hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Dai, Junhu
    Institute Of Geographic Sciences And Natural Resources Research, Beijing, China.
    Pandey, Rajiv
    Indian Council Of Forestry Research And Education, Dehradun, India.
    Erfanian, Mohammad Bagher
    Ferdowsi University Of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Ahmed, Talaat
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Bai, Yang
    Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Mengla, China.
    Molau, Ulf
    University Of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Impact of ambient temperature, precipitation and seven years of experimental warming and nutrient addition on fruit production in an alpine heath and meadow community2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 836, article id 155450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alpine and polar regions are predicted to be among the most vulnerable to changes in temperature, precipitation, and nutrient availability. We carried out a seven-year factorial experiment with warming and nutrient addition in two alpine vegetation communities. We analyzed the relationship between fruit production and monthly mean, maximum, and min temperatures during the fall of the pre-fruiting year, the fruiting summer, and the whole fruit production period, and measured the effects of precipitation and growing and thawing degree days (GDD & TDD) on fruit production. Nutrient addition (heath: 27.88 ± 3.19 fold change at the end of the experiment; meadow: 18.02 ± 4.07) and combined nutrient addition and warming (heath: 20.63 ± 29.34 fold change at the end of the experiment; meadow: 18.21 ± 16.28) increased total fruit production and fruit production of graminoids. Fruit production of evergreen and deciduous shrubs fluctuated among the treatments and years in both the heath and meadow. Pre-maximum temperatures had a negative effect on fruit production in both communities, while current year maximum temperatures had a positive impact on fruit production in the meadow. Pre-minimum, pre-mean, current mean, total minimum, and total mean temperatures were all positively correlated with fruit production in the meadow. The current year and total precipitation had a negative effect on the fruit production of deciduous shrubs in the heath. GDD had a positive effect on fruit production in both communities, while TDD only impacted fruit production in the meadow. Increased nutrient availability increased fruit production over time in the high alpine plant communities, while experimental warming had either no effect or a negative effect. Deciduous shrubs were the most sensitive to climate parameters in both communities, and the meadow was more sensitive than the heath. The difference in importance of TDD for fruit production may be due to differences in snow cover in the two communities. © 2022 The Authors

  • 2.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Erfanian, Mohammad Bagher
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Molau, Ulf
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chen, Shengbin
    Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu, China.
    Bai, Yang
    Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden Chinese Academy of Sciences, Mengla, China.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Changes in plant composition and diversity in an alpine heath and meadow after 18 years of experimental warming2022In: Alpine Botany, ISSN 1664-2201, E-ISSN 1664-221X, Vol. 132, no 2, p. 181-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global warming is expected to have large impacts on high alpine and Arctic ecosystems in the future. Here we report effects of 18 years of experimental warming on two contrasting high alpine plant communities in subarctic Sweden. Using open-top chambers, we analysed effects of long-term passive experimental warming on a heath and a meadow. We determined the impact on species composition, species diversity (at the level of rare, common and dominant species), and phylogenetic and functional diversity. Long-term warming drove differentiation in species composition in both communities; warmed plots, but not control plots, had distinctly different species composition in 2013 compared with 1995. Beta diversity increased in the meadow, while it decreased in the heath. Long-term warming had significant negative effects on the three orders of phylogenetic Hill diversity in the meadow. There was a similar tendency in the heath, but only phylogenetic diversity of dominant species was significantly affected. Long-term warming caused reductions in forbs in the heath, while evergreen shrubs increased. In the meadow, deciduous and evergreen shrubs showed increased abundance from 2001 to 2013 in warmed plots. Responses in species and phylogenetic diversity to experimental warming varied over both time (medium (7 years) vs long-term (18 years)) and space (between two neighbouring plant communities). The meadow community was more negatively affected in terms of species and phylogenetic diversity than the heath community. A potential driver for the changes in the meadow may be decreased soil moisture caused by long-term warming. © 2021

  • 3.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; Environmental Science Center, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Calluna AB, Nacka, Sweden.
    Dai, Junhu
    Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; CAS-HEC, Islamabad, Pakistan.
    Mollazehi, Mohammad D.
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Abdel-Salam, Abdel-Salam G.
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Pandey, Rajiv
    Indian Council of Forestry Research and Education, Dehradun, India.
    Molau, Ulf
    Göteborgs Universitet, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of ambient climate and three warming treatments on fruit production in an alpine, subarctic meadow community2021In: American Journal of Botany, ISSN 0002-9122, E-ISSN 1537-2197, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 411-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Premise: Climate change is having major impacts on alpine and arctic regions, and inter-annual variations in temperature are likely to increase. How increased climate variability will impact plant reproduction is unclear. Methods: In a 4-year study on fruit production by an alpine plant community in northern Sweden, we applied three warming regimes: (1) a static level of warming with open-top chambers (OTC), (2) press warming, a yearly stepwise increase in warming, and (3) pulse warming, a single-year pulse event of higher warming. We analyzed the relationship between fruit production and monthly temperatures during the budding period, fruiting period, and whole fruit production period and the effect of winter and summer precipitation on fruit production. Results: Year and treatment had a significant effect on total fruit production by evergreen shrubs, Cassiope tetragona, and Dryas octopetala, with large variations between treatments and years. Year, but not treatment, had a significant effect on deciduous shrubs and graminoids, both of which increased fruit production over the 4 years, while forbs were negatively affected by the press warming, but not by year. Fruit production was influenced by ambient temperature during the previous-year budding period, current-year fruiting period, and whole fruit production period. Minimum and average temperatures were more important than maximum temperature. In general, fruit production was negatively correlated with increased precipitation. Conclusions: These results indicate that predicted increased climate variability and increased precipitation due to climate change may affect plant reproductive output and long-term community dynamics in alpine meadow communities. © 2021 The Authors. American Journal of Botany published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Botanical Society of America

  • 4.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    et al.
