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  • 1.
    Aronsen-Torp, Jenny
    et al.
    School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Berggren, Vanja
    School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Somali Women's Experiences of Cooking and Meals after Immigration to Sweden2013In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 146-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article elucidates Somali women's experiences of cooking and meals after immigration to Sweden. Six Somali women participated in repeated focus group interviews. Content analysis of the interviews resulted in four themes: change in routines and content of the daily meals, changed experiences related to cooking and shopping for groceries, the social dimensions in food-related occupations, and change of identity and roles. According to the women, variety of factors related to their life in Sweden had led to changes in their food occupations and meals: environmental changes, societal factors and the fact that the women secured employment. Although their new focus on employment led to altered responsibility and time for the cooking, foodrelated occupations remained important for the creation of identity and the maintenance of the family. This study may inform the development of strategies to restrict the negative impacts of immigration on Somali women's health. Future research will increase understandings of the relationships between food-related occupations and women's roles, identity and health. © 2013 The Journal of Occupational Science Incorporated.

  • 2.
    Berg, Marie
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Breastfeeding and its impact on daily life in women with type 1 diabetes during the first six months after childbirth: a prospective cohort study2012In: International Breastfeeding Journal, ISSN 1746-4358, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 7, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: For mothers with diabetes, breastfeeding is a great challenge due to their struggle with potentially unstable blood glucose levels. This paper explores breastfeeding attitudes and impact of breastfeeding on the daily life of mothers with type 1 diabetes compared with non-diabetic mothers.Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study of 108 mothers with type 1 diabetes and a reference group of 104 mothers in the west of Sweden. Data were collected through medical records and structured telephone interviews at 2 and 6 months after childbirth.Results: Women in both the diabetes group and the reference group had high levels of confidence (84% and 93% respectively) in their breastfeeding capacity before childbirth, and 90% assessed breastfeeding as a positive and an important experience during the six months of follow-up. About 80% assessed breastfeeding as influencing daily life 'very much' or 'quite a lot' at 2 months as did 60% at 6 months, with no difference between the groups. In mothers with diabetes, the impact of breastfeeding on the priority of other duties decreased over time, as did feelings of time pressure and negative effects on patterns of sleep. Compared to the reference group, mothers with diabetes at 6 months remained more affected by disruptions in daily life and they felt more worried about their health both at 2 and 6 months after childbirth. For the reference group mothers' sensitivity to unexpected disruptions in daily routines decreased between 2 and 6 months after childbirth, and they expressed a greater need to organize their time than mothers with diabetes.Conclusion: Mothers with diabetes type 1 express more worry for own health and are more sensitive to distruptions. To balance their everyday life and to reduce the risk of stress and illhealth they are therefor, compared to other mothers, likely to need additional professional and peer support. © 2012 Berg et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 3.
    Bigelius, Ulla
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The value and meaning of an instrumental occupation performed in a clinical setting2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 4-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate how patients in a clinical setting, combining acute stroke care and rehabilitation, perceived the value and meaning attached to a commonly used instrumental occupation, namely "Brewing coffee and making an open-face cheese sandwich with sliced vegetable". Another aim was to validate the ValMO model, proposing that value and meaning are related phenomena. Upon performing the occupation, 38 participants answered questionnaires concerning perceived meaning and occupational value. The results showed that the occupation was highly valued by the participants and that it was perceived as meaningful. No age or gender differences were found. The findings confirmed the proposed link between value and meaning. In conclusion, a commonly used and supposedly meaningful occupation was indeed found to be valued and meaningful by the patients and the findings validated the targeted aspects of the ValMO model. This study was unique in its focus on value and meaning in a clinical context. Futures studies should clarify if the link between meaningful occupation and well-being, which has been shown in many studies of everyday situations and is another of the assumptions in the ValMO model, can be proved in clinical contexts as well. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd.

  • 4.
    Björklund, Cecilia
    et al.
    Division of Health and Rehabilitation, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lilja, Margareta
    Division of Health and Rehabilitation, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Division of Health and Rehabilitation, Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Temporal patterns of daily occupations related to older adults' health in northern Sweden2014In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 127-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify characteristics of temporal patterns of daily occupations that could be related to high and low subjective health among older adults in Northern Sweden. A cross-sectional design imprinted by time-geographic methodology was used and participants 70 years and older were purposively selected and divided into groups of high and low health using the SoC-29 and SF-36 questionnaires. Daily occupations data were registered and analysed using VISUAL Time-PAcTS and related to health conditions using SPSS. The results showed that the participants in the high- and low-health groups showed similar patterns of participation in occupations during the 24-hour sequences describing their daily routines. Some differences in patterns of frequency and duration of occupations were shown between health groups during the 24-hour sequences as well as within six intervals. The low-health group showed higher frequencies and longer durations for “care for oneself” and “reflection and recreation” occupations and lower for “house-keeping” and “procure and prepare food” occupations compared to the high-health groups. There were few significant differences between the high- and low-health groups' mean durations for occupations. The results of this study could contribute to the support and assistance of occupations of older adults in society. © 2014 The Journal of Occupational Science Incorporated.

  • 5.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Hälsouniversitetet, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige & Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, landstinget i Östergötland, Linköping, Sverige.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper, Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Lättare psykisk ohälsa2015In: Återgång i arbete: processer, bedömningar och åtgärder / [ed] Kerstin Ekberg & Mona Eklund & Gunnel Hensing, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1:1, p. 111-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    JOS Special Issue: Occupational Science in Europe2012In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 2p. 91-92Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Institutionen för hälsa, vård och samhälle, Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Institutionen för hälsa, vård och samhälle, Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Ny struktur på vardagen - en hjälp vid stress-relaterad ohälsa2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 36, p. 1688-1690Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Swedish Institute of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Quality of life and client satisfaction as outcomes of the Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO) programme for women with stress-related disorders: A comparative study2013In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The outcomes, in terms of quality of life and satisfaction with rehabilitation, of the 16-week Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO) programme as a work rehabilitation method for women with stress-related disorders was evaluated. It was hypothesised that, compared to women who got Care as Usual (CAU), the ReDO group would improve their quality of life and self-mastery more, and that those differences would prevail at follow-ups after 6 and 12 months. Another hypothesis was that the ReDO group would be more satisfied than the CAU group with the rehabilitation received. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-two women were recruited to the ReDO intervention and a matched comparison group got CAU. METHODS: The data consisted of self-ratings of quality of life, self-mastery and satisfaction with the work rehabilitation received. RESULTS: The first hypothesis was only partially verified. No general group differences were identified, but closer examination indicated different trajectories in the two groups. There was an increase in quality of life in the ReDO group from baseline to completion of the work rehabilitation, and further increase at the six-month follow-up, while the quality of life in the CAU group was stable over time. Regarding self-mastery there was an increase from baseline to completed rehabilitation in the ReDO group but a pronounced decrease in the CAU group. Thereafter the group differences levelled out. The second hypothesis was verified. The ratings of client satisfaction were considerably higher in the ReDO group. CONCLUSION: The ReDO seems a promising work rehabilitation method for strengthening quality of life and self-mastery for the target group. Future research should include larger groups and be based on randomised controlled designs. © 2013 - IOS Press and the authors.

  • 9.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDOTM): Facilitating Return to Work Among Women with Stress-Related Disorder2015In: International Handbook of Occupational Therapy Interventions / [ed] Ingrid Söderback, Cham: Springer, 2015, 2, p. 553-563Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a scarcity of rehabilitation methods for people with stress-related disorders that are effective in terms of return to work and reducing sick leave. This chapter describes the Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDOTM) program for women with stress-related disorders, the development, its main principles, and primary and secondary outcomes. The ReDOTM program, which addresses people’s whole repertoire of everyday occupations, was effective in the primary healthcare context, compared to traditional rehabilitation provided by the Social Insurance Offices. Further research is needed, however, to establish a firm evidence base for the ReDOTM intervention. © Springer Internatinal Publishing Switzerland 2015.

  • 10.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Swedish Institute of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Women's perceptions of everyday occupations: Outcomes of the Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO) programme2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim was to (i) assess the outcomes of the 16-week Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO) programme for women on sick leave due to stress-related disorders, in terms of occupational value, satisfaction with everyday occupations, and participation level; (ii) investigate the relationships between those outcomes and return-to-work rate. Methods: A total of 42 women receiving ReDO and 42 receiving care as usual (CAU) were included in a matched-control study with measurements before and after the rehabilitation. Seventy-eight participated on both occasions. They completed self-report questionnaires regarding the aforementioned outcomes. Return-to-work data were obtained from the registers of the Social Insurance Offices. Results: Increases in concrete, symbolic, and self-reward values were found in both groups, but no statistically significant difference between the groups was demonstrated. The ReDO group improved more than the CAU group, however, on satisfaction with everyday occupations and participation level. Occupational value, but not satisfaction with everyday occupations, was related to return to work. Conclusions: Everyday occupations were shown to be relevant outcomes after work rehabilitation and could play an important role in future development of profession-specific evidence of occupational therapy. Further support was obtained for viewing occupational value and satisfaction with everyday occupations as theoretically distinct phenomena. © 2014 Informa Healthcare.

  • 11.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Vårdal Institute, Swedish institute for Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagell, Peter
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the Pearlin Mastery Scale in people with mental illness and healthy people2012In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 66, no 6, p. 380-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mastery refers to the degree to which people perceive that they can control factors that influence their life situation, and has been found important for people's quality of life and well-being. It is thus essential to be able to measure mastery in a valid and reliable way. Aim: This study aimed at using the Rasch measurement model to investigate the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the Pearlin Mastery Scale (Mastery-S). Methods: A sample of 300 healthy individuals and 278 persons with mental illness responded to the Mastery-S. Item responses were Rasch analysed regarding model fit, response category functioning, differential item functioning (DIF) and targeting, using the partial credit model. Results: The Mastery-S items represented a logical continuum of the measured construct but one item displayed misfit. Reliability (Person Separation Index) was 0.7. The response categories did not work as expected in three items, which could be corrected for by collapsing categories. Three items displayed DIF between the two subsamples, which caused a bias when comparing mastery levels between subsamples, suggesting the Mastery-S is not truly generic. Conclusions: The Mastery-S may be used to obtain valid and reliable data, but some precautions should be made. If used to compare groups, new analyses of DIF should first be made. Users of the scale should also consider exempting item 6 from the scale and analyse it as a separate item. Finally, rewording of response categories should be considered in order to make them more distinct and thereby improve score reliability.

  • 12.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Leufstadius, Christel
    Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Time use in relation to valued and satisfying occupations among people with persistent mental illness: Exploring occupational balance2010In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how temporal occupational patterns, operationalized as time use and daily rhythm, are related to occupational balance, in terms of the value and satisfaction that people with persistent mental illness derive from daily occupations. The respondents, 103 individuals visiting an outpatient psychosis unit, completed a time-use diary and questionnaires targeting occupational value and satisfaction. Spending more total time in non-rest occupations (TTNR), in the categories of self-care/maintenance, work/education and play/leisure, was related to perceiving more concrete value, such as making something or learning new things. TTNR was also related to symbolic and self-reward value and to having satisfying daily occupations. A subgroup with a daily rhythm that meant being active during the day and sleeping at night time perceived more symbolic value and greater satisfaction with their daily occupations than another characterized by low activity during the day and having turned the clock around by mostly sleeping and resting during the day. Temporal occupational patterns seemed important for perceived occupational value and satisfaction with daily occupations, seen as facets of occupational balance, and a spiral type of relationship was assumed. © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 13.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Persson, Dennis
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Occupational Value among Individuals with Long-Term Mental Illness2003In: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy / Revue Canadienne d`Ergotèrapie, ISSN 0008-4174, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 276-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The study compared the perceived value of occupation among a sample of individuals with long-term mental illness to a sample of people not diagnosed with mental illness. As well, it investigated whether diagnostic and demographic factors were related to perceived occupational value among the individuals with mental illness. Finally, the study examined the relationship between occupational value and ratings of health and well-being. Method. One hundred and three individuals with mental illness and 28 healthy individuals were recruited for the study. Results. Overall occupational value among the individuals diagnosed with mental illness differed only marginally from the healthy group, indicating that perceived occupational value was by and large not related to mental illness. Among the individuals with mental illness, having children living at home was related to occupational value. There were moderate to strong associations between occupational value and measures of health and well-being. Practice Implications. This study provides important insights into occupational value among individuals with persistent mental health problems and provides some preliminary evidence in support of the Value, Meaning and Occupation Model. © CAOT PUBLICATIONS ACE

  • 14.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & The Vårdal Institute, The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Persson, Dennis
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hagell, Peter
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rasch analysis of an instrument for measuring occupational value: Implications for theory and practice2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 118-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated psychometric properties of an instrument for assessing perceived occupational value, the 26-item OVal-pd. Data from 225 Swedish subjects with and without known mental illness were analysed regarding fit to the Rasch measurement model (partial credit model), differential item functioning (DIF), and functioning of the OVal-pd four-category response scale. The reliability (index of person separation, analogous to Cronbach's alpha) was good (0.92) but there were signs of overall and item level (six items) misfit. There was DIF between people with and without mental illness for three items. Iterative deletion of misfitting items resulted in a new 18-item DIF-free scale with good overall and individual item fit and maintained reliability (0.91). There were no disordered response category thresholds. These observations also held true in separate analyses among people with and without mental illness. Thus, the first steps of ensuring that occupational value can be measured in a valid and reliable way have been taken. Still, occupational value is a dynamic construct and the aspects that fit the construct may vary between contexts. This has implications for, e.g., cross-cultural research and calls for identification of a core set of culture-free items to allow for valid cross-cultural comparisons. Copyright © 2009 Informa UK Limited

  • 15.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wästberg, Birgitta
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Skåne University Hospital Malmö-Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    A longitudinal study of the working relationship and return to work: perceptions by clients and occupational therapists in primary health care2015In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The working relationship between client and therapist can be important to enhance outcomes from vocational rehabilitation for women with stress-related disorders in primary health care. The aim was to investigate the working relationship, as perceived by clients and therapists in the Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO™) program, and its relationships to return to work and satisfaction with the rehabilitation. Another aim was to compare the ReDO™ group and a "care-as-usual" (CAU) group regarding perceptions of the working relationship with the social insurance officer. © 2015 Eklund et al.; licensee BioMed Central.

  • 16.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Orban, Kristina
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Argentzell, Elisabeth
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bejerholm, Ulrika
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tjörnstrand, Carina
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The linkage between patterns of daily occupations and occupational balance: Applications within occupational science and occupational therapy practice2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 41-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterns of daily occupations (PDO) and occupational balance (OB) are recurring phenomena in the literature. Both are related with health and well-being, which makes them central in occupational therapy practice and occupational science. The aim was to review how PDO and OB are described in the literature, to propose a view of how the two constructs may be linked, and elaborate on how such a view may benefit occupational science and occupational therapy. The literature was analysed by latent and manifest content analysis and comparative analysis. The findings were summarized in a model, framing PDO as the more objective and OB as the more subjective result from an interaction between personal preferences and environmental influences. The proposed model does not assume a cause–effect relationship between the targeted constructs, rather a mutual influence and a joint reaction to influencing factors. Indicators of PDO and OB were identified, as well as tools for assessing PDO and OB. The authors propose that discerning PDO and OB as separate but interacting phenomena may be useful in developing a theoretical discourse in occupational science and enhancing occupational therapy practice. Although the scope of this study was limited, the proposed view may hopefully inspire further scrutiny of constructs. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 17.
    Eklund, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wästberg, Birgitta
    Department of Health Sciences, Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & The Swedish Institute of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Work outcomes and their predictors in the Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO) rehabilitation programme for women with stress-related disorders2013In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that the Redesigning Daily Occupations programme reduced the degree of sick leave and increased return to work rates among women on sick leave for stress-related disorders when compared with "care as usual". To further investigate the Redesigning Daily Occupations intervention, this study explored changes in the work situation from baseline to a 12-month follow-up in the Redesigning Daily Occupations group compared with the "care as usual" group and analysed any predictors of change. © 2012 Australian Occupational Therapy Journal.

  • 18.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lund universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    101 Women's patterns of daily occupations: Characteristics and realtionships to health and well-being2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigated the concept of balance in daily occupations. The overarching aim was to explore women’s patterns of everyday occupations and to investigate relationships between different aspects of patterns of daily occupations and health and well-being. The participants were working, cohabitant women with pre-school children. The methods used focused on exploring patterns of daily occupations and assessing sociodemographic aspects, self-rated health, and well-being. The results imply methodological development for documenting patterns of daily occupations, measuring occupation-related experiences associated with daily occupations, and categorising patterns of daily occupations according to complexity. This thesis identified the building blocks of patterns of daily occupations as main, hidden and unexpected occupations. Women’s hassling experiences associated with daily occupations were generated mainly by the social environment and their uplifting experiences resulted primarily from performing occupations. Moreover, typical patterns of daily occupations with respect to complexity were identified, and relationships of complexity in patterns of daily occupations to health and well-being were investigated. The result indicated that more hassles in combination with low control and high complexity in pattern of daily occupations mean an increased risk of experiencing low health and well-being. The findings contribute to the knowledge base of occupational science by further illuminating the concept of pattern of daily occupations: its constituents and its complexity. The results contribute to research on women’s total workload in relation to a sense of well-being and give implications for occupational therapy intervention for people who have taken ill due to imbalance in their pattern of daily occupations.

  • 19.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Coaching for learning – supporting health through self-occupation analysis and revision of daily occupations2012In: World Federation of Occupational Therapists Bulletin, ISSN 1447-3828, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 52-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recognition of daily occupations is important for promoting health. All the same, the everyday is often taken for granted, even if daily occupations that are hindered or lost may constitute a risk for developing ill-health. Risk factors might include occupational imbalance or occupational alienation.

    In this paper, the Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO) programme, an occupational therapy group intervention aimed at providing knowledge about daily occupations and their impact on health, is presented as an example of an educative approach within the profession. In the ReDO-programme, occupational therapists act as coaches to support learning about occupation. The group leaders use specific tools to facilitate self-occupation-analysis among participants. Understanding the influence of occupation may enable sustainable changes in the everyday and patterns of daily occupations that promote health. © Informa UK Limited 

  • 20.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fresh Perspectives on Occupation: Creating Health in Everyday Patterns of Doing2013In: New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1171-0462, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I would like to thank the New Zealand Association of Occupational Therapists and the Scientific Programme Committee for inviting me to present at this conference. It is an honour. The theme of this conference is Fresh Perspectives and I will present three perspectives on maybe the most central phenomenon for occupational therapists; namely daily occupations. My point of departure is my part of the world, a Scandinavian and Swedish approach to occupational therapy practice, occupational therapy research, and education. I present a view of the complexity of human occupation, from a time and doing perspective. The focus is how understandings of the organisation and structure of occupations can be used to enhance health. I will address an occupation focused intervention for women with stress-related illness, and where the knowledge can be used to enable participants to make self-directed changes in their daily occupations.

  • 21.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Stability in women's experiences of hassles and uplifts: A five-year follow-up survey2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 95-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hassles and uplifts, a concept used in measuring daily stress events, was applied to working mothers' everyday life. The aim was to explore the stability in working mothers' experiences in patterns of daily occupations, operationalized as hassles and uplifts, between the year 2000 (baseline) and the year 2005 (follow-up). Further, the intention was to reveal possible differences in the number, origins, and ratings of hassles or uplifts between baseline and follow-up. The baseline study comprised 100 women, of whom 77 agreed to participate in the follow-up study. At baseline the questionnaire THU-5 was applied in the form of an interview, and at follow-up it was adapted to a self-response questionnaire sent home to the respondents. Stability was explored qualitatively by investigating the reported causes of hassles and uplifts, and quantitatively by comparing the numbers and ratings of the experiences at baseline and at follow-up. The results indicate a certain amount of stability, although the cause of the experiences changes in line with changes in life stage. It was concluded that the methodology used (THU-5 and THU-3) was sensitive to these changes and could be applied in clinical settings, providing occupational therapists with a tool for detecting daily hassles that could be dealt with. Likewise, detected uplifts can be useful in the process of re-clesigning patterns of daily occupations affected by stress. Copyright © 2019 Informa UK Limited.

  • 22.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO)-Program: Supporting Women With Stress-Related Disorders to Return to Work - Knowledge Base, Structure, and Content2013In: Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, ISSN 0164-212X, E-ISSN 1541-3101, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 85-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the structure and content of an occupational therapy group treatment program intended to enable lifestyle changes for return to work, used with women who have stress-related disorders. The Redesigning Daily Occupations-program constitutes three phases. Phase I focuses on occupational self-analysis. Phase II focuses on setting goals and strategies for change, and Phase III is a job placement program that provides opportunities to implement the strategies when work is restarted. The program may be of use for the target group and additional populations where people experience difficulties in organizing their daily occupations. The program outcome should be evaluated. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 23.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences and The Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Department of Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Women's perceived frequency of disturbing interruptions and its relationship to self-rated health and satisfaction with life as whole2010In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 225-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Daily occupations form a pattern dominated by a few main occupations intertwined with hidden occupations. A third category is denoted unexpected occupations or minor events that interrupt the rhythm of main and hidden occupations. The phenomenon of unexpected occupations can be interpreted as an illustration of interruptions in daily life or daily minor stressors. The study aimed to investigate women's perceived frequency of such disturbing interruptions, and possible relationships with their self-rated health and satisfaction with life as a whole. The study included 202 women aged 38 years, and 286 women aged 50 years who replied to a mailed questionnaire. The results showed that perceived high frequency of interruptions was related to poor subjective health among the younger women, and to low satisfaction with life as a whole in both age groups. Furthermore, the younger women perceived disturbing interruptions more frequently than the older ones, and among the younger women those who had children living at home and lived with a partner experienced disturbing interruptions more frequently than those without children living at home or those living single. The results should be interpreted with caution because the measurement of perceived interruptions has not yet been subjected to psychometric evaluation. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 24.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & The Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & The Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Horstmann, Vibeke
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gard, Gunvor
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Holmström, Eva-Lotta
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Health factors in the everyday life and work of public sector employees in Sweden2012In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 321-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to explore aspects of everyday life in addition to established risk factors and their relationship to subjective health and well-being among public sector employees in Sweden. Gainful employment impact on employees' health and well-being, but work is only one part of everyday life and a broader perspective is essential in order to identify health-related factors.

    Participants: Data were obtained from employees at six Social Insurance Offices in Sweden, 250 women and 50 men.

    Method: A questionnaire based on established instruments and questions specifically designed for this study was used. Relationships between five factors of everyday life, subjective health and well-being were investigated by means of multivariate logistic regression analysis.

    Results: The final model revealed a limited importance of certain work-related factors. A general satisfaction with everyday activities, a stress-free environment and general control in addition to not having monotonous movements at work were found to be factors explaining 46.3% of subjective good health and well-being.

    Conclusions: A person's entire activity pattern, including work, is important, and strategies for promoting health should take into account the person's situation as a whole. The interplay between risk and health factors is not clear and further research is warranted. © 2012 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

  • 25.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Christiansen, Charles H.
    University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, USA.
    The Complexity and Patterns of Human Occupations2014In: Occupational Therapy: Enabling Performance, Participation and Well-Being / [ed] Charles H. Christiansen, Carolyn Manville Baum & Julie D. Bass, Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Incorporated , 2014, 4, p. 111-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve
    Institutionen för Neurovetenskap och fysiologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Kroksmark, Ulla
    Samhällsmedicinska institutionen, Lunds universitet, Dalby, Sverige & Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Interventionsprogram och metod för att underlätta i vardagen2014In: Hälsa och aktivitet i vardagen – ur ett arbetsterapeutiskt perspektiv / [ed] Ulla Kroksmark, Nacka: Förbundet Sveriges Arbetsterapeuter , 2014, p. 79-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Describing Patterns of Daily Occupations - A Methodological Study Comparing Data from Four Different Methods2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of patterns of daily occupations to health has been emphasised ever since occupational therapy was founded, but little is known about this relationship. The aim of this study was to describe in detail one woman’s pattern of daily occupations as an initial step in developing strategies for further studies of patterns of daily occupations. Four different methods were used, one on each of four days. Three types of occupations were discerned; main occupations, hidden occupations, and unexpected occupations, which intertwined and formed an occupational pattern. The occupations were, in turn, composed of actions. Using the diary method gave an overall picture of main occupations during a whole day. Direct observation and video-recorded observation added additional information about the actions that were the building blocks of the occupations, as well as about hidden and unexpected occupations. The fourth method, a variant of the experience sampling method, gave deeper knowledge about the informant’s reflections when performing an occupation. It was assumed that a detailed description of patterns of occupation is needed to understand its relationship to health. Therefore, if the diary method is used, it has to be combined with a subsequent interview. Direct observation was the single method that best captured the complexity of the pattern of daily occupations as captured in this study. Copyright © 2001 Informa UK Limited.

  • 28.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Levels of Complexity in Patterns of Daily Occupations: Relationship to Women's Well-Being2006In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study builds on a previous study of the everyday occupations of 100 women who worked at home and in the paid workforce. Their pattern of daily occupations was depicted using time-occupation graphs inspired by the time geography method, whereby the women’s pattern of occupations were categorised and clustered according to complexity. For each woman, the level of complexity was operationalised as the frequency of shifting between three categories of occupation (main, hidden, and unexpected) and sleep, along with the frequency of unexpected occupations and whether shifts in type of occupation were concentrated in limited parts of the day, e.g., the mornings. The study had two aims. First, to test the hypothesis that among women who work at home and in the paid workforce, those with low-complex patterns of daily occupations would rate their health and well-being higher than women having medium-complex patterns. As well, those with medium-complex patterns would rate their health and well-being better than women with highcomplex patterns. Secondly, the study aimed to investigate differences among these subgroups in relation to sociodemographic factors. The hypothesis was partly confirmed. Increasing complexity was associated with lower levels of self-rated health, but not with lower levels of sense of coherence and well-being. With respect to sociodemographic factors, the women in the three subgroups differed in terms of level of education. The results tentatively confirm theoretical assumptions of a link between patterns of daily occupations and experiences of health, and provide an incentive for further research on this relationship. © 2006, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

  • 29.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Return to Work Outcomes of the Redesigning Daily Occupations (ReDO) Program for Women with Stress-Related Disorders: A Comparative Study2011In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 676-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress-related disorders are a frequent cause for sick leave, with consequences such as great distress and adverse economic effects for the affected person and substantial costs for society. Identifying effective interventions that facilitate return to work is thus important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the 16-week Redesigning Daily Occupations program as a work rehabilitation method for Swedish women with stress-related disorders. The authors of this study hypothesized that, compared to women who got Care as Usual, 12 months after completed rehabilitation a larger proportion of the Redesigning Daily Occupations women would have returned to work, and they would have less sick leave, perceive less stress, and have greater self-esteem. Forty-two women entered the Redesigning Daily Occupations intervention and a matched comparison group received Care as Usual. The data, collected between 2007 and 2010, consisted of registry information and questionnaires targeting socio-demographics, perceived stress, and self-esteem. The findings partly verified the hypotheses. A larger proportion of the Redesigning Daily Occupations women returned to work and they decreased their sick leave and increased their self-esteem more than the Care as Usual group, but the groups did not differ in stress reduction. Thus, the Redesigning Daily Occupations seems to be a promising work rehabilitation method for women with stress-related disorders. © 2011 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 30.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    The Relationships of Hassles and Uplifts to Experience of Health in Working Women2004In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 19-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish women are more ill than men are, often explained by women's heavier total workload. A balanced pattern of daily occupations is believed to promote health. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of aspects of the pattern of daily occupations and lifestyle factors to working mothers' health and well-being, and whether control influenced any relationships. One hundred working, cohabiting mothers took part in semi-structured interviews targeting health and well-being, control, lifestyle variables, and hassles and uplifts in the pattern of daily occupations. All variables were dichotomised according to a median cut and subjected to logistic regression analyses. Working more and having a university diploma were found to be risk factors for experiencing more hassles. Risk factors for fewer uplifts were having more than two children and fewer leisure occupations. Experiencing less control constituted a risk of low self-rated health and with an additional high level of hassles impacted on the experience of well-being. © 2003 The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 31.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Vardagsrevidering: ett rehabiliteringsprogram för kvinnor med stressrelaterad ohälsa2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Women's experiences of hassles and uplifts in their everyday patterns of occupations2003In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, E-ISSN 1557-0703, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 95-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate experiences of hassles and uplifts among women. One hundred working mothers were interviewed using the Target Complaints instrument. Content analysis, resulting in both qualitative categories and quantitative variables, was used. Working mothers' hassles were mainly generated by their social, temporal and doing contexts and illustrate the importance of considering women's total patterns of everyday occupations and not focusing one-sidedly on the work situation when treating occupation-related ill-health. Women's uplifts were experienced through the social context and by doing such different occupations as going to the movies, cleaning the house, or attending a class. This indicates the appropriateness of using a client-centred approach in interventions with openness to the client's unique situation. Unexpected occupations were identified almost exclusively among the hassles. This is important knowledge for occupational therapists since women will continue to be dual workers and at potential risk of developing unbalanced and detrimental patterns of occupations, in turn causing ill health. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 33.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Vårdal Institute, Swedish Institute of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Persson, Dennis
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Occupational value and relationships to meaning and health: Elaborations of the ValMO-model2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 72-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This study investigates the theoretical assumption of the Value and Meaning in Occupations model. The aim was to explore the relationship between occupational value, perceived meaning, and subjective health in a sample of individuals of working age, 50 men and 250 women. Frequency of experienced values in occupations was assessed through the Occupational Value instrument with pre-defined items. Perceived meaning was operationalized and assessed by the Sense of Coherence measure. Subjective health was estimated by two questions from the SF-36 questionnaire. The analyses implied descriptive analyses, correlations, and logistic regression analyses in which sociodemographic variables were included. The findings showed highly significant relationships between occupational value and perceived meaning and when belonging to the high group of occupational value the likelihood was tripled of belonging to the high group of perceived meaning. When married or cohabitating there was double the likelihood of belonging to the high group of perceived meaning. Although perceived meaning was found to be positively associated with subjective health, working full time was the most important factor in explaining subjective health, compared with working less than full time. The results confirm assumptions in the ValMO-model, and the importance of focusing on occupational value in clinical practice is highlighted. © 2011 Informa Healthcare.

  • 34.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Carita
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Aspects of daily occupations that promote balance among women in Sweden2009In: Life balance: Multidisciplinary theories and research / [ed] Kathleen Matuska & Charles H. Christiansen, Thorofare, NJ: Slack Incorporated , 2009, p. 115-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35. Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Arbetsterapi: för rätten till aktivitet och delaktighet2011In: Tidningen Arbetsterapeuten, ISSN 0345-0988Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Avdelningen för arbetsterapi, Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Persson, Dennis
    Avdelningen för arbetsterapi, Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Brott och smutstvätt – en betraktelse av komplexiteten i vardagens göromål genom en litterär lins2005In: Aktivitetsvidenskab: i et nordisk perspektiv / [ed] Hans Jørgen Bendixen, Tove Borg, Elsebet Frydendal Pedersen & Ulla Altenborg, København: FADL's Forlag a/s, 2005, 1, p. 147-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Persson, Dennis
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    ValMO-modellen: Ett redskap för aktivitetsbaserad arbetsterapi2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rögnvaldsson, Thorsteinn
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Recognition of Similarities: A Methodological Approach to Analysing and Characterising Patterns of Daily Occupations2004In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 3-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been proposed that it should be possible to identify patterns if daily occupations that promote health or cause illness. This study aimed to develop and to evaluate a process for analysing and characterising subjectively perceived patterns of daily occupations, by describing patterns as consisting if main, hidden, and unexpected occupations. Yesterday diaries describing one day if 100 working married mothers were collected through interviews. The diaries were transformed into time-and-occupation graphs. An analysis based on visual interpretation of the patterns was performed. The graphs were grouped into the categories low, medium, or high complexity. In order to identify similarities the graphs were then compared both pair-wise and group-wise. Finally, the complexity and similarities perspectives were integrated, identifying the most typical patterns of daily occupations representing low, medium, and high complexity. Visual differences in complexity were evident. In order to validate the Recognition of Similarities (ROS) process developed, a measure expressing the probability if change was computed. This probability was found to differ statistically significantly between the three groups, supporting the validity of the ROS process. © 2004, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Fox, Jackie
    et al.
    Discipline of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Sciences, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Shiel, Agnes
    Discipline of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Sciences, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    A systematic review and narrative synthesis of occupational therapy-led interventions for individuals with anxiety and stress-related disorders2019In: Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, ISSN 0164-212X, E-ISSN 1541-3101, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 179-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anxiety and stress-related disorders are highly prevalent and impede participation in life activities. Occupational therapists work extensively with people diagnosed with these disorders but the effectiveness of their interventions is unclear. A systematic search strategy identified 19 papers describing 13 studies. Studies varied in methodology, intervention type, and theory base. The results show the potential for lifestyle approaches, occupational science-based programs, and skill-building to improve mental health. The variety of interventions and methodologies of many studies means that the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for this population is not yet determined. High-quality research is required to replicate interventions with emerging potential for effectiveness.

  • 40.
    Hocking, Clare
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Science and Therapy, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Kronenberg, Frank
    University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Nayar, Shoba
    Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Stanley, Mandy
    University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Wicks, Alison
    University of Canberra, Bruce, Australia.
    Wilson, Linda
    Otago Polytechnic, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Addressing diverse occupational needs: What new knowledge do European and New Zealand occupational therapists seek?2014In: New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1171-0462, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports preliminary efforts to canvas occupational therapists' opinions on occupational science research priorities. Findings, while not generalizable, suggest that occupational therapists are seeking to better understand how to influence the health of children and those with chronic conditions, as well as to have knowledge that underpins their practice in the use of occupation. Occupational science can support occupational therapy practitioners to meet future changes in the scope of occupational therapy practice. The initiative reported here is a small beginning in ensuring that occupational science fulfils its promise to inform the occupational therapy profession.

  • 41.
    Johansson, Gun
    et al.
    Primary Health Care, Region of Halland, Varberg, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University, Dept of Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Lund University, Dept of Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Everyday hassles and uplifts among women on long-term sick-leave due to stress-related disorders2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 239-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A balance between different experiences of occupations in everyday life is important for well-being. The study aim was to describe hassles and uplifts in everyday occupations among women on long-term sick-leave due to stress-related disorders. The sample consisted of 77 women and experiences were collected by the THU-5 instrument. The statements were analysed using quantitative content analysis. Data were categorized into three domains of hassles concerning oneself, doings, and social and physical context. The same domains occurred among the uplifts. Hassles were mostly generated by disturbing people around the women and by their limited body functions. The women were uplifted by supportive social relationships and by performing relaxing and calming occupations. The study illuminates the strong need for social support among women on sick-leave, as well as their low level of energy, which was an obvious obstacle for performing occupations. It is suggested that, in order to increase well-being in the target group, the occupational therapist should meet their need for occupations that match their current level of energy. The challenge for the client is to avoid remaining in a pattern of low-demand occupations without exceeding her/his capacity and returning to an unhealthy pattern of occupations. © 2012 Informa Healthcare.

  • 42.
    Leufstadius, Christel
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & The Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & The Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Meaningfulness in work – Experiences among individuals with persistent mental illness2009In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how people with persistent mental illness, with various types of work and employment conditions, experience and describe the meaningfulness of work. The study had a qualitative approach and twelve informants living in the community were purposefully selected and interviewed according to overarching themes. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis, and all of the authors were involved in the analysis process. The findings resulted in four main themes: 1) work per se has certain characteristics, 2) participation in different contexts gives a feeling of normality, acceptance, belonging and fulfilment of norms and values, 3) work affords structure, energy and a balanced daily life, and 4) work increases well-being and strengthens one's identity. A tentative model is described concerning perceived meaningfulness in work among individuals with persistent mental illness, in which the first three aspects of meaning are a prerequisite for meaning in terms of increased well-being and strengthened identity. Furthermore, it seems important that work has to bring the just right challenge to the individual in order for him or her to perceive the identified aspects of meaningfulness. © 2009 IOS Press. All rights reserved.

  • 43.
    Leufstadius, Christel
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden & The Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkman, Tommy
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Meaningfulness in daily occupations among individuals with persistent mental illness2008In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how people with persistent mental illness who work or study, attend a community‐based activity centre or have no regular activities, experience and describe the meaningfulness of their daily occupations. Data were gathered from 102 randomly selected individuals who were interviewed regarding their daily occupations and perceived meaningfulness using a ‘yesterday activity diary’. Content analysis revealed five main themes of meaningfulness: 1) Connection with others and the world around them, 2) Enjoyment and fun in life, 3) Being productive and having a sense of achievement, 4) Being occupied and having routines and projects in the stream of time and 5) Taking care of oneself to maintain health. Their connections, enjoyment and fun, and taking care of oneself were the aspects of meaningfulness that occurred most frequently. Participants who worked or studied more frequently identified connections, and made fewer statements about taking care of their health. The findings contribute to the knowledge of perceived meaningfulness in daily occupation, showing that despite different occupational structures and settings, all themes of meaningfulness were represented in the three groups. Thus, people with persistent mental illness create and find meaning within their daily occupations, although the occupations that generate these aspects of meaningfulness may differ. Copyright © 2018 Informa UK Limited

  • 44.
    Leufstadius, Christel
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, The Vårdal Institute, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkman, Tommy
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Meaningfulness in daily occupations among individuals with persistent mental illness2008In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how people with persistent mental illness who work or study, attend a community-based activity centre or have no regular activities, experience and describe the meaningfulness of their daily occupations. Data were gathered from 102 randomly selected individuals who were interviewed regarding their daily occupations and perceived meaningfulness using a ‘yesterday activity diary’. Content analysis revealed five main themes of meaningfulness: 1) Connection with others and the world around them, 2) Enjoyment and fun in life, 3) Being productive and having a sense of achievement, 4) Being occupied and having routines and projects in the stream of time and 5) Taking care of oneself to maintain health. Their connections, enjoyment and fun, and taking care of oneself were the aspects of meaningfulness that occurred most frequently. Participants who worked or studied more frequently identified connections, and made fewer statements about taking care of their health. The findings contribute to the knowledge of perceived meaningfulness in daily occupation, showing that despite different occupational structures and settings, all themes of meaningfulness were represented in the three groups. Thus, people with persistent mental illness create and find meaning within their daily occupations, although the occupations that generate these aspects of meaningfulness may differ. © 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

  • 45.
    Leufstadius, Christel
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy and Gerontology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Time use and daily activities in people with persistent mental illness2006In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, E-ISSN 1557-0703, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 123-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate time use in work/education, self-care/self-maintenance, play/leisure, rest/relaxation, and sleep in people with persistent mental illness. A further aim was to investigate how time use in the daily activities was associated with health-related variables and social interaction. The study comprised 103 participants with a diagnosis of persistent mental illness who completed self-ratings and interviews in order to assess (1) time use of activities during one 24-hour day, (2) social interaction and (3) health-related factors. The major results indicated that the total time in activity (TTA) and the time spent on work/ education and sleep seemed to be related to the majority of the target variables. Four groups of daily rhythm were identified and the daily rhythm groups differed concerning perceived mastery and social interaction. Although the results of this study were statistically significant they did not indicate clinical significance. Therefore, the assumption that there is a relationship between occupation and well-being could not be clearly verified. This study had a cross-sectional design based on a one-time measure, which is an important limitation for the validity of the study. Furthermore, no Bonferroni corrections were made for mass significance and some of the findings would have disappeared if such corrections had been made. More studies concerning time use in daily activities, and daily rhythm in relation to health and well-being are needed. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 46.
    Lundmark, Martina
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Thoracic Intensive Care Unit, Lund, Sweden & Department of Health Sciences at Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences at Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lennerling, Annette
    The Transplant Center, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Almgren, Matilda
    Skåne University Hospital, Thoracic Intensive Care Unit, Lund, Sweden & Department of Health Sciences at Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Department of Health Sciences at Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Skåne University Hospital, Department of Transplantation and Cardiology, Lund, Sweden.
    Health transition after lung transplantation - a grounded theory study2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 15-16, p. 2285-2294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To investigate lung recipients' process of transition from prior the transplantation to one year afterwards, as well as what their main concerns are and how they deal with these concerns. Background: During the last three decades, lung transplantation has been established as an effective treatment for patients with end-stage pulmonary disease. Towards the end of the 20th century, the concept of survival expanded to also include improving health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Although many studies have been published regarding lung recipients' HRQoL, aspects of health and everyday life remain understudied. Lung transplantation demands some kind of transition. However, very little is known about this transitional process. Design: A qualitative inductive approach using Grounded Theory (GT) was used. Methods: A total of ten adult males and five adult females (n = 15) with a mean age of 55 years were included in the study and interviewed one year after transplantation. The open-ended interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim after each interview. The analysis of the material was performed consistent with Charmaz contructivistic approach of GT. Results: The core category Reconstructing daily occupations summarises a process wherein the generated GT is present through four main categories: Restricting, Regaining, Reorganising and Enriching. The process of reconstructing daily occupations is necessary to regain health. Conclusions: A trajectory of health transition is evident, starting pretransplant with the lung disease and severe illness and proceeding at least up to one year after the transplantation with experienced health. Relevance to clinical practice: The result enables a unique possibility to enhance the lung recipients' striving for everyday life and thereby promote health. There is a need for change in the existing multidisciplinary transplant team to also include an occupational therapist to support and guide the lung recipients in changing their occupational patterns. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  • 47.
    Morville, Anne Le
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Methodological challenges when doing research that includes ethnic minorities2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 405-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are challenging methodological issues in obtaining valid and reliable results on which to base occupational therapy interventions for ethnic minorities. The aim of this scoping review is to describe the methodological problems within occupational therapy research, when ethnic minorities are included. Method: A thorough literature search yielded 21 articles obtained from the scientific databases PubMed, Cinahl, Web of Science and PsychInfo. Analysis followed Arksey and O’Malley’s framework for scoping reviews, applying content analysis. Results: The results showed methodological issues concerning the entire research process from defining and recruiting samples, the conceptual understanding, lack of appropriate instruments, data collection using interpreters to analyzing data. Conclusion: In order to avoid excluding the ethnic minorities from adequate occupational therapy research and interventions, development of methods for the entire research process is needed. It is a costly and time-consuming process, but the results will be valid and reliable, and therefore more applicable in clinical practice. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 48.
    Morville, Anne Le
    et al.
    The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente
    The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Christensen, Robin
    The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Amris, Kirstine
    The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Activity of daily living performance amongst Danish asylum seekers: A cross-sectional study2014In: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture, ISSN 1018-8185, E-ISSN 1997-3322, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 49-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) ability impairment in newly arrived Danish asylum seekers. It was hypothesized that exposure to trauma and torture would negatively influence ADL performance and that measures of ADL ability would be lower in individuals exposed to torture as compared to the non-tortured.

    SUBJECTS: Forty-three newly arrived asylum seekers aged 20-50 years, from Iran, Afghanistan and Syria, were consecutively included in the study. 

    METHOD: ADL ability was assessed with the observation-based test Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). Interviews were based on questionnaires about torture exposure, WHO-5 Wellbeing Index, Major Depression Inventory and Pain Detect Questionnaire. All participants were interviewed and tested using a linguistic interpreter. RESULTS: Thirty three (77%) participants reported exposure to torture. The tortured did not differ significantly from the nontortured on measures of ADL ability (two-sample t-tests: Motor, p= 0.36; Process, p= 0.82). ADL performance impairment was observed in the overall study sample. Twelve had motor and 15 process ability measures below age norms and 2 below both AMPS motor and process cut-offs for effortless and efficient ADL performance. There were statistically significant - weak to moderate - correlations between self-reported psychological distress, VAS average pain, pain distribution and the AMPS measures.

    CONCLUSION: The study results supported significant ADL ability impairment in tortured as well as non-tortured newly arrived asylum seekers. Implementation of performance-based evaluation of ADL ability as part of the initial medical screening of this particular population should be considered.

  • 49.
    Morville, Anne Le
    et al.
    The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark & Institute of Rehabilitation and Nutrition, Department of Occupational Therapy, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente
    The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Christensen, Robin
    The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Amris, Kirstine
    The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Activity of Daily Living Performance amongst Danish Asylum Seekers: A cross-sectional study2014In: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture, ISSN 1018-8185, E-ISSN 1997-3322, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 49-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of Activities of Daily Living (ADL) ability impairment in newly arrived Danish asylum seekers. It was hypothesized that exposure to trauma and torture would negatively influence ADL performance and that measures of ADL ability would be lower in individuals exposed to torture as compared to the non-tortured.

    Subjects: Forty-three newly arrived asylum seekers aged 20-50 years, from Iran, Afghanistan and Syria, were consecutively included in the study.

    Method: ADL ability was assessed with the observation-based test Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). Interviews were based on questionnaires about torture exposure, WHO-5 Wellbeing Index, Major Depression Inventory and Pain Detect Questionnaire. All participants were interviewed and tested using a linguistic interpreter.

    Results: Thirty three (77%) participants reported exposure to torture. The tortured did not differ significantly from the nontortured on measures of ADL ability (two-sample t-tests: Motor, p= 0.36; Process, p= 0.82). ADL performance impairment was observed in the overall study sample. Twelve had motor and 15 process ability measures below age norms and 2 below both AMPS motor and process cut-offs for effortless and efficient ADL performance. There were statistically significant - weak to moderate - correlations between self-reported psychological distress, VAS average pain, pain distribution and the AMPS measures.

    Conclusion: The study results supported significant ADL ability impairment in tortured as well as non-tortured newly arrived asylum seekers. Implementation of performance-based evaluation of ADL ability as part of the initial medical screening of this particular population should be considered.

  • 50.
    Morville, Anne-Le
    et al.
    Department of Rheumatology, The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark & Department of Occupational Therapy, Institute of Rehabilitation and Nutrition, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Amris, Kirstine
    Department of Rheumatology, The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Eklund, Mona
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Danneskiold-Samsoe, Bente
    Department of Rheumatology, The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    A Longitudinal Study of Changes in Asylum Seekers Ability Regarding Activities of Daily Living During Their Stay in the Asylum Center2015In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, ISSN 1557-1912, E-ISSN 1557-1920, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 852-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to assess change in activities of daily living (ADL) ability amongst asylum seekers and if there were any difference between tortured and non-torture following a 10 months post-arrival period, and if self-reported health and exposure to torture were factors related to change in ADL-ability. The study was a combined baseline, follow-up correlational study amongst individuals from Afghanistan, Iran and Syria, living in Danish asylum centers. Forty-three persons aged 20-50, were invited and participated in the baseline study. Twenty-two were still in asylum center at the follow-up and 17 of them participated. ADL-ability was measured using Assessment of Motor and Process Skills and questionnaires about exposure to torture, self-reported mental health and pain. ADL motor and process measures, well-being and self-rated health declined from baseline to follow-up. Measures of pain and depression increased. Exposure to physical torture and change in ADL motor (r = 0.525) measures were associated, as well as change in current pain and change in ADL process (r = 0.525) measures. Due to preponderance of torture survivors analysis of group difference was not applicable. Health care workers should be aware of ADL concerns and exposure to torture in this population to best address their needs within rehabilitation settings.

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