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  • 1.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Living with major depression: experiences from families' perspectives2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 309-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the ways of living with major depression in families. Seven families with an adult member who suffered major depression participated, in all 18 participants. Data were collected from seven narrative group interviews, one with each family. A qualitative thematic content analysis was used and the text was coded according to its content and further interpreted into themes. Findings consist of five themes: 'Being forced to relinquish control of everyday life'; during depression the family members lost their energy and could not manage everyday life. 'Uncertainty and instability are affecting life'; everyday life in the families was unstable and emotions influenced the atmosphere. 'Living on the edge of the community': the families periodically lived in seclusion. 'Everyday life becomes hard'; everyday life was demanding for everyone in the family and the responsibility shifted between family members. 'Despite everything a way out can be found'; the families as a unit as well as individually had their own ways of coping and finding some kind of satisfaction within the bounds of possibility. The families' experiences were demanding. Children were aware of their parent's depression and were involved in managing everyday life and emotionally affected by the situation. This legitimates the need for nurses and other healthcare professionals to have a family's perspective on the whole situation and to include partners as well as children and take their experiences seriously when supporting and guiding a family. It is important to develop strategies which in particular include children in the planning, provision and receiving of care as well as unburden them with the responsibility. It is also important to support the family in their own coping strategies with a major depressive episode.

  • 2.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg.
    Danielson, Ella
    University of Gothenburg.
    Major depression in a family: What happens and how to manage - a case study2007In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 691-706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depression challenges the ways of living for both individuals and families. The aim of this study was to describe what happens and how to manage major depression in a family. The case in this paper is a family with a mother who is suffering major depression and her son and daughter. Narrative interviews and qualitative content analysis were conducted. The findings revealed six themes: "a stealthy intruder," "moving slowly to helplessness," "saving the situation," "protecting oneself and others," "conveying things that are beyond words," and the "dispersal of shadows." These themes elucidated the family members' varying views of depression and the unique ways they managed the situation.

  • 3.
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The meaning of major depression in family life: the viewpoint of the ill parent2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 1-2, p. 284-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVE: The aim was to elucidate the meaning of major depression in family life from the viewpoint of an ill parent. Background. Major depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is common and may appear repeatedly over several years, and affects family life. Depression in parents has a negative impact on family function and children's health; however, studies regarding the deeper understanding of major depression in family life are lacking.

    DESIGN: A qualitative explorative study using narrative interviews with eight parents who were identified with major depression.

    METHODS: A phenomenological-hermeneutic method of interpretation was used for analysing interview texts and included naïve understanding, a structural analysis where text was divided into meaning units, which were condensed and abstracted, and finally a comprehensive understanding.

    RESULT: Two themes were extracted: 'to be afflicted in an almost unmanageable situation' with sub-themes 'feeling hopelessly bad', 'being worthless', 'being unsatisfied' and the theme 'to reconcile oneself to the situation' with sub-themes 'being active', 'being satisfied' and 'maintaining parenthood'.

    CONCLUSION: Comprehensive understanding revealed the parents' simultaneous suffering and dignity in family life; suffering with serious lack of well-being and health, destroyed self-confidence and unhappiness, and dignity with strength, confidence and joy in children. The movement between suffering and dignity complicated family life. Dignity was threatened by the awareness that suffering in major depression was recurrent. Dignity had to be repeatedly restored for self and the family, and family dignity has to be restored before others outside the family circle.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: A deeper understanding of the meaning of major depression in family life is helpful and for healthcare professionals to prevent individual and family suffering by assisting and preserving dignity.

  • 4.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Psychiatric and Mental Health care, The Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Britt H.
    Psychiatric and Mental Health care, Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Department of Psychiatry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Daily life for young adults who care for a person with mental illness: a qualitative study2012In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 610-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the daily life and management strategies of young informal carers of family members or friends with mental illness. Twelve young adults (three men and nine women; 16-25 years old) in Sweden were voluntarily recruited between February and May 2008. Data collected through eight individual semi-structured interviews and one focus group interview were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings revealed nine subthemes that were further grouped into three main themes: showing concern, providing support and using management strategies. Participants lived in constant readiness for something unexpected to happen to the person they cared for, and their role in the relationship could change quickly from family member or friend to guardian or supervisor. Supporting a friend was considered as large a personal responsibility as supporting a family member. Their management strategies were based on individual capacities and their ability to step aside should the situation become too demanding. These young informal carers need support in caring for the mentally ill. As the internet becomes increasingly fundamental to daily life, support could be provided most effectively through person-centred web sites.

  • 5.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Need and Usage of Different Kind of Support among Young Informal Carers of Persons with Mental Illness2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The high prevalence of mental illness among young person’s means that their relatives and close friends are exposed to stress by having to take on the responsibility for the support of family members or friends in difficult situations of life when suffering from mental illness. Young informal carers have shown to be exposed to a great burden in which they put their own daily tasks aside in order to stay close to the person who suffers from mental illness. Objective: Explore how young (16–25) informal carers of a person with a mental illness experience and use different kind of support, such as web-support, counseling, and group counseling, friends, family, relatives support societies, health care services etc. Method: In a mixed method approach, we first interviewed 12 young carers, and 241 completed a self-administered questionnaire. While the young carers strive to maintain control, their main support seems to be others in their lives, who often define the situation differently. Results: The carers said web-support, counseling, and group counseling might be helpful, yet very few had any professional support. The results also showed that the young informal carers’ safety net is their social network and the person who suffer from mental illness. Conclusion: Young informal carers are in need of a combination of web-based and face-to-face person-centered support, but they do not receive it. Professional support is required. Further studies about the needs of young informal carers of persons with mental illness especially those supporting friends, is necessary to gain before planning to start support interventions for them.

  • 6.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Need and Usage of Different Kind of Support among Young Informal Carers of Persons with Mental Illness2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The high prevalence of mental illness among young person’s means that their relatives and close friends are exposed to stress by having to take on the responsibility for the support of family members or friends in difficult situations of life when suffering from mental illness. Young informal carers have shown to be exposed to a great burden in which they put their own daily tasks aside in order to stay close to the person who suffers from mental illness. Objective: Explore how young (16–25) informal carers of a person with a mental illness experience and use different kind of support, such as web-support, counseling, and group counseling, friends, family, relatives support societies, health care services etc. Method: In a mixed method approach, we first interviewed 12 young carers, and 241 completed a self-administered questionnaire. While the young carers strive to maintain control, their main support seems to be others in their lives, who often define the situation differently. Results: The carers said web-support, counseling, and group counseling might be helpful, yet very few had any professional support. The results also showed that the young informal carers’ safety net is their social network and the person who suffer from mental illness. Conclusion: Young informal carers are in need of a combination of web-based and face-to-face person-centered support, but they do not receive it. Professional support is required. Further studies about the needs of young informal carers of persons with mental illness especially those supporting friends, is necessary to gain before planning to start support interventions for them.

