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  • 1.
    Andersson, Johnn
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Environmental Systems Analysis Department of Energy and Environment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammar, Linus
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The critical role of informed political direction for advancing technology: The case of Swedish marine energy2017In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 101, p. 52-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine energy technologies can contribute to meeting sustainability challenges, but they are still immature and dependent on public support. This paper employs the Technological Innovation Systems (TIS) framework to analyze the development and diffusion of Swedish marine energy up until 2014. While there were promising device developers, relevant industrial capabilities, and world-class research, the system suffered from weaknesses in several important innovation processes. Finally, the analysis identifies the lack of informed political direction as a critical blocking factor and highlights its connection to domestic market potential. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  • 2.
    Bashiri, Farzana
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Bridging Academia and Activism in Climate Research and Movement — Insights from Scholar Activists in Sweden2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bashiri, Farzana
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Tracing the Threads of Academic Activism - A conceptual literature review2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bjare, Ulrika
    et al.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Föreställningar om samverkan: Hur visioner om lärosätenas roll i samhället tagit sig uttryck i högskolelagen2021In: Humanvetenskapernas verkningar: kunskap, samverkan, genomslag / [ed] Linus Salö, Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2021, 1, p. 251-280Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Fuenfschilling, Lea
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Paxling, Linda
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Norm-critical innovation as a way forward for responsible innovation? Evidence from a Swedish innovation policy program2022In: Journal of Responsible Innovation, ISSN 2329-9460, E-ISSN 2329-9037, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 371-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2014, the Swedish innovation agency Vinnova set up the program ‘Gender and Diversity for Innovation’, which has its roots in norm-critical innovation. In line with rationales for responsible innovation, a central aim of the program is to identify and challenge discriminatory norms to develop more inclusive and equal innovation processes. This article presents the findings of an in-depth analysis of 34 projects funded under the program. It explores how norm-critical innovation has been practiced and performed in various empirical settings and whether norm-critical innovation practices could be a way forward for the implementation of responsible innovation. Using a qualitative research design, we identify the most common activities and outputs in the projects and carve out the core characteristics of norm-critical innovation practice. Furthermore, the paper explores the value and limitation of norm-critical approaches for fostering responsible innovation and addressing societal challenges more broadly. © 2022 The Author(s).

  • 6.
    Hylmö, Anders
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Karltorp, Kersti
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    How do firm internal and external factors combine to contribute to the propensity of energy incumbents to implement radical innovations?2023In: 14th IST conference 2023, Responsibility and Reflexivity in Transitions: Book of Abstracts, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transitioning the energy sector to meet sustainability challenges requires introducing innovative solutions for energy production, storage, flexibility, security, and consumption (Fahnestock and Karltorp, 2019). Some of these innovations will be radical compared to incumbent firms’ competence base, solutions, and market attributes (Bergek et al., 2013). Although some energy utilities embrace innovation, most of these incumbents are inert due to significant lock-in effects of infrastructures and facilities.

    While a larger body of research focuses on incumbents as developers of innovation (Klepper, 1997; Christensen, 1997/2013), less attention is paid to the factors that influence incumbents’ ability to implement radical innovation. A review of the comparatively few existing studies reveals that a) a combination of firm internal and external factors needs to be accounted for, b) factors are interdependent and form complex causal relations, and c) the same outcome related to adoption may result from different combinations of conditions as revealed by contradictions (Karltop and Perez Vico, forthcoming). Yet, no existing studies examine the complex casual relationships as configurations of factors that combine to contribute to incumbents’ propensity to implement radical innovations. Thus, we study how incumbent firms’ internal and external characteristics contribute to implementing radical innovation in the form of configurations of factors, using regional energy firms as empirical case.

    We explore this question using a qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) that enables us to consider the effects of multiple causal factors and their complex causal relationships on a particular outcome, such as the propensity to implement radical innovation (Ragin, 2008). We use a comparative case study of eight Swedish public regional energy firms to explore the influence of factors derived from a recent literature review (Karltop and Perez Vico, forthcoming) that include external landscape, financial, technology, and industry conditions, as well as firm internal structural conditions, absorptive capacity and alignment with innovation. We base the analysis on semi-structured interviews with firm representatives and qualitative and quantitative data from media, annual reports, economic databases, and funding agencies.

