists are likely to concentrate most on the core and lest on the periphery of their subsystems (Maeir & Rechtin, 2002). Other players like development project group members and management in general have often limited access to dependency-based system views and use intuitive approach when dealing with dependencies., hence a transfer of knowledge is essential to be able to support flexibility in system-level project co-ordination.

  • 31.
    Kreimeyer, Matthias
    et al.
    Munich Technical University, Garching, Germany.
    Danilovic, MikeJönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.Lindeman, UdoMunich Technical University, Garching, Germany.
    Proceedings of the 10th International DSM Conference: Stockholm, 11 and 12 November 20082008Konferanseproceedings (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The proceedings contain 34 papers. The topics discussed include: introduction of software related DSMs to software engineers; modeling structural change over time - requirements and first methods; an approach to model time dependent process-stakeholder networks; indirect connections in a supply chain: visualisation and analysis; applying Apollo to DSM for schedule adherence visualisation; advanced project management framework for product development; simulation of product change effects on the duration of development processes based on the DSM; a complexity measure for concurrent engineering projects based on the DSM; assessing design strategies from a change propagation perspective; re-engineering legacy knowledge based engineering systems using DSM: extending the affordance structure matrix - mapping design structure and requirements to behavior; and using the design structure matrix (DSM) and architecture options to optimize system adaptability.

  • 32.
    Kreimeyer, Matthias
    et al.
    Insitute for Product Development, Munich Technical University, Garching, Germany.
    Deubzer, Frank
    Insitute for Product Development, Munich Technical University, Garching, Germany.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Fuchs, Stefan Daniel
    Insitute for Product Development, Munich Technical University, Garching, Germany.
    Herfeld, Ulrich
    Insitute for Product Development, Munich Technical University, Garching, Germany.
    Lindemann, Udo
    Insitute for Product Development, Munich Technical University, Garching, Germany.
    Team composition to enhance collaboration between embodiment design and simulation departments2007Inngår i: DS 42: Proceedings of ICED 2007, the 16th International Conference on Engineering Design, Paris, France, 28.-31.07.2007 / [ed] J.-C. Bocquet, Bristol: The Design Society, 2007, Vol. DS 42Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient collaboration between design and simulation departments is a key factor to efficient product development. There are numerous efforts to systematically “integrate” product development activities using CAD- and CAE-systems.

    This paper presents a team-based approach to render collaboration, i.e. communication and coordination, between the engineers involved in designing and simulating the product more efficient. It is part of an overall integration strategy to support collaboration between the departments in question in terms of the product architecture and the engineers involved as well as information objects, tools, and the process.

    The team structures proposed combine the different ways of organization prevailing in design and simulation. Based on a product architecture regarding both functional and geometry-oriented perspectives onto the product, virtual teams attributed to parts of this component-function-structure serve as a basis to enhance communication. This is intended to offer a means of orientation to coordinate common efforts between engineers involved. The paper lines out a method to compose teams that merge the necessary competences and responsibilities involved to foster communication across different engineers involved in a set of functions and components.

  • 33.
    Lindemann, Udo
    et al.
    Munich Technical University, Garching, Germany.
    Danilovic, MikeJönköping International Business School (JIBS), Jönköping, Sweden.Deubzer, FrankMunich Technical University, Garching, Germany.Maurer, MaikMunich Technical University, Garching, Germany.Kreimeyer, MatthiasMunich Technical University, Garching, Germany.
    Proceedings of the 9th International DSM Conference: Munich: 16 - 18 October 20072007Konferanseproceedings (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The proceedings contain 33 PowerPoint presentations. The topics discussed include: from product/service complexity management to innovation; managing complexity in automotive engineering; social network techniques applied to design structure matrix analysis. the case of a new engine development at Ferrari SpA; analyzing core competence and core products for developing agile and adaptable corporation; analyzing communication dependencies in product development using the design structure matrix; benefits derived from use of DSM as part of the ADePT approach to managing engineering projects; DMM partitioning analysis for design study procedure optimization; a simulation model to predict impacts of alterations in development processes; the projection relationship between object process models (OPM) and design system matrices (DSM); and function driven process design for the development of mechatronic systems.