  • 7.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Need and usage of support among young informal carers of persons with mental illness: a mixed-method study2013In: Horatio, European Psychiatric Nursing Congress 2013: Abstract book / [ed] Neslihan Keser Özcan, Hülya Bilgin, 2013, p. 94-94Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    University West, Trollhättan.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University.
    Sjöström, Nils
    Gothenburg University.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Support for young informal carers of persons with mental illness: a mixed-method study2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 611-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how young (16-25 year old) informal carers of a person with a mental illness experience and use support. In a mixed method approach, we interviewed 12 young carers, and 241 completed a self-administered questionnaire. While the young carers strive to maintain control, their main support seems to be others in their lives, who often define the situation differently. The carers said web-support, counseling, and group counseling might be helpful, yet very few had any professional support. Young carers are greatly in need of support and it should be provided.

  • 9.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Science, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Institute of Health and Care Science, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Effectiveness of web-based versus folder support interventions for young informal carers of persons with mental illness: a randomized controlled trial2014In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 362-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Compare the impact of two interventions, a web-based support and a folder support, for young persons who care for people who suffer from mental illness. 

    Methods: This study was a randomized control trial, following the CONSORT statements, which compared the impact of two interventions. Primary outcome variable was stress, and secondary outcome variables were caring situation, general self-efficacy, well-being, health, and quality of life of young informal carers (N = 241). Data were collected in June 2010 to April 2011, with self-assessment questionnaires, comparing the two interventions and also to detect changes. 

    Results: The stress levels were high in both groups at baseline, but decreased in the folder group. The folder group had improvement in their caring situation (also different from the web group), general self-efficacy, well-being, and quality of life. The web group showed increase in well-being. 

    Conclusion: Young informal carers who take on the responsibility for people close to them; suffer consequences on their own health. They live in a life-situation characterized by high stress and low wellbeing. This signals a need for support. 

    Practice implications: The non-significant differences show that each intervention can be effective, and that it depends upon the individual's preferences. This highlights the importance of adopting person-centered approach, in which young persons can themselves choose support strategy. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Gothenburg, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    Gothenburg, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Gothenburg, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Effectiveness of Web-Based versus Folder Support Interventions for Young Informal Carers of Persons with Mental Illness: a Randomized Controlled Trial2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Changes in psychiatric services mean more young persons have to care for a mentally ill family member or friend while they themselves are in the sensitive transition to adulthood.

    Objective: Compare the impact of two interventions, a web-based support and a folder support, for young persons who care for people who suffer from mental illness.

    Method: This study was a randomized control trial, following the CONSORT statements and eConsort support. Primary outcome variable was stress, and secondary outcome variables were caring situation, general self-efficacy, well-being, health, and quality of life of young informal carers (N=241). Data were collected in June 2010 to April 2011, with self-assessment questionnaires three times, four months apart, comparing the two interventions and also to detect changes.

    Results: The result showed that stress levels were high in both groups at baseline, but decreased significantly in the folder group. The folder group had significant improvement in their caring situation (also significantly different from the web group), general self-efficacy, well-being, and quality of life. The web group show significant increase in well-being.

    Conclusion: Young informal carers who take on the responsibility for people close to them with mental illness; suffer consequences on their own health. They live in a life-situation characterized by high stress and low well-being. This signals a need for support for these young persons.

    Clinical relevance: The findings in this study are uniquely valuable because of the target group and the comparison of two different interventions to support them. The non-significant differences in the data show that each intervention can be effective, and that it depends upon the individual’s preferences. This highlights the importance of adopting person-centred approach, in which young persons can themselves choose support strategy

  • 11.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Centre for Person-Centred Care Research (GPCC), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Vårdal Institute – The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Nils
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The impact of a person-centred web-based intervention on young informal carers of people with mental illness2015In: Abstracts: 19th International Philosophy of Nursing Society (IPONS) conference August 24-26, 2015 Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden: Technology, Health Care and Person-centeredness: Beyond Utopia and Dystopia. Thinking the Future., Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet , 2015, p. 4-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research show that young person’s often take responsibility and offer care and support for significant others who suffer from mental illness. This adoption of responsibility has consequences not only for the mentally ill, but also for the carer. A person-centred support approach to provide the young informal carers of what they are in need of is according to previous research essential, and in need of. As the internet becomes increasingly fundamental to young people in their daily lives, person-centred web-based interventions may be effective in supporting those caring for a person with mental illness.

    Objective: To analyze (according to stress, burden, quality of life, and self-efficacy) the impact of a person-centred web-based intervention (information, education, and support) for young persons who support family members or close friends with mental illness.

    Methods: The study design was prospective and randomized. The sample consisted of young informal carers (N = 241; 16–25 y), where N = 241 completed structured questionnaires at baseline and were allocated to person-centred web-based support (N = 121) respectively folder support (n =120) regarding available support in the society for young persons who support someone suffering from mental illness.

    Results: Data show that the stress levels were high in both groups at the start of the intervention, but decreased in the folder group, who also showed improvements in their caring situation (also different from the web-support group), general self-efficacy, well-being and their quality of life. The group who received person-centred web-based support showed significant increase in their well-being.

    Conclusion: It is of great importance to measure the stress and caring situation of young informal carers of persons with mental illness in order to understand their situation. One type of support could be person-centred web-based, however our results indicate that individuals seek support depending on their individual preferences. Since the responsibility of care has shifted from the health care services to the family and friends of the person suffering from a mental illness, more person- centred care/support interventions should be investigated for further development.

  • 12.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden & Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, Lund & Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, Lund & Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Science, Lund & Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Caring Situation, Health, Self-efficacy, and Stress in Young Informal Carers of Family and Friends with Mental Illness in Sweden2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared the caring situation, health, self-efficacy, and stress of young (16–25) informal carers (YICs) supporting a family member with mental illness with that of YICs supporting a friend. A sample of 225 carers, assigned to a family group (n = 97) or a friend group (n = 128) completed the questionnaire. It was found that the family group experiences a lower level of support and friends experienced a lower positive value of caring. No other differences in health, general self-efficacy and stress were found. YICs endure different social situations, which is why further study of the needs of YICs, especially those supporting friends, is urgently needed.

