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  • 1.
    Dalzochio, Marina Schmidt
    et al.
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Renner, Samuel
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Description of the final stadium larva of Erythrodiplax media (Odonata: Libellulidae) with preliminary key to known South American larvae in the genus2018In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 93-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The larva of Erythrodiplax media is described and illustrated based on two exuviae of reared larvae and one final stadium larva collected in Xangri-lá, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The larva of E. media can be distinguished from other species of Erythrodiplax by the presence of lateral spines on S8 and S9, the number of premental setae (n = 22), palpal setae (n = 7) and by the mandibular formula. We also provide a preliminary key to known South American larvae in the genus. © 2018 Worldwide Dragonfly Association.

  • 2.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – Univates, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – Univates, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Dalzochio, Marina S.
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – Univates, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Ecoregions within the Brazilian Pampa biome reflected in Odonata species assemblies2019In: Austral ecology (Print), ISSN 1442-9985, E-ISSN 1442-9993, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 461-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on vegetation composition, previous studies of the Pampa biome in southern Brazil have defined seven ecoregions within the area. Here, we test this ecoregion approach studying the semi-aquatic insect group Odonata in five of these regions, aiming at comparing the ecoregions to the more traditional environmental predictors of water quality and land cover. Based on a data set of occupancy comprising 99 species distributed between 131 localities, a one-way Permutational Multivariate