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  • 1.
    Einberg, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Clausson, Eva K.
    Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Awareness of demands and unfairness and the importance of connectedness and security: Teenage girls’ lived experiences of their everyday lives2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, article id 27653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, a number of studies have demonstrated that stress and mental health problems have increased among adolescents and especially among girls, although little is still known concerning what girls experience in their everyday lives. The aim of this study was to describe the phenomenon of teenage girls’ everyday lives, as experienced by the girls themselves. A phenomenological approach of reflective lifeworld research was used, and the findings are based on eight qualitative interviews with girls aged 13–16 years. The essence of teenage girls’ everyday lives as experienced by the girls themselves can be described as consciousness regarding demands and unfairness and regarding the importance of connectedness and security. The girls are aware of the demands of appearance and success, and they are conscious of the gender differences in school and in the media that affect them. The girls are also conscious about the meaning of connectedness with friends and family, as well as the importance of the security of their confidence in friends and feeling safe where they stay. If teenage girls feel connected and secure, protective factors in the form of manageability and meaningfulness can act as a counterweight to the demands and unfairness of everyday life. For professionals who work with teenage girls, the results from this study can be important in their work to support these girls.

  • 2.
    Falk, Solvig
    et al.
    Malmö University, Department of Health and Society.
    Wahn, Anna-Karin
    Malmö University, Department of Health and Society.
    Lidell, Evy
    Malmö University, Department of Health and Society.
    Keeping the maintenance of daily life in spite of Chronic Heart Failure: A qualitative study2007In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 192-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Patients with CHF (Chronic Heart Failure) is an increasing group in the society. They often experience increasing powerlessness and depression in daily life as well as difficulties adhering to other physical symptoms. Many patients have difficulties to deal with daily demands.

    Aims:

    To describe how persons, living with CHF, perceived the maintenance of their daily life.

    Methods:

    This study was following a phenomenographic method in order to describe variations of perceptions. Data was collected through taped interviews, taken from 17 patients. The sample was selected from patients attending a specialist Chronic Heart Failure day care unit.

    Results:

    Five main categories were identified from 345 statements describing variations in how patients with CHF kept maintenance in their daily life. The categories include: dealing with the realities of life, dealing with thoughts about life's infinity, taking responsibility, dealing with the surrounding world and keeping up with values of life.

    Conclusion:

    The illness symptoms clearly affected daily routines but participants showed remarkable resolve and showed that values in life could be maintained albeit with a few adjustments. No patient expressed a desire to give up. Understanding patients' perceptions the specialist nurse can transfer these knowledge to other patients in similar situations.

  • 3.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildebrandt, Linda
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Status and trends in Swedish dissertations in the area of cardiovascular nursing2007In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 72-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, cardiovascular nursing (CVN) is a young branch of nursing science. The explicit knowledge contained in CVN dissertations has, so far, not been studied in Europe, and this is especially true in the case of Sweden. Accordingly, the aim of this literature study was to describe the status of and compare trends in Swedish dissertations in the area of CVN in terms of organisational structure, approach, research strategy, social orientation and socio-demographic aspects. The literature search resulted in 29 dissertations and a 26-item questionnaire that illuminated the problem areas. Most dissertations were produced in the universities of Göteborg, Halmstad and Linköping; a minority had a nurse as main supervisor; rehabilitation was the most common CVN approach; very few of the dissertations had an experimental design; and the majority was hospital-based. The main trends were (A) an increase in dissertations that were written during the last 6 years, (B) an increased number of nurses as main supervisors as well as publication in nursing journals, (C) an increase in hospital care settings while a decrease in community settings, and finally, (D) an increased number of dissertations addressing the issues of tertiary prevention as well as focusing on patients and next-of-kin as target groups. An important implication is to stimulate nurse-led interventions at all preventative levels in order to maintain or improve the cardiac health of both healthy and sick individuals, but also in order to visualize CVN and distinguish it from cardiology.

  • 4.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Baigi, Amir
    Research and Development (R&D), Primary Health Care, Halland, Sweden and Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stress and self-rated health: comparison between 26-year old Swedish women at intervals of twenty years2006In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 30-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In society of today there are great demands on young women concerning education, work and social life and also concerning health and beauty expectations. The aim of this study was to compare 26-year old Swedish women studied at intervals of twenty years concerning stress in daily life and self-rated health. The participants in 2002 (n=386) answered the same questionnaire that was used twenty years ago in a prospective population study (n=85). The result showed no difference in self-rated health between the two groups. However, women in 2002 reported more stress and health complaints such as exhaustion, sleep disorders, restlessness and difficulty concentration. They also reported low energy level and bad appetite. This discomfort must be interpreted with caution and not necessarily as ill health. However, it is important to take the experience of stress in daily life and the increase in health complaints into consideration even if women today rate their health as good in order to avoid lasting imbalance and thereby future diseases.

  • 5.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Cunico, L.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
    Lindgren, E. -C
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health promotion in nursing education: Attitudes among nurse students2015In: Acta Biomedica, ISSN 0392-4203, Vol. 86, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) European Strategy for Nursing and Midwifery has called for the explicit inclusion and application of health promotion in all nursing curricula. However, research indicates that there are deficiencies in nursing education regarding health promotion in both the theoretical and practical elements of education. Insight into the experiences of European nursing students’ attitudes, positive or negative, about working in health promotion may provide a clue whether health promotion will be regarded as an important task and to what extent it will have priority in different parts of Europe. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare Italian and Swedish nursing students’ attitudes towards health promotion practice on matriculation to nursing school and after a three-year nursing education, and to explore whether attitudes towards health promotion practice correlate with BMI and smoking. Method: The study involved students who started their nursing education in autumn 2009 (n =240). Data were collected via a questionnaire. Results: The results show that the Swedish students had a more positive stance on health promotion than Italian students did. After completion of a three-year nursing education programme, Italian students’ attitudes on health promotion had improved, while no such development was seen in Sweden. Further, no correlation between lifestyle issues and attitudes to health promotion was found. Conclusion: Health promotion in nursing education may have important influence on students’ attitudes and thereby on the quantity and quality of future health promotion practice. © Mattioli 1885.

  • 6.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Access to the world after myocardial infarction: experiences of the recovery process2006In: Rehabilitation Nursing, ISSN 0278-4807, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a traumatic health event and at the same time a transition of vital importance in human life. The purpose of this study was to elucidate recovery patterns after myocardial infarction with regard to the content of patients' experiences. The study used a descriptive design and a qualitative method. Interviews with 16 men and women were performed, and data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. The recovery process had a pattern of ability, restraints, and reorientation. Through self-help and help from others, the mutual sharing of burdens, and clarifying restraints to recovery, the recovery process progressed toward reorientation. New values and motivation for change, as well as a new balance within the self and relationships were found. The MI had been integrated into life and, through the recovery process, patients' attitudes were better focused, leading to an enhanced quality of life.

  • 7.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Women's experiences of recovery after myocardial infarction: a meta-synthesis2007In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women report lower well-being, compared with men, during recovery after myocardial infarction (MI). To support women in their recovery it is important to understand their experiences from their own perspective. However, a single study using a qualitative method does not have the potential to contribute to evidence-based nursing practice, and it is therefore important to synthesize findings from several qualitative studies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to perform a meta-synthesis of findings of women's experiences of recovery after MI. Methods: A meta-synthesis with seven qualitative studies, including a total of 70 women, was performed. Results: Recovery was characterized by subordination and superordination. The women strived to preserve their self, and at the same time they were strongly oriented toward other people. Four concepts emerged: protecting, adjusting, downgrading, and succumbing. Conclusion: Women oscillate between subordination and superordination. Protecting the matriarchy and being a victim of the patriarchy shed light on this ambivalence in the same way as adjusting to the situation and succumbing to the disease do.

  • 8.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Luepker, Russell V.
    Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA .
    Baigi, Amir
    Research and Development (R and D), Primary Health Care, Halland, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stress, health complaints and self-confidence: a comparison between young adult women in Sweden and USA2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 202-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition to adulthood is a period in life when women encounter conflicts, ambiguities and rapidly expanding roles that may be stressful and difficult to manage. The aim of this study was to compare stress in daily life, health complaints and self-confidence in 26-year old women in two different cultures. A health survey study was performed among Swedish women (n = 386) and American women (n = 201) living in urban areas at the West coast of Sweden and in Minnesota. Both Swedish and American women reported stress in their everyday life, with higher figures for the Americans. Overall health was rated lower by the Swedish women and they reported more health complaints such as headache, general tiredness, irritability, depression and sleeping disorders. There was a difference between groups in self-confidence with higher figures for excellent self-confidence among American women. However, low self-confidence was reported by more American than Swedish women. A good work situation predicted self-confidence in Swedish women and financial confidence in American women. Physical fitness was associated with self-confidence in both groups. Young women in both cultures experienced high level of stress but health related complaints were more common among Swedish women. High stress and health complaints must be taken seriously and interventions to support young women in the midst of transition to adulthood should contain stress reduction as well as empowerment performed in a more effective way than today in different health care settings and at place of work.

  • 9.
    Jensen, Annika
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The influence of conscience in nursing2009In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of conscience on nurses in terms of guilt has frequently been described but its impact on care has received less attention. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' conceptions of the influence of conscience on the provision of inpatient care. The study employed a phenomenographic approach and analysis method. Fifteen nurses from three hospitals in western Sweden were interviewed. The results showed that these nurses considered conscience to be an important factor in the exercise of their profession, as revealed by the descriptive categories: conscience as a driving force; conscience as a restricting factor; and conscience as a source of sensitivity. They perceived that conscience played a role in nursing actions involving patients and next of kin, and was an asset that guided them in their efforts to provide high quality care.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Mats
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Varberg Hospital, SE 432 81 Varberg, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Department of Internal Medicine, Varberg Hospital, SE 432 81 Varberg, Sweden .
    Myredal, Anna
    Department of Internal Medicine, Varberg Hospital, SE 432 81 Varberg, Sweden .
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Arterial baroreflex dysfunction after coronary artery bypass grafting2009In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 8, p. 426-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although uncommon, the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia is high in certain subsets of patients after coronary artery bypass grafting. Arterial baroreflex dysfunction has been linked to increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. The aim of the current study was to explore arterial baroreflex function during the early recovery phase and up to five months after surgery. Electrocardiogram and beat-to-beat blood pressures were registered in patients (n=92) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting five weeks and five months after surgery. Healthy subjects (n=31) were examined for comparison. The arterial baroreflex sensitivity and the baroreflex effectiveness index were calculated. The baroreflex sensitivity and the baroreflex effectiveness index were reduced by 36% and 64%, respectively (P<0.01 for both) in patients five weeks after coronary artery bypass grafting compared to healthy subjects (HS). Values increased during follow-up but the baroreflex effectiveness index remained reduced by 55% in patients compared to HS five months after cardiac surgery (P<0.01). Arterial baroreflex dysfunction prevails both early and long-term after coronary artery bypass grafting. Reduced modulation of cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity could contribute to the increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia observed during the early recovery phase after cardiac surgery.

  • 11.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mats
    Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Varberg, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Endurance - integration of strength and vulnerability in relatives' response to open heart surgery as a lived experience2006In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being, ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open heart surgery is a threatening life event for patients and their relatives. The relatives' situation is especially complex since at the same time they both support the patient and suffer themselves. The purpose of the present study was to describe relatives' lived experiences of a family member's open-heart surgery in a lifeworld perspective. Nine relatives of patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and/or heart valve surgery were interviewed in depth using a phenomenological approach. Endurance was found to be the essential characteristic for this group and was derived from four constituents: unconditionality, uncertainty, mutuality and sadness. Unable to escape their changed lifeworld, they demonstrated endurance throughout the entire illness process, which implied a great sense of responsibility and the setting aside of their own needs and wishes. The endurance rendered them both strong and vulnerable, although the vulnerability was not immediately apparent. There is a risk that relatives in need for help to handle this threatening situation may be ignored by health care professionals because they seem so capable. A lifeworld perspective in health care including the entire family can prevent such a situation.

  • 12.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Varberg, Sweden, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mats
    Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Varberg, Sweden, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Fragility - the price of renewed life: Patients experiences of open heart surgery2005In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 290-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Open heart surgery often implies a threat to life and is associated with fear and anxiety. It is also a strong encroachment on body and integrity and adjusting life afterwards could be difficult. Despite improvements in treatment the patients' reactions appear to be unchanged. Introducing a lifeworld perspective would supply a different kind of knowledge based upon the patients' own experiences coloured by their linguistic usage and bodily expressions.

    Aim:

    The aim of this study was to describe patients' experiences of open heart surgery in a lifeworld perspective.

    Method:

    Fourteen patients treated with coronary artery bypass surgery and/or heart valve operation were in-depth interviewed in 2003. The phenomenological method was used for the interviews as well as for the analysis. The informants reflected on their experiences of the illness, meetings with health care, family relations and wishes for the future.

    Findings:

    The essence of the phenomenon was fragility. Fragility was understood through the following categories: distance, uncertainty, vulnerability, reliance and gratitude.

    Conclusions:

    Patients want to be treated as unique individuals. They ask for more dialogues with the staff. Awareness of their supposed lifelong fragility implies that health care staff acquires an open and holistic approach.

  • 13.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johansson, Mats
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Depressed mood over time after open heart surgery impacts patient well-being: A combined study2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 277-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Depression is a common cause of decreased well-being after open heart surgery (OHS) and a risk factor for new cardiac events. Little is known about the long-term prevalence of depressive symptoms after OHS or their effect on well-being. The aim of this study was to explore the presence of depressed mood in patients during the recovery phase after open heart surgery as well as depressed mood and well-being 3 years later.

    Method: Eighty consecutively included patients completed a questionnaire about depressed mood at 5 weeks, 5 months and 3 years after OHS. A telephone interview took place after receipt of the third questionnaire to explore their well-being. Quantitative and qualitative data were analysed separately and thereafter together.

    Result: Depressed mood occurred in 52% of the patients during recovery or 3 years after OHS. The qualitative content analysis produced the theme of transition, which was based on three categories.

    Conclusion: Depressed mood was reported by the majority of patients during recovery after OHS and had a long-term effect on their well-being. OHS constituted a transition for all patients, but those with depressed mood had difficulty finishing the transition process and reorientating life.

  • 14.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Hosp Varberg, Dept Internal Med, Varberg, Sweden..
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johansson, Mats
    Vastra Vall, Dept Gen Med, Varberg, Sweden..
    Health-care professionals' documentation of wellbeing in patients following open heart surgery: a content analysis of medical records2013In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 112-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To explore health-care professionals' documentation of patient wellbeing in the first five months after open heart surgery. Background Open heart surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting or heart valve replacement) is an intervention aimed at relief of symptoms and increased wellbeing. It is a complex procedure with deep experiences encompassing physiological, psychological and social aspects. Health-care professionals' documentation of expressions of decreased wellbeing related to open heart surgery is an important basis for decisions and for the understanding of patients' overall health situation. Method Eighty medical records were examined by means of qualitative and quantitative methods in order to explore documentation of patient wellbeing at four points in time. The analysis was performed by content analysis and descriptive statistics. Results Documentation of physical wellbeing was dominant on all occasions, while psychological wellbeing was moderately well documented and social aspects of wellbeing were rarely documented. Conclusion The medical records did not adequately reflect the complexity of undergoing open heart surgery. Hence the holistic approach was not confirmed in health-care professionals' documentation. Implications for nursing management Managers need to support and work for a patient-centred approach in cardiac care, resulting in patient documentation that reflects patient wellbeing as a whole.

  • 15.
    Karlsson, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Varberg Hospital, Varberg.
    Mattsson, Bengt
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Section of Primary Health Care, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Johansson, Mats
    Department of Internal Medicine, Varberg Hospital, Varberg.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Well-being in patients and relatives after open-heart surgery from the perspective of health care professionals2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 5-6, p. 840-846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explore how health care professionals perceive the well-being of patients and relatives following open-heart surgery.

    Background

    Open-heart surgery is an extraordinary life event associated with hope and fear among both patients and relatives, thus they require attention from health care professionals. Patients' short stay in hospital after surgery and the workload of health care professionals increase the risk that reduced well-being will be overlooked. Health care professionals need to become familiar with the signs of reduced well-being.

    Design

    The study has an observational design and was performed using a qualitative method.

    Method

    Health care professionals working with patients who have undergone open-heart surgery participated in focus group discussions. The data were analysed by means of content analysis. Results. Two categories emerged: signs of vulnerability and signs of insecurity. The latent meaning of the study was interpreted as awareness of an exposed position.

    Conclusion

    The health care professionals were aware of patients' and relatives' exposed position following open-heart surgery. Reduced well-being was communicated by bodily and emotional signs, which were captured using direct communication or intuition. Relevance to clinical practice. Developing the ability to recognise signs of reduced well-being is important for minimising the negative influences associated with open-heart surgery for patients and relatives. Increased awareness that both anger and avoidance can mask depression is important. Patients and their relatives, particularly younger ones, should be observed to ensure early detection of a life crisis provoked by the heart disease. Furthermore, staff should invite patients and their partners to talk about sexuality. Changes aimed at increasing patients' and relatives' well-being would be facilitated by interdisciplinary teamwork, 'reflection groups' for a greater exchange of knowledge and the implementation of a patient/family perspective. The latter would lead to greater interest in the relatives' situation and position in cardiac care.

  • 16.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Family support-a burden to patient and caregiver2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 149-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to describe family support in terms of the sources as well as the consequences of burden for caregivers, patients and family interaction. Caregivers' sources of burden were related to difficulties in coping with patients' emotional responses, physical complaints and altered life style behaviour as well as future oriented factors. Consequences in terms of caregivers' perceptions of emotional distress and personal losses are elucidated. In terms of family support, when focusing on sources of burden for patients' concerning family support, emotional support is emphasised and related to overprotection. Two different definitions of the overprotection concept are used in order to elucidate different consequences of the phenomenon. Sources and consequences of burden are also related to family interaction. The family is regarded as a system in which a cardiac disease may cause an imbalance. Poor marital quality or poor family functioning is described as a hindrance to a new balance. To summarise, the reviewed literature unanimously shows that the interactive support between family members when dealing with cardiac disease constitutes a considerable emotional burden. Therefore the support for emotional communication within the family should take priority. The knowledge described can provide a foundation for the development of family support in the cardiac area.

  • 17.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Psychological needs of cardiac patient and family post myocardial infarction1999In: XXI Congress of the European Society of Cardiology / [ed] Francisco Navarro López, Bologna: Medimond, 1999, p. 955-959Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lidell, Evy
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Axelsson, Åsa
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    A masters programme in cardiovascular nursing: a two-year-follow-up2009In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 48-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate professional development and promotion as well as whether the new competence was requested after completion of a one-year master programme (MP) in Cardiovascular (CV) nursing. In Sweden the first one-year MP within the CV area took place between 2003 and 2005 at Halmstad University with a follow-up in 2007. The sample consisted of seventeen former students who had completed the MP. A questionnaire was developed comprising twenty items grouped into three main sections. Most of the nurses stated that their knowledge was requested and that they had developed their professional attitude, skills and knowledge. Seven of the nurses had a new position and five of them had advanced in terms of leadership. In three cases, the master exam was critical for the employers’ decision. Six of the nurses who had a new post had obtained an increase in salary. In conclusion, the MP led to increased competence as well as improved career prospects. Information about the MP should be available at clinics, and collaboration between clinical practice and education is necessary in order to ensure relevant use of master educated nurses’ competence.

  • 19.
    Lidell, Evy
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Long-term effects of a comprehensive rehabilitation programme after myocardial infarction1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine the long-term effects on myocardial infarction (MI) patients of a six-month comprehensive rehabilitation programme (CRP) conducted by an interdisciplinary team regarding cardiac events, physical and psychological conditions, life habits, and cardiac health knowledge. The results of a multivariate analysis carried out five years after the MI showed that cardiac events and psychological condition were not significantly influenced by the CRP. However, it was found that the physical condition of the patients benefited from the CRP; self-reported physical fitness (p < 0.002) and physical exercise test (p < 0.007). CRP participation was linked to significant modifications of life habits (diet change; p < 0.04, sexual activity; p < 0.000). The cardiac health knowledge was significantly improved by participation in the CRP (basic cardiac knowledge; p < 0.005; knowledge about misconceptions; p < 0.04). In conclusion, CRPs have had positive long-term effects on physical condition, life habits and cardiac health knowledge. No such effects, however, were found regarding either cardiac events or psychological condition.

  • 20.
    Lidell, Evy
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Awareness in research supervision: a single subject study2008In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 23-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretically, one part of supervision is the direct object i.e. what can be learnt, another part is the indirect object aiming at how the learning process is constituted and influenced by both the doctoral student and his/her supervisor. Emphasising both the what and the how object of learning as well as their interrelationship may be an important factor for the development of the role of supervisor in research. The aim of this study was to describe supervision of doctoral students from the perspective of a research supervisor. Interview data were analysed in accordance with content analysis. The result showed that research supervision had a latent content of awareness of underlying structures and the preconditions for learning that became visible through self-appraisal, orientation towards a goal, in the interaction and the performance of an art. Awareness was a cornerstone in research supervision that enabled both the what and the how aspect of learning.

  • 21.
    Lidell, Evy
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Höfer, Stefan
    Department of Medical Psychology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Saner, Hugo
    Cardiovascular Prevention, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, University Hospitals Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland.
    Perk, Joep
    Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Oldridge, Neil
    College of Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Aurora Cardiovascular Services, Aurora Medical Group, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.
    Health-related quality of life in European women following myocardial infarction: A cross-sectional study2015In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 326-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Coronary heart disease is a major contributor to women’s health problems.

    Design: Self-perceived social support, well-being and health-related quality of life (HRQL) were documented in the cross-sectional HeartQoL survey of European women one and six months after a myocardial infarction.

    Methods: European women were recruited in 18 European countries and grouped into four geographical regions (Southern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Europe and Eastern Europe). Continuous socio-demographic variables and categorical variables were compared by age and region with ANOVA and χ2, respectively; multiple regression models were used to identify predictors of social support, well-being and HRQL.

    Results: Women living in the Eastern European region rated social support, well-being and HRQL significantly lower than women in the other regions. Older women had lower physical HRQL scores than younger women. Eastern European women rated social support, well-being and HRQL significantly lower than women in the other regions. Prediction of the dependent variables (social support, well-being and HRQL) by socio-demographic factors varied by total group, in the older age group, and by region; body mass index and managerial responsibility were the most consistent significant predictors. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  • 22.
    Lidell, Evy
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Luepker, Russell
    Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minnesota.
    Baigi, Amir
    Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Gothenburg.
    Lagiou, Areti
    Faculty of Health and Welfare Professions, Athens Technological Educational Institute, Athens.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Medication usage among young adult women: A comparison between Sweden, the USA, and Greece2008In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 4-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated whether or not medication usage among young adult women differed across three countries. An additional aim was to evaluate the association between medication use and sociodemographic factors and exercise habits. A sample of 1098 young adult women were selected in Sweden, the USA, and Greece. Consistent medication usage by young adult women in the three countries related to oral contraceptives and vitamins; nevertheless, there were differences. The main differences were found in the use of laxatives, iron supplements, analgesics, antidepressants, and antacid medication. The most outstanding differences were the frequent use of laxatives in Sweden and vitamins in the USA. Different association patterns were found between medication use and culture, sociodemographic factors, and exercise. The assessment of medication use among young adult women can be performed very easily and provides an immediate indication of their well-being and needs for preventative care.

  • 23.
    Lidell, Evy
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Segesten, Kerstin
    Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    A myocardial infarction patient’s current anxiety: Assessed with a phenomenological method1997In: International Journal of Rehabilitation and Health, ISSN 1068-9591, E-ISSN 1573-1537, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 205-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to illustrate how a patient with a myocardial infarction history may experience current anxiety. We conducted the assessment using a phenomenological method. The participant was a 62- year old man, chronically ill due to two myocardial infarctions and heart failure. Five categories emerged from the data: distress, worthlessness, insecurity, indifference, and lack of strength, illustrating feelings embedded in the current anxiety. These feelings relate to past and present experiences as well as to an insecure future. The findings are not generalizable in a statistical manner, but they are an illustration of the importance of identifying a cardiac patient’s current anxiety from a holistic perspective, in order to understand what is occurring emotionally and to understand the need for emotional support. Qualities in the caring relationship may create possibilities for this patient to receive and perceive emotional support. © 2019 Springer Nature Switzerland AG. Part of Springer Nature.

  • 24.
    Lundén, Karin
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Baigi, Amir
    Dept. of Primary Health Care, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Coronary care unit nurses' outlook on death - their own thoughts as well as those of their patients: a pilot study2007In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 9-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No studies have examined the  level of preparedness of CCU  nurses to deal with cardiac patients’  death issues. Accordingly,  the aim of this pilot study was to  explore and describe CCU nurses’  outlook on their own as well  as their patients’ thoughts about  death. A pilot study was conducted  in 2005 at a University Hospital  in southern Sweden. The 63  (93%) nurses answered a newly  established 18-item questionnaire  regarding their own and their  patients’ thoughts about death.  Descriptive statistics revealed  that 90% of nurses believed that  patients often thought about  death. Regarding their outlook on  death issues, 41% were aware of  their personal standpoint, 63%  were clear about their plan of  action, 34% showed openness  towards their patients and 26%  expressed educational adequacy.  These low figures pertaining to  both personal and professional  awareness indicate a lack of  knowledge and competence. Clinical  implications are the provision  of various forums at CCUs  on this subject and the creation of  awareness at all levels of nursing  education. Research implications  are to further develop the instrument  and implement an intervention  at the CCU of how to care  for dying cardiac patients in a  professional manner.

  • 25.
    Wendt, Eva
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Trust and confirmation in a gynecologic examination situation: A critical incident technique analysis2004In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 83, no 12, p. 1208-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gynecologic examination is a common measure in reproductive health care. Many women experience the examination as a more or less negative event, with shortcomings in the examiner's behavior. The aim of the study was to describe, in terms of critical incidences, women's experiences concerning the personnel's behavior in the situation of gynecologic examination. Methods. The informants were strategically chosen and consisted of 30 Swedish women between the ages of 18-82 years old. The data collection method was qualitative research interviews analyzed by critical incident technique. Results. The result consisted of 30 subcategories, five categories, and two main areas - trust and confirmation. The personnel enabled trust when they promoted participation, created confidence, and were supportive. The opposite behavior contributed to the lack of trust. Confirmation described behavior that confirmed, respectively, did not confirm the women. This was shown through the presence or lack of respect and engagement. Conclusion. The personnel's positive behavior enabled trust and confirmed the women as individuals, while negative behavior was decisive in an unfavorable way. A complexity of patterns of knowing in nursing was identified. Participation through information that contributed to trust was important and amounted to one fourth of the incidents in the material. Respect and engagement, which confirmed the women, facilitated a positive caring relationship. The examination situation can be improved through reflection of the personnel's own behavior and further research about women's own experiences.

  • 26.
    Wendt, Eva
    et al.
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Westerståhl, Anna
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Baigi, Amir
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Young women's sexual health and their views on dialogue with health professionals2007In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 590-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Many women who experience sexual problems or who have been subjected to sexual abuse, do not seek help, and often health professionals avoid raising such issues. The aim of this study was to describe young women's sexual health and their views on a dialogue about aspects of sexuality in connection with a gynecologic examination.

    METHOD:

    Cross-sectional study. Women, 23, 26 and 29 years of age, called for gynecologic screening between March and July 2006 (n=488; response rate 75%). Descriptive statistics, multiple logistic regression and bivariate analysis were used.

    RESULTS:

    The majority (95%) had a positive attitude towards sexuality, although many women reported sexual problems, and one-fifth (22%) were dissatisfied with their sex life. Women considered it appropriate to be asked about sexuality in general (92%), while a majority (72%) found questions about sexual abuse appropriate. However, depending on the area, the majority (76-99%) had never been asked such questions. Demographic variables, aspects of life, sexuality and sexual abuse were irrelevant for whether women considered it appropriate to be asked questions about aspects of sexuality, by a midwife/doctor in connection with a gynecologic examination.

    Conclusion:

    The result can activate health professionals to initiate a dialogue about sexual issues among young women. In this way, many women who experience sexual problems or have been subjected to sexual abuse, may be provided the opportunity to improve their sexual health.

  • 27.
    Wendt, Eva K.
    et al.
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, General Practice and Public Health, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy A. S.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Westerståhl, Anna K.E.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Marklund, Bertil R.G.
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, General Practice and Public Health, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Hildingh, Cathrine I.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Young women's perceptions of being asked questions about sexuality and sexual abuse: a content analysis2011In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 250-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to describe young women's perceptions of being asked questions by midwives or doctors pertaining to sexuality and sexual abuse in connection with visits for gynaecological examination. DESIGN: a qualitative study. Data comprised responses to open-ended questions in a questionnaire and were analysed by qualitative content analysis. SETTING: a county in the south-west of Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: all of the 23-, 26- and 29-year-old women who attended eight midwife and youth centres for cervical screening during the period between March and July 2006 were invited to participate. The open-ended question about sexuality was answered by 413 women, and 409 women answered the question about sexual abuse, representing approximately 84% of the women who answered the questionnaire as a whole. FINDINGS: the data resulted in a total of eight categories and 31 codes, which showed the women's perceptions of being asked questions about sexuality and sexual abuse. Six of the categories dealt with why it was considered natural to be questioned. Health professionals can be trusted and questions can open up a dialogue as well as clarify the woman's situation. The context of a visit for a gynaecological examination is relevant and questions will make it possible for the professionals to strengthen the woman. Another reason was that sexuality is an essential part of life. Those women who felt that it would not feel natural to be asked questions about sexuality and sexual abuse considered that the context is wrong and that such questions will encroach on the woman's personal sphere. KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: women's responses indicate that there are good reasons for midwives and doctors to raise questions about sexuality and sexual abuse when they meet young women. Taking opportunity to find those who have sexual problems and/or experience of sexual abuse could reduce the suffering of these women and lead to an economic gain to society. The provision of training and supervision for midwives and doctors is important to enhance the quality of conversations about sexual matters. In order to deal with such issues, it is necessary to have knowledge of sexual health, relationships and violence, as well as a professional stance and a good conversational technique.

  • 28.
    Wendt, Eva
    et al.
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, Falkenberg, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Westerstål, Anna
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Possibilities for dialogue on sexuality and sexual abuse: Midwives' and clinicians' experiences2011In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 539-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe midwives’ and clinicians’ experiences of the possibilities and obstacles for dialogue with young women on sexuality and sexual abuse, focusing on the possibilities. Design: qualitative study with interview data analysed by qualitative content analysis. Setting: South-west Sweden. Participants: A purposive sample, consisting of 15 midwives, six gynaecologists and five general practitioners aged 30–65 years, was chosen in order to obtain as many different experiences as possible. The participants’ professional experiences varied, ranging from five to more than 35 years, and they were employed at youth clinics, primary health-care centres, gynaecology clinics, a specialist sexual medicine centre and antenatal care centres, situated in small and large cities. Findings: The participants described the respectful encounter that can be created when young women meet midwives and clinicians in the context of a gynaecological consultation. In this situation, there was a potential to strengthen women while attempting to improve their sexual health. Support from the organisation and the use of personal skills and assets were found to be promoting factors for dialogue. Lack of organisational support or communication skills and difficult emotions complicated the situation, which might, in turn, restrain midwives and clinicians from raising sexual issues. Implications for practice Increased knowledge, support and opportunities for reflection concerning dialogue regarding sexual issues might evoke the interest and intent of health professionals to approach these issues. Guidelines regarding dialogue about both sexuality and sexual abuse should be routine in health-care services.

  • 29.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Health in everyday life among spouses of haemodialysis patients: a content analysis2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that haemodialysis requires that spouses support and assist their partner during the treatment period, little attention has been focused on their health. The aim of this study was to explore experiences of health in everyday life among spouses of haemodialysis patients. The study had an explorative and descriptive design based on content analysis. Thirteen participants were interviewed in their home without the presence of the patient. The results show that arduousness was experienced when that spouses' everyday life was taken up by caring for the patient at the expense of his/her own health. Spouses exhibited stamina and neglected their own health when focusing on the patient and minimising their own condition. Independence in everyday life revealed that spouses who cared about themselves and looked after their own health experienced relaxation and happiness, which protected their health. Clinical interventions should include an assessment of the spouses' health and everyday life in order to plan the care to ensure that it is directed towards increasing their independence. Instruments need to be developed that assess when and how spouses experience the greatest sense of well-being, if they have scope for relaxation and recovery, and what type of support they require in their everyday life.

  • 30.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Professional support for next of kin of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment: a content analysis study of nursing documentation2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 353-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives. The aim of this study was to examine the content of nursing documentation with a focus on professional support for next of kin (NoK) of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment. Background. Professional support in nursing focuses on promotion, maintenance and restoration of health and prevention of illness. Design. The study had a descriptive design and qualitative content analysis was used to search for themes based on descriptions contained in the collected nursing documentation. Methods. The total number of nursing records of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment (n = 50) for the 5-year period 1998–2002 was included. All nursing documentation was systematic in accordance with the VIPS-documentation model. Results. The professional support could be described within the framework of three themes: to explore NoK's supportive resources, to enable NoK' readiness in caring for the patient and to co-operate with NoK in the care of the patient in the home, captured by the core theme which described the professional support as a continuous process. Conclusions. Next of kin are a supportive resource in the nursing care of patients receiving chronic haemodialysis treatment and professional support for NoK focuses on planning their participation in the care of patients in the home. Relevance to clinical practice. Professional support for NoK should be documented in family focused nursing diagnoses, which would make it possible to search for different types of support. Future research might explore nurses' or NoK's views on carer support.

  • 31.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    "Time for dialysis as time to live": Experiences of time in everyday life of the Swedish next of kin of hemodialysis patients2009In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 45-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the content of time in everyday life as experienced by the next of kin of patients on hemodialysis in Sweden. Chronic renal disease often requires hemodialysis, which is a time-consuming treatment that makes it necessary to carefully plan everyday life and involves the next of kin to a large degree. This study used a descriptive design with a content analysis approach. The analysis of the data from the twenty interviews revealed the experiences of time in the everyday lives of the next of kin of a patient on hemodialysis. The content of time in everyday life can be described as follows: fragmented time, vacuous time, and uninterrupted time. The findings show how everyday life time for the next of kin is minimized and that the common life space is contracted. The next of kin must be provided with supervision in order to provide them with more of their own time in everyday life, which can benefit their health.

  • 32.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Time in everyday life as experienced by next of kin of haemodialysis patientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to explore the content of time in everyday life as experienced by the next of kin of haemodialysis patients.

    Background Chronic renal disease often requires haemodialysis which is a time-consuming treatment that necessitates careful planning of everyday life and involves next of kin to a large degree. Next of kin's time can be severely restricted when his/her life is devoted to the needs of the haemodialysis patient.

    Method This study used explorative and descriptive design with a qualitative content analysis approach. Twenty next of kin selected purposive with the criterion of having at least one year of experience as a next of kin of a patient on haemodialysis.

    Results Analysis of data from the interviews revealed experiences of time in everyday lives of the next of kin of haemodialysis patients. Their experiences were reflected in the concepts fragmented time, vacuous time and uninterrupted time.

    Conclusion The experience of time in the everyday lives of next of kin of haemodialysis patients demonstrated that time for themselves was minimised and that common life space contracted. The next of kin were also aware of the prognosis of renal disease and the fact that haemodialysis was a life-sustaining treatment, which forced them to live in the present. They afforded wellness when they experienced a break from everyday live and could use their time for their own needs. Attention should be focused on time in the nurse's assessment of the next of kin's everyday life and whether or not next of kin have sufficient time required for the patient's care. There is need for further research that focuses on a generalisation of the fmdings by means of the development of instruments that can contribute assessment of time in everyday life among next of kin of chronically ill patients.

  • 33.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högstedt, Benkt
    Dept. of Development and Research, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden .
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Lidell, Evy
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Time distribution factors of hospital and home care among chronic haemodialysis patients2004In: EDTNA-ERCA journal, ISSN 1019-083X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, many studies are available that focus on haemodialysis; however studies on the time distribution factor involved are lacking. It is therefore important to study the distribution of time, taking into account outpatient care, inpatient care and home care. The aim of the study was to chart over a five-year period, the time distribution factors of hospital care and home care among chronic haemodialysis patients. The design of the study was descriptive, and the data material was drawn from a patient register (N = 61). The data analysis was performed by means of both descriptive and inferential statistics.

1 - 33 of 33
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