  • 13.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Att använda internet vid datainsamling2017In: Vetenskaplig teori och metod: från idé till examination inom omvårdnad / [ed] Maria Henricson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 2, p. 217-232Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    eHälsa2017In: Vårdpedagogik / [ed] Margret Lepp & Janeth Leksell, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, 1, p. 190-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Andreasson, E.
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Psychiatry Sahlgrenska, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, Sweden.
    Patients treated for psychosis and their perceptions of care in compulsory treatment: basis for an action plan2012In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to describe patients' conceptions and experiences of care in compulsory treatment for acute onset of psychosis. Twelve patients with experience of compulsory treatment were interviewed in 2008-2009, and phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the data. Two descriptive categories emerged in the results: receiving needed support and perceiving respectful care. Patients perceived that coercive interventions were positive if they were given good care, if they were given the shelter they needed, if they got help with understanding and if the setting was healing. Patients felt respected if they were treated like human beings, if they were allowed to retain as much of their autonomy as possible and if they were invited to participate even though they were under compulsory treatment. The results show that it is important to prevent patients from being traumatized during compulsory treatment and to take advantage of patients' inner resources. Patients' experiences of compulsory treatment can form the basis for preparing an individual action plan for future compulsory treatment. Individual action plans could empower patients during compulsory treatment and improve their experience of care.

  • 16.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Baigi, Amir
    Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Changes in the effects of process-oriented group supervision as reported by female and male nursing students: a prospective longitudinal study2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 437-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to perform a large-scale investigation over a longer period of time, to evaluate changes in the effects of process-oriented group supervision (PGS) as reported by female and male nursing students undergoing a 3-year nursing education. The study included nursing students (n = 183) who were followed during their 3-year study period in relation to their participation in PGS.

    Methods:

    A questionnaire consisting of three subscales: supportive (six items), educational (six items) and developmental (six items) as well as three items of a socio-demographic character (age, gender and previous experience of healthcare work) was used. Student’s t-test was conducted to compare the educational, supportive and developmental subscales between the first and third year.

    Results:

    Females had a significant increase in the educational subscale (p = 0.018) over the 3-year study period, while no such difference was found for the males (p = 0.733). The female students also exhibited an increase in the supportive subscale (p = 0.031) over the 3-year period, while there was no difference for the male students (p = 0.426). There was also an increase in the developmental subscale for the female students over the 3-year period (p = 0.047) but no significant difference for their male counterparts (p = 0.912). For the study group as a whole, an increased positive effect of supervision was observed in the educational subscale (p = 0.020).

    Conclusions:

    The findings have strengthened the argument for the use of PGS in nursing education. To achieve the goal of PGS, which is supportive, educational and developmental in nature, it is important to bear in mind that the supervision needs of women and men can differ. Further research should therefore map out the supervisees’ experiences and expectations of participating in a single sex group.

  • 17.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, IngelaHögskolan Väst, Institutionen för omvårdnad, hälsa och kultur, Avd för sjuksköterskeutbildning.
    Psykiatrisk omvårdnad: att stödja hälsofrämjande processer2006Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    oken, den första i sitt slag, har ett hälsofrämjande förhållningssätt både vad gäller att förhindra att psykisk ohälsa uppstår och att förhålla sig till personer som i någon mening drabbats av psykisk ohälsa. Syftet är att locka fram hälsofrämjande processer, att hitta hälsan i det sjuka. Författarna beskriver den vårdande insatsen, mötet och relationen mellan vårdare och patient/vårdtagare. Boken belyser också betydelsen av att övriga sociala relationer fungerar, såväl inom familjen som i övriga samhällslivet.

    (Beskrivning från förlaget)

  • 18.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Baigi, Amir
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The development of a questionnaire for evaluating process-oriented group supervision during nursing education2008In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 88-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefits of process-oriented group supervision are difficult to evaluate, as the validity and reliability of the existing instruments have been questioned. The aim was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire in order to evaluate the effects of process-oriented group supervision on nursing students during their three-year nursing education. A 55-item Process-oriented Group Supervision Questionnaire (PGSQ) with a developmental design was formulated on the basis of a literature review and the expectations of nursing students who participated in a three-year nursing education programme (N = 176). Construct validity and internal consistency reliability were tested at the end of each study year: year 1 (T1), year 2 (T2), and year 3 (T3) by means of exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach’s coefficient. An adequate explorative factor analysis (principal component analysis, varimax rotation) with an Eigenvalue >1.0 and factor loadings >0.40, reduced the questionnaire to 18 items comprising three factors labelled educative, supportive and developmental, which explained 60.2% at T1, 71.8% at T2, and 69.3% at T3 of the total cumulative variance. The corresponding Cronbach’s coefficient figures were 0.89 (T1), 0.94 (T2) and 0.93 (T3). The 18-item PGSQ is considered to be a short and useful tool due to its satisfactory validity and reliability figures.

  • 19.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Science, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Svensson, Marie-Louise
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Baigi, Amir
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Effects of process-oriented group supervision as reported by nursing students: a pilot study2008In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 26-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One method to ensure that nursing students are better prepared for their future professional role can be to offer them process-oriented group supervision. The aim of this prospective, longitudinal pilot study was to evaluate the effects of a process-oriented group supervision programme (PGSP) comprising educational, supportive and developmental areas based on reports by nursing students undergoing a 3-year nursing education. The students (N=61) evaluated their experiences of the PGSP by means of a questionnaire, which they filled in after each study year. An independent t-test was conducted to compare the educational, supportive, and developmental areas after the first (2002), second (2003) and third year (2004) as well as over the whole 3-year study period. The result showed no significant difference in scores in the educational area. However, there was a significant increase in the supportive area (p=.03) over the 3-year period, which was especially noticeable during the first year (p=.013). There was also an increase in the developmental area over the 3-year period (p=.021) as well as during the first year (p=.024). Thus, PGSP seems to develop nursing students in their professional identity and personal growth. However, as this was a pilot study, a research implication is to perform a large-scale study over a longer period of time.

  • 20.
    Arvidsson, Barbro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Science, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Öijervall, Jörgen
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Process-oriented group supervision implemented during nursing education: nurses’ conceptions 1 year after their nursing degree2008In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 868-875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the variation in how nurses conceive process-oriented group supervision, implemented during nursing education, 1 year after their nursing degree. BACKGROUND: Process-oriented group supervision can be an effective support system for helping nursing students and nurses to reflect on their activities. METHODS: A descriptive qualitative design was chosen for the study. Conceptions were collected through interviews with 18 strategically selected Swedish nurses in 2005. RESULTS: Three descriptive categories comprising seven conceptions were emerged. Supportive actions comprised: a sense of security, belonging and encouragement. Learning actions involved: sharing and reflecting while developmental actions described: enabling professional identity and facilitating personal development. CONCLUSIONS: Process-oriented group supervision has a lasting influence on nurses' development. The possibility to reflect over new stances during nursing education was a prerequisite for the provision of high-quality care. Process-oriented group supervision can make an important contribution to nursing education. IMPLICATIONS: for Nursing Management Process-oriented group supervision provides nurses with the strength to achieve resilience to stress in their work. It may lead to autonomy as well as clarity in the nurse's professional function. This indicates the need for nurse managers to organize reflective group supervision as an integral part of the nurse's work.