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Erfanian, Mohammad Bagher
    Ferdowsi University Of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Chen, Shengbin
    Chengdu University Of Technology, Chengdu, China.
    Sun, Shou Qin
    Institute Of Mountain Hazards And Environment, Chengdu, China.
    Molau, Ulf
    University Of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bryophyte cover and richness decline after 18 years of experimental warming in alpine Sweden2020In: AoB Plants, E-ISSN 2041-2851, Vol. 12, no 6, article id plaa061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is expected to affect alpine and Arctic tundra communities. Most previous long-term studies have focused on impacts on vascular plants, this study examined impacts of long-term warming on bryophyte communities. Experimental warming with open-top chambers (OTCs) was applied for 18 years to a mesic meadow and a dry heath alpine plant community. Species abundance was measured in 1995, 1999, 2001 and 2013. Species composition changed significantly from original communities in the heath, but remained similar in mesic meadow. Experimental warming increased beta diversity in the heath. Bryophyte cover and species richness both declined with long-term warming, while Simpson diversity showed no significant responses. Over the 18-year period, bryophyte cover in warmed plots decreased from 43 % to 11 % in heath and from 68 % to 35 % in meadow (75 % and 48 % decline, respectively, in original cover), while richness declined by 39 % and 26 %, respectively. Importantly, the decline in cover and richness first emerged after 7 years. Warming caused significant increase in litter in both plant communities. Deciduous shrub and litter cover had negative impact on bryophyte cover. We show that bryophyte species do not respond similarly to climate change. Total bryophyte cover declined in both heath and mesic meadow under experimental long-term warming (by 1.5-3 °C), driven by general declines in many species. Principal response curve, cover and richness results suggested that bryophytes in alpine heath are more susceptible to warming than in meadow, supporting the suggestion that bryophytes may be less resistant in drier environments than in wetter habitats. Species loss was slower than the decline in bryophyte abundance, and diversity remained similar in both communities. Increased deciduous shrub and litter cover led to decline in bryophyte cover. The non-linear response to warming over time underlines the importance of long-term experiments and monitoring. © 2020 The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  • 5.
    Biurrun, Idoia
    et al.
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Pielech, Remigiusz
    Uniwersytet Rolniczy im. Hugona Kollataja w Krakowie, Krakow, Poland; Foundation for Biodiversity Research, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Dembicz, Iwona
    Uniwersytet Warszawski, Warsaw, Poland; Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Gillet, François
    Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Besancon, France.
    Kozub, Łukasz
    Uniwersytet Warszawski, Warsaw, Poland.
    Marcenò, Corrado
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain; Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Reitalu, Triin
    Tallinna Tehnikaülikool, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Van Meerbeek, Koenraad
    KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Guarino, Riccardo
    Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Chytrý, Milan
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Pakeman, Robin J.
    The James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
    Preislerová, Zdenka
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Axmanová, Irena
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Burrascano, Sabina
    Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy.
    Bartha, Sándor
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Boch, Steffen
    Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Wald, Schnee und Landschaft WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Bruun, Hans Henrik
    Københavns Universitet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Conradi, Timo
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    De Frenne, Pieter
    Universiteit Gent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Essl, Franz
    Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Filibeck, Goffredo
    Università degli Studi della Tuscia Viterbo, Viterbo, Italy.
    Hájek, Michal
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja
    Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
    Kuzemko, Anna
    M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Molnár, Zsolt
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Pärtel, Meelis
    Ökoloogia ja Maateaduste Instituut, Tartu, Estonia.
    Pätsch, Ricarda
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
    Prentice, Honor C.
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Roleček, Jan
    Institute of Botany of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Pruhonice, Czech Republic.
    Sutcliffe, Laura M. E.
    Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Gottingen, Germany.
    Terzi, Massimo
    CNR Istituto di Bioscienze e Biorisorse, Bari, Bari, Italy.
    Winkler, Manuela
    Osterreichische Akademie Der Wissenschaften, Vienna, Austria; Universitat fur Bodenkultur Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Wu, Jianshuang
    Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Aćić, Svetlana
    University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Acosta, Alicia T. R.
    Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy.
    Afif, Elias
    Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
    Akasaka, Munemitsu
    Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Japan.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Aleffi, Michele
    Università degli Studi di Camerino, Camerino, Italy.
    Aleksanyan, Alla
    National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia.
    Ali, Arshad
    Hebei University, Baoding, China.
    Apostolova, Iva
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Ashouri, Parvaneh
    Agricultural Research, Education & Extension Organization, Iran, Tehran, Iran.
    Bátori, Zoltán
    Szegedi Tudományegyetem (SZTE), Szeged, Hungary.
    Baumann, Esther
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    Becker, Thomas
    Universitat Trier, Trier, Germany.
    Belonovskaya, Elena
    Institute of Geography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Benito Alonso, José Luis
    JOLUBE Consultor Botánico, Jaca, Spain.
    Berastegi, Asun
    Environmental Management of Navarre, Pamplona, Spain.
    Bergamini, Ariel
    Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Wald, Schnee und Landschaft WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Bhatta, Kuber Prasad
    Universitetet i Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Bonini, Ilaria
    Università degli Studi di Siena, Siena, Italy.