  • 34.
    Liu, Lihua
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Halila, Fawzi
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The Swedish Maintenance and Services Market in Wind Power Industry Lessons Learned and Opportunities for Chinese Service Providors2013Inngår i: Advances in Social Science, Humanities, and Management: 2013 International Conference on Advances in Social Science, Humanities, and Management (ASSHM 2013), Paris: Atlantis Press, 2013, s. 133-138Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents results from an investigation of maintenance and service market of Swedish wind power industry. Although the average number of disruptions per wind turbine only increased slightly from 2007 to 2009 in Sweden, the average downtime, the average electricity production loss and accordingly economic loss to the wind power operators increased 3 times during the same period. Equipped with strong production power, technology skills and expertize, Chinese wind turbine manufacturers have opportunity to enter the Swedish wind power maintenance and service market, and bring benefit to Swedish wind power industry and to themselves‟ internationalization process and sustainable development. 

  • 35.
    Lysek, Michal
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). HMS Industrial Networks AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). Shanghai Dianji University, School of Business, Shanghai, China.
    Liu, Jasmine Lihua
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). Shanghai Dianji University, School of Business, Shanghai, China.
    Do You Know Your Customers? Do You Love Them? Reevaluating Value Creation for Customers through Business Model Innovation2019Inngår i: Proceedings of The IIER International Conference, The IIER International Conference , 2019, s. 6-16Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    What customers want is one thing, but what they actually need and what they desire is something else. In this paper we define existing customer needs as something that customers know and are aware of, can express, and new customer needs as something that customers do not yet know and are not yet fully aware of. Just like in a Johari window. Companies usually go for the former because the latter is more difficult. Particularly when the customer desire is more psychological in character. Business models are valuable innovation tools because they can turn even an old and less novel technology into a successful innovation, but as stated by Chesbrough, at the heart, a business model performs two important functions: value creation and value capture. However, how can you create value when customers don’t know what they actually need? When they cannot express what they actually desire? Maybe a deeper interaction is required, interpreting the customer’s needs, reading between the lines, inferring what is going on underneath the surface, and collaborative prototyping. This study was based on an exploratory, inductive research approach influenced by grounded theory, studying three Swedish technological companies: Axis, HMS and Sectra. Using grounded theory coding techniques, a typology of seller and buyer needs was created based on four categories: unconstrained needs, undoubtful needs, unconventional needs, and uncertain needs. The results show that depending on which category the company resides, the typology can help managers decide when it is appropriate to listen closely to customers, and when it is not. When they want to fulfill existing customer needs and when they want to fulfill new customer needs. However, discovering new customer needs requires close interaction with customers. Especially when you want to discover not just what customers know that they want, but also what they do not yet know that they actually need. Intimacy is needed when you really want to come close to customers and really want to explore and understand their deep desires.

  • 36.
    Lysek, Michal
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). HMS Industrial Networks AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Liu, Jasmine Lihua
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    In Search of Innovation: Exploring the Dynamics of Innovation2016Inngår i: International Journal of Social, Behavioral, Educational, Economic, Business and Industrial Engineering, ISSN 1307-6892, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 215-229, artikkel-id 280Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    HMS Industrial Networks AB has been recognized as one of the most innovative companies in the industrial communication industry worldwide. The creation of their Anybus innovation during the 1990s contributed considerably to the company’s success. From inception, HMS’ employees were innovating for the purpose of creating new business (the creation phase). After the Anybus innovation, they began the process of internationalization (the commercialization phase), which in turn led them to concentrate on cost reduction, product quality, delivery precision, operational efficiency, and increasing growth (the growth phase). As a result of this transformation, performing new radical innovations have become more complicated.

    The purpose of our research was to explore the dynamics of innovation at HMS from the aspect of key actors, activities, and events, over the three phases, in order to understand what led to the creation of their Anybus innovation, and why it has become increasingly challenging for HMS to create new radical innovations for the future.

    Our research methodology was based on a longitudinal, retrospective study from the inception of HMS in 1988 to 2014, a single case study inspired by the grounded theory approach. We conducted 47 interviews and collected 1 024 historical documents for our research.

    Our analysis has revealed that HMS’ success in creating the Anybus, and developing a successful business around the innovation, was based on three main capabilities – cultivating customer relations on different managerial and organizational levels, inspiring business relations, and balancing complementary human assets for the purpose of business creation.

    The success of HMS has turned the management’s attention away from past activities of key actors, of their behavior, and how they influenced and stimulated the creation of radical innovations. Nowadays, they are rhetorically focusing on creativity and innovation. All the while, their real actions put emphasis on growth, cost reduction, product quality, delivery precision, operational efficiency, and moneymaking. In the process of becoming an international company, HMS gradually refocused. In so doing they became profitable and successful, but they also forgot what made them innovative in the first place. Fortunately, HMS’ management has come to realize that this is the case and they are now in search of recapturing innovation once again.

