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  • 1.
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    et al.
    University of Leipzig.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Career transitions and career termination2007In: Handbook of sport psychology / [ed] Gershon Tenenbaum and Robert C. Eklund, Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, 2007, 3, 712-733 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to comprehensively overview this research area and expand the perspectives provided in the two earlier editions of this Handbook. In this chapter, we first define and explain the key concepts of athletic career, career transition, and career termination. In subsequent sections, we discuss the theoretical background, the empirical research, and intervention approaches as they are concerned with career transitions and termination. We close the chapter with suggestions for future research in the career transition area.

  • 2.
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    et al.
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Sport psychology in Europe – Women’s perspective2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, 55-55 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to other disciplines of psychology, sport and exercise psychology is a very young field. Sport psychology associations were founded in a variety of countries (particularly in Europe and North America) in the 1960es and later, after the first World Congress of Sport Psychology had taken place in Rome in 1965. Despite the fact that even in those ages quite a few women were studying psychology and afterwards starting a scientific career, females in sport psychology were extremely underrepresented. One of the reasons could lie in the fact that sport, much more than psychology, was a stereotypically male field, with only a few opportunities available to women. Making a career in sport psychology was then a double contradiction for women. First, making a career in general contradicted the typical female role, and second, making a career in sport meant an untypical field for women.

    The presentation will be structured as a dialogue between the two presenters – female sport psychologists working in the field for more than 30 years. Both were born and started their careers during the period of the Cold War: Dorothee Alfermann in the Federal Republic of Germany, and Natalia Stambulova in the Soviet Union. Both countries do not exist on the European map any more reflecting dramatic political, social and economic changes in Europe during the last two decades. All the changes in the European context put their impacts on the development of sport and exercise psychology in Europe including overall organizational development, as well as female careers and their contributions to European Federation of Sport Psychology (FEPSAC), other international sport psychology organizations (e.g., ISSP, AASP) and international sport psychology events (e.g., Congresses). The dialogue will be structured around the following three themes: (a) the presenters’ own careers analyzed from the point of gender issues (e.g., female professional role models and mentors), (b) history of European sport and exercise psychology, foundation of FEPSAC and contribution of its first President Ema Geron (1969-1973), and (c) female sport psychology professionals’ role in today’s European sport psychology and their contributions to FEPSAC, ISSP, AASP, national sport psychology associations, the editorial board of Psychology of Sport and Exercise, the European Forum of Applied Sport Psychologists, the European Master’s Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology (EMSSEP), and the recent European Master’s (Mundus) Program in Sport and Exercise Psychology (EMPSEP).

  • 3.
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    et al.
    Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Zemaityte, Aiste
    University of Vilnius, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Causes and consequences of career termination: A comparison of German, Russian and Lithuanian athletes2001In: International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) 10th World Congress of Sport Psychology: organized by Democritus University of Thrace, University of Thessaly, Hellenic Society of Sport Psychology : in the dawn of the new millennium : May 28-June 2, 2001, Skiathos, Hellas : programme and proceedings: vol. 4 / [ed] Athanasios Papaioannou, Marios Goudas, Yannis Theodorakis, Thessaloniki, Greece: Christodoulidi Publications , 2001, 26-28 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Battochio, Randy C.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Career barriers in the National Hockey League: An inductive thematic analysis of first-hand data from Canadian professional ice hockey players2016In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of the study were: (a) to examine the Canadian National Hockey League (NHL) players’ internal and external barriers associated with the demands at each NHL career stage and status together with across-career barriers, and (b) to feature the Canadian NHL players’ barriers in the empirical career model. Five rookies, five veterans, and 13 retirees agreed to participate in conversational interviews before their transcripts underwent an interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2012). Prospects face draft year pressure and team camp anxiety. Rookies and sophomores deal with insecurity with teammates and roster spot uncertainty. Prime veterans have to manage ruminating over missed chances while seasoned veterans struggled with social connections. Across career stages and statuses, NHL players deal with career threatening injuries and conflicts with head coach. After discussing how these results contribute to the empirical career model of Canadian NHL players and also extend the career transition and maladaptation literatures, delimitations and future directions are proposed for sport psychology researchers.

  • 5.
    Battochio, Randy C.
    et al.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada.
    Stages and demands in the careers of Canadian National Hockey League players2015In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 34, no 3, 278-288 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have identified some demands of Canadian National Hockey League (NHL) players, yet there is little direction for players hoping to reach the lucrative league. The objectives of this study were to identify the stages, statuses and demands in Canadian NHL players’ careers and propose an empirical career model of Canadian NHL players. In total, 5 rookies, 5 veterans and 13 retirees had their interviews undergo an interpretive thematic analysis. Prospects face the NHL combine, training camp and minor league assignment. While developing into NHL players, rookies deal with NHL call-ups, team competition and formative production while sophomores seemed preoccupied by the opposition. Prime veterans become All-Stars by garnering point production and challenging for the Stanley Cup while seasoned veterans remain relevant through training camps. A discussion about the model’s viability is followed by applications for sport psychology researchers and practitioners. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

  • 6.
    Becker-Larsen, Astrid
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    "Organizing for excellence": stress-recovery states in the Danish national orienteering team during a training camp and the 2015 World Championship2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, 639-640 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elite level athletes are under considerable pressure to perform, why energy management is a natural part of the life of elite athletes. Energy management is particularly important during periods of high demand on their resources, such as during training camps and competitions, which are often intense and do not allow sufficient time for recovery. Research on recovery has mainly focused on individual physical and physiological strategies. In the 2015 World Championship, the Danish national orienteering team was the best nation, winning four gold medals. In the present study we examined: (a) the stress-recovery states of the Danish orienteers during a three-week preparatory training camp and the following 2015 World Championship, and (b) their perceived sources of stress and recovery during the two events. The study was designed as mixed-method with the RESTQ-sport questionnaire, semi-structured interviews, and a coach’s journal as the data sources used longitudinally during the camp and the championship. Results revealed: (a) well-balanced stress-recovery states among all athletes during the entire period; and (b) perceived sources of stress and recovery classified into organizational, social, personal, and athletic. The athletes themselves stated that their well-balanced stress-recovery states positively affected their learning, well-being, and performance. The organizational strategies played a key role in reducing athletes’ unnecessary stress and in facilitating individual recovery. We suggest that “organizing for excellence”, keeping in mind athletes' energy management, is a special task for coaches and managers when preparing for camps and competitions. 

  • 7.
    Carlsson, Björn A.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Johnson, UrbanHalmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).Josefsson, Karin A.Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).Stambulova, NataliaHalmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Proceedings of the Nordic Conference 2008: Health, Participation and Effects of Sport and Exercise2008Conference proceedings (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Cruz, Jaume
    et al.
    Autonomous Univeristy of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Garcia-Mas, Alexandre
    Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma, Illes Balears, Spanien.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Lucidi, Fabio
    University of La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.
    Márquez, Sara
    University of León, León, Spain.
    Reyes, Santiago
    ONECO.
    Serpa, Sidonio
    University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Jaenes, Jose Carlos
    University Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain.
    PsyTool design and theoretical background2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, 212-212 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PsyTool is a European project, funded by Erasmus+ Sport Programme, led by the Universidad Pablo de Olavide (Sevilla, Spain). It brings together 13 partners from Spain, Portugal, Italy, United Kingdom and Sweden, running from January 2016 to December 2017. PsyTool is based theoretically on the concept of youth development through the practice of sport in positive and safe environments. The central idea is that this type of practice leads to a psychological wellbeing in all areas of personal development of athletes. Through sport programs that are free of bullying; zero permissiveness towards substance use; low acceptance of gamemanship and cheating, and at the same time promoters of fair play and clean competition, young athletes are more likely to increase their psychological well-being while they practice the sport to their best level of capacity. One of the most important assets of PsyTool is the formation of Agents of Change as inductors of this well-being promoter environment, according to their different responsibilities, from the politics to grassroot coaching. The AoCs’ selection, training and certification is one of the key points of this program. This so-called “targeted snowball” approach is expected to produce a spreading impact on the young athletes, which can be evaluated in the short and medium term, depending of the nature of the different AoCs. Coming form this design and theoretical background, this program –once the results have been analyzed- has to lead to a more ambitious development both in its scope and on the educational methods involved with.