    Our analysis generates multiple solutions in the form of configurations of different factors contributing to incumbents’ propensity to implement radical innovations. These solutions reveal how factors amplify or offset each other and provide insight into different development paths for incumbents seeking to implement radical innovation. This paves the way for building a coherent theoretical frame for understanding incumbents in the light of radical innovation that accounts for multiple causes related to the firm’s structure, strategy, and external conditions.

    Our findings have several management and policy implications. To implement radical innovation necessary for energy transitions, firms and policy makers must simultaneously pay attention to the multiple ways in which internal and external conditions may interact. Although some factors are beyond the firm’s control, managers could focus on the factors that moderate others, as these represent an opportunity for compensation. With this study, we also contribute to the field of transition studies by exploring a configurational approach to understanding the role of incumbents in meeting sustainability challenges.

  • 7.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Ökad samverkanskompetens inom universitet och högskolor: Lärdomar från utvecklingen av ett kurskoncept2021Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 8.
    Jonsson, Anna
    et al.
    School of Economics and Management, Lund, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Engaging in Societal Collaboration Through Reflexivity: Experiences from a Cross-Disciplinary Pilot Course for Faculty2024In: Making Universities Matter: Collaboration, Engagement, Impact / [ed] Mattsson, Pauline; Perez Vico, Eugenia; Salö, Linus, Cham: Springer, 2024, 1, Vol. Part F2013, p. 11-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited understanding of how education initiatives geared toward faculty and support staff can foster a capacity for long-term and integrated societal engagement and collaboration within higher education institutions. Using the experiences from a cross-disciplinary pilot course in Sweden, the current study aims to identify features that explicate how skills and academic rigor for engaging in societal collaboration can be developed toward a “reflexive scholarship of societal collaboration.” Based on a case study of the course, we identify the need for (i) theoretical orientation, (ii) collective reflections among diverse participants, and (iii) application of gained knowledge in real-world contexts. Building on the experiences from the pilot course, we explore and discuss the participants’ reflections on how their partaking in the course may support a reflexive scholarship of societal collaboration. Our study is relevant to managers and policymakers interested in nurturing long-term and integrated collaborations between academia and various societal actors. © The Author(s) 2024.

  • 9.
    Jonsson, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; SIR, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Initiating and Anchoring an Academic Course on Societal Collaboration: A Story About ‘Someotherism’ and a Need for Reflexivity2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2001-7405, E-ISSN 2001-7413, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 75-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration between academia and society has become a key priority for many higher education institutions (HEIs). In Sweden, this is partly driven by political calls to secure the long-term provision of knowledge, innovation and competitiveness. At the system and institutional level, responses to this are reflected in governance structures and strategic documents. However, those strategic responses often fall short and attempts to organise for collaboration are often met with scepticism, and, in practice, micro-level changes are slow. This paper asks why that is the case by reflecting on the experiences gained from initiating and anchoring a course on societal collaboration at a Swedish HEI. We analyse the experiences from this bottom-up initiative by building on the notion of reflexivity. Our study contributes to research on managing and organising collaboration at HEIs by highlighting and illustrating the need to adopt a scientific approach – to use scientific knowledge – and engage (more) in reflexivity when organising to ensure societal collaboration. Efforts to produce collaboration cannot be expected to be solved by ‘someother’, but require strategy to be aligned with practice. We conclude our reflexive inquiry with implications for research and practice. Copyright (c) 2023 Anna Jonsson, Eugenia Perez-Vico, Diamanto Politis

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  • 10.
    Jonsson, Anna
    et al.
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Ökad samverkanskompetens inom universitet och högskolor: Utveckling och test av ett kurskoncept2021Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Karltorp, Kersti
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden; Jönköping international business school, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Factors conditioning incumbent firms’ implementation of radical innovations: A systematic literature review2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Meeting the urgent climate challenge will require that incumbent firms implementinnovations, of which some are radical compared to firms’ competence-base or market solutions.To support this development, a thorough understanding of the prerequisites for implementationis needed. The body of literature on conditioning factors for incumbent firms’ innovationimplementation is vast and informative but also scattered in a diversity of fields, such asinnovation management, industrial dynamics and transition studies. Further, findings aresometimes contradictory. It is thus difficult to get a coherent understanding of which factorsinfluence implementation and how. We therefore set out to conduct a systematic literature reviewon factors influencing the propensity of incumbents to implement radical innovation. Our studyrevealed 8 firm-external factors related to the landscape pressure, the maturity of the innovationand related infrastructure as well as external network fit, and 11 firm-internal factors related tostructural conditions, responsive capacity and the internal alignment with the innovation. We alsofound extensive interdependence between these factors within and across the firm internal andexternal level. We thus conclude that reaching a thorough understanding of the prerequisites forimplementation requires simultaneously paying attention to a wide variety of conditioning factorson firm internal and external level, and their interconnectedness. @ 2022 The Authors.