    Our analysis indicates that HMS’ management is facing several barriers to innovation related path dependency and other lock-in phenomena. HMS’ management has been captured, trapped in their mindset and actions, by the success of the past. But now their future has to be secured, and they have come to realize that moneymaking is not everything. In recent years, HMS’ management have begun to search for innovation once more, in order to recapture their past capabilities for creating radical innovations. In order to unlock their managerial perceptions of customer needs and their counterinnovation driven activities and events, to utilize the full potential of their employees and capture the innovation opportunity for the future.

  • 37.
    Lysek, Michal
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). HMS Industrial Networks AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Palmhager, Jörgen
    HMS Industrial Networks AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Re-envisioning Innovation: From Vision to Strategy to Plan and Back Again2019Inngår i: International Journal of Action Research, ISSN 1861-1303, E-ISSN 1861-9916, Vol. 15, nr 1, s. 5-24Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    HMS is a Swedish company and a global market leader in the industrial communication industry. Initially, HMS was managed with a vision of a connected industry. Gradually, that vision was complemented with strategies on how to reach that vision. In line with the company’s growth and acquisitions, these strategies started to substitute their vision and they began to be supplemented with much more detailed plans. As the company’s offer expanded, these detailed plans began to take over as the company’s primary instrument of guidance. In other words, HMS went through three phases: From a “Market Establishment” phase (with a vision as their primary guideline), to a “Market Development” phase (with strategies as their primary guideline), and finally to a “Market Maturity” phase (with detailed plans their primary guideline). In so doing, their vision became less challenging/ motivating for HMS’ employees. An action research approach was used, influenced by grounded theory. The results showed that people have different mindsets throughout these phases, and going back is challenging because while HMS’ employees need a vision, visions come without detailed plans and will not work unless they are supplemented by inspirational communication and passionate innovation champions who can push forward without any detailed plans. © 2019, Verlag Barbara Budrich. All rights reserved.

  • 38.
    Pataci, Hilal
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Liu, Lihua
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). Shanghai Dianji University, School of Business, Shanghai, China.
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Halila, Fawzi
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL).
    Exploring the Dynamics of the Wind Energy Industry2015Inngår i: International Association for Management of Technology: IAMOT 2015 Conference Proceedings / [ed] Pretorius, Leon, Cape Town: International Association for Management of Technology (IAMOT) , 2015, s. 631-654Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the end of 1990s the growth of new energy and renewable energy production has been strong and increasing. Wind power energy has become one important source of energy almost all over the world. Europe, USA and Asia has become the leading markets in the development of wind energy. The total volume of global wind energy production has increased from 13,600 MW in 1999 to 318,137 MW in 2013. Since 2006 the wind energy industry is showing very rapid growth as well as dynamics among major industry actors. Some companies has left the industry due to heavy competion, some has used the growth as an opportunity to expand and the inceasing demand and the growth in the wind energy sector has opened opportunities for new actors to enter the industry. China has very fast become the largest country in the world in terms of installed wind energy capacity (28,7% share of total installed capacity and 45,4 % share of installed capacity in 2013). China is followed by Germany, UK and India. USA is now on the 6th place regarding the share of new installed capacity in 2013 with 3,1%. Sweden is on the 9th global place, shared with Romania, with 2.0 % installed capacity in 2013.The study focuses on the industry dynamics among major wind turbine producers during the period of 2006 and 2013. The study explores how the seven top wind energy companies, with the greatest market share of wind turbine manufacturing, used business model innovation to create competitive advantage, how they act to sustain competitive, and how they act business wise globaly in the wind energy industry. Our analysis identifies three major industry clusters based on their mix of business model components. We have labeled those three as “Born in Wind – Stay In Wind”, “Born In Wind – Expand In Others” and “Born In Others – Expand In Wind” due to the patterns of actors from their origin, growth and expansion strategies to diffusion in different markets. The majority of manufacturers have their origin outside wind energy industry, and they create success through new combinations of resources and new value creation for customers. Only one global actors is born in the wind energy and is still remaning in the wind energy industry. All actors have over the years reshaped their business model components, value propositions and value creation to customers in order to sustain competitive on the market. There are new comers in the wind turbine industry that in short of time has achieved high growth and high market shares. Our analysis shows that the business model innovation can be seen as one important perspective to understand the dynamics of wind power industry. Based on our analysis and findings we suggest that companies in the future even more should focus on the design and innovation of their business models, and that those should have the focus on the value creation for customers from a customer perspective and make differentiation from their competitors in the global wind power industry. Copyright © 2015 by Halmstad University & Shanghai Dianji University.

