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  • 1.
    Andersson, Johnn
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Environmental Systems Analysis Department of Energy and Environment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammar, Linus
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The critical role of informed political direction for advancing technology: The case of Swedish marine energy2017In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 101, p. 52-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine energy technologies can contribute to meeting sustainability challenges, but they are still immature and dependent on public support. This paper employs the Technological Innovation Systems (TIS) framework to analyze the development and diffusion of Swedish marine energy up until 2014. While there were promising device developers, relevant industrial capabilities, and world-class research, the system suffered from weaknesses in several important innovation processes. Finally, the analysis identifies the lack of informed political direction as a critical blocking factor and highlights its connection to domestic market potential. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  • 2.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    En översikt av forskningen om samverkansformer och deras effekter2018In: Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap / [ed] Martin Berg, Vaike Fors & Robert Willim, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 1, p. 29-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Forskardjuren – Hunden, elefanten och räven2019In: Kampen om kunskap: Akademi och praktik / [ed] Axel Brechensbauer, Maria Grafström, Anna Jonsson & Mikael Klintman, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2019, p. 137-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    How industry collaboration influences research: The case of the Swedish Interdisciplinary Material Consortia 1990-20002019In: Industry & higher education, ISSN 0950-4222, E-ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 289-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides new insights into the consequences of university–industry collaboration for the content and conduct of academic research by analysing the Swedish research funding programme for the so-called ‘materials consortia’, in place between 1990 and 2000. Using secondary sources, the analysis highlights the causality in university–industry collaboration and the impact of such collaboration on the academic research environments involved. While the funding programme was clearly aimed at influencing the conduct of academic research, impacts are seen mostly in content. Also, collaborative activities with long-term positive outcomes grew organically rather than top-down, with mutual trust and recognition at the operational level of great importance. The policy implications include the realization that the durability of efforts, from funders as well as at the operational level, is key to achieving deeper added value in university–industry collaborations. The article contributes to a deepened and broadened understanding of the multidimensionality of university–industry collaborations and their effects on research.  © The Author(s) 2019.

  • 5.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden & Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Olof, Hallonsten
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    A resource- and impact-based micro-level conceptualization of collaborative academic work2017In: Aslib Journal of Information Management, ISSN 2050-3806, E-ISSN 2050-3814, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 624-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop new conceptual tools for analyzing how contemporary collaborative academic work is organized on micro-level, and its social and economic impact, in broad terms. Thus it makes a contribution towards a better view on how contemporary academics organize their professional activities in light of profound changes to the framework conditions of academic work, and a better view on the productivity and potentially very wide societal impact of academia.

    Design/methodology/approach: Based on previous research, the arguments are developed conceptually. The paper builds both on previous empirical findings and strong traditions in organization theory (resource dependence theory) and innovation studies.

    Findings: The paper achieves a synthesized conceptual view on impact of academia, strongly related to how individual academics organize their professional activities today, given the recent profound structural changes to the academic system. The paper launches resource dependence as a key concept for understanding contemporary academic work in a collaborative context, and sequences of impact as a key tool for conceptualizing the very varied role of academia in society.

    Research limitations/implications: While building strongly on previous research, the paper is conceptual in nature and thus its value lies chiefly in assisting future studies.

    Practical implications: The contribution can assist in policymaking by promoting the achievement of more accurate and better balanced models and appraisal schemes. Originality/value: The paper has theoretical originality and its synthesized argument about organizing and impact is of high value for current scholarly debate on these topics. © 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 6.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Serger, Sylvia Schwaag
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Swedish Govt Agcy Innovat Vinnova, Int Strategy & Networks, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wise, Emily
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Benner, Mats
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Knowledge triangle configurations at three Swedish Universities2017In: Foresight and STI Governance, ISSN 2312-9972, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 68-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of a knowledge triangle, i.e., the principle of strengthening the linkages between research, education and innovation, has emerged as a result of policymakers’ expectations that universities assume a broader societal responsibility. Yet, little is known about how these tasks and their interactions are orchestrated at universities. We explore concept of how the knowledge triangle is manifested in the organisation and strategy of three different Swedish universities, and how these manifestations are shaped by the policy landscape. The article highlights the fact that although the knowledge triangle remains a priority, explicit national policies are lacking, with the responsibility of integration falling upon universities themselves. We observe great diversity in how the principles of the knowledge triangle are orchestrated at the universities, e.g., through individuals’ interpretations and attitudes, and through management strategies and incentive schemes. However, the three tasks have largely been handled separately, with weak coordination and generally limited ambition demonstrated by university management teams to forge new combinations of remits. At the individual and group levels, we observe weak task articulation, although some role models serve as inspiration. Tensions emerge as the responsibilities of operationalising the knowledge triangle falls on individuals who sometimes lack the appropriate mandate and resources. These findings raise questions for further research and implications for policy and university management.

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