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  • 1.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Att fånga tidens tempo: Humanistisk och samhällsvetenskaplig forskning i näringslivet2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Riksbankens Jubileumsfond har sedan 2009 ett pilotprogram, Flexit,  där forskare inom humaniora och samhällsvetenskap får möjlighet att arbeta som in-house forskare i den privata sektorn under tre år. Flexits syften är att:

    • bygga broar mellan humanistisk och samhällsvetenskaplig forskning och näringslivet,
    • underlätta kunskapsutbyte och stimulera kontakter så att fler organisationer utanför universitetsvärlden kan se och nyttja kompetensen hos disputerade humanister och samhällsvetare.
    • påverka meriteringssystemet så att akademin i högre grad värderar erfarenheter från företagsvärlden, och vice versa,
    •  visa alternativa karriärmöjligheter för forskare inom humaniora och samhällsvetenskap.

    Två av forskarna från den första omgången, Martin Berg och Susanna Toivanen, berättar om sina erfarenheter inom programmet. Susanna Toivanen berättar hur det är att forska om framtidens kontorsarbetsplatser, och vilka möjligheter och utmaningar det innebär att bedriva forskning i samverkan med ett stort byggbolag. Susanna är verksam som samhällsvetenskaplig forskare på NCC Property Development på företagets kontor i Västra Hamnen i Malmö.

    Martin Berg delar med sig av sina erfarenheter av att forska om sociala medier på en webb- och strategibyrå som har ena foten i Malmö och den andra på internet. Martin är sociolog och verksam som forskare på Good Old i Malmö.

    Maria Wikse fungerar som samtalsledare.

  • 2.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Begäret försvann på en middag med Judith Butler2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Behind the Screen: Communicative capitalism and automated social structures2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, numerous journal articles aiming at discerning the impact and possible meanings of social network sites (SNS) such as Facebook and Twitter have been published. It is often argued that SNS significantly diverge from earlier forms of web communities since they are centred around the individual actor rather than themes of interest. An important aspect of these changes is that SNS allow for the construction of a public or semi-public profile through which it is possible to put on display a list of shared social connections which, in turn, makes it viable to browse the social connections of other users. Although being important aspects of SNS, these observations do not account for the automated data processing of harvested personal information that constitute the very motor of these sites. Drawing on an analysis of an extensive empirical material consisting of approximately 470 self-reflexive diary entries on the subject of Facebook use, authored by people between the ages of 22 and 68 together with an exploration of the ways in which Facebook gathers and processes personal and interactional data in order to provide what is assumed to be an enhanced user experience, this paper aims at establishing a sociological understanding of the interrelationship between social practices and automated social structures on Facebook. Taken as a whole, this paper contributes to an understanding of SNS by relating social practices to the automated social structures that (for commercial reasons) emerge within SNS thus rendering creative identity performances problematic. In so doing, it provides an important account of how bodies, selves and technologies intersect and relate to new forms of power in contemporary communicative capitalism. 

  • 4.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Bloggen som forskningsredskap2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Checking in at the urban playground: Digital geographies and electronic flâneurs2011In: Networked Sociability and Individualism: Technology for Personal and Professional Relationships / [ed] Francesca Comunello, Hershey: IGI Global, 2011, p. 171-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking its point of departure in a critical discussion of the imagined dividing line between physical and digital spaces, this chapter demonstrates a socio-spatial turn in Internet studies and sets out to explore the meaning of locative technologies as an illuminating example of how such spatial boundaries increasingly collapse. Being empirically grounded in an analysis of twelve qualitative interviews with users of the applications Foursquare and Gowalla, this chapter focuses on the interplay between what is termed electronic flâneurs and digital geographies and demonstrates in what ways the use of locative technologies provokes changes at two levels in the social realm; first, by adding a communicative digital layer to the spatial organisation of physical space and second, by adding a spatially bound layer to interactions in digital space.