  • 12.
    Mattsson, Pauline
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Introduction: Universities and the Matter of Mattering2024In: Making Universities Matter: Collaboration, Engagement, Impact / [ed] Mattsson, Pauline; Perez Vico, Eugenia; Salö, Linus, Cham: Springer, 2024, 1, Vol. Part F2013, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introductory chapter, we provide insights into the debates that inspired this volume. Our aim is to extend the boundaries of the concept societal interaction and discuss the conditions for universities to undertake such endeavors. Within this context, we introduce the matter of “mattering” which serves as the central theme that runs through this volume. Mattering, we posit, can be comprehended through three key concepts: collaboration, engagement, and impact. We outline how each concept contributes to an increasing understanding of the manifold ways in which mattering can be grasped and achieved. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the coherent set of individual chapters that, separately or jointly, deal with the three concepts. Through these chapters, this volume aims to make a valuable addition to the evolving literature that explores how universities can expand their impact beyond conventional higher education missions. Collectively, these chapters cover the context of the mattering of universities and draw on various empirical data sources, mainly from Sweden but also internationally. Within this compilation of inquiries, we shed light on the multifaceted impact of universities on societies, exploring the mechanisms, contexts, and temporal dimensions of their contributions to advancing knowledge and addressing societal challenges. © The Author(s) 2024.

  • 13.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    En översikt av forskningen om samverkansformer och deras effekter2018In: Samverkansformer: Nya vägar för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap / [ed] Martin Berg, Vaike Fors & Robert Willim, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 1, p. 29-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 14.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Forskardjuren – Hunden, elefanten och räven2019In: Kampen om kunskap: Akademi och praktik / [ed] Axel Brechensbauer, Maria Grafström, Anna Jonsson & Mikael Klintman, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2019, p. 137-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Fram med humanisters föreställningar om samverkan!2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    When Average Joe met the Inexperienced Superstar—a case study of the consequences for a university of a partnership with IKEA2021In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 81, no 4, p. 795-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how consequences from a university-wide partnership unfolded at various levels within a university and induced intra-organizational dynamics. This was achieved via an in-depth investigation of “The Bridge,” a collaborative partnership between the young mid-range Swedish Linnaeus University (“Average Joe”) and the home furnishing retail giant IKEA, which despite its global reach has only limited research capacity (the “Inexperienced Superstar”). Based on previous research that conceptualizes consequences of collaborations as changes in wide-ranging resource categories over time, this article develops a conceptual framework that advances the understanding of the consequences of collaborative efforts at both the level of faculty individuals and groups, as well as on a university-wide level. The study identified both differences and similarities between the two levels related to material, knowledge, and social resource mobilization, and revealed consequent tensions within the university due to an imbalance in material resource mobilization and social resource mobilization. The resource-based multi-level perspective that this study puts forward enables a more fine-grained and dynamic understanding of the conditions for undertaking and organizing university-wide long-term collaborative efforts © 2020, The Author(s).

  • 17.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Configurations of proximities in collaborative R&D projects as drivers of radical innovation2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to advance the scholarly understanding of how different combinations of proximities in collaborative R&D projects drive radical innovation. We use fuzzy set Qualitative Comparative Analysis to explore how configurations of geographical, cognitive, social and institutional proximity lead to radical innovations in collaborative R&D projects. The analysis generates three solutions. Each solution includes either cognitive, organizational or geographical distance, and all include social proximity. Thus, our results indicate that social proximity is central but not sufficient for radical innovation in R&D projects as it must be combined with a distance in another dimension. This shows that even though distance is a necessity to achieve radical innovation it seems difficult to cope with distance in more than one dimension at a time. The results contribute to novel insights in an area where previous research has generated contradictory and ambiguous results.