  • 21.
    Bernhardsdottir, Johanna
    et al.
    Department of Nursing University of Iceland Reykjavik Iceland & Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland Reykjavik Iceland .
    Dimmit Champion, Jane
    School of Nursing The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX USA .
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). The Institute of Health and Care Science Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg Gothenburg Sweden.
    The experience of participation in a brief cognitive behavioural group therapy for psychologically distressed female university students2014In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 679-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the experience of participation in four sessions of cognitive behavioural group therapy for psychological distress for female university students' (n = 19), aged 22–45 years. Data were gathered with semi-structured interviews during March and April 2008 and analysed according to thematic content analysis. The results identified four themes: ‘Gaining knowledge and understanding’, ‘Becoming more balanced and positive in thinking’, ‘Feeling more self-confident and in control’ and ‘Opportunities for practice and in-depth reflections’. Future recommendations include an increase in sessions from four to five, with one booster session to follow-up on newly acquired skills. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 22.
    Brockington, Ian
    et al.
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Butterworth, Ruth
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Glangeaud-Freudenthal, Nine
    Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    An international position paper on mother-infant (perinatal) mental health, with guidelines for clinical practice2017In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to set out informal, provisional and comprehensive but concise guidelines for mother-infant (perinatal) mental health (psychiatry), as an area of specialisation. It is informal in the sense that the authors are clinicians and researchers from many different nations, who share a common goal and vision, speaking on their own behalf and not with the backing of any authority or society. It is provisional in the expectation that it can be improved by criticism and new research findings. It is a comprehensive summary of the development of the specialty, its core knowledge and recommended investigations and interventions. It is concise (under 6,000 words, taking less than an hour to read) in order to increase readership and facilitate translation. No attempt has been made to parade the evidence for these suggestions, because the document would have been too long to translate, and for many to read. Instead, drafts were circulated for criticism by those included in the authorship, resulting in a consensus (finalised by the three principal authors), providing a framework to guide service provision, clinical practice and research. The full list of authors, from 33 nations, is given in the postscript. They include mother-infant (or parent-infant) and perinatal adult or child psychiatrists and those with a special interest; mother-infant, perinatal and forensic psychologists; psychiatric nurses; the founders of Postpartum Support International and the Association for Postnatal Illness; representatives of social work and obstetrics and the management of these services, and research scientists working in the field. © 2016 The Author(s)

  • 23.
    Dahlqvist Jönsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Department of Research, Development and Education (FoUU), Region of Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nunstedt, Håkan
    Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Johansson Berglund, Inger
    Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Hedelin, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Problematization of perspectives on health promotion and empowerment in mental health nursing – within the research network “MeHNuRse” and the Horatio conference, 20122014In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 22945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental illness is increasing worldwide, while a trend towards an ever more specialized health care takes place. This development creates great demands on nurses to work from a holistic perspective of nursing. The health perspective emphasizes cooperation and communication with those who suffer from long-term mental illness, focusing on their independence and health. From a health perspective, every human being is an actor in his/her own life with an inherent ability to make their own choices. However, persons who suffer from long-term mental illness are at risk of losing power and control over areas of their lives and their health. Mental health nurses are in position to support these persons in promoting health and to regain control over their lives. The emphasis of this paper is thus to discuss mental health nurses responsibility to provide health promoting nursing care, through interpretation of the concepts of empowerment, emancipation, self-efficacy and self-management how can mental health nurses work from a health-promoting perspective in relation to these concepts. The focus of this paper is the challenge of real health promotion in mental health nursing discussed at a workshop at the European Horatio festival in Stockholm 2012 with over 600 participating mental health nurses and researchers from European countries. © 2014 P. D. Jönsson et al.

  • 24.
    Doyle, Louise
    et al.
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Turku University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Lahti, Mari
    Turku University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Keogh, Brian
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Meade, Oonagh
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, Jan
    Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stickley, Theodore
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Preparing master-level mental health nurses to work within a wellness paradigm: Findings from the eMenthe project2018In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 823-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health promotion remains an important component of mental health nursing practice. Supporting wellness at both the individual and societal levels has been identified as one of the key tenets of mental health promotion. However, the prevailing biomedical paradigm of mental health education and practice has meant that many nurses have not been equipped to incorporate a wellness perspective into their mental health practice. In the present study, we report on an exploratory study which details the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required by master-level mental health nurses to practice within a wellness paradigm from the perspective of three groups of key stakeholders: (i) service users and family members (n = 23); (ii) experienced mental health nurses (n = 49); and (iii) master-level mental health nursing students (n = 37). The findings, which were reported from individual and focus group interviews across five European countries, suggested a need to reorientate mental health nursing education to include a focus on wellness and resilience to equip mental health nurses with the skills to work within a strengths-based, rather than a deficits-based, model of mental health practice. Key challenges to working within a wellness paradigm were identified as the prevailing dominance of the biomedical model of cause and treatment of mental health problems, which focusses on symptoms, rather than the holistic functioning of the individual, and positions the person as passive in the nurse-service user relationship. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  • 25.
    Dunér, Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nordström, Monica
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Support networks and social support for persons with psychiatric disabilities–a Swedish mixed-methods study2012In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 712-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore the structure, interaction, and function of the support networks of women and men with psychiatric disabilities. The study took a mixed-methods approach, using quantitative (n=181) and qualitative (n=42) data from a region in southern Sweden. The quantitative results showed that the respondents received widespread support of different types and from many different sources. However, the qualitative interviews revealed that many of the interviewees did not perceive the received support as supportive. The respondents’ internal resources influenced both their ability to receive support and their perception of the support. The informal and formal support sources formed the external resources of the respondents. Our interviewees often experienced formal support as conditional support, while informal support from the family was experienced as unconditional. There was thus a gap between the structure and function of the social support. This article contributes important knowledge from the perspective of persons with psychiatric disabilities.

  • 26.
    Elf, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rystedt, Hans
    Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Institute of Health and Care Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    An Investigation of Intended and Real Use of a Research Web Health Portal and Its Implementation2014In: Electronic Journal of Health Informatics, ISSN 1446-4381, E-ISSN 1446-4381, Vol. 8, no 1, article id e8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory design (PD) projects involve prospective users as co-designers in a process where the design object emerges through several iterations. However, the result of such a process can only partly anticipate how the future real users will use the designed object. For this reason, its actual use needs to be investigated. The present study investigated the relationship between intended use and real use in two web-based health support systems in order to explore the conditions for redesign. The dependency between intended use and real use was found to be weak. Rather, the real use was dependent on 1) the context of use and 2) the needs or interest of the users. We conclude that redesign should be based on continuous use of web metrics collected in natural settings and by involving users on a recurring basis. While a web health portal must have an agenda it is important to adapt thing design to use design, why redesign in essence will become an adaptation to user needs. ©Copyright of articles originally published in www.eJHI.net under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License is retained by the authors.