     

  • 6.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    ”Cumming” to Terms with Communicative Capitalism2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    The last few years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of services and applications that facilitate online social interaction of various kinds. Contemporary accounts of the social web most often take their point of departure in an analysis of Social Network Sites (SNS) such as Twitter and Facebook. In contrast to such an endeavour, this paper shifts focus from the social realm of SNS to social interactions that occur through and around amateur sex-cam services such as cam4.com, which is a service claiming to be ”the largest worldwide webcam community”. Cam4.com allows the users to broadcast themselves while having sex, masturbating or simply engaging in exhibitionist practices of different sorts. Every broadcast is accompanied by a public chat which provides a possibility to communicate with the viewers as well as a ”tip box” through which viewers can make economic transactions to the broadcasting user. These transactions are often closely related to the bodily sexual practices of the users and it is frequently said that a certain amount of tips is required for making an orgasm (or similar activity) taking place. This paper takes its point of departure in an analysis of various forms of social interaction on cam4.com in order to establish an understanding of the relationship between bodily practices and communicative acts in light of the electronically mediated setting by which their performance is facilitated and interconnected. This analysis, in turn, is related to a broader theoretical framework that builds upon a critical assessment of the works of George H. Mead (1934), Judith Butler (1990) and Anthony Giddens (1992) together with a reconfiguration of Jodi Dean’s (2005, 2010a, 2010b) notion of ”communicative capitalism” which designates a very specific form of late capitalism which is materialised in the bits and bytes of the network society. Taken as a whole, this paper provides a deeper understanding of the processes involved in contemporary online (bodily) communication while at the same time positioning these microsociological matters in a broader macroscopical theoretical framework.

  • 7.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Deltagande netnografi2015In: Handbok i kvalitativa metoder / [ed] Göran Ahrne & Peter Svensson, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, p. 142-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Den osynlige humanisten2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Det draperade jaget2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Det personliga varumärket och ofrihetens ekonomi2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Där tran(s)orna slutar dansa: Facebook och den andres automatisering2012In: En gestalt, många berättelser: En vänbok till Lars-Erik Berg / [ed] Jessica Mjöberg och Anette Lundin, Skövde: Högskolan i Skövde, Institutionen för teknik och samhälle , 2012, p. 93-113Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Facebook: Att återupptäcka gårdagen2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Facebook: Automated structures and reflexive social practices2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, numerous journal articles aiming at discerning the impact and possible meanings of social network sites (SNS) such as Facebook and Twitter have been published. It is often argued that SNS significantly diverge from earlier forms of web communities since they are centred around the individual actor rather than themes of interest. An important aspect of these changes is that SNS allow for the construction of a public or semi-public profile through which it is possible to put on display a list of shared social connections which, in turn, makes it viable to browse the social connections of other users. Although being important aspects of SNS, these observations do not account for the automated data processing of harvested personal information that constitute the very motor of these sites. Drawing on an analysis of an extensive empirical material consisting of approximately 470 self-reflexive diary entries authored by people between the ages of 22 and 68 together with an exploration of the ways in which Facebook gathers and processes personal and interactional data in order to provide what is assumed to be an enhanced user experience, this paper aims at establishing a sociological understanding of the interrelationship between social practices and automated social structures on Facebook. This paper provides an important contribution to contemporary sociological studies of new media by relating social practices to the automated social structures that (for commercial reasons) emerge within social network sites thus rendering creative identity performances problematic.

  • 14.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Facebook och friheten som sköt sig i foten2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Facebook Places och den elektroniska flanören2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Forskningsprocesser och öppenhetens politik2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    George Herbert Mead2013In: Relationell socialpsykologi: Klassiska och samtida teorier / [ed] Henrik Stenberg & Bo Isenberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, p. 16-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Gör språket dig tjock?2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Hur blir man sociolog (och andra svåra frågor)?2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Improve me! 100 days of wristband guidance2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body monitoring devices are increasingly turning into machines that not only track personal activity but also provide suggestions on how to lead a life that is assumed to be continuously improved. By measuring, interpreting and correlating various data sources, these devices are assumed to provide an understanding that goes beyond everyday self knowledge. Although these devices most certainly can provide information on how to run faster or sleep better, it remains unclear how it feels to gain a deeper understanding of oneself by means of a technological device. This paper approaches this question in an auto-ethnographic study (by the author of this paper) where the Jawbone UP wristband and the ”Smart Coach” insight and coaching ”engine” will be used and the suggestions for improvement slavishly followed during 100 days. This system crunches personal data in various ways in order to provide ”actionable insights and uniquely personalized guidance” (jawbone.com).