  • 9.
    Defruyt, Simon
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Wylleman, Paul
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    De Brandt, Koen
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Helping dual career athletes to recover from injury: a dual career support providers’ (DCSPs’) perspective2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The combination of elite sport and study, called a dual career (DC), can be challenging for athletes. DC Athletes can encounter co-occurring challenges at different domains of development (athletic, psychological, psychosocial, educational/vocational and financial) (Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004). In this challenging period and environment, the burden of an injury is likely to be stressful for DC athletes. Although previous research have looked at how sports stakeholders can support the athletes within the athletic domain, no research up to our knowledge addressed how elite athletes can be supported holistically (i.e. in the different domains of development) outside of the club context. Therefore, current research aimed at gathering good practices of holistic support for DC athletes from a dual career support provider (DCSP) perspective.

    Methods

    Within the ‘Gold in education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) project, co-funded by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union, focus groups were conducted with a selection of DCSPs. As inclusion criterion for the participants, a DCSP was defined as: ‘a professional consultant, related to an educational institute and/or an elite sport organization – or certified by one of those – that provides support to elite athletes in view of optimizing their DC (combination of elite sport and education).’ One focus group in Sweden with six DCSPs and two focus groups in Belgium with two and three DCSPs were held. Using a phenomenological approach, participants were asked to share their methods used to holistically support DC athletes in coping with an injury.

    Results

    Five main themes of support emerged from the DCSPs discussions: a) practical support (e.g. support with transport problems if necessary), b) emotional support (e.g. empathic listening), c) reframing the injury in a holistic perspective (e.g. athletes will have more time for studies and family), d) empowerment of self-regulation competences (e.g. encourage the use of a recovery agenda), e) multidisciplinary and multi-organizations’ cooperation (e.g. structural meetings between different DC stakeholders).

    Conclusion

    Findings underscore the importance of a developmental and empowering approach in holistically supporting DC athletes to recover from an injury. Moreover, the cooperation between stakeholders in a DC support environment is crucial for an optimal recovery. Future research and practice could use current findings to develop injury recovery programs in a DC setting.

    References

    Wylleman P, Lavallee D. (2004). A Developmental Perspective on Transitions Faced by Athletes. In M Weis (Ed.), Developmental sport psychology. Morgantown, WV: Fitness International Technology.

  • 10.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    From career initiation to discontinuation: an empirical career model of Swedish handball players2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, 190-191 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral project was inspired by a set of challenges articulated in the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers paradigm (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013), and especially in regard of contextualizing career research and existing ‘general’ frameworks. Innovative aspects of this study consisted of: (a) exploring career experiences of Swedish handball players with foci on stages and transitions in their athletic and non-athletic development, and (b) consolidating the players’ first-hand data into an empirical career model of Swedish handball players (further – the empirical model). The holistic athletic career model (Wylleman, Reints & De Knop, 2013) served as a prototype for the empirical model and was useful in structuring the players’ career experiences. Eighteen elite Swedish handball players (retiring or just recently retired) took part in narrative type interviews about their whole careers with an interest in both athletic and non-athletic developments. Thematic analysis initially took a deductive turn to identify the handball career structure, and then the empirical data relevant to each stage/sub-stage were analysed inductively to identify themes describing players’ career experiences at each stage. Finally, the themes were incorporated into the stage-like structure, and the empirical model was completed. The model describes careers of Swedish handball players as having four stages – initiation, development (with three sub-stages), mastery (with four sub-stages), and discontinuation. It also contains eight layers – athletic categorisation in terms of age, pathways of the Swedish Handball Federation, academic/vocational, psychological, psychosocial, and financial developments – all aligned with age markers and complemented by sets of themes describing players’ stage-by-stage career experiences from the holistic perspective. Further in the project the empirical model will be used to create the ‘whole career’ psychological support system for Swedish handball players.

  • 11.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Returning home after playing abroad: re-adaptation challenges of elite Swedish handball players2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, 531-531 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In cultural sport psychology and athlete migration literature (Ryba, Schinke, Stambulova, & Elbe, 2017) there is a call for studying athletes’ transnational mobility and cultural transitions out of, and back to the country of origin. This call is also echoed in the cultural praxis of athletes’ careers paradigm (Stambulova & Ryba, 2013) attracting attention of career researchers. This study is aimed at exploring “back home” re- adaptation challenges of elite Swedish handball players after several years of playing professionally abroad. Eleven players (six females) were interviewed about their careers from the beginning to the end, and their narratives about the transition back to Sweden were extracted from the larger data set and thematically analysed (Braun & Clarke, 2013). Participants spent abroad for M=7.2±2.8 years, and many of them came back having families and kids. Several informants narrated that the transition was more challenging than they expected, and they (especially at the beginning) felt themselves as strangers in their own land. Five major themes describing the transition challenges were: “to rethink self-identity”, “to renew family life”, “to re- establish links with relatives and family”, “to understand local laws and regulations”, “to keep in pace with the society”. The identity issue was addressed through a sense of being “in between” the identities of the home and the foreign cultures that elevated emotional discomfort, especially at the early phase of re-adjustment. Three themes describing coping strategies used in the re-adaptation were: “don’t give up” (i.e., attempt to change own attitude and the situation to the better), “use social skills” (e.g., be alert and communicate) and “search for social support” (e.g., from a spouse and close family). Based on the findings, recommendations will be provided for pre-retirement planning of elite athletes and psychological support in their cultural transition and re-adaptation back home.

  • 12.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Svenska handbollsspelares karriär: En empirisk modell och ett psykologiskt stödsystem2015In: Program Svebi 2015, 2015, 25-25 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion

    Handboll har en lång tradition inom svensk idrottsrörelse och tillhör de mest populära lagidrotterna. I Sverige finns 110 000 utövare, lika många män och kvinnor, som är aktiva i landets 400 föreningar. Internationella Handbollförbundet har 190 medlemsländer och Sverige är en ledande nation inom världshandbollen med 21 medaljer i OS, VM och EM. Att satsa på en karriär som elitspelare i handboll är attraktivt. I Sverige finns ett Riksidrottsgymnasium och 38 Nationellt godkända idrottsutbildningar som kvalitetssäkras av Svenska Handbollförbundet (SHF). Det innebär att drygt 400 spelare årligen tar examen från ett elithandbollsgymnasium. Trots handbollens utbredning och popularitet finns lite kunskap om handbollskarriären, utifrån övergångar och utmaningar som aktiva ställs inför. Kunskapen är av vikt för aktiva liksom tränare, föräldrar och stödpersoner t.ex. idrottspsykologiska rådgivare. Forskningen är relevant för föreningar, förbund, gymnasier och SHF:s spelarutbildning, landslagsverksamhet och tränarutbildning. Ökad kunskap medför att fler fullföljer och optimerar sin karriär, samt stannar kvar och är välmående en längre period. Dagens idrottsforskning inom karriärområdet och aktuell studie belyser betydelsen av förklaringsmodeller som ser karriären från ett idrottsspecifikt och holistiskt kontext. Forskning som dels fångar den verksamma kulturen, dels studerar den livslånga processen och hela karriären, tillskillnad från enstaka moment.