  • 27.
    Elf, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg , Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    'The web is not enough, it's a base': an explorative study of what needs a web-based support system for young carers must meet2011In: Informatics for Health and Social Care, ISSN 1753-8157, E-ISSN 1753-8165, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 206-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about the specific needs that a web-based support system for young carers (YCs) must meet. Twelve young people with experience of caring for and supporting a close friend, partner or relative with mental illness (MI) were interviewed about their life situation, support needs and opinions about a hypothetical web-based support system. The transcribed interviews were analysed using content analysis. The analysed data were organised into three themes relating to support needs, each including a number of sub-themes: knowledge--understanding MI, managing the mentally ill person and self-care; communication--shared experiences, advice and feedback, and befriending; and outside involvement--acute relief, structured help and health care commitments. Web-based support for YCs may be a suitable way to meet the need for knowledge and to meet some of the needs for communication. We have outlined a concept of a geographically anchored web support to meet the need for befriending, facilitate connections to health and social care, and increase understanding and interaction between the parties involved. Further research is needed to corroborate the results.

  • 28.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    et al.
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Callaghan, Patrick
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    van Dommelen, Riet
    Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Keogh, Brian
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    van de Sande, Roland
    Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Sitvast, Jan
    Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stickley, Theodore
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Päivi
    Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Helsinki, Finland.
    eMenthe: a European co-operation project to enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice with eLearning material2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29. Göransson, Carina
    et al.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Wijk, Helle
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Kvalitetsutveckling inom hälso- och sjukvård2006In: Grundläggande omvårdnad. 4 / [ed] Nina Jahren Kristoffersen, Finn Nortvedt & Eli-Anne Skaug, Stockholm: Liber, 2006, 1, p. 152-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Hedberg, L
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    The importance of health for persons with psychiatric disabilities2009In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 455-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons with psychiatric disabilities often lead an isolated life, and their living conditions are usually not as good as those of other people. There are few studies that describe these individuals' own opinions of what can contribute to increased health. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the importance of health for persons with psychiatric disabilities. The study group comprised 12 persons, living in the community in west of Sweden, who were interviewed during 2005. The data were analysed by means of qualitative content analysis. The findings revealed five categories: (1) help and support in daily life; (2) being part of a social context; (3) having a meaningful daily life; (4) using resources in the right way; and (5) experiencing well-being. The result showed that interventions that promote health need to be clarified and strengthened by means of coordinated efforts from the healthcare services and the local community. In addition, persons with psychiatric disabilities should be invited and encouraged to participate in society as well as being listened to and having their needs addressed.

  • 31.
    Hedman Ahlström, Britt
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Children's view of a major depression affecting a parent in the family2011In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 560-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to elucidate, from the children's perspective, the meaning for family life of a parent suffering a major depression disorder. Eight children and young adults were interviewed. Phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis generated two themes: (1) "Being a rescuing observer" with the subthemes, "Being attentive" and "Being considerate," and (2) "Being a frustrated observer" with the subthemes, "feeling discomfort" and "being out of it." Children's lives alternate between responsibility and loneliness as they wait for reciprocity in family life to return to normal. Children need support in order to manage their sense of responsibility and loneliness adequately.

  • 32.
    Holmgren Melin, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden & Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Storm Mowatt Haugland, Bente
    Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Tord
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Eastern and Southern Norway, Box 4623 Nydalen, N-0405 Oslo, Norway.
    Treatment and 12-month outcome of children and adolescents with obsessive–compulsive disorder: A naturalistic study2015In: Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, ISSN 2211-3649, E-ISSN 2211-3657, Vol. 6, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disorder associated with distress and impairment in many domains. Moreover, there is a high risk of relapse and developing a chronic illness. Randomized-controlled trails (RCT), the gold-standard for evaluating treatments, show treatments to be efficacious, yet little is known about their generalizability and long-term durability in "usual-care" settings. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of evidence-based pediatric OCD-treatments in regular practice. Participants were 109 children (aged 7-17 years) with aprimary diagnosis of OCD, recruited from a specialized OCD-clinic in Sweden. Few exclusion criteria were applied. The youths were assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 months following the first assessment, using Childre's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Children's OCD Impact Scale. They were treated with Cognitive Behavior Therapy, augmented with SSRI when indicated. The majority responded well to treatment i.e. were free from OCD or in remission at 12 month evaluation. Moreover, the participants psychosocial functioning significantly improved from baseline to evaluation at 6 and 12months. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  • 33.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margaretha
    et al.
    Centrum for Children's Right, Queen Silvia's Children's Hospital Sahlgrenska University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wee Sævig, B. I.
    The Norwegian Cancer Society, Bergen, Norway.
    Challinor, J.
    Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention. Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Abramovitz, L. Z.
    UCSF Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    A Global Web-based Programme about Cancer in Language Specific for Staff, a Sick Child and Their Family2013In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 60, no Suppl. 3, p. 185-185, article id P-0565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose/Objective: To have expert paediatric oncology nurses to inform and explain childhood cancer diagnoses, treatments, side effects, situations and feelings, by developing a web-based programme.

    Materials and Methods: The programme will be developed and tested in three steps. Step 1 is to develop a web portal with animated pictures of cancer themes based on the ’See Hear Do’ programme in Sweden and Norway. Step 2 is to add text and audio in several languages for each theme (such as Arabic, English, Spanish). Step 3 is to develop two informational sections on the web portal: one section for staff and for the patient and family. The staff, children and families will evaluate each section as appropriate before the programme is published on the web portal. A participatory design method is going to be used. The programme will also be offered to nurses in the International Society of Paediatric Oncology and nursing working group of the Pediatric Oncology in Developing Countries committee for translation into their native languages.

    Results: Expected result is that the web portal can easily be downloaded via computer, iPad or mobile and can be used twofold. Staff can use this programme for self-education and for working with the child and family. The child and family can use the web programme in various situations during the child’s cancer treatment, e.g., explaining the diagnosis to family members, schoolmates, families’ networks, during phone calls using an interpreter or for persons with a visual or auditory disability.

    Conclusions: Goal of the project is to globalize childhood cancer education and information with a web-based programme including pictures, text and audio in various languages. The programme is designed to consider the professional’s information and the child and family’s needs and participation. The active role of all stakeholders to ensure cultural relevance is key to this project.