  • 21.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Interpassivity and social network subjectivity2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, a steady stream of journal articles and conference papers with the aim of discerning the impact and possible meanings of social network sites (SNS) have been published. It is often argued that SNS diverge significantly from earlier forms of web communities since they are centred around the individual actor rather than themes of interest. Although providing a solid understanding of the social dynamics surrounding identity performance and self-presentation, most researchers have not sufficiently assessed the interrelationship between the conditions of social interaction on SNS and subjectivity. Being of crucial importance for any understanding of the relationship between participatory action and identity performance, an analysis of the conditions of subjectivity illuminates fundamental social processes of importance to the general understanding of the implications of SNS. Drawing on an analysis of an extensive empirical material consisting of approximately 470 self-reflexive diary entries authored by people between the ages of 22 and 68, the purpose of this paper is to explore the changed conditions of subjectivity on SNS by addressing two interrelated themes. First, this paper aims at understanding the possible implications of the fact that social and symbolic content increasingly becomes delivered to the individual through personalised feeds, thus invigorating a state of interpassivity through which the social network acts on its own behalf. Secondly, this paper strives at understanding what it means that other individuals occupy a salient role in the individual self-presentation. In what ways does this state of affairs affect the processes through which individual subjectivity is continuously enabled and negotiated? This paper explores crucial aspects of the social and interactional terrain of SNS thus attempting to provide a theoretical and conceptual apparatus, mainly by the concepts interpassivity and social network subjectivity, that can further strengthen research on SNS.

  • 22.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    It’s quiet! What are they talking about?: Auto-ethnographic Reflections on Silence and Mediated Interactions in a Digital Workplace Environment2011In: The Work Environment: Impact of Technological, Social and Climate Change / [ed] Maria Albin, Johanna Alkan-Olsson, Mats Bohgard, Kristina Jakobsson, Björn Karlson, Peter Lundqvist, Mikael Ottosson, Fredrik Rassner, Måns Svensson, and Håkan Tinnerberg, Göteborg: Arbete och Hälsa, University of Gothenburg , 2011, p. 11-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last few years have witnessed an increased development of applications and services aimed at organisational communication and interaction. Instant messaging, enterprise social networks and web-based systems for time tracking are often assumed to facilitate organisational communicative practices. While providing a vast array of possibilities, applications and services of this kind also provoke changes at the level of social interaction and communication in the physical workplace environment. Taking its point of departure in an auto-ethnographic account of processes involved in the author’s becoming part of a digital workplace environment, this paper critically considers core characteristics of organisational communicative technologies as well as their social and material implications. In overall terms, this paper suggests that technologies of this kind allows for a layering of the workplace environment that facilitates the establishment of serendipitous relationships and interactions as well as providing a blurring of the boundaries of corporate positions and hierarchies while simultaneously giving rise to a complex set of surveillance techniques and power relations.

  • 23.
    Berg, Martin
    Lunds Universitet, Sverige.
    Makeovermani: om Dr Phil, plastikkirurgi och illusionen om det perfekta jaget2007In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 93-96Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    N/A

  • 24.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    McFacebook och den sociala snabbmaten2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25. Berg, Martin
    Minnesbilder under mattan2014In: Sydsvenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1652-814X, no 27 feb., p. 2p. B4-B5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Netnografi2011In: Handbok i kvalitativa metoder / [ed] Göran Ahrne och Peter Svensson, Malmö: Liber, 2011, p. 118-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Netnografi: Att forska om och med internet2015 (ed. 1:1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    ”Det är väl bara att googla ... ” Allt fler forskare och studenter upplever ett behov av att använda sig av internet i sin forskning. I regel uppstår då en rad frågor om hur detta ska gå till. Den här boken ger en grundlig introduktion till netnografin som vetenskaplig metod för att forska om och med hjälp av internet.