    Syfte & teoretisk ram

    Syftet i delstudie 1 är att utifrån intervjuer med etablerade svenska landslagsspelare i handboll studera handbollskarriären och utveckla en Empirisk karriärmodell (EKM) för svenska handbollsspelare. Modellen valideras i tre separata fokusgrupper, bestående av tränare, herr- och damspelare. Syftet i delstudie 2 är att utveckla och validera ett Psykologiskt stödsystem (PSS) för svenska elithandbollsspelare. Utifrån EKM och doktorandens gedigna erfarenhet av tillämpat arbete med svenska elit- och landslagsspelare skapas ett stödsystem, som validering i fyra fokusgrupper; tränare, herr-, damspelare och idrottspsykologiska rådgivare. Utifrån diskussioner och slutsatser sammanställs PSS. Det teoretiska ramverket består av: Cultural praxis of athletes’ careers (Stambulova & Ryba, 2014), Holistic athletic career model (Wylleman, Reints & De Knop, 2013) och Athletic career transition model (Stambulova, 2003).

    Metod

    Studiens urval är strategiskt och baseras på att informanterna ska ha spelat minst 20 tävlingslandskamper på seniornivå för Sverige, de ska ha varit professionella idrottare på internationell klubbnivå i minst fem år och vara i slutet av sin karriär, alternativt ha avslutat sin idrottsliga karriär. Om idrottskarriären är avslutad ska avskedet skett inom de närmsta tre åren. Under 2015 har pilotintervju och 18 stycken narrativa intervjuer genomförts. Studien har en jämn fördelning mellan kvinnor och män. De kvinnliga informanternas ålder är mellan 28 och 34 år (M = 30,6, SD = 2,2), de manliga informanternas ålder är mellan 27 och 38 år (M = 34,4, SD = 3,1). I snitt har kvinnorna spelat 83 landskamper (SD = 36,5), männen har i snitt spelat 123 landskamper (SD = 57,3).

    Resultat och diskussion

    Analys av intervjuer pågår således är studiens resultat och diskussion under arbete. Reflektion från aktuell process är att idrottskarriären är av central betydelse och anges som det område som alltid har prioriterats högst i informanternas liv. Det finnas en tendens i att kvinnor ställs inför en komplexare tillvaro eftersom de väljer att ha uppmärksamhet på parallella områden i livet, som de därmed får hantera. Den ekonomiska verkligheten är av naturliga skäl tuffare för kvinnorna, eftersom ersättningar är markant lägre. Det är också en faktor som skapar ökad fokus på andra områden i livet, främst utbildning. Förståelsen kring det som krävs på internationell nivå, utmaningar som väntar och färdigheter som gynnar, verkar vara relativt låg innan de aktiva i studien de facto hamnar på aktuell nivå. Flera val är medvetna samtidigt som informanterna reflekterar kring att tillfälligheter och tur är återkommande faktorer i deras karriär.

  • 13.
    Ekengren, Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Linnér, Lukas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Moving to Play Abroad: Experiences of Transnational Team Handball Players2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many athletes strive to excel in their sport, dreaming of fame and fortune, aiming for a career as a professional athlete. In the Nordic countries, becoming professional often implies a migration across national borders. In this relocation, it is not only crucial for transnational athletes to adapt in sport, a cultural and psychological adaptation is also needed (Ryba, Haapanen, Mosek, & Ng, 2012; Agergaard & Ryba, 2014). The purpose of this study was to examine team handball players’ experiences of their first transition and adaptation to a professional league in a foreign country, with a specific focus on their perceived demands and coping strategies. Participants were 18 senior elite team handball players (10 male, 8 female). During narrative-type interviews participants were encouraged to tell their story, focusing on how they experienced their first transnational transition. Participants’ narratives were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2013), themes and patterns of meaning were identified. The four major themes of perceived transition demands were: ‘Learn new cultural and social codes’, ‘Adjust to the rules of the new club’, ‘Accept the result focused environment’, ‘Acknowledge your role and play it’. Three themes of coping strategies were: ‘Embrace the challenge’ (e.g., be aware of the new context, negotiate and adapt to new norms and expect the unexpected) ‘Embrace yourself’ (e.g., to care for and prioritize yourself in a self-centered, but still positive way) and ‘Embrace your demons’ (e.g., accept feelings of doubt and anxiety and carry on regardless of them). Based on the research findings recommendations will be provided for psychological support of transnational athletes in their transition and adaptation abroad.

  • 14.
    Elbe, A.-M.
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lintunen, T.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Apitzsch, E.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strengell, A.-M.
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Alfermann, Dorothee
    University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Bakker, F.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Boen, F.
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Cruz, J.
    Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Gernigon, C.
    University Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Papaioannou, A.
    University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece.
    Roberts, G.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Serpa, S.
    Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stelter, R.
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Career and Employment Survey for the Former Students of the European Master’s Programme in Sport and Exercise Psychology2009In: Congrès International de Psychologie du Sport, Vincennes, 1-3 juillet 2009: Actes, Paris: Institut National du Sport, de l'Expertise et de la Performance (INSEP) , 2009, 121-121 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the European Master’s Programme in Sport and Exercise Psychology (EMPSEP) is to pool expertise of 12 European universities within one Master’s programme (see http://www.fepsac.com/). The 60 ECTS European programme provides students with advanced knowledge and skills. The EMPSEP comprises a joint intensive course, a study module similar in all the participating universities, lectures and seminars, a Master’s thesis, and a mobility period of 4-5 months at an EMPSEP host university. Ten years after the graduation of the first students the EMPSEP consortium conducted an online survey. Seventy of the invited 174 former students participated in the study (mean age 31.5 years, SD= 4.7). The aim of the survey was to discover the participants’ employment status and how their participation in the master’s program was related to this. Results indicate that 86% of the participants have started working since they completed their degree. Forty percent of those participants who have started working in their first job have managed to receive a permanent position, 27% a fixed term or temporary job, 25% a part time job, 6% are self employed and 1 person (2%) was employed by subsidies in his/ her first job after graduation. On a scale from extremely dissatisfied (1) to extremely satisfied (6), the participants rated their satisfaction with the program in relation to their career as 4.72 (SD=1.13) on average. Sixty nine of the participants felt that they had benefited from the international network provided by the students and teachers within the programme, and 94% would recommend the European Master’s program to other students in their field.