  • 34.
    Johansson, I M
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg.
    Danielson, Ella
    University of Gothenburg.
    Encounters in a locked psychiatric ward environment2007In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 366-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This focused ethnographic study aims at describing encounters in the healthcare environment on a locked psychiatric ward. It was carried out in Sweden on an acute psychiatric ward for patients with affective and eating disorders. Data were collected through participant observations and informal interviews, and analysed by qualitative content analysis. The result shows that the healthcare environment on this locked psychiatric ward offered a space for encounters between people, in a continuum from professional care to private meetings and social events. It included joy and friendship as well as unintentional insights into other patients' suffering. The characteristics of the encounters formed three themes: the caring relationship, the uncaring relationship and the unrecognized relationship. The caring and the uncaring relationship concerned relationships between staff and patients or their next of kin. These revealed contrasting qualities such as respect and flexibility as well as lack of respect and mistrust. The unrecognized relationship theme visualized the patients' relationships with each other and included both supportive and intrusive elements that were probably significant for the outcome of care. The unrecognized relationship contributes with new knowledge about conditions for patients in inpatient care, and indicates that the patients' relationships with each other merit greater attention. © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Inger M.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg.
    Danielson, Ella
    University of Gothenburg.
    The health-care environment on a locked psychiatric ward: an ethnographic study2006In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 242-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent changes in psychiatric hospital care involving a reduction in the number of beds and time spent in hospital motivated the study of conditions of inpatient care on such wards. An ethnographic study of a locked, acute psychiatric ward in a department of psychiatry was performed with the aim of describing the health-care environment in such a ward. The ward admitted patients on both a voluntarily and involuntarily basis. Data were collected by means of 3.5 months of participant observations. The results showed a health-care environment that was overshadowed by control. Staff were in control but they also lacked control; they attempted to master the situation in line with organizational demands and they sometimes failed. At the same time, the staff tried to share the responsibility of caring for patients and next of kin. Patients were controlled by staff; they were the underdogs and dependent on staff for their care and the freedom to leave the ward. Patients tried to make themselves heard and reacted to the control by developing counter-strategies. What this study adds to earlier research is patients' pressure on staff and sometimes quite an open struggle for more control, which may be an expression for an unacceptable imbalance in power between patients and staff. © 2006 The Authors.

  • 36.
    Johansson, Inger M
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The meaning of care on a locked acute psychiatric ward: Patients' experiences2009In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 501-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The deinstitutionalization of psychiatric care has led to a concentration of patients to fewer wards. This leads to difficulties in separating voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients, and there is a risk that the interest in safeguarding patients' autonomy will decrease. AIMS: The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning care has to patients on a locked acute psychiatric ward. The study was performed on a ward for patients with affective and eating disorders who were admitted both voluntarily and involuntarily. METHODS: Interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The results show that to the patients, care had contradictory qualities some alleviated their suffering while others contributed to stress. The alleviation from suffering originated from the experiences of strengthened integrity and self-determination, from being supported, and having a place of refuge on the ward. In contrast to this, there were experiences of being dependent and trapped because of lack of influence and choice, and being controlled. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this qualitative study shows that to the patients, care can mean being disciplined in a way that risks undermining the alleviation of suffering that care can provide. It is thus important to be observant when it comes to manifestations of control in care. The study also shows that the support of fellow patients has a value as a complement to the care given by staff members and next of kin, something that needs to be further investigated.

  • 37.
    Johansson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella B.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The experience of working on a locked acute psychiatric ward2013In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 321-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study’s aim was to elucidate health-care staff experience of working on a lockedacute psychiatric ward. In many countries changes in health care has contributed tofewer beds available in inpatient care, and a concentration of patients with severepsychiatric conditions. This implies a changing work environment in acute psychiatriccare. Qualitative interviews with health-care staff (n = 10) were carried out on a wardfor patients with affective disorder and eating disorder in a Swedish hospital. Qualitativecontent analysis was used. Four themes were identified from the data: ‘undergoingchanges in care delivery’, ‘feeling a need for security and control’, ‘managing thedemands at work’ and ‘feeling a sense of responsibility’. This study adds to earlierresearch into how a sense of responsibility can place a significant burden on health-carestaff working on a locked psychiatric ward and also contribute to increased control ofpatients. This study also shows that relationships and power structures among healthcarestaff need to be addressed when organizational changes are made in care delivery.Further research is needed to reach a comprehensive understanding of care on lockedacute psychiatric wards, including a development of nursing and medicine as knowledgedomains in one common context.

  • 38.
    Josefsson, Ulrika
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Angered Hospital, Angered, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellström, Anna-Lena
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Koinberg, Ingalill
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margareta
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Web-based support in long-term illness – a person-centred care approach2012In: Scandinavian Conference on Health Informatics 2012 October 2–3 oktober, Linköping, Sverige / [ed] Daniel Karlsson, Johan Gustav Bellika, Pia Britt Elberg, Mariann Fossum, Gert Galster, Gunnar Hartvigsen, Sabine Koch & Gunilla Nilsson, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 59-59Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Josefsson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sweden & Angered Hospital, Angered, Sweden .
    Berg, Marie
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden & School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Koinberg, Ingalill
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellström, Anna-Lena
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margareta
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ranerup, Agneta
    Department of Applied IT, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Person-centred web-based support - development through a Swedish multi-case study2013In: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, ISSN 1472-6947, E-ISSN 1472-6947, Vol. 13, article id 119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Departing from the widespread use of the internet in modern society and the emerging use of web applications in healthcare this project captures persons’ needs and expectations in order to develop highly usable web recourses. The purpose of this paper is to outline a multi-case research project focused on the development and evaluation of person-centred web-based support for people with long-term illness. To support the underlying idea to move beyond the illness, we approach the development of web support from the perspective of the emergent area of person-centred care. The project aims to contribute to the ongoing development of web-based supports in health care and to the emerging field of person-centred care.

    Methods/Design

    The research design uses a meta-analytical approach through its focus on synthesizing experiences from four Swedish regional and national cases of design and use of web-based support in long-term illness. The cases include children (bladder dysfunction and urogenital malformation), young adults (living close to persons with mental illness), and two different cases of adults (women with breast cancer and childbearing women with type 1 diabetes). All of the cases are ongoing, though in different stages of design, implementation, and analysis. This, we argue, will lead to a synthesis of results on a meta-level not yet described.

    Discussion

    To allow valid comparisons between the four cases we explore and problematize them in relation to four main aspects: 1) The use of people’s experiences and needs; 2) The role of use of theories in the design of person-centred web-based supports; 3) The evaluation of the effects of health outcomes for the informants involved and 4) The development of a generic person-centred model for learning and social support for people with long-term illness and their significant others. Person-centred web-based support is a new area and few studies focus on how web-based interventions can contribute to the development of person-centred care. In summary, the main intention of the project outlined here is to contribute with both a synthesis of results on meta-level from four cases and a substantial contribution to the field person-centred care.