  • 39.
    Simonchik, Anastacia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Hoveskog, Maya
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Danilovic, Mike
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI). Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai, China.
    Halila, Fawzi
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap, Centrum för innovations-, entreprenörskaps- och lärandeforskning (CIEL), Business Model Innovation (BMI).
    Göthberg, Niklas
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Customer value perceptions and business models: The case of O&M services in Swedish wind energy industry2015Inngår i: Book of Abstracts: 3rd International Business Servitization Conference: Orkestra-Basque Institute of Competitiveness Deusto Business School: Bilbao, November 13-14, 2014, Terrassa: OmniaScience , 2015, s. 83-87Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 40.
    Sosa, Manuel
    et al.
    INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    A Structured Approach to Re-Organize for Creativity2009Inngår i: ICED 09: the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design : 24-27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA : proceedings / [ed] M. Norell Bergendahl, M. Grimheden, L. Leifer, P. Skogstad & U. Lindemann, Glasgow: The Design Society, 2009, Vol. 3, s. 343-350Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most difficult challenges when managing innovation is to identify the individuals within the organization that need to work closely with each other to maximize the generation of creative ideas. Typically, product development organizations group their individuals based on functional areas or specific projects (or a combination of both). Such a formal organizational structures not only shape the communication patterns among development actors but also impact the outcomes that individuals get from their interactions with others. This paper introduces a structured approach to guide managers on their decisions to form a temporary team (or task force) from which creative solutions would be demanded. Our approach exploits the notion of dyadic creativity, which recognizes that people trigger the generation of creative ideas when interacting with each other for task-related matters. As a result, the goal of our approach is to identify groups of individuals within the organization that have a history of triggering the generation of creative ideas when interacting with each other. Our approach is structured in three steps: 1) Capturing the current organizational structure; 2) Measuring dyadic creativity; and 3) Forming clusters of creatives. We illustrate our approach by implementing it in the development department of a European software development firm.

  • 41.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Boix Miralles, Rafa
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Manufacturing Networks: Critical factors to successful collaboration2004Inngår i: CIRP Journal of Manufacturing Systems, ISSN 1581-5048, Vol. 33, nr 3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The competitive situation for Small and Medium Sized Enterprises, SME’s, has become intensified during the last few years. Large customers, such as within the automotive industry, have increased the outsourcing of their manufacturing capacity and reduced the number of suppliers. At the same time the large systems integrators place demands on their suppliers to actively participate in the product development and to take full responsibility for manufacturing as well as to deliver complete systems or subsystems. Due to the limited capacity of the suppliers, in terms of the scarcity of resources and limited knowledge base, suppliers need to collaborate in networks. The purpose of this study is to identify critical factors to successful network collaborative settings. In this paper we also introduce a four dimensional tentative framework, in terms of surface of integration, the scope of integration, the time horizon of integration, and the intensity of integration. This framework can be used to analyze how well collaborative networks are developed from three aspects of corporate integration, in terms of structural design of the network, the design of the work flow in collaborative settings, and aspect of handling the psychological and social boundaries among people, that management has to handle in order to increase the degrees of network collaboration. This tentative framework is suggested as an analytical tool that can be used in order to understand how different collaborative networks are developed in terms of the network constellation, output of the collaborative process, as well as duration and robustness of the network.

  • 42.
    Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Danilovic, Mike
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Fernández Aguilar, Alfonso
    School of Industrial Engineering of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Flaquer Borràs, Oriol
    School of Industrial Engineering of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Dynamics of sourcing – strategic implications of outsourcing2007Inngår i: 14th International annual EurOMA conference: Managing operations in expanding Europe / [ed] Nuran Acur, Nessim K. Erkip & Evrim Didem Günes, Ankara: Bilkent University, 2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    From a strategic manufacturing perspective companies are facing challenges in finding a balance in what they do on their own and what their suppliers do. This balance requires some times that companies are outsourcing and sometimes in sourcing activities. One conclusion is that outsourcing should be considered as a strategic decision that is not easily made by a purchasing or operations department. Many companies tend to outsource more and more of their manufacturing to specialists, but this does not mean that companies can afford to loose their competence in manufacturing. It is still essential that the companies, even though another company performs parts of the actual manufacturing, understand the special conditions for manufacturing. Otherwise they are not in a position where they can discuss product development, specification of the different tasks that they want the contractors to do, and they can certainly not make the right decisions when buying components and parts from suppliers. The outsourcing decisions also need to be strategically justifiable and outsourcing only for cost reasons is rarely successful. Outsourcing should provide other advantages in terms of improvement of competitive priorities. For different reasons, it may also end up in a situation where the company needs to insource previously outsourced activities.

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