    Büchler, Marc-Olivier
    Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Budzhak, Vasyl
    Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi, Ukraine.
    Bueno, Álvaro
    Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
    Buldrini, Fabrizio
    Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Campos, Juan Antonio
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Cancellieri, Laura
    Università degli Studi della Tuscia Viterbo, Viterbo, Italy.
    Carboni, Marta
    Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy.
    Ceulemans, Tobias
    KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Chiarucci, Alessandro
    Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Chocarro, Cristina
    Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Conti, Luisa
    Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy; Institute of Botany of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Pruhonice, Czech Republic; Universitat de Lleida, Lleida, Spain.
    Csergő, Anna Mária
    Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Godollo, Hungary.
    Cykowska-Marzencka, Beata
    Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland; Wladyslaw Szafer Institute of Botany of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, Poland.
    Czarniecka-Wiera, Marta
    Instytut Technologiczno-Przyrodniczy, Warsaw, Poland; University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Czarnocka-Cieciura, Marta
    National Information Processing Institute, Warsaw, Poland.
    Czortek, Patryk
    Uniwersytet Warszawski, Warsaw, Poland.
    Danihelka, Jiří
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic; Institute of Botany of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Pruhonice, Czech Republic.
    de Bello, Francesco
    Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain.
    Deák, Balázs
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Demeter, László
    National Agency for Protected Areas, Miercurea-Ciuc, Romania.
    Deng, Lei
    Northwest A&F University, Yangling, China.
    Diekmann, Martin
    Universität Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Dolezal, Jiri
    Institute of Botany of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Pruhonice, Czech Republic; Jihočeská Univerzita v Českých Budějovicích, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
    Dolnik, Christian
    Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Dřevojan, Pavel
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Dupré, Cecilia
    Universität Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Ecker, Klaus
    Eidgenössische Forschungsanstalt für Wald, Schnee und Landschaft WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
    Ejtehadi, Hamid
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Erschbamer, Brigitta
    Universität Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Etayo, Javier
    I.E.S. Zizur Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
    Etzold, Jonathan
    ESTOK UG, Bernau (bei Berlin), Germany.
    Farkas, Tünde
    Nemzeti Park Igazgatóságok, Hungary, Kecskemet, Hungary.
    Farzam, Mohammad
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Fayvush, George
    National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia.
    Fernández Calzado, María Rosa
    Universidad de Granada, Facultad de Farmacia, Granada, Spain.
    Finckh, Manfred
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Fjellstad, Wendy
    The Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, As, Norway.
    Fotiadis, Georgios
    Geoponiko Panepistimion Athinon, Athens, Greece.
    García-Magro, Daniel
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    García-Mijangos, Itziar
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Gavilán, Rosario G.
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Germany, Markus
    Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Ghafari, Sahar
    University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran.
    Giusso del Galdo, Gian Pietro
    Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Grytnes, John-Arvid
    Universitetet i Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Güler, Behlül
    Dokuz Eylül Üniversitesi, Izmir, Turkey.
    Gutiérrez-Girón, Alba
    Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Helm, Aveliina
    Ökoloogia ja Maateaduste Instituut, Tartu, Estonia.
    Herrera, Mercedes
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Hüllbusch, Elisabeth M.
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    Ingerpuu, Nele
    Ökoloogia ja Maateaduste Instituut, Tartu, Estonia.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Jandt, Ute
    Martin-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Janišová, Monika
    Institute of Botany Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Jeanneret, Philippe
    Forschungsanstalt Agroscope Reckenholz-Tanikon, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jeltsch, Florian
    Universität Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Jensen, Kai
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Jentsch, Anke
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    Kącki, Zygmunt
    University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Kakinuma, Kaoru
    Shanghai University, Shanghai, China.
    Kapfer, Jutta
    The Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, As, Norway.
    Kargar, Mansoureh
    Natural Resources and Watershed Management Administration of Alborz Province, Karaj, Iran.
    Kelemen, András
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Kiehl, Kathrin
    Fachhochschule Osnabrück, Osnabruck, Germany.
    Kirschner, Philipp
    Universität Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Koyama, Asuka
    Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan.
    Langer, Nancy
    Stiftung Naturschutzfonds Brandenburg, Potsdam, Germany.
    Lazzaro, Lorenzo
    Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy.
    Lepš, Jan
    Jihočeská Univerzita v Českých Budějovicích, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
    Li, Ching-Feng
    National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Li, Frank Yonghong
    Inner Mongolia University China, Hohhot, China.
    Liendo, Diego
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Lindborg, Regina
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Löbel, Swantje
    Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Lomba, Angela
    Universidade do Porto, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Fornelo e Vairao, Portugal.
    Lososová, Zdeňka
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Lustyk, Pavel
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Luzuriaga, Arantzazu L.
    Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
    Ma, Wenhong
    Inner Mongolia University China, Hohhot, China.
    Maccherini, Simona
    Università degli Studi di Siena, Siena, Italy.
    Magnes, Martin
    Universitat Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Malicki, Marek
    University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland; Wroclaw Medical University, 50-367 Wrocław, Poland.
    Manthey, Michael
    Universität Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Mardari, Constantin
    Universitatea Alexandru Ioan Cuza, Iasi, Romania.
    May, Felix
    Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Mayrhofer, Helmut
    Universitat Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Meier, Eliane Seraina
    Forschungsanstalt Agroscope Reckenholz-Tanikon, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Memariani, Farshid
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Merunková, Kristina
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Michelsen, Ottar
    Norges Teknisk-Naturvitenskapelige Universitet, Trondheim, Norway.