  • 18.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    How industry collaboration influences research: The case of the Swedish Interdisciplinary Material Consortia 1990-20002019In: Industry & higher education, ISSN 0950-4222, E-ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 289-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides new insights into the consequences of university–industry collaboration for the content and conduct of academic research by analysing the Swedish research funding programme for the so-called ‘materials consortia’, in place between 1990 and 2000. Using secondary sources, the analysis highlights the causality in university–industry collaboration and the impact of such collaboration on the academic research environments involved. While the funding programme was clearly aimed at influencing the conduct of academic research, impacts are seen mostly in content. Also, collaborative activities with long-term positive outcomes grew organically rather than top-down, with mutual trust and recognition at the operational level of great importance. The policy implications include the realization that the durability of efforts, from funders as well as at the operational level, is key to achieving deeper added value in university–industry collaborations. The article contributes to a deepened and broadened understanding of the multidimensionality of university–industry collaborations and their effects on research.  © The Author(s) 2019.

  • 19.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Joelsson, Erik
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Pauline
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nelhans, Gustaf
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    How Promotion Guidelines Reflect Swedish Higher Education Institutions’ Societal Collaboration Strategies2024In: Making Universities Matter: Collaboration, Engagement, Impact / [ed] Mattsson, Pauline; Perez Vico, Eugenia; Salö, Linus, Cham: Springer , 2024, 1, Vol. Part F2013, p. 99-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the alignment between the stated intention of Swedish Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to matter and the assessment of individuals to matter. To achieve this aim, HEIs collaboration strategies are compared with the criteria for the guidance for merits regarding docentship. Our analysis reveals a notable disparity: the societal collaboration visions outlined in strategies were rarely reflected in promotion guidelines. There is a substantial degree of variability in how these guidelines address collaboration merits. Despite the prevalence of ambitious strategies among HEIs, only a minority align these aspirations with guidelines that encompass the breadth and depth required for effective, high-quality collaboration. © The Author(s) 2024.

  • 20.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden & Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Olof, Hallonsten
    Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    A resource- and impact-based micro-level conceptualization of collaborative academic work2017In: Aslib Journal of Information Management, ISSN 2050-3806, E-ISSN 2050-3814, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 624-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop new conceptual tools for analyzing how contemporary collaborative academic work is organized on micro-level, and its social and economic impact, in broad terms. Thus it makes a contribution towards a better view on how contemporary academics organize their professional activities in light of profound changes to the framework conditions of academic work, and a better view on the productivity and potentially very wide societal impact of academia.

    Design/methodology/approach: Based on previous research, the arguments are developed conceptually. The paper builds both on previous empirical findings and strong traditions in organization theory (resource dependence theory) and innovation studies.

    Findings: The paper achieves a synthesized conceptual view on impact of academia, strongly related to how individual academics organize their professional activities today, given the recent profound structural changes to the academic system. The paper launches resource dependence as a key concept for understanding contemporary academic work in a collaborative context, and sequences of impact as a key tool for conceptualizing the very varied role of academia in society.

    Research limitations/implications: While building strongly on previous research, the paper is conceptual in nature and thus its value lies chiefly in assisting future studies.

    Practical implications: The contribution can assist in policymaking by promoting the achievement of more accurate and better balanced models and appraisal schemes. Originality/value: The paper has theoretical originality and its synthesized argument about organizing and impact is of high value for current scholarly debate on these topics. © 2017, © Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 21.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Schwaag Serger, Sylvia
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wise, Emily
    Research Policy Group, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Benner, Mats
    Lund University School of Economics and Management, Lund, Sweden.
    Knowledge Triangle Configurations at Three Swedish Universities2021In: The Knowledge Triangle: Changing Higher Education and Research Management Paradigms / [ed] Meissner, Dirk; Gokhberg, Leonid; Kuzminov, Yaroslav; Cervantes, Mario; Schwaag Serger, Sylvia, Cham: Springer, 2021, p. 187-212Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of a Knowledge Triangle, i.e. the principle of strengthening the linkages between research, education and innovation, has emerged as a result of policymakers’ expectations on universities to assume a broader societal responsibility. Yet, little is known about how these tasks and their interaction are orchestrated at universities. We explore how they are manifested in the organisation and strategy of three different Swedish universities, and how the policy landscape conditions these manifestations. The chapter highlights that although the knowledge triangle remains a priority, explicit national policies are lacking, with the responsibility of integration falling on universities themselves. We observe a great diversity in how knowledge principles are orchestrated at the universities, e.g. through individuals’ interpretations and attitudes, and through management strategies and incentive schemes. The three tasks have largely been handled separately, with weak coordination and generally limited ambitions from university managements to forge new combinations of remits. At the individual and group level, we observe weak task articulation, although some role models serve as inspiration. Tensions emerge as the responsibilities of operationalising the Knowledge Triangle falls on individuals who sometimes lack the appropriate mandate and resources. These findings raise questions for further research and implications for policy and university management. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021