    Boken bidrar med en förståelse för internet som struktur, artefakt, redskap och umgängesyta samtidigt som en förståelse utvecklas för det sociala och kulturella liv som blomstrar på, med och i relation till internet. Författaren beskriver hela den netnografiska forskningsprocessen – från forskningsfråga till publicerat forskningsresultat – på ett sätt som tar internets villkor och möjligheter på allvar för att kunna utnyttja dess potential. 

  • 28.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Nya Facebook och sammanträffandets autenticitet2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Nyårslöftets sociologi: lagbrottets njutning2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Nätporr och det förlösande kapitalet2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Participatory trouble: Towards an understanding of algorithmic structures on Facebook2014In: Cyberpsychology : Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, ISSN 1802-7962, E-ISSN 1802-7962, Vol. 8, no 3, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have engaged in understanding how the internet and online platforms increase political engagement through various forms of online participation and leverage social collective action. This article advances this line of research by exploring how social network sites in general and Facebook in particular are fuelled by algorithms that affect and become entangled with social practices on these sites. The article is empirically grounded in an analysis of 66 self-reflexive diaries on Facebook use and studies algorithmic structures on Facebook by exploring how personalized social feeds affect the experienced relationship between self and others as well as the readiness to share information to a network of peers. In contrast to studies that position online platforms as strengthening participatory political action, this article argues that it is necessary to take into account how algorithmic structures affect interpersonal relationships and the experienced ability to engage in participatory practices. © 2014, Masaryk University. All rights reserved.

  • 32.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Professorsporträtt #1: Elisabet Näsman2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Professorsporträtt #2: Katarina Sjöberg2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Professorsporträtt #3: Carl-Göran Heidegren2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Professorsporträtt 4: Stefan Svallfors2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Rationalized Intimacy and Disciplinary Social Networks2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Berg, Martin
    Good Old, Malmö.
    Samverkan och samvärkens nödvändighet2012In: Akademi och stad – vänner för framgång / [ed] Peter Arvebro och Sonja Meksa, Helsingborg: Helsingborgs stad , 2012, p. 24-31Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Berg, Martin
    Lunds Universitet, Sverige.
    Självet och subjektets svårgripbara nödvändighet: utkast till en socialpsykologisk kritik av Judith Butler2006In: Lambda Nordica: Tidskrift om homosexualitet, ISSN 1100-2573, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 7-24Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The self and the elusive necessity of the subject: outline of a social- psychological critique of Judith Butler In her widely cited and criticised Gender trouble, Judith Butler (1990) elaborated the thought that gender needs to be understood as performative – a certain kind of doing behind the bars of a hegemonic heterosexual imperative that governs intelligible bodily configurations. Drawing mainly on psychoanalytical and foucauldian arguments, Butler dwells upon numerous important questions concerning power and subjectivity while arguing that subjects need to conform to the heterosexual matrix in order to gain intelligibility. However, she does not manage to emphasize the importance of situating neither the subject nor the body in a social reality. Due to the problematic and sometimes unclear differentiation between the concepts of performance and performativity as well as the somewhat obscure idea of subjectivity, self and corporeality that are put forward in Butler’s theorizing, it is here argued that her theoretical framework needs to be re-conceptualized from the viewpoint of social psychology. Combining a theoretical framework that draws upon Butler (1990; 1993; 1997a and 1997b) with a symbolic interactionist perspective (Blumer 1969; Mead 1995), this paper aims at locating intersections, gaps and similarities between these rather disparate perspectives. Initiating such a venture, the argument pursued in this paper revolves around the concept of social self and the ways this concept possibly can elaborate Butler’s theory. It is argued that a social psychological take on butlerian thinking can enhance and further elaborate an understanding of the processes involved in the doing of gender.

  • 39.
    Berg, Martin
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Självets garderobiär: självreflexiva genuslekar och queer socialpsykologi2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det övergripande syftet med föreliggande studie är tudelat. För det första syftar den till att på teoretisk väg etablera en dialog mellan queerteoretisk och socialpsykologisk teoribildning om aktörer och aktörsskap med utgångspunkt i en kritisk läsning av Judith Butler och George Herbert Mead. För det andra syftar den till att på empirisk väg utveckla och fördjupa denna dialog i syfte att demonstrera och resonera kring de möjligheter som uppstår i spänningen mellan dessa teoretiska perspektiv. På detta sätt är avsikten att föra ett bidrag till såväl den queer- och genusteoretiska debatten som dess socialpsykologiska motsvarighet. Ambitionen är att detta sammantaget kan utgöra ett ramverk i vilket möjligheterna med en queer socialpsykologi skisseras. I jämförelsen mellan dessa teoretiska perspektiv fokuseras på frågan om hur människor antas bli till som aktörer och under vilka villkor och genom vilka processer detta äger rum. I centrum för denna diskussion positioneras relationen mellan deras respektive antagande om struktur och aktör samt hur denna relaterar till och förutsätts vara uppburen genom något slags praktik. För det andra diskuteras individens möjlighet att omförhandla sitt förvärvade aktörsskap och genom vilka processer och praktiker detta eventuellt kan göras möjligt. Avhandlingen är uppdelad i fyra delar. Den inledande delen (del 1: Inledande ord) introducerar studiens övergripande bakgrund, teoretiska position, syfte, material och de metodologiska överväganden som har gjorts under forskningsresans gång. Den andra delen (del 2: Teoretiska interventioner) utvecklar i tre kapitel den diskussion om spänningen mellan queerteori och socialpsykologi som påbörjades i avhandlingens första och inledande kapitel. I ett första kapitel fokuseras på Judith Butler för att ringa in och granska några centrala argument och faktorer i hennes tänkande. I ett andra kapitel diskuteras George Herbert Mead för att, i likhet med föregående kapitel, presentera hans övergripande argument och huvudsakliga tankegångar. Avslutningsvis avrundas avhandlingens andra del med ett kapitel som syftar till att summera och utveckla den spänningsrelation som hittas mellan dessa två teoretiker samtidigt som en diskussion förs om de möjligheter en empirisk utveckling av den teoretiska problematiken skulle kunna bidra med. Den teoretiska spänning som lokaliseras mellan Mead och Butler kretsar i första hand kring deras förståelse av relationen mellan aktör och praktik och med utgångspunkt i denna formuleras arbetsbegreppen transaktör och transpraktik som genomgående används i presentationen av det empiriska materialet. Avhandlingens tredje del (del 3: Empiriska nedslag) är i första hand av empirisk karaktär och är uppdelad i två kapitel. I det första av dessa förs en diskussion om hur de självreflexiva genuslekarna inbegriper formulerandet av ett särskilt transgenus och på vad sätt det är möjligt att förstå iscensättandet av genus som en i första hand självkommunikativ praktik. Gradvis demonstreras hur det går att utläsa en önskan om att iscensätta genus tillsammans med andra människor och därför kretsar det följande kapitlet kring en diskussion om betydelsen av social interaktion för detta iscensättande. Med andra ord går det att utläsa en rörelse från självkommunikation till (önskad) social interaktion och detta är ett tema som tydligt ringar in en stor del av den teoretiska problematik som genomsyrar denna studie. I den fjärde och avslutande delen (del 4: Avslutande reflektioner) knyts i tre kapitel de resonemang som hittills har presenterats och diskuterats ihop. Det inledande kapitlet för en teoretiskt orienterad diskussion om den föregående genomgången av det empiriska materialet. I ett därpå följande kapitel fokuseras på olika aspekter av självreflexiva genuslekar i relation till den klädda kroppen för att visa hur den tidigare presenterade praktik- och aktörsproblematiken är avhängig den klädda kroppens genusprägling. I detta sammanhang visas hur det är möjligt att upprätta en relation mellan självets framväxt, subjektivitet och den klädda kroppen. Avslutningsvis förs ett kortfattat resonemang kring avhandlingens huvudsakliga argumentationslinjer och vilka möjligheter ett tänkande inspirerat av queer socialpsykologi för med sig.

  • 40.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Smart jewellery: measuring the unknown2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-tracking devices and apps often measure and provide interpretations of personal data in a rather straightforward way, for instance by visualising the speed and distance of a run or the quality of sleep during a night. There is however a growing number of devices that take the data analysis further by providing insights and algorithmic advices about domains of our lives that are otherwise thought of as difficult to grasp. This paper explores two devices of this kind, namely the Moodmetric and the ŌURA which are two recently released smart rings with associated mobile apps that claim to measure emotions and rest, promote happiness and help users to perform better. Whereas several studies have shed light over how users engage with self-tracking apps and devices, little attention has been paid to how these technologies stem from dreams, hopes and imaginaries of designers and developers. This paper approaches self-tracking from a producer perspective in order to frame how users and their everyday lives are imagined by designers and how these assumptions are built into the technologies. Empirically, the paper is based on a content analysis of blog posts, marketing materials and user guides from the ŌURA and Moodmetric companies along with video interviews with company representatives as well as recordings of their public appearances. Engaging with the field of software studies as well as the emerging field of self-tracking studies, this paper aims at providing a basis for further design oriented studies of self-tracking.

  • 41.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Social Intermediaries and Object-Centred Sociability2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, a steady stream of journal articles and conference papers with the aim of discerning the impact and possible meanings of social network sites (SNS) have been published. It is often argued that SNS significantly diverge from earlier forms of web communities since they are centred around the individual actor rather than themes of interest. According to boyd and Ellison (2007), an important aspect of these changes is that SNS allow for the construction of a public or semi-public profile through which it is possible to put on display a list of shared social connections which, in turn, makes it viable to browse the social connections of other users. By demonstrating the social connections to others, an establishment of latent social ties is facilitated and thus, as Haythorntwaite (2005) has demonstrated in depth, a form of connectivity emerges that makes otherwise unconnected others connect. Following these lines of thoughts, this paper aims at establishing an understanding of SNS which takes into account two interrelated yet hitherto undertheorised themes. First, SNS such as Facebook and Twitter, have largely come to function as mediators of social and symbolic content which in turn provide the basis for social interaction. Following the arguments of Knorr-Cetina (1997), among others, this paper explores the fact that communication on SNS occurs through a shared social object which is not only mediated but also structured thus allowing for a certain kind of object-centred sociability. Secondly, taking into account the emergence of such a sociability, this paper suggests that SNS are not so much mechanisms for self-presentation and social interaction as they can be regarded as social intermediaries which subject social and symbolic content to the specific structure of the digital interface. Taken as a whole, this paper provides an exploratory understanding of emerging social structures in digital culture thus illuminating important facets of social interaction and communication in contemporary society. 

    boyd, d. m., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), 210-230. 

    Cetina, K. K. (1997). Sociality with Objects: Social Relations in Postsocial Knowledge Societies. Theory, Culture & Society, 14(1), 1-30. 

    Haythornthwaite, C. (2005). Social networks and Internet connectivity effects. Information, Communication & Society, 8(2), 125-148. 

  • 42.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Social Intermediaries and the Location of Agency: A Conceptual Reconfiguration of Social Network Sites2012In: Contemporary Social Science, ISSN 2158-2041, E-ISSN 2158-205X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over recent years significant changes in the nature of online communication have taken place, not the least because of the emergence of Web 2.0 and the subsequent proliferation of Social Network Sites (SNS). These changes illuminate the need for having a precise conceptual apparatus that can grasp the complexity of contemporary online phenomena and their social dynamics. Exploring various accounts of SNS as part of the wider Web 2.0 realm, this paper approaches the widespread assumption that SNS bring forth a number of changes in the social as well as institutional arrangements surrounding their being used. Distinguishing between an instrumental and an institutional approach towards SNS, this paper suggests that contemporary research on SNS is roughly divided into two broad streams, one that focuses on how SNS are brought into service by users, and the other on how SNS bring users into service. The difference between these approaches is framed by suggesting a conceptual separation between individual-oriented and system-oriented agency. In order to overcome the difficulties attached to understanding the social dynamics of SNS as a distinct application within the Web 2.0 realm, it is argued that the term ‘social intermediaries’ offers a way to conceptualise SNS with respect to their functional position in the social realm, thus providing an important alternative to contemporary instrumental and institutional accounts. © 2012 Copyright Academy of Social Sciences.

  • 43.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Social Intermediaries as the Third Other: Web 2.0 and the Conceptualisation of Sociality and Agency2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over recent years significant changes in the nature of online communication have taken place, not the least because of the emergence of Web 2.0 and the subsequent proliferation of Social Network Sites (SNS). These changes have provided researchers, scholars and critics with a multi-levelled field of investigation while at the same time illuminating the need for having a precise conceptual apparatus which bears a possibility to account for the social dynamics of contemporary online phenomena. This paper explores the possibility to understand the various appearances of Web 2.0 and SNS as bringing forth a number of changes in the social as well as institutional arrangements surrounding their being used. In overall terms, these phenomena are conceptualised from a perspective that either focuses on individual instrumentality or institutional exploitation. Whereas the instrumental view primarily locates agency at the level of individual users and the personal benefits associated with the performance of various technologically mediated actions, the institutional view ascribes agency to the Web 2.0 applications which are assumed to commercially deploy their users as objects of inquiry and sources of information. In this paper, these ideas are further elaborated by suggesting a conceptual separation between individual- oriented and system-oriented agency that lays the foundation for developing a conceptual apparatus that accounts for the social dynamics of Web 2.0 and SNS. Taking the different ways of locating agency as a point of departure, it is furthermore suggested that the term ‘social intermediaries’ provides a possibility to conceptualise Web 2.0 and SNS from the perspective of their functional position in the social realm, thus providing an important alternative to contemporary instrumental and institutional accounts. Drawing on Georg Simmel’s understanding of sociality, the notion of social intermediaries is conceptualised as a ‘third Other’ that is assumed to intervene in the social realm and the processes as well as practices of of which it consists. 

  • 44.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Sociala algoritmer och brukat skratt2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Sociala medier är en omöjlighet2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Teknologisk socialitet och bokskrivandets problem2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    The Archived Self: Online Data Processing and the Automated Re-Invention of Life History2012In: Proceedings of a Regular Session, Archives for Maintaining Community and Society in the Digital Age: Final Version (20120213), 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, numerous journal articles aiming at discerning the impact and possible meanings of social network sites (SNS) such as Facebook and Twitter have been published. It is often argued that SNS significantly diverge from earlier forms of web communities since they are centred around the individual actor rather than themes of interest. According to boyd and Ellison (2007), an important aspect of these changes is that SNS allow for the construction of a public or semi-public profile through which it is possible to put on display a list of shared social connections which, in turn, makes it viable to browse the social connections of other users. Although being important aspects of SNS, these observations do not account for the automated data processing of harvested personal information that constitute the very motor of these sites. Exploring the ways in which Facebook gathers and processes personal and interactional data in order to provide what is assumed to be an enhanced user experience, this paper aims at establishing a (micro-)sociological understanding of the interrelationship between social interaction and archival practices as well as processes on Facebook. Drawing on the theories of Mark Poster (1995/2006) and Michel Foucault (1990/1979) among others, this paper provides an important contribution to contemporary archive studies as well as a critical account of the increasingly automatised understanding of personal life history.