    Molero Mesa, Joaquín
    Universidad de Granada, Facultad de Farmacia, Granada, Spain.
    Moradi, Halime
    University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
    Moysiyenko, Ivan
    Kherson State University, Kherson, Ukraine.
    Mugnai, Michele
    Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy.
    Naqinezhad, Alireza
    University of Mazandaran, Babolsar, Iran.
    Natcheva, Rayna
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Ninot, Josep M.
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Nobis, Marcin
    Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Krakow, Poland.
    Noroozi, Jalil
    Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Nowak, Arkadiusz
    Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland; Uniwersytet Opolski, Opole, Poland.
    Onipchenko, Vladimir
    Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Palpurina, Salza
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria; National Museum of Natural History Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Pauli, Harald
    Osterreichische Akademie Der Wissenschaften, Vienna, Austria; Universitat fur Bodenkultur Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Pedashenko, Hristo
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Pedersen, Christian
    The Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, As, Norway.
    Peet, Robert K.
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, United States.
    Pérez-Haase, Aaron
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Universitat de Vic - Universitat Central de Catalunya (UVic-UCC), Vic, Spain.
    Peters, Jan
    Michael Succow Foundation, Greifswald, Germany.
    Pipenbaher, Nataša
    Univerza v Mariboru, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Pirini, Chrisoula
    School of Biology, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Pladevall-Izard, Eulàlia
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Plesková, Zuzana
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Potenza, Giovanna
    Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Potenza, Italy.
    Rahmanian, Soroor
    Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran.
    Rodríguez-Rojo, Maria Pilar
    Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real, Spain.
    Ronkin, Vladimir
    V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv, Ukraine.
    Rosati, Leonardo
    Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Potenza, Italy.
    Ruprecht, Eszter
    Universitatea Babeș-Bolyai, Cluj Napoca, Romania.
    Rusina, Solvita
    Latvijas Universitāte, Riga, Latvia.
    Sabovljević, Marko
    University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Sanaei, Anvar
    Shenyang Institute of Applied Ecology Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China.
    Sánchez, Ana M.
    Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
    Santi, Francesco
    Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Savchenko, Galina
    V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv, Ukraine.
    Sebastià, Maria Teresa
    Universitat de Lleida, Lleida, Spain.
    Shyriaieva, Dariia
    M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Silva, Vasco
    Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Škornik, Sonja
    Univerza v Mariboru, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Šmerdová, Eva
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Sonkoly, Judit
    Debreceni Egyetem, Debrecen, Hungary; MTA-DE Lendület Functional and Restoration Ecology Research Group, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Sperandii, Marta Gaia
    Università degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy; CSIC-GV-UV - Centro de Investigaciones sobre Desertificación, Moncada, Spain.
    Staniaszek-Kik, Monika
    University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
    Stevens, Carly
    Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Stifter, Simon
    EURAC Research, Bolzano, Italy.
    Suchrow, Sigrid
    Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
    Swacha, Grzegorz
    University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Świerszcz, Sebastian
    Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland; Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, Poland.
    Talebi, Amir
    University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
    Teleki, Balázs
    Debreceni Egyetem, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Tichý, Lubomír
    Masarykova Univerzita, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Tölgyesi, Csaba
    Szegedi Tudományegyetem (SZTE), Szeged, Hungary.
    Torca, Marta
    Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain.
    Török, Péter
    Debreceni Egyetem, Debrecen, Hungary; MTA-DE Lendület Functional and Restoration Ecology Research Group, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Tsarevskaya, Nadezda
    Institute of Geography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Tsiripidis, Ioannis
    School of Biology, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Turisová, Ingrid
    Matej Bel University, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia.
    Ushimaru, Atushi
    Kobe University, Kobe, Japan.
    Valkó, Orsolya
    Institute of Ecology and Botany, Vacratot, Hungary.
    Van Mechelen, Carmen
    PXL University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Vanneste, Thomas
    Universiteit Gent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Vasheniak, Iuliia
    Vasyl' Stus Donetsk National University, Vinnytsia, Ukraine.
    Vassilev, Kiril
    Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Viciani, Daniele
    Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy.
    Villar, Luis
    Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Virtanen, Risto
    University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Vitasović-Kosić, Ivana
    University of Zagreb, Faculty of Agriculture, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Vojtkó, András
    Eszterhazy Karoly University, Heves County, Hungary.
    Vynokurov, Denys
    M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Waldén, Emelie
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Yun
    Senckenberg Museum of Natural History Görlitz, Görlitz, Germany.
    Weiser, Frank
    Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany.
    Wen, Lu
    Inner Mongolia University China, Hohhot, China.
    Wesche, Karsten
    German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Senckenberg Museum of Natural History Görlitz, Görlitz, Germany; Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    White, Hannah
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Widmer, Stefan
    Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Wolfrum, Sebastian
    Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan für Ernährung, Landnutzung und Umwelt, Freising, Germany; Institute for Organic Farming, Freising, Germany.
    Wróbel, Anna
    Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Krakow, Poland.
    Yuan, Zuoqiang
    Shenyang Institute of Applied Ecology Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China.
    Zelený, David
    National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Zhao, Liqing
    Inner Mongolia University China, Hohhot, China.