  • 40.
    Jönsson, P D
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wijk, Helle
    Inst. of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Outcomes of an educational intervention for the family of a person with bipolar disorder: a 2-year follow-up study2011In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 333-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to analyse the outcomes of an educational intervention for family members living with a person with bipolar disorder. A longitudinal study was conducted comprising a 10-session educational intervention designed for families with members in outpatient mental health care. Thirty-four family members agreed to participate. Data were collected on five occasions, at baseline and during a 2-year follow-up through self-assessment instruments: the Carers of Older People in Europe Index, the Jalowiec Coping Scale-40, the Sense of Coherence questionnaire and the Social Adaptation Self-evaluation Scale. The results showed that the condition had a considerable negative impact on the family members as carers, but the educational intervention increased their understanding, which facilitated the management of their lives. A significant improvement in stress management was seen over time and social functioning was retained. The study showed that families living with one member with bipolar disorder benefited from the educational intervention in terms of increasing understanding of the condition and reducing stress. Mental health care needs to develop educational interventions further and offer the families support to strengthen their ability to manage with the situation.

  • 41.
    Jönsson, Patrik Dahlqvist
    et al.
    Institute of Heath and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Institute of Heath and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wijk, Helle
    Institute of Heath and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Institute of Heath and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Experience of living with a family member with bipolar disorder2011In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe illness that has a serious impact on the lives of those affected and on their families. The aim of this study was to elucidate what it means for family members to live with an adult person who has BD, with reference to their views concerning the condition of the person affected and the future. During 2005, 17 family members of people with the disorder were interviewed, and the data obtained were subjected to a qualitative content analysis. The findings showed that family members felt alone with their experiences and struggled to make sense of and to maintain normality, as their life was encroached on by the condition. Bearing the burden of responsibility and control made it difficult for family members to focus on their own future. To build hope, they needed opportunities to share their experiences with others, increased understanding of the condition, and relief from the burden they bore. This study underlines the importance of strengthening support holistically for family members living with an adult person with BD. Support and interventions concerning these families' needs have to be developed and should be provided by all mental health-care services.

  • 42.
    Jönsson, Patrik Dahlqvist
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy/The Vårdal Institute, Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wijk, Helle
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska Academy/The Vårdal Institute, Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Caring Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Psychiatric Services in Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Persons living with bipolar disorder: Their view of the illness and the future2008In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 29, no 11, p. 1217-1236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe the meaning of living with bipolar disorder (BD) based on individuals' views of the illness and their future. Interviews were conducted with 18 participants who resided in Sweden and had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Qualitative content analysis was employed. The findings revealed that daily life of those with BD was characterized by insecurity and challenges of accepting, understanding, and managing the illness. Increased hope of being able to influence the condition and receiving support to achieve a stable structure in life facilitates the management of daily life. Further research is needed on the next of kins' experiences of living with persons with BD. Copyright © Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

  • 43.
    Karpowicz, Ewa
    et al.
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Anorexia & Bulimia Unit, SE-41685 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Nursing, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nevonen, Lauri
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro and Capio Anorexia Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Self-esteem in patients treated for anorexia nervosa2009In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 318-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) mainly affects girls or women between 13 and 45 years of age. According to previous studies, one of the reasons for the desire to be thin is low self-esteem. The purpose of the study was to examine the self-esteem of 38 female patients with AN between 16 and 25 years of age, before and after 3 months of treatment at a specialist ward for eating disorders in Göteborg, Sweden. A quantitative pre- and post-assessment based on two self-rating questionnaires, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE-S) and three subscales (weight phobia, body dissatisfaction, and ineffectiveness) of Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2), together with body mass index (BMI), were used in the study, which was conducted between June 2005 and March 2008. The results reveal that self-esteem, BMI, weight phobia, and body dissatisfaction improved significantly between pre- and post-treatment. The RSE-S and EDI-2 ineffectiveness correlate highly with one another, which lends support to convergent validity, and the internal consistency was high for both the RSE-S and EDI-2 ineffectiveness. The results indicate that the treatment was effective, as both patients' self-esteem and BMI increased after completed treatment, which was the primary goal of the treatment at this ward. Future studies should focus on follow up and the way self-esteem manifests itself at different points in time within an individual.

  • 44.
    Keogh, Brian
    et al.
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Lahti, Mari
    University of Applied Science, Turku, Finland.
    Meade, Oonagh
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stickley, Theodor
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Kilkku, Nina
    University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Developing e-learning materials in mental health: the eMenthe Project2017In: Mental Health Practice, ISSN 1465-8720, E-ISSN 2047-895X, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 36-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a European collaborative project that developed master’s degree level e-learning materials for mental health nurses. The e-learning materials are freely available online at www.ementhe.eu

  • 45.
    Keogh, Brian
    et al.
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Killku, Nina
    Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Turku University, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Kalevo, Camilla
    Läksy, Marja-Liisa
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Stickley, Theodore
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Päivi
    Diaconia University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Developing Master’s level eLearning material in mental health – Phase one, consulting with key stakeholders2014In: Book of Abstracts, 2014, p. 116-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The need to develop education programmes for mental health nurses that are responsive to the needs of key stakeholders is essential to ensuring that mental health nursing practices remain contemporary and consistent with national and international mental health policy. To this end, a group of mental health nursing faculty from seven European countries came together to develop transferable eLearning materials for Masters Levels mental health nursing students focusing on a three of key areas; 1)recovery and social inclusion, 2) mental health promotion and prevention and 3) working with families and caregivers. This poster provides details of how the European partners will conduct the first phase of the project which is consultation with the key stakeholders (MSc Students, senior and expert mental health nurses, family and carer organisations and mental health service users).

    Aim and objectives: The aim of this project is to develop e-learning materials for Masters level mental health nursing education programmes based on the identified needs of key stakeholders.

    Methods: This research follows an action research design and this first phase will involve consultation with key stake holders using a qualitative approach. Data will be collected in three phases: 1. One focus group will be conducted with current MSc in Mental Health Nursing Students. 2. The participants (MSc Students) involved in phase one will be required to return to their areas of practice and gather information from 2 senior and expert mental health nurses using a prepared data collection template. 3. The researchers will collect data from the family carer organisations and mental health service users using telephone interviews using a prepared data collection template. This process will be repeated in all the European universities involved and will form the basis for the eLearning content.

    Analysis and Results: Data collection is due to start in December 2013.

    Recommendations: This collaborative approach to postgraduate mental health nursing education will ensure that a consistent, contemporary and needs driven eLearning package will be developed. 

  • 46.
    Keogh, Brian
    et al.
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    University of Applied Science Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Lahti, Mari
    University of Applied Science Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Meade, Oonagh
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Applied Sciences HU, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Stickley, Theodor
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Kilkku, Nina
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Working with Families Affected by Mental Distress: Stakeholders' Perceptions of Mental Health Nurses Educational Needs2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 822-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Family and informal caregivers provide a substantial amount of care and support to people who experience mental health problems. The aim of this study was to explore mental health nurses', students' and service users' perceptions of the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are required by mental health nurses to work with families and carers using a qualitative methodology. Three themes emerged from the data: Knowledge of the family and how mental distress affects the family; working with the family - support and education; and valuing the role of the family. The three themes demonstrate the complexity of preparing mental health nurses to work with families and carers, and the article offers recommendations about how this might be achieved. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 47.
    Kilkku, Nina
    et al.
    Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Tampere, Finland.
    Callaghan, Patrick
    University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Van Dommelen, Riet
    Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Henrika.Jormfeldt@hh.se.
    Keogh, Brian
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Van De Sande, Roland
    , Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Stickley, Theodore
    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Päivi
    Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Helsinki, Finland.
    eMenthe: a European co-operation project to enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice with eLearning materials2013In: Horatio, European Psychiatric Nursing Congress 2013: Abstract book / [ed] Neslihan Keser Özcan & Hülya Bilgin, 2013, p. 152-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are wide differences in the quality and content of mental health nurse education throughout Europe. These are evident in the course structures, emphasis and specific content. This diversity between programmes creates possibilities for countries to learn from one another and to share and benefit from the diverse approaches. As the concerns and development needs regarding mental health practices are shared, it is wise to identify best practices and to share these for mutual benefit to ensure the highest quality education and practice. To this end, seven European universities from Finland, Ireland, Sweden, United Kingdom and the Netherlands have commenced a collaboration to enhance  Master’s level education in mental health practice. The project’s aim is to develop eLearning materials with an action research approach in collaboration with Master’s level students from these universities and associated partners from clinical practice. eLearning materials on three central themes: recovery, mental health promotion and prevention, the role of families and caregivers will be launched for students in Master’s level and clinical practice to use.  International co-operation is seen as a quality assurance process; each of the partners are highly esteemed universities with extensive experience in mental health education, research and strong links with practice. With this kind of co-operation it is possible to enhance the quality of Master’s level education in Europe in the future. Funding for the project has been applied for from the Erasmus LLP-programme. At the time of the conference the project will have commenced if the funding decision is positive.

  • 48.
    Killku, Nina
    et al.
    Tampere University.
    Callaghan, Patrick
    University of Nottingham.
    van Dommelen, Riet
    University of Utrecht.
    Doyle, Louise
    Trinity College.
    Ellilä, Heikki
    Turku University.
    Higgins, Agnes
    Trinity College.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Kalevo, Camilla
    Keogh, Brian
    Trinity College.
    Läksy, Marja-Liisa
    van de Sande, Roland
    University of Utrecht.
    Sitvast, Jan
    University of Utrecht.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Stickley, Theodore
    University of Nottigham.
    Vuokila-Oikkonen, Päivi
    Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Finland.
    Developing eLearning materials to support professional competencies and clinical careers on Master's level mental health practice in Europe2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are wide differences in the quality of mental health nurse education at Bachelor and Master’s level throughout Europe. Furthermore, there are wide variations in content. However the concerns, challenges and development needs of mental health practice are shared in many countries. These issues form the basis for the EU-funded eMenthe-project (2013-2016) which aims to enhance Master’s level education in mental health practice by developing eLearning materials through a European co-operation.

    The co-operation includes seven European universities from Finland, Ireland, Sweden, United Kingdom and the Netherlands. These organizations and their respective Master’s students are associated partners of the project. International co-operation is seen as a quality assurance process; each of the partners is a highly esteemed university with extensive experience in mental health education, research and strong links with practice.

    ELearning –materials will be developed during this co-operation on three different themes. The themes include: mental health promotion and prevention, recovery and social inclusion and engaging with families and caregivers. These themes were agreed as common issues of concern for all partners prior to the application process. During the final year of the project (2016) eLearning materials will be made available to students undertaking Master’s level education and those working in clinical practice. This dual approach to dissemination will support the professional competencies of practitioners as well as academic progression. 

  • 49.
    Lundström, Sofie
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ahlström, Britt Hedman
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jormfeldt, Henrika
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Eriksson, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    The Meaning of the Lived Experience of Lifestyle Changes for People with Severe Mental Illness2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of the lived experience of lifestyle changes as perceived by people with severe mental illness (SMI). People with SMI who have experience in managing lifestyle changes were interviewed (n = 10). The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. The findings reveal three themes: (1) struggling with inner and outer limitations, (2) on one's own but together with others and (3) longing for living a life in harmony. The meaning of lifestyle changes can be understood as a person's internal and external endeavors to make well-considered decisions about lifestyle changes. Support should focus on strengthening the person's self-efficacy and should be based on the person's experiences. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 50.
    Melin, Karin
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skarphedinsson, Gudmundur
    University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Skärsäter, Ingela
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Storm Mowatt Haugland, Bente
    Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway.
    Ivarsson, Tord
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Eastern and Southern Norway, Oslo, Norway.
    A solid majority remit following evidence-based OCD treatments: a 3-year naturalistic outcome study in pediatric OCD2018In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports follow-up 2 and 3 years after the initial assessment of a sample of youth with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Participants were 109 children and adolescents, aged 5-17 years, recruited from a specialized, outpatient OCD clinic in Sweden. Patients were treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), augmented when indicated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). In cases where SSRIs were insufficient, augmentation with a second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) was applied. Participants were assessed with the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS), Children's OCD Impact Scale (COIS), and Children's Depressive Inventory (CDI) at follow-ups 2 and 3 years after baseline assessment. Treatment response was defined as CY-BOCS total score ≤ 15, and remission was defined as CY-BOCS total score ≤ 10. Analyzing the outcomes with linear mixed-effects models (LME) showed a decrease in OCD symptom load from 23 to 6.9 at the 3-year follow-up. Moreover, two of three (66.1%) participants were in remission, and another 19.2% had responded to treatment at the 3-year follow-up. Thus, 85.3% of participants responded to treatment. Moreover, during the follow-up period, participants' psychosocial functioning had significantly improved, and depressive symptoms had significantly decreased. The results suggest that evidence-based treatment for pediatric OCD, following expert consensus guidelines, has long-term positive effects for most children and adolescents diagnosed with OCD. The results also indicate that improvements are maintained over a 3-year period, at least, and that improvement is also found with regard to psychosocial functioning and depressive symptoms. © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG

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