  • 22.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Serger, Sylvia Schwaag
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Swedish Govt Agcy Innovat Vinnova, Int Strategy & Networks, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wise, Emily
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Benner, Mats
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden & Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Knowledge triangle configurations at three Swedish Universities2017In: Foresight and STI Governance, ISSN 2312-9972, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 68-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of a knowledge triangle, i.e., the principle of strengthening the linkages between research, education and innovation, has emerged as a result of policymakers’ expectations that universities assume a broader societal responsibility. Yet, little is known about how these tasks and their interactions are orchestrated at universities. We explore concept of how the knowledge triangle is manifested in the organisation and strategy of three different Swedish universities, and how these manifestations are shaped by the policy landscape. The article highlights the fact that although the knowledge triangle remains a priority, explicit national policies are lacking, with the responsibility of integration falling upon universities themselves. We observe great diversity in how the principles of the knowledge triangle are orchestrated at the universities, e.g., through individuals’ interpretations and attitudes, and through management strategies and incentive schemes. However, the three tasks have largely been handled separately, with weak coordination and generally limited ambition demonstrated by university management teams to forge new combinations of remits. At the individual and group levels, we observe weak task articulation, although some role models serve as inspiration. Tensions emerge as the responsibilities of operationalising the knowledge triangle falls on individuals who sometimes lack the appropriate mandate and resources. These findings raise questions for further research and implications for policy and university management.

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  • 23.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanell, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Valorizing the Humanities: Impact Stories, Acting Spaces, and Meandering Knowledge Flows2024In: Making Universities Matter: Collaboration, Engagement, Impact / [ed] Mattsson, Pauline; Perez Vico, Eugenia; Salö, Linus, Cham: Springer, 2024, 1, Vol. Part F2013, p. 211-232Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its proven societal value, humanities knowledge tends to be marginalized in research policy; this has been a topic of debate for some time. In this chapter, we focus on the valorization of humanities knowledge, with the aim of comprehending the way this process engenders societal impact. We argue that historical impact stories offer an effective methodological approach for a deeper understanding of such valorization and its subsequent impact. Drawing on three humanities research cases from Sweden, we propose that valorization and impacts of humanities knowledge should be seen as processual and as influenced by societal actors who determine the premises and condition the somewhat unpredictable nature of such impacts. We introduce two concepts: (i) acting space, which involves access to collaborators, audiences, and channels that enable knowledge valorization, and (ii) meandering knowledge flows, which provides insight into the uneven and hard-to-predict nature of valorization. Through these concepts, we wish to provide a better and more nuanced understanding of how knowledge valorization in the humanities unfolds. By doing so, we hope to support humanities scholars to find ways of articulating their own modes of mattering. © The Author(s) 2024.

  • 24.
    Widén, Kristian
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Winkler, Charlotta
    WSP Sverige, Göteborg/Halmstad, Sverige.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Brogren, Maria
    WSP Sverige, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Implementering av solcellsanläggningar i svensk stadsbyggnad – hinder ur ett aktörsperspektiv2021Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Resource management in combination with small-scale, self-produced and locally produced electricity in direct connection to where the needs are has great potential for greatly reducing the use of fossil energy sources. To ensure this, an increase in the implementation of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems as well as other innovations in the built environment is required. Technical features such as efficiency and / or technical development to enable assembly or installation are no longer obstacles to implementation. The technology is mature, is available on the market and PV projects are profitable over time. However, the increase in installed capacity in recent years is largely due to an increase in photovoltaic parks. The potential for expansion in the built environment remains.

    The overall goal of the project was to identify, analyze and find connections between obstacles that stand in the way of an increased pace of implementation of photovoltaic systems in the Swedish built environment. The project has been done through three work packages (1) workshops and interviews to gain a basic understanding of the obstacles that exist for a general implementation of photovoltaic systems in the built environment, (2) verification workshop and (3) analysis of the data collected in the two preceding steps.