  • 15.
    Fallby, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Rådgivarens roll i Sverige och världen2004In: Guiden till idrottspsykologisk rådgivning / [ed] Johan Fallby, Stockholm: SISU idrottsböcker , 2004, 68-91 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Social influences on the junior-to-senior transition in Swedish athletes: narrative case studies2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, 124-124 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The junior-to-senior transition (JST) is decisive for athletes who want to reach the elite/professional sport level. The JST: (a) is initiated by a set of demands relevant to athletic and non-athletic development, (b) lasts between one and four years, and (c) is characterized by athletes’ high dropout rate (Bruner, Munroe-Chandler, & Spink, 2008; Franck, Stambulova, & Weibull, 2016; Stambulova, 2009). This study is a follow up of the quantitative longitudinal study of the JST in Swedish club-based athletes (Franck et al., 2016; Franck, Stambulova, & Ivarsson, in press) and aimed at further qualitative exploration of the JST process emphasizing social influences involved. Four athletes (age M = 24.2, SD = 1.5) representing tennis, swimming, football, and basketball were interviewed. They were encouraged to reflect retrospectively on their JST process using five measurement points of the longitudinal study as an aid to structure their narratives. The interviews lasted for about 90 minutes. Thematic narrative analysis (Smith, 2016) was used to identify themes related to social influences during the JST and their perceived facilitative or debilitative effects. All four JST narratives were unique, however, to structure the results the narratives were pared to represent individual vs. team sport contexts. The results revealed that the social factors facilitating the JST were shared by both sport contexts and included family support, and good relationships with coaches and peers. The debilitating social factors that worked as the JST barriers were more diverse across the sport contexts. These factors covered a lack of sponsors/financial support and the ambiguity of requirements from the sport federations in individual sports, and changes in the structure of the team and selection to a higher level team not being ready for, in team sports. All participants went through the JST, continued a few years after, and then terminated their athletic careers.

  • 17.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Swedish Athletes’ Transition from Junior to Senior Sports: A Quantitative Longitudinal Study2013In: Abstracts of the ISSP 13th World Congress of Sport Psychology: July 21-26, 2013, Beijing Sport University, Beijing, China, Beijing, 2013, 58-58 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore the process of the transition from junior to senior sports in Swedish athletes. Previous studies showed that the junior-to-senior transition (a) is initiated by a set of demands relevant to athletic and non-athletic development, (b) lasts for about two years, (c) known for a high dropout rate and often described by athletes as the most difficult within-career transition (e.g., Bruner et al., 2008; Stambulova, 2009; Vanden Auweele et al., 2004). This quantitative longitudinal study included five measurements that were conducted every six months, and altogether covered two-and-a-half-years with two measurements of the transition variables and one measurement of related personal variables each year. The following package of four instruments was used: the Transition Monitoring Survey (Stambulova, Franck, & Weibull, 2012), the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989) and the Physical Self-Perception Profile – Revised (Lindwall, Hagger, & Asci, 2007). In the first measurement 101 club-based Swedish athletes (74 males and 27 females) of 15 -20 years old took part. The dynamics of participants was characterized by an increasing dropout rate from each measurement to the next, and as a result only 37 participants were left to the time of the final (fifth) measurement. Overall dynamics of transitional variables throughout the five measurements was characterized by an increase in motivation and perceived quality of adjustment on the senior athletic level from the first to the third measurement followed by a decrease in these variables across the last two measurements. Decrease in the athletes’ perceived degree of adjustment was especially relevant to their adjustment to senior competitions and to combining sport and studies. Perceived importance of sport (especially of competitions) decreased progressively from the first to the fifth measurement. The other transitional variables (e.g., perceived demands, resources, coping strategies, stress level, need in support) were characterized by various types of dynamics. Meanwhile athletes’ athletic identity and overall satisfaction with their sport and life were rather high and stable across all the five measurements. The next step in the data treatment will be based on the Multilevel Modeling and the Latent Growth Curve Analysis to identify successful and less successful transitional pathways with relevant dynamics and patterns of the transitional and personal variables.

  • 18.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Swedish junior athletes’ personal profiles in relation to the dynamics of adjustment in the junior-to-senior transition2015In: Book of Abstracts of the 20th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science – 24th - 27th June 2015, Malmö – Sweden / [ed] A. Radmann, S. Hedemborg & E. Tsolakidis, Malmö: European College of Sport Science (ECSS) , 2015, 295-295 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to previous research, the junior-to-senior transition (JST) is decisive for athletes who want to reach the elite/professional sport level, it lasts for 2-4 years, and is known for its high dropout rate. The longitudinal study of the junior-to-senior transition process in Swedish club-based athletes conducted by the authors involved several lines of data analysis with this presentation focusing on the dynamics of athletes’ junior-to-senior transition adjustment in relation to their personal characteristics. The study had five measurements conducted every six months using several instruments; these instruments measured the athletes’ level of athletic identity, task- and ego orientation, self-esteem and adjustment in the transition process. The latent profile analysis identified three profiles (based on athletes personal characteristics; BIC = 771.11; entropy = 0.87; Parametric Bootstrapped likelihood ratio test = -356.07, p < 0.001). In the profile-1, athletes (34 males and 11 females) were characterized by high athletic identity, self-esteem, task orientation, and the JST motivation; they also had moderately high ego orientation. These athletes perceived to be 72 % adjusted at the first measurement, had a positive progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived to be 83 % adjusted at the senior level. In the profile-2, athletes (30 males and 7 females) perceived themselves to have high self-esteem and the JST motivation, relatively high athletic identity and task orientation complemented by moderate ego orientation. They perceived themselves to be 66 % adjusted at the first measurement, had a positive progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived themselves to be 73% adjusted. In the profile-3 athletes (9 males and 9 females) reported high self-esteem, relatively high task orientation, as well as moderate athletic identity, ego orientation and the JST motivation. These athletes perceived to be 62 % adjusted at the first measurement, had almost no progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived themselves to be 64 % adjusted. These findings supported our hypothesis that athletes with different profiles of personal characteristics follow different pathways through the JST process. The JST pathways are going to be explored more in detail with the aim to understand transition variables contributing to the dynamics of perceived adjustment. Further this knowledge can be used in assisting athletes in the JST.

  • 19.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Swedish athletes' adjustment patterns in the junior-to-senior transition2016In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific objectives of this study were: (a) to identify adjustment patterns in the JST based on athletes’ dynamics of adjustment during a two-and-a–half-year period, and (b) to describe the athletes’ demographic, personal and transitional characteristics at the beginning of the JST that were related to the different adjustment patterns. This quantitative longitudinal study consisted of five measurements conducted approximately every six months over a two-and-a-half-year period. One instrument was used to measure the transition variables and three instruments to measure personal characteristics. In the first measurement, 101 club-based Swedish athletes with the mean age of 16.51 (SD = 1.32) took part. The latent profile analysis (LPA) on athletes’ perceived degree of adjustment provided three profiles with different patterns in the JST. Profile 1 had a progressive adjustment pattern, whereas the second profile had a regressive adjustment pattern, and the third profile had a sustainable adjustment pattern. The descriptive statistics and Cohen’s d indicated that there were differences (with variation in magnitude) between the three profiles at the first measurement in terms of how athletes perceived different transitional characteristics. Keeping a primary focus on sport (but also having attention to other spheres of life), high athletic identity and motivation to reach senior level were characteristics relevant for both progressive and sustainable adjustment patterns. © 2016 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 20.
    Franck, Alina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Weibull, Fredrik
    School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Profiles of personal characteristics and relevant pathways in the junior-to-senior transition: A longitudinal study of Swedish athletes2016In: International Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 0047-0767, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the specific foci were as follows: (1) to identify profiles of athletes in the junior-to-senior transition (JST) based on their personal characteristics (athletic identity, self-esteem and goal orientation) and (2) to describe the JST pathways relevant to the profiles. This quantitative longitudinal study included five measurements that were conducted approximately every six months. The following package of four instruments was used: the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (Duda, 1989), the self-esteem sub-scale from the Physical Self-Perception Profile – Revised (Lindwall, Hagger, & Asci, 2007) and the Transition Monitoring Survey (Stambulova, Franck, & Weibull, 2012). In the first measurement 100 club-based Swedish athletes (73 male and 27 female) with the mean age of 16.51 (SD = 1.32) participated. The Latent Profile Analysis identified three profiles of athletes and several similarities and differences can be seen in the profiles of athletes’ transition pathways. The main findings are: (1) three profiles of personal characteristics associated with different JST transition pathways were identified; (2) athletic identity appeared to be key personal characteristic that influenced the dynamic of adjustment and (3) different styles of coping strategies were associated with different JST pathways. The JST pathways relevant to the profiles are discussed based on the theoretical framework and previous research.

  • 21.
    Hagger, Martin S.
    et al.
    University of Essex.
    Biddle, Stuart J. H.
    Loughborough University.
    Chow, Edward W.
    Hong Kong Institute of Education.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Kavussanu, Maria
    University of Birmingham.
    Physical self-perceptions in adolescence: Generalizability of a hierarchical multidimensional model across three cultures2003In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, ISSN 0022-0221, E-ISSN 1552-5422, Vol. 34, no 6, 611-628 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the generalizability of the form, structural parameters, and latent means of a hierarchical multidimensional model of physical self-perceptions in adolescents from three cultures. A children's version of the physical self-perception profile (PSPP-C) was administered to samples of British, Hong Kong, and Russian high school students. A structural equation model that hypothesized a hierarchical structure with global self-esteem as a superordinate construct and physical self-worth as a domain-level construct governing the PSPP-C subdomains fit the data adequately. Tests of the cross-cultural generalizability of the proposed model supported the invariance of the factor pattern and model parameters across the samples. Latent means analysis suggested that the factor means were significantly higher in the British sample, a finding that supports the results of cross-cultural studies of self-esteem in other domains.

  • 22.
    Hale, Bruce
    et al.
    Staffordshire University, UK.
    James, Benjamin
    Roehampton Institute London, UK.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Lesgaft Institute, St.-Petersburg, Russia.
    Determining the dimensionality of athletic identity: a "Herculean" cross-cultural undertaking1999In: International Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 0047-0767, Vol. 30, no 1, 83-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hanin, Yuri L.
    et al.
    KIHU – Research Institute for Olympic Sports, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia B.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sport Psychology, Overview2004In: Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology / [ed] Charles Spielberger, Elsevier, 2004, 463-477 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Sport psychology is a subdiscipline of psychology applied to a competitive sport as a specific context of organized physical (motor) activity. Competitive sport is focused on high achievement and consistent excellence, in contrast to other settings in which exercise is used for physical education, leisure, or rehabilitation. The major emphasis in sport psychology is on the study and application of psychological factors enhancing athletic performance and on the impact of sport participation on a person’s (or team’s) development.

  • 24.
    Hanin, Yuri
    et al.
    KIHU, Res. Institute for Olympic Sports, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Metaphoric description of performance states: an application of the IZOF model2002In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, Vol. 16, no 4, 396-415 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined feeling states prior to, during, and after best ever and worst ever competition in 85 skilled Russian athletes using metaphor-generation method (Hanin, 2000). Six situations elicited 510 idiosyncratic and functionally meaningful metaphors (67% animate and 33% inanimate agents) and 922 interpretative descriptors. Metaphors and descriptors reflected high action readiness in best ever competition and low action readiness in worst ever competition. Athletes used different metaphors to describe their feelings prior to, during, and after performance. Accompanying idiosyncratic descriptors had multiple connotations with different components of psychobiosocial state. Aggregated content of descriptors had high scores on optimal and low scores on dysfunctional state characteristics in best ever competition but not in worst ever competition. Future research directions and practical implications are suggested.

  • 25.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Southern Denmark University, Odense, Denmark.
    Roessler, Kaya
    Southern Denmark University, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Athletic talent development environments: An explorative case study2008In: Proceedings of the Nordic Conference "Health, Participation and Effects of Sport and Exercise" / [ed] B.Carlsson, U. Johnson, K. Josefsson, N. Stambulova, Halmstad: Halmstad University , 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a holistic description of the psychosocial competencies and environmental conditions associated with successful talent development. Research into talent development has evolved from talent detection to talent development, both perspectives accepting an athlete centered approach. Recent research into athletic career transitions emphasizes the importance of context but often refers to context in a micro perspective (sport, education and family). This study expands the notion of context and emphasizes the embeddedness of an athlete into his or her context. The research strategy is a multiple case study. The study takes a current perspective investigating three actual athletic talent development environments in Scandinavia renowned for successful talent development. The members of the environment are young prospect athletes on the verge of making a transition to high level elite sports. Through an explorative integrative approach, the study aims to develop and refine hypotheses on optimal talent development environments. Methods of data collection include interviewing of club administrators, coaches, young prospect athletes, established elite athletes and also observations of daily life. This paper presents results from the first case, a Danish elite sailing environment, and preliminary results from the second case study, a Swedish track and Field club. On a descriptive level, the structure of the environment is outlined, and the roles and functions of components and relations in the environment are clarified. On an explanatory level, factors (preconditions, process and group culture) underpinning environmental success are identified and structured.

  • 26.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Talent development environment in sport: An explorative case study based on the system's theory framework2007In: Book of abstracts / [ed] Yannis Theodorakis, Marios Goudas & Athanasios Papaioannou, Volos: University of Thessaly , 2007, 192-192 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at presenting a holistic description of environmental conditions and psychosocial competencies associated with successful talent development in sport. Most of the research conducted on psychological aspects of athletic talent development has been retrospective and accepted an athlete-centred approach (Bloom, 1985; Ericsson, 1996; see Durand-Bush & Salmela, 2001 for review) This study shifts its focus from an individual athlete to all kinds of psychosocial environmental conditions working as resources and/or barriers for the athletic talent development. The system’s theory (Patton & McMahon, 2006) is used as a theoretical framework for this multi-case study. It emphasizes the wholeness of intra-individual and contextual influences on a person and interrelations between these influences. A talented athlete is seen as fully embedded into this context. The project is supposed to compare four athletic environments (sport clubs in Denmark and Sweden) renowned for successful athletic talent development. This paper will focus on the results of the first case study where the research methodology is going to be tested. The study has a qualitative and explorative nature seeking to develop and refine hypothesis on optimal talent development environments. Methods of data collection include interviewing of club administrators, coaches, young prospect athletes, their parents, and also observations of daily life in the environments to obtain systematic and detailed knowledge of athletic talent development as it occurs in the real world.

  • 27.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Southern Denmark University, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Creating optimal environments for talent development: A holistic ecological approach2017In: Routledge Handbook of Talent Identification and Development in Sport / [ed] Joseph Baker, Stephen Cobley, Jörg Schorer & Nick Wattie, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017, 271-284 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors introduce the holistic ecological approach (HEA) to talent development in sport, which proposes a shift in research attention from the individual athletes to the broader developmental context or environment in which they develop. This introduction includes ecologically inferred definitions of talent development and of the athletic talent development environment (ATDE), research guidelines and two working models. In combination these key elements serve as a guide for further research. The authors proceed to present two cases: a successful kayak environment and an ineffective golf environment, both studied from the HEA perspective. A comparison of successful environments in different sports reveals that while each environment is unique, they in many ways employ the same principles in their work. This leads to a presentation of eight common features of successful ATDEs. Moving from ecological research to ecologically informed practice, the authors add applied principles and provide an example of how these principles were used to improve the performance culture of the Danish national orienteering team. Together, the eight features, the case example, and the applied guidelines can serve as a guide for practitioners aiming to improve talent development environments in sport.

  • 28.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Southern Denmark University, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    From general to adapted frameworks in investigating athletic talent development environments2009In: Proceedings of the 12th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Marrakesh, Morocco: International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Southern Denmark University, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Holistic perspective in analysing a successful athletic talent development environment: a case study2009In: Proceedings of the 12th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Marrakech, Morocco: International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Holistic approach to Athletic Talent Development Environments: A successful sailing milieu2010In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 11, no 3, 212-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Research into the discovery and development of athletic talent has tended to focus on the individual athlete. This study assumes a holistic ecological approach; it focuses on the overall athletic talent development environment (ATDE), presents an analysis of one particular ATDE (the Danish national 49er sailing team) and examines key factors behind its success in creating top athletes. To guide the project, two working models were developed. The ATDE working model serves to describe the environment’s components and structure. The environmental success factors (ESF) working model serves to structure factors contributing to the environment’s success.

    Method. The research takes the form of a case study. Data were collected from multiple perspectives (in-depth interviews with administrators, coaches and athletes), from multiple situations (observation of training, competitions and meetings) and from the analysis of documents.

    Results. Empirical versions of the ATDE and ESF models were developed of the investigated environment, which was characterized by a high degree of cohesion, with the relationship between current and prospective elite athletes at its core. A lack of resources was compensated for by a strong organizational culture, characterized by values of open co-operation, individual responsibility and a focus on performance process.

    Conclusions. The research concluded that the holistic ecological approach constitutes an important supplement to the contemporary literature on athletic talent and career development, that further studies of specific environments are needed to establish the common features of successful ATDEs and that practitioners should look beyond the individual in their attempts to nurture sporting excellence.

  • 31.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Univerisity of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Univerisity of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Riding the wave of an expert: A successful talent development environment in kayaking2011In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, Vol. 25, no 3, 341-362 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The holistic ecological approach to talent development in sport highlights the central role of the overall environment as it affects a prospective elite athlete. This paper examines a flat-water kayak environment inNorwaywith a history of successfully producing top-level senior athletes from among its juniors. Principal methods of data collection include interviews, participant observations of daily life in the environment and analysis of documents. The environment was centered around the relationship between prospects and a community of elite athletes, officially organized as a school team but helping the athletes to focus on their sport goals, teaching the athletes to be autonomous and responsible for their own training, and perceived as very integrated due to a strong and cohesive organizational culture. We argue that the holistic ecological approach opens new venues in talent development research and holds the potential to change how sport psychology practitioners work with prospective elite athletes.The holistic ecological approach to talent development in sport highlights the central role of the overall environment as it affects a prospective elite athlete. This paper examines a flat-water kayak environment in Norway with a history of successfully producing top-level senior athletes from among its juniors. Principal methods of data collection include interviews, participant observations of daily life in the environment and analysis of documents. The environment was centered around the relationship between prospects and a community of elite athletes, officially organized as a school team but helping the athletes to focus on their sport goals, teaching the athletes to be autonomous and responsible for their own training, and perceived as very integrated due to a strong and cohesive organizational culture. We argue that the holistic ecological approach opens new venues in talent development research and holds the potential to change how sport psychology practitioners work with prospective elite athletes. © 2011 Human Kinetics, Inc.

  • 32.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya
    Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Successful talent development in track and field: Considering the role of environment2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no Suppl.2, 122-132 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Track and field includes a number of high intensity disciplines with many demanding practices and represents a motivational challenge for talented athletes aiming to make a successful transition to the senior elite level. Based on a holistic ecological approach, this study presents an analysis of a particular athletic talent development environment (ATDE) in track and field, the IFK Växjö track and field club, and examines key factors behind its successful history of creating top level athletes. The research takes the form of a case study. Data were collected from multiple perspectives (in-depth interviews with administrators, coaches and athletes), from multiple situations (observation of training, competitions and meetings) and from the analysis of documents. The environment was characterized by a high degree of cohesion, by the organization of athletes and coaches into groups and teams, and by the important role given to elite athletes. A strong organizational culture, characterized by values of open co-operation, by a focus on performance process and by a whole person approach, provided an important basis for the environment’s success. The holistic ecological approach encourages practitioners to broaden their focus beyond the individual in their efforts to help talented junior athletes make a successful transition to elite senior level.

  • 33.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Storm, Louise
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Larsen, Carsten
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Creating optimal environments for talent development2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, 242-243 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The holistic ecological approach (HEA) to talent development in sport shifts researchers’ attention from the individual athletes to the broader environment in which they develop. The HEA provides a theoretical grounding, ecologically inferred definitions of talent development, two working models, and methodological guidelines. The HEA highlights two interconnected ways of analyzing athletic talent development environments (ATDE). First, there is a focus on the structure of the environment, particularly the roles and cooperation of key persons. Second, there is a focus on the organizational culture of the team. A number of in-depth case studies of successful talent development environments in Scandinavia have shown that while each environment is unique, they also share a number of features. They are characterized by proximal role modeling; an integration of efforts among the different agents (family, coaches, management etc.); inclusive training groups rather than early selection; a focus on long-term developmental rather than on early success, and a “strong and coherent” organizational culture. Moving from ecological research to ecologically informed practice, we add applied principles and provide an example of how these principles were used in developing a culture for goal directedness in a group of under-17 players in a football academy in Denmark. The case example demonstrates two main ideas: (1) a team’s organizational culture influences the athletes, or in popular terms the characteristics of culture become the character of the athletes; and (2) the coach plays a vital part in creating and maintaining a team culture. Together, the eight common features of successful ATDEs, the case examples, and the applied HEA principles can serve as a guide for practitioners aiming to improve talent development environments in sport.

  • 34.
    Hvatskaya, Elena
    et al.
    St.-Petersburg State University of Physical Education and Sports, St.-Petersburg, Russia.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    St.-Petersburg State University of Physical Education and Sports, St.-Petersburg, Russia.
    Perception of the first competition: Retrospective analysis made by elite athletes1997In: Innovations in sport psychology: linking theory and practice : proceedings / [ed] Bar-Eli, Michael & Lidor, Ronnie, ISSP , 1997, 321-323 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, 241-242 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the career literature, an injury is termed as a non-normative transition (e.g., Stambulova & Wylleman, 2014), and therefore, it is implied that there is a process behind it. But the injury transition process has never been in focus of the career researchers in sport psychology, and therefore this study is a pioneering exploration unpacking this process. The study was designed as a single subject case study based on a constructivist narrative approach with the objectives (1) to explore the athlete’s career development, injuries within the career and their impact, and (2) to explore in detail the athlete’s injury experiences. The participant was a 26 years old former handball player who had experienced two major ACL-injuries during his career. To guide the research process from formulation of the research objectives and to interpretation of narratives, the narrative oriented inquiry framework or NOI (Hiles & Čermak, 2008) was followed. Following combination of the holistic-content and the categorical content analyses allowed conceptualizing injuries as career transition processes embedded into the athlete’s career development. Moreover, the participant’s narratives made possible to identify four phases in the injury transition (i.e., pre-injury, injury and first reactions, diagnosis and treatment, rehabilitation and consequences) with distinct psychological content (e.g., demands, resources, barriers, and coping strategies) relevant to each phase. Based on the results of the study it is possible to anticipate that athletes, sport psychology consultants, coaches, and members of the sport medicine teams might benefit from being aware about specific demands and barriers relevant to the different phases of the injury transition process. This knowledge can be further used to facilitate development of adequate resources and coping strategies to help injured athletes with rehabilitation process and successful comeback to active sport involvement. © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science

  • 36.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Injury as a career transition: Experiences of a Swedish elite handball player2016In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This single-subject case study adopted a narrative approach and focused on two objectives: (a) to explore an athlete’s career development, including the impact of injuries, and (b) to explore that athlete’s injury experiences in detail. The participant was a 26-year-old former elite handball player who had experienced two major anterior cruciate ligament injuries during his career. To guide the research process from the formulation of its objectives to the interpretation of the participant’s narratives, we followed the narrative-oriented inquiry framework. To collect the participant’s stories, a low-structured interview guide consisting of open questions and requests for information about the participant’s handball career and injury experiences was used. The holistic content analysis allowed us to conceptualise injuries as career transition processes embedded in the athlete’s career development. Moreover, the participant’s narratives made it possible to identify four phases of injury transition and the distinct psychological content (demands, resources, barriers, and coping strategies) relevant to each of the four phases. Based on the results of the study, we anticipate that athletes, sport psychology consultants, coaches, and members of sport medicine teams can benefit from greater awareness of the specific demands and barriers relevant to each phase of the injury transition process. This knowledge can be further used to facilitate the development of adequate resources and coping strategies to help injured athletes navigate the rehabilitation process and successfully return to active sport involvement.

  • 37.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Editorial to the QHW Thematic Cluster “Health, Physical Activity and Lifestyle”2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, 29156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Johnson, Urban
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Performance Enhancement Issues in Sport Psychology Consulting: Seventeen Cases Summary2006In: 11th annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, 05-08 July, LAUSANNE 2006 - Switzerland, BOOK OF ABSTRACTS / [ed] Hoppeler H., Reilly T., Tsolakidis E., Gfeller L., Klossner S., Cologne: European College of Sport Science , 2006, 440- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Jonsson, Linus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Weman Josefsson, Karin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Papaioannou, G. Athanasiosos
    University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece.
    Exploring exercise behavior and well-being of Swedish university students: A self-determination perspective2013In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between motivational profile, self-efficacy, basic needs satisfaction, exercise behavior, and well-being among Swedish university students. A set of the instruments including GLTEQ, SHIS, BPNES, BREQ-2 and BARSE was distributed at a university in southern Sweden. The respondents (n=260) included men (n=122) and women (n=138). For analysis and processing of the gathered data SPSS was used with Pearson’s r and Multiple Regression Analysis. The results showed that competence, autonomy and relatedness were positive predictors of self-determined motivation, whilst identified regulation, intrinsic regulation and barrier self-efficacy were positive predictors for strenuous exercise. Moreover, a regression analysis showed that only competence was a significant predictor for well-being; however, positive correlations were shown between all the basic needs and well-being. Satisfaction of the basic needs seem to result in more self-determined motivation and higher levels of barrier self-efficacy, which in turn increases the number of strenuous exercise sessions per week. Furthermore, satisfaction of the basic needs, especially competence through exercise, appears to be important for university students’ well-being. Strenuous exercise itself may also have the potential to positively influence well-being.

  • 40.
    Järphag, Ulf
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Center for Sport and Health Science (CIHF).
    Psychological aspects of athletic retirement among elite Swedish athletes2003In: New Approaches to Exercise and Sport Psychology: Proceedings of the 11th European Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] R. Stelter, FEPSAC , 2003, 81- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. This study is a part of the international project „European perspectives on athletic retirement“ (Alfermann, Stambulova, & Zemaityte, in press). It focuses on: a) reasons for sports career termination; b) perceived emotional problems, need for adaptation, and duration of transitional period; c) differences in the process of retirement between athletes who planned and did not plan it in advance.Method. The „Retirement from sport“ questionnaire (Alfermann, Stambulova, & Zemaityte, 2001) was send to retired Swedish athletes by mail, and after considering returned answers 88 subjects were selected for this study on the basis of two criteria: international level athletic career; 1-10 years period after the sports career end. Participants included males (n=57) and females (n=31) – representatives of different individual and team sports.ResultsQuantitative analyses showed that elite Swedish athletes terminated mainly because of sport-related reasons followed by health- and familyrelated reasons. About a half of the subjects (46%) perceived a specific need to adjust to the life after sports, and 24% experienced emotional problems during the transitional period, which lasted 19.0 months (SD=15.7). Several one-way ANOVAs were conducted to identify differences in the process of athletic retirement between two groups of subjects: who planned (67%) and did not plan (33%) retirement. These revealed that athletes who planned retirement were more satisfied with their athletic careers (p< .01) and the timing of retirement (p< .01); they also used „acceptance“ of retirement as a coping strategy more often (p< .01). Athletes who did not plan retirement had more negative emotional reactions on this event (p< .01), and used „denial“ as a coping strategy more often (p< .05).Conclusion. The results will be discussed from the point of view of the Sports Career Transition model (Stambulova, 1997).

  • 41.
    Kiuppis, Florian
    et al.
    Catholic University of Applied Sciences Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Special issue of Sport in Society: Transitions in Sport Life2017In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 20, no 10, 1485-1486 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    From the Swedish dual career model to a national digital system of dual career support services2015In: Proceedings: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology: Sport Psychology: Theories and Applications for Performance, Health and Humanity: 14-19 July 2015, Bern, Switzerland / [ed] Olivier Schmid & Roland Seiler, Bern: University of Bern , 2015, 241-241 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sport and educational systems in Sweden have a long history (since the 1970s) of cooperating on a high school level. Recently steps have been taken by the Swedish Sport Confederation to initiate cooperation in higher education (i.e., university level). Swedish research on athletes’ dual careers has mainly focused on the high school level (e.g., Stambulova, Engström, Franck, Linnér, & Lindahl, 2014; Uebel, 2006), with Fryklund (2012) as the only one who targeted the university level. Stambulova et al. (2014) presented the Swedish dual career model to set up an agenda for future dual career research in Sweden. The model aligns the stages in the Swedish educational system with related age markers and stages in athletic as well as vocational development illustrating possible dual career pathways and related transitions. Outlined by the Swedish dual career model a new project has been initiated.  Demands and challenges as well as the relevant needs in psychological support of Swedish university student-athletes are investigated through mixed-method qualitative and quantitative explorations. Based upon findings and in collaboration with researchers in health innovation and embedded intelligent systems a national digital system of dual career support services is going to be developed and tested. The digital service can be explained as an online national career assistance program including dual career education, networking and training from a preventive-supportive perspective. That is, helping university student-athletes to develop knowledge, competencies and skills to become more competent and (with time) autonomous in managing their own careers. In a broader sense, the system is seen as facilitating implementations of the Swedish dual career philosophies of “winning in the short-run”(i.e., obtaining an optimal dual career balance) and “winning in the long-run”, that is, proactively preparing student-athletes for athletic career termination (Stambulova et al., 2014). © 2015 University of Bern, Institut of Sport Science 

  • 43.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Profiles of Dual Career Competences of Swedish University Student-Athletes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining sport and education (or work) is termed as athletes ‘dual careers’ (DC) and it is an evolving area of research in Europe, guided by the European Union Guidelines on Dual Careers of Athletes (2012). In this presentation, results from a Swedish national study will be presented. The aim of the study was to investigate university student-athletes’ DC competences (i.e., knowledge, skills, experience and attitudes) for a successful DC. The study is part of the European project ‘Gold in Education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) involving eight other European countries. Seventy-one Swedish university student-athletes (mean age= 25.2) representing various sports completed the DC Competence Survey. The survey measured student-athletes’ perceptions (i.e., importance and possession) of 38 DC competences (e.g., ability to prioritize, dedication to succeed, self-discipline, ability to cope with stress), and student-athletes’ experience of, coping with, and use of competences in seven challenging DC scenarios (e.g., missing important days in school, moving away from home, injury). The Latent profile analysis on student-athletes’ possession of competences indicated that the model with a 3-profile solution provided the best fit (entropy = 0.876; Parametric Bootstrapped likelihood ratio test =.01). Profile-1 (P1: n=7) corresponded to student-athletes with an average level of competence; Profile-2 (P2: n=42) to an average-to-good level of competence, and Profile-3 (P3: n=22) to a good competence level. Profile-3 outscored the two other profiles in terms of mean coping with all seven DC scenarios (P1: M=3.39; P2: M=3.58; P3: M=4.15), indicating that the more competences student-athletes possessed the better they coped. However, the pattern of coping between profiles was not consistent across all scenarios, suggesting that some competences were more important for some scenarios and less important for others. Further analysis aims to reveal scenario-specific competences to guide practitioners helping student-athletes in specific DC scenarios.

  • 44.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Henriksen, Kristoffer
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Holistic approach to understanding a dual career environment at a Swedish university2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, 243-244 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dual career (DC; combination of sport and studies) research is traditionally focused on student-athletes’ developmental demands and coping resources. To support athletes’ talent development in combination with education, sport federations and universities (and others) co-create high performance centers or DC hubs. Research into these environments is limited. Inspired by the holistic ecological approach, and particularly by the athletic talent development environment model (Henriksen, 2010), we created the dual career development environment (DCDE) working model and then used this model to explore a ‘golf and study’ environment at a Swedish university. The DCDE model is structured into three levels (micro, meso, and macro) and three domains (study, sport, and private) taking into account societal institutions, sport and education systems. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with nine university elite golf-students about perceived support during their transition to, and first year within the environment, and with four stakeholders (e.g., coach, study director) to discover their perspective on the environment and the support they provided. Observations and documents collected from the environment web-page also supported the analysis. Key features of the investigated DCDE related mainly to the micro and meso levels and included: collaborative arrangements between sport and academic stakeholders aimed at facilitating the student-athletes’ DCs, high quality coaching and facilities, stakeholders’ shared focus on a ‘whole person’ including, for example, student- athletes’ physical and psychological well-being. It was also found that the daily life of the student-athletes was concentrated around the campus gym as a place to meet and discuss various sport, study and personal life issues with each other and with their physical coach (also a university teacher). Further study is planned to target the macro level of the environment to advance these findings. 

  • 45.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Lindahl, Kent
    Swedish Sports Confederation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Promoting dual career support services: Swedish perspectives and actions taken2017In: Sport psychology: Linking theory to practice: Proceedings of the 14th ISSP World Congress of Sport Psychology / [ed] G. Si, J. Cruz and J.C. Jaenes, 2017, 47-47 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation we share: (a) key findings on experiences and competences of Swedish dual career support providers (DCSP) from the European Project “Gold in Education and Elite Sport”, and (b) insights into the actions derived from the Project and taken to advance the dual career (DC) support services in Sweden. Across the country, 31 DCSPs (mean age= 47.4) completed the DCSP survey that measured perceptions of 35 competences to facilitate student-athletes’ development (e.g., be an active and supportive listener) and explored experiences of, and coping with, six DCSP’s scenarios (e.g., supporting a student-athlete when missing days in school). Additionally, six DCSPs took part in a focus group discussion on how they work and what methods they use to support their student-athletes. Overall, the results revealed that the DCSPs demonstrated high awareness of DC and related challenges, possessed necessary competences, managed the relevant scenarios, and reflected on their work in congruence with a whole person perspective. Results also indicated that the DCSPs worked mainly part time, held higher education degrees, but lacked specific DC education and networks. When positioning the findings within the Swedish DC context two major actions were initiated. First, as a DCSP is a new job profile in Sweden that should be developed, planning efforts for a national DCSP education system and a complementary national digital DC support service are currently in progress. Second, with the recent expansion of the Swedish DC system to include the higher education level, a shared basis is needed for sustainable development. Therefore, the Swedish Sport Confederation initiated the action of developing Swedish national DC Guidelines. The Guidelines will be briefly outlined with strategies to facilitate student-athletes’ DC development including different transitions and their search for optimal balance between sport, studies, and private life.

  • 46.
    Linnér, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Parker, James
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Ekengren, Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Dual Career Balance in Student-Athletes University Transition2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Balancing studies, a personal life and sports, that is, having a dual career, is considered as a challenge associated with transitional demands in athletic and non-athletic (psychological, psychosocial, academic/vocational, financial) domains (Wylleman, Reints, & De Knop, 2013). The aim of this study was to investigate student-athletes’ university transition with a specific focus on how student-athletes balance different domains of their lives. Twenty-three Swedish university student-athletes (mean age= 21.52; 16 males and 7 females) representing six sports (equestrianism, golf, handball, ice hockey, soccer, table tennis) partook in the study. Participants completed the Dual Career Monitoring Survey (DCMS), weekly, over the first twelve weeks of their university education. The DCMS is developed by the authors and measures student-athletes perceptions of balance, time investments, demands, coping, satisfaction, resources and barriers in relation to sport, studies, private life, social life and financial situation. In exploring student-athletes’ perception of dual career balance throughout the twelve weeks, an intra-class correlation analysis revealed a between-person variance of 0.14 (14%). That is, with regards to balance in their dual careers 86% was due to within-person variance, suggesting that balance is idiosyncratic and that further analysis should investigate within-person change. Encouraged by these findings we continued with a person-centered analysis using the Dynamic P-technique for modeling patterns of data (Nelson, Aylward, & Rausch, 2011). The relationships between changes in balance (i.e., prioritizing sport, studies or other domains of life), demands, coping and satisfaction throughout the twelve weeks will be presented. Our findings contribute to the understanding of balance as a central tenet of athletes’ dual careers (Second author et al., 2015). From our findings we suggest practitioners to take into account the individual dynamics in dual career balance from a whole-person perspective.

  • 47.
    Minniti, Antoinette
    et al.
    Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Life Skills for Junior Soccer Players2012In: 2nd Dubai International Symposium of Sport Psychology: Mental Training. Strategies and Methods: 19-20 September 2012, Dubai: Dubai Sports Council , 2012, 26-28 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Poczwardowski, Artur
    et al.
    University of Denver, Denver, USA.
    Haberl, Peter
    United States Olympic Committee (USOC), Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA.
    Diehl, Robert
    Mental Health Partners, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    O'Neil, Adam
    Sport Concussion Institute, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA.
    Transitions of Young Swedish Athletes and American Olympians to Elite Training Settings2012In: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, 132-133 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Jyvaskyla, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Schinke, Robert J.
    School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Elbe, Anne-Mari
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    ISSP position stand: Transnationalism, mobility, and acculturation in and through sport2017In: International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1612-197X, E-ISSN 1557-251XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The historically unprecedented pace of internationalising sport industry and transnational movement of athletic talent in the last 20 years has heightened the need for developing new competencies in research and daily practice of sport psychology professionals. While academic literature in cultural sport psychology and praxis has been increasing, sport professionals and local organisations seem to give scant time and resources to stay abreast of complex social changes in transnational industry and to the development of cultural competencies. Stemming from the continuing need for qualified athletic personnel to support transitioning athletes and to achieve intercultural effectiveness in daily practices, our objectives in this position statement are to critically review and analyse the growing scholarship pertinent to various forms of transnational mobility and acculturation of athletic migrants, and subsequently provide recommendations for further use in research and applied contexts. © 2017 International Society of Sport Psychology

  • 50.
    Ryba, Tatiana
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Stambulova, Natalia
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
    Athletes' careers across cultures2012In: ATL12: 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program, Indianapolis, IN: Association for Applied Sport Psychology , 2012, 117-117 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
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