  • 48.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    The “cyberqueer” option: A sociological take on queer qualitative methods2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on my experience of “field work” within the web community qruiser.com, this presentation raises a number of questions related to the tension between sociological and queer modes of inquiry. Frequently, as Seidman suggests out, queer analyses consist of a “rendering of literary analysis into social analysis” (1995: 125). The social realm, however, is “often narrowed into categories of knowledge and culture while the latter is itself often reduced to linguistic, discursive binary figures” (ibid: 139). What are the possibilities of a queer sociological method and in what ways is it possible to overcome the problems that Seidman points out? It is my intention to further investigate these issues by turning to what Wakeford (2002) has named “cyberqueer research”. Is it a viable thought that web communities, as O’Brien proposes, make up “a site for studying the viability and implications of constructionist theories that emphasize ’doing gender’ as a social accomplishment” (2001: 79)? Following this line of thought, could a “cyberqueer research” help to overcome the inherent differences between sociological and queer modes of inquiry?

    O’Brien, Jodi. (2001), “Writing in the body: gender (re)production in online interaction”, in Marc A. Smith and Peter Kollock (eds.), Communities in Cyberspace. London & New York Routledge, 76-104.

    Seidman, Steven (1995), “Deconstructing Queer Theory or the Under-Theorization of the Social and the Ethical”, in Linda Nicholson and Steven Seidman (eds.), Social Postmodernism: Beyond Identity Politics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 116-41.

    Wakeford, Nina (2002), “New Technologies and ’Cyber-queer’ Research”, in Diane Richardson and Steven Seidman (eds.), Handbook of Lesbian & Gay Studies. London: Sage, 115-44.

  • 49.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    The production of online space: Facebook and algorithmic metapower2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explicitly focusing on Facebook, this paper aims at exploring the effects of algorithms as social structures and strives at advancing the study of how algorithms contribute to a production of online space and its impact on various social processes concerning self and subjectivity. Empirically, this papers departs from an analysis of approximately 470 self-reflexive diary entries about Facebook use, authored by people between the ages of 22 and 68. The findings are analysed by turning to core readings in the emerging field of software studies (Kitchin & Dodge 2011, Manovich 2013) along with the works of Henri Lefevbre (1999/1974) and Georg Simmel (2009/1908). In overall terms, this paper suggests that spatiality is still an important facet of contemporary online sphere yet in a radically different sense than early accounts of online space proposed. By exploring the changed characteristics of online space, this paper advances the ongoing discussion of algorithms as social structures as well as the possible surfacing of new forms of power and their general implications for everyday life (online). These are all matters that need to be taken seriously if research is supposed to establish an understanding of the complex nature of the digital world and the ways in which it feeds into, affects and become part of material social spaces.

  • 50.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Vernacular Sociology and Netnographic Explorations2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the history of the internet, and the social web in particular, is comparatively short, numerous publications have strived at establishing an understanding of what it means to undertake qualitative research on the internet. Early accounts of virtual ethnography or "netnography" focused mainly on the possibility to make use of web communities for researching identity performances and consumption patterns among other themes. During the last few years, the emergence of social network sites (SNS) has heavily redefined the social landscape of the internet since it involves a shift from thematically orientated communities to networks that are centred around the activity of the individual actor. Increasingly, these networks form the basis for a new way of interaction by means of user-generated content since people engage in social activities such as sharing, reviewing and commenting upon the information that each and other user generate. Taking these fundamental changes into account, Beer och Burrows (2007) point at the importance of adjusting research strategies to the conditions of the social web while at the same suggesting that users of SNS are to some extent already involved in a sort of vernacular sociology as part of their social practices. Taking these thoughts further, this paper sets forth to understand in what ways recent developments of SNS have provided a shift in the ways in which the social actor can possibly be delineated. Since SNS allow for a self-presentation and social interaction that largely depend upon the social connection to others, the conditions for communication and social interaction have been fundamentally altered and this state of affairs challenges the assumptions that underlie qualitative research in general and ethnograpy in particular. Theoretically elaborating on these thoughts, the overall objective with this paper is to explore the tensions between ethnographic practies on the internet and the fact that users of SNS are not only preoccupied with a vernacular sociology but are also, and more importantly, to a large extent delineated by their interpersonal actions and social connections. 

    Beer, D., & Burrows, R. (2007). Sociology And, of and in Web 2.0: Some Initial Considerations. Sociological Research Online, 12(5).

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