    Given the number of actors that affect the implementation and the number of aspects that must be managed, the implementation of solar photovoltaic systems appears as complex, which is a challenge. There are many aspects that must be handled by several actors and that change their accepted processes or entail completely new tasks. Another challenge that clearly emerges was the lack of knowledge, both among themselves and among others and in all phases of the projects. However, it is the client's competence that is seen as most critical, mainly linked to the understanding of how the implementation of solar cells affects the project process. Linked to the challenges of complexity and lack of knowledge, further perceived challenges emerge regarding both the construction process and external regulations, which clearly affect implementation. As PV is still relatively new, the competence has not been established, which in turn leads to uncertainty about responsibility. This becomes extra clear in that it is such a complex process with many actors involved.

    In conclusion, there is still much that can be done to simplify the implementation of solar photovoltaic systems in built environments. Despite this, an increasing volume of PV systems are being implemented in the built environment and is about to become a natural part of construction.

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    Slutrapport Implementering av solcellsanläggningar
  • 25.
    Winkler, Charlotta
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Bosch-Sijtsema, Petra
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability. CIRCLE, the Centre for Innovation Research Department, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Interconnecting Innovation and Business Ecosystems: A Case of Client Orchestration in ConstructionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how a public construction client as a focal firm orchestrates innovation and business ecosystems by coordinating participant activities to co-create value in the construction industry. The research is based on qualitative methods, with 25 semi-structured interviews being conducted with client representatives and project partners from four completed construction projects. This study shows how the orchestration of ecosystems for value co-creation in construction includes activities inside and outside projects. While business ecosystem activities in projects tend to be exploitative, innovation ecosystem activities are typically exploratory. Yet, the activities are not exclusive in this sense, but rather entail varying degrees of both exploration and exploitation. We show how a rather small public client firm, steered by an internal strategy for driving innovation and sustainable development in its building stock and long-term commitment to and engagement with many actors, can successfully orchestrate such activities by assuming the role of a focal interconnecting actor. We identify key factors contributing to client success in achieving high innovation ambitions: finding suitable partners, fostering strong relationships throughout and among projects, continuously testing and capturing learning from innovation, and engaging with the industry.

  • 26.
    Winkler, Charlotta
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Challenges to business ecosystem alignment when implementing solar photovoltaic systems in the Swedish built environment2024In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 497-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementing solar photovoltaic systems in the built environment (BEPV) is critical for the construction sector’s contribution to mitigating climate change. While previous studies give various insights into innovation implementation, the challenges to value co-creation by construction actors remain underexplored. By studying the alignment of business ecosystems implementing BEPV in the Swedish built environment, we address this need. Drawing on the cumulative experience of construction actors, this study demonstrates how knowledge mislocation, knowledge deficits, cultural discrepancies, insufficient building codes, frequently changing regulations, and implementing a highly embedded innovation can disturb ecosystem alignment. The study contributes to the ecosystem literature, scholarly discussions of innovation implementation in complex construction projects, and the PV diffusion literature by offering insights into the realignment of ecosystems involving value co-creation by actors from previously unconnected industries. The study links PV diffusion research to the construction management literature by exploring the cumulative experience of implementation at the micro level. We highlight the significant industry reconfigurations required to accommodate a deeply embedded technological innovation, reconfigurations going beyond the challenges of implementing systemic innovations encumbered by fewer material dependencies. We also emphasize the critical importance of industrial interaction, coordination, and learning to accelerate the sustainability transition. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 27.
    Winkler, Charlotta
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Perez Vico, Eugenia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Widén, Kristian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Sustainability, Innovation and Management in Building (SIMB).
    Explaining barriers to the alignment of business ecosystems implementing solar photovoltaic systems in the built environment2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to identify barriers to the alignment of temporary business ecosystems for solar photovoltaic systems in the built environment (BEPV) in the Swedish construction sector and explain these barriers in terms of how they impact ecosystem alignment. We identify three barriers; the high degree of radicalness of BEPV innovation, the lack of BEPV related knowledge among actors and inapt conventions for BEPV. The study contributes to the business ecosystems literature through insights from a novel sector that reveals how challenges related to temporality, incumbency and actor diversity impact ecosystem alignment. The study also highlights the critical role of formal conventions for ecosystem dynamics. We further provide new insights to the study of construction management, as the business ecosystem lens offers a systematic explication of the complexity of construction projects and highlights the need to pay attention to the alignment of ecosystem elements in order to successfully implement innovations. The study highlights implications for policy and business concerned with the diffusion and implementation of BEPV.

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