    Dengler, Jürgen
    Zürcher Hochschule Winterthur, Winterthur, Switzerland; Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Benchmarking plant diversity of Palaearctic grasslands and other open habitats2021In: Journal of Vegetation Science, ISSN 1100-9233, E-ISSN 1654-1103, Vol. 32, no 4, article id e13050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journal of Vegetation Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Association for Vegetation Science.Aims: Understanding fine-grain diversity patterns across large spatial extents is fundamental for macroecological research and biodiversity conservation. Using the GrassPlot database, we provide benchmarks of fine-grain richness values of Palaearctic open habitats for vascular plants, bryophytes, lichens and complete vegetation (i.e., the sum of the former three groups). Location: Palaearctic biogeographic realm. Methods: We used 126,524 plots of eight standard grain sizes from the GrassPlot database: 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 1,000 m2 and calculated the mean richness and standard deviations, as well as maximum, minimum, median, and first and third quartiles for each combination of grain size, taxonomic group, biome, region, vegetation type and phytosociological class. Results: Patterns of plant diversity in vegetation types and biomes differ across grain sizes and taxonomic groups. Overall, secondary (mostly semi-natural) grasslands and natural grasslands are the richest vegetation type. The open-access file ”GrassPlot Diversity Benchmarks” and the web tool “GrassPlot Diversity Explorer” are now available online (https://edgg.org/databases/GrasslandDiversityExplorer) and provide more insights into species richness patterns in the Palaearctic open habitats. Conclusions: The GrassPlot Diversity Benchmarks provide high-quality data on species richness in open habitat types across the Palaearctic. These benchmark data can be used in vegetation ecology, macroecology, biodiversity conservation and data quality checking. While the amount of data in the underlying GrassPlot database and their spatial coverage are smaller than in other extensive vegetation-plot databases, species recordings in GrassPlot are on average more complete, making it a valuable complementary data source in macroecology. © 2021 The Authors.

  • 6.
    Bouroussis, Constantinos A.
    et al.
    National Technical University Of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Simulations and Analysis of the Optimum Uniformity for Pedestrian Road Lighting Focusing on Energy Performance and Spill Light in the Roadside Environment2022In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 15, no 9, article id 2983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Road lighting uniformity is an essential lighting quality parameter for motorists and pedestrians and varies with lighting design parameters. Increased road lighting uniformity may result in benefits, such as increased reassurance and perceived safety for pedestrians or an increased overall visual perception. However, no previous study has investigated how road lighting uniformity varies with lighting design scenarios or how the uniformity of various lighting design scenarios affects other essential parameters, such as energy performance and obtrusive light. This study aimed to investigate: (I) how uniformity varies with different road lighting design scenarios, and (II) how uniformity correlates with energy performance and risk for increasing spill light. The study is limited to pedestrian roads. We performed photometric calculations in ReluxDesktop for more than 1.5 million cases with single-sided pole arrangements and for various geometries of road width, pole distance, pole height, overhang, and luminaire tilt. The results were analyzed with a set of five relevant metrics that were calculated and analyzed together with uniformity. For the evaluation, we used the minimum luminaire power needed to achieve an average illuminance of 10 lx, the power density indicator (DP), edge illuminance ratio (REI), and we introduced two new indicators for spill light on the ground in the border areas: the extended edge illuminance ratio (extended REI) and the spill flux ratio (RSF). The results show that increased uniformity levels may significantly increase energy consumption and spill light, but that both these impacts can be relatively controlled if uniformity is kept under certain limits. The investigated cases also demonstrated that improper lighting planning significantly increases adverse effects, such as spill light. © 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 7.
    Durmus, Dorukalp
    et al.
    Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennysylvania, United States.
    Nilsson Tengelin, Maria
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Borås, Sweden.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Investigating the methods and health outcomes of research studies on light pollution and human physiology and behaviour: a systematic review2022In: 2021 Joint Conference - 11th International Conference on Energy Efficiency in Domestic Appliances and Lighting & 17th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Lighting (EEDAL/LS:17), IEEE, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Light at night (LAN) enables humans to extend their lifestyle and exploration, cultivates economic growth, and increases the perception of safety. On the other hand, LAN has been connected to adverse health outcomes, such as circadian disruption, mood effects, and increased breast cancer incidence risk in humans. Studies investigating health outcomes of LAN utilize a variety of methods sometimes resulting in conflicting outcomes. We conducted a systematic review focusing on the experimental methods and health outcomes of LAN studies. While most studies found a negative impact of LAN on human health, lighting conditions were not adequately reported or controlled in many cases. Recommendations are provided for future research studies investigating LAN effects on human health outcomes. © 2022 IEEE

  • 8.
    Gren, Ing Marie
    et al.
    Swedish University Of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Brutemark, Andreas
    Calluna AB, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Effects of shipping on non-indigenous species in the Baltic Sea2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 821, article id 153465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shipping is regarded as an important vector for aquatic non-indigenous species (ANIS) worldwide. Less attention has been paid to its role in relation to environmental and economic causes of introduction and establishment, the knowledge of which is necessary to assess effects of changes in regulations on shipping. The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of shipping on the incidence of ANIS in the Baltic Sea compared with environmental and economic factors. To this end, a production function was estimated with count data on ANIS (response variable) and shipping, environmental and economic factors as explanatory variables. Regression results from different regression models showed that shipping has a significant impact on ANIS incidence and can account for up to 38% of the number of ANIS in the sea. Predictions of the impact of measures implementing the Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediment indicated a reduction by 17% in the number of ANIS, which was counteracted by an expected increase in shipping traffic. © 2022

  • 9.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. University Of Gävle, Gavle, Sweden.
    Brutemark, A.
    Biotopia, Uppsala, Sweden; Uppsala Naturskola, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Correspondence: Addressing and mitigating the ecological effects of light pollution requires ecological perspectives2022In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 10.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Gasparovsky, D.
    Slovak University Of Technology, Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Bouroussis, C. A.
    National Technical University Of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Schlangen, L. J.M.
    Eindhoven University Of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Lau, S.
    Yd Illumination, Hangzhou, China.
    Donners, M.
    Signify Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Correspondence: Obtrusive light, light pollution and sky glow2022In: Lighting Research and Technology, ISSN 1477-1535, E-ISSN 1477-0938, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 191-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 11.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Calluna AB, Nacka, Sweden.
    Development of an indicator system for local governments to plan and evaluate sustainable outdoor lighting2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 1506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor lighting offers many benefits to its users and is often considered a necessity for an active lifestyle when living in modern society. Sustainable outdoor lighting should fulfil the functional needs of the users, be cost-and energy-efficient, and result in minimal environmental impact. So far, a limited number of studies have been able to present clear strategies on how to plan and use outdoor lighting to ensure that it contributes towards sustainable development. Therefore, this study aimed to answer the following questions: (1) How many of the previously established sustainability indicators are already used by municipalities in their lighting planning? (2) Which types of indicators are not used by municipalities? Another aim of the study was to further develop the framework of sustainability indicators by adding new indicators that were identified from lighting plans of Swedish municipalities and the existing literature. In this study, lighting master plans from 16 randomly chosen Swedish municipalities with varying population sizes were analyzed. The results show that few sustainable indicators are used by the municipalities’ lighting plans, especially in the social dimension. The existing framework of sustainability indicators was developed by adding new indicators. Furthermore, 28 new indicators were identified, eight originated from new studies and the literature, and 20 originated from the municipalities’ lighting master plans. This study shows that there is a need for guidelines and recommendations for working with outdoor lighting from a sustainability perspective, especially in the social dimension of sustainability, where most of the new indicators were identified. © 2021 by the author. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 12.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Calluna AB, Nacka, Sweden.
    Bouroussis, Constantinos A.
    National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Ecological impact of artificial light at night: Effective strategies and measures to deal with protected species and habitats2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 11, article id 5991Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When conserving or protecting rare or endangered species, current general guidelines for reducing light pollution might not suffice to ensure long-term threatened species’ survival. Many protected areas are exposed to artificial light at levels with the potential to induce ecological impacts with unknown implications for the ecosystems they are designated to protect. Consequently, it is recommended that precautionary methods for the avoidance and mitigation of light pollution in protected areas be integrated into their management plans. This paper’s aims are to present an overview of best practices in precautionary methods to avoid and mitigate light pollution in protected areas and to identify and discuss what ecosystems should be considered light-sensitive and how to prioritise species and habitats that need protection from artificial light, including examples of legislation covering ecological light pollution in the European Union and in Sweden. The important aspects to include when considering light pollution at a landscape level are listed, and a proposal for prioritisation among species and habitats is suggested. Sensitive and conservation areas and important habitats for particularly vulnerable species could be prioritised for measures to minimise artificial lighting’s negative effects on biodiversity. This may be done by classifying protected natural environments into different zones and applying more constrained principles to limit lighting. The light pollution sensitivity of various environments and ecosystems suggests that different mitigation strategies and adaptations should be used depending on landscape characteristics, species sensitivity and other factors that may determine whether artificial light may be detrimental. Issues of the currently used measurement methods for artificial light at night are reviewed. We also propose and discuss the principles and benefits of using standardized measurement methods and appropriate instrumentation for field measurements of artificial light concerning the environmental impact of light pollution. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 13.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Bouroussis, Constantinos A.
    Lighting Laboratory, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Measures for reducing the adverse effects of artificial light at night: inter-disciplinary development and progress2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of artificial light at night in the outdoor environment may introduce negative andunwanted side-effects such as light pollution and unwanted impacts on humans, ecosystemsand biodiversity. Therefore, appropriate measures for reducing the adverse effects of artificiallight at night are important to establish a sustainable use of outdoor lighting. This paperpresents an updated overview and a state-of-the-art of available and effective measures forreducing artificial light at night, which range from strategical and high-level recommendationsto more practical and applicable lighting design recommendations and principles. Another aimis to identify prioritized future research questions and areas that will enhance progress withinthe area. We present the current recommendations into three groups: (I) recommendations forlegislation at the national or international levels, (II) recommendations for technical andpractical adaptations of the lighting design and (III) recommendations for sensitive species,taxa, areas or ecosystems.

  • 14.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Zissis, Georges
    Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France.
    Merschbrock, Christoph
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Nilsson Tengelin, Maria
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Borås, Sweden.
    EU ecodesign requirements for waste handling of lighting: perspectives from France and Sweden2022In: 2021 Joint Conference - 11th International Conference on Energy Efficiency in Domestic Appliances and Lighting & 17th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Lighting (EEDAL/LS:17), IEEE, 2022, IEEE, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular economy is becoming an important topic for lighting design, research, and industry. Recent legislation, like the EU's ecodesign regulation, has established circularity, reparability, and recyclability as requirements for the industry. This article investigates what happens at the end-of-life stages of lighting products through questionnaires and interviews conducted with experts in Sweden and France. The focus is on understand the impact of the new EU requirements on industrial practice in France and Sweden. Moreover, the article provides ideas for practical improvement of both product recyclability and waste handling of luminaires and light sources. © 2022 IEEE

  • 15.
    Lett, Signe
    et al.
    Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg S.
    Institute of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Becker-Scarpitta, Antoine
    Spatial Food Web Ecology Group & Research Centre for Ecological Change, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Christiansen, Casper T.
    Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Center for Permafrost (CENPERM), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen K, Denmark.
    During, Heinjo
    Ecology & Biodiversity, Department of Biology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Ekelund, Flemming
    Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Henry, Gregory H.R.
    Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Lang, Simone I.
    Department of Arctic Biology, The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS), Svalbard, Norway.
    Michelsen, Anders
    Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Center for Permafrost (CENPERM), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Rousk, Kathrin
    Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Environmental Science Center, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Betway, Katlyn R.
    Biology Department, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI, USA.
    Rui, Sara B.
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Callaghan, Terry
    Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield UK, Sheffield, United Kingdom; Department of Botany, Tomsk State University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Carbognani, Michele
    Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
    Cooper, Elisabeth J.
    Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, Biosciences Fisheries and Economics, UiT-The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Cornelissen, J. Hans C.
    Department of Ecological Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Climate Impacts Research Centre, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Egelkraut, Dagmar
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Elumeeva, Tatiana G.
    Department of Ecology and Plant Geography, Biological Faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia.
    Haugum, Siri V.
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Hollister, Robert D.
    Biology Department, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI, USA.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. Ecology and Environmental Science, RLAS, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Keuper, Frida
    BioEcoAgro Joint Research Unit, INRAE, Barenton-Bugny, France.
    Klanderud, Kari
    Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Lévesque, Esther
    Département des Sciences de l’environnement et Centre d’études nordiques, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Canada.
    Liu, Xin
    Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Mountain Ecological Restoration and Bioresource Utilization & Ecological Restoration and Biodiversity Conservation Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu, China.
    May, Jeremy
    Department of Biology, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA.
    Michel, Pascale
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Mörsdorf, Martin
    Department of Geobotany, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
    Petraglia, Alessandro
    Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
    Rixen, Christian
    WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF, Davos Dorf, Switzerland.
    Robroek, Bjorn J.M.
    Aquatic Ecology & Environmental Biology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Rzepczynska, Agnieszka M.
    Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A.
    Centre for environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Hasselt, Belgium.
    Tolvanen, Anne
    Natural Resources Institute Finland, Oulu, Finland.
    Vandvik, Vigdis
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Volkov, Igor
    Laboratory of Biodiversity and Ecology, Tomsk State University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Volkova, Irina
    Department of Botany and Laboratory of Ecosystem and Climate Change Studies, Tomsk State University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Zuijlen, Kristel van
    Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Can bryophyte groups increase functional resolution in tundra ecosystems?2022In: Arctic Science, E-ISSN 2368-7460, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 609-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relative contribution of bryophytes to plant diversity, primary productivity, and ecosystem functioning increases towards colder climates. Bryophytes respond to environmental changes at the species level, but because bryophyte species are relatively difficult to identify, they are often lumped into one functional group. Consequently, bryophyte function remains poorly resolved. Here, we explore how higher resolution of bryophyte functional diversity can be encouraged and implemented in tundra ecological studies. We briefly review previous bryophyte functional classifications and the roles of bryophytes in tundra ecosystems and their susceptibility to environmental change. Based on shoot morphology and colony organization, we then propose twelve easily distinguishable bryophyte functional groups. To illustrate how bryophyte functional groups can help elucidate variation in bryophyte effects and responses, we compiled existing data on water holding capacity, a key bryophyte trait. Although plant functional groups can mask potentially high interspecific and intraspecific variability, we found better separation of bryophyte functional group means compared with previous grouping systems regarding water holding capacity. This suggests that our bryophyte functional groups truly represent variation in the functional roles of bryophytes in tundra ecosystems. Lastly, we provide recommendations to improve the monitoring of bryophyte community changes in tundra study sites. © 2022 Canadian Science Publishing

  • 16.
    Lindh, Ulrika Wänström
    et al.
    Department of Construction Engineering and Lighting Science, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Perceived lighting uniformity on pedestrian roads: From an architectural perspective2021In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 14, no 12, article id 3647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lighting uniformity is a key factor in traffic safety, and it could even result in energy savings for light installations. However, highly uniform horizontal road lighting for motorized vehicles may not be optimal for pedestrian roads. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the way in which pedestrians experience road lighting uniformity. Accordingly, we employed a qualitative approach to examine pedestrian road lighting uniformity. Visual analyses were used to exemplify and discuss the perceived uniformity. The case studies were performed on three pedestrian roads with similar light installations. The results show that the experience of road lighting uniformity differs substantially between the three roads. Based on the case studies, there are many aspects that need to be considered beyond the light falling on the horizontal surfaces. This study suggests that the visual experience of road lighting uniformity for pedestrians is difficult to estimate with photometric values because the visual impact of uniformity is highly influenced by the spatial context and landscape. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 17.
    Nilsson Tengelin, M.
    et al.
    Department of Measurement Science and Technology, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Borås, Sweden.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Andersson, P.
    Calluna AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Källberg, S.
    Department of Measurement Science and Technology, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Borås, Sweden.
    A Novel Method for Studying Threshold Levels for Positive Phototaxis in Insects2021In: CIE x048: 2021 Proceedings of the Conference CIE 2021, Vienna: CIE Central Bureau , 2021, p. 262-268Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel method for studying threshold levels for positive phototaxis ofinsects and smaller mobile organisms. Outdoor lighting affects light sensitive species and thereis a need to evaluate the effect of light levels, spectral composition of the light and lightdistribution to mitigate the ecological impacts of the artificial light. For this purpose, a test boxinvestigating the effect of light on insects in a controlled manner has been constructed. The boxis equipped with a luminance source and the light levels can be varied from a maximum valuecontinuously down to zero. The spectral composition of the light can be varied by changing thelamp or using optical filters. For visibility of the insects the box has infrared light emitting diodesin the ceiling and two wide-angle cameras monitor the light response. The functionality of thebox is tested with the species greater wax moth.

  • 18.
    Rawat, Monika
    et al.
    School of Environment and Natural Resources, Doon University, Dehradun, India.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Bai, Yang
    Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, Mengla, Yunnan, China.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Environmental Science Center, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Litter decomposition above the treeline in alpine regions: A mini review2021In: Acta Oecologica, ISSN 1146-609X, E-ISSN 1873-6238, Vol. 113, article id 103775Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Litter decomposition is a key driver of ecosystem processes and carbon cycling. Decomposition rate is influenced by numerous factors, such as temperature, humidity, litter properties, soil properties, and properties of soil fauna/microbial communities. The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge on litter decomposition above the treeline in alpine regions worldwide and identify: I) factors that have been studied in great detail, II) factors that have been less intensively investigated, III) geographical regions that have been less well studied, and IV) factors with consistent or inconsistent effects on decomposition. The review showed inconsistent results for all factors covered by two or more studies regarding their effect on decomposition rate (positive, negative, no effect), usually a result of interactions between factors. Studies examining one or several factors in the physical environment (i.e., altitude, experimental warming, microclimate, snow cover and soil moisture) were most common, while studies on different aspects of resource quality were the second most common. The impacts of trophic interactions on soil microbes and fauna were less frequently studied. Europe and Asia were the best-represented regions, in terms of number of studies and geographical distribution, while there were no studies from Africa and very few from South America and Australia. North American studies were all from Colorado, and those from Asia were all from China. In order to obtain better global representation, there is a need for studies in Africa, South America, and Australia. There is also a need for more studies to explain the large variation in responses of litter decomposition rates to different influencing factors in alpine environments. Future research should focus on interactions between different factors and on experiments testing specific relationships, such as the potential interaction between temperature and soil moisture and its effect on litter decomposition above the treeline in alpine regions. © 2021 The Authors

  • 19.
    Rawat, Monika
    et al.
    Environmental Science Center, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Molau, Ulf
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bai, Yang
    Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, China.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Environmental Science Center, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Visitors off the trail: Impacts on the dominant plant, bryophyte and lichen species in alpine heath vegetation in sub-arctic Sweden2021In: Environmental Challenges, E-ISSN 2667-0100, Vol. 3, article id 100050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alpine ecosystems are under increasing pressure due to tourism and recreational activities. When leaving desig- nated trails as is frequently observed, visitors can cause unintentional damage to vegetation. This study investi- gated the effect of human trampling on the dominant species of vascular plants, bryophytes and lichens along an infrequently used hiking trail in an alpine ecosystem in sub-arctic Sweden. The hypothesis tested was that prox- imity to the trail (as an effect of more people leaving the trail for a short distance compared to a longer distance) causes a decrease in species with low resistance to trampling. With a greater decrease in taller forbs and shrubs than in graminoids and prostrate plants, a greater decrease in lichen than in bryophyte species, and a change in vegetation composition. The results showed that proximity to the trail did not cause a decrease in the majority of dominant species, with none of the eight most dominant vascular plants showing any significant effects of prox- imity to the trail. One bryophyte species (Dicranum elongatum) among the six most commonly found decreased with proximity to the trail. Three lichen species (Cladonia arbuscula, Cladonia uncinalis, Ochrolechia frigida) among the eight most common species decreased with proximity to the trail. There was no evidence that taller species decreased with proximity to the trail, although the deciduous shrub Betula nana showed a tendency for a decrease. Proximity to the trail caused a greater decrease in lichen species than in bryophyte species. Multivariate analyses showed that distance from trail and transect direction had significant effects on overall vegetation composition. The level of low-intensity trampling recorded indicates that current numbers of hikers at the site can be sustained for longer periods with minimum impact on vascular plant species, but to get a more general understanding of the impact of low-intensity trampling data from additional sites are needed. © 2021 The Author(s)

  • 20.
    Scharn, Ruud
    et al.
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brachmann, Cole G.
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patchett, Aurora
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reese, Heather
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjorkman, Anne D.
    Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Environmental Science Center, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Björk, Robert G.
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Molau, Ulf
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Björkman, Mats P.
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vegetation responses to 26 years of warming at Latnjajaure Field Station, northern Sweden2022In: Arctic Science, E-ISSN 2368-7460, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 858-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is rapidly warming high latitude and high elevation regions influencing plant community composition. Changes in vegetation composition have motivated the coordination of ecological monitoring networks across the Arctic, including the International Tundra Experiment. We have established a long-term passive warming experiment using open-top chambers, which includes five distinct plant communities (Dry Heath; Tussock Tundra; and Dry, Mesic, and Wet Meadow). We measured changes in plant community composition based on relative abundance differences over 26 years. In addition, relative abundance changes in response to fertilization and warming treatments were analyzed based on a seven-year Community-Level Interaction Program experiment. The communities had distinct soil moisture conditions, leading to community-specific responses of the plant growth forms (deciduous shrubs, evergreen shrubs, forbs, and graminoids). Warming significantly affected growth forms, but the direction of the response was not consistent across the communities. Evidence of shrub expansion was found in nearly all communities, with soil moisture determining whether it was driven by deciduous or evergreen shrubs. Graminoids increased in relative abundance in the Dry Meadow due to warming. Growth form responses to warming are likely mediated by edaphic characteristics of the communities and their interactions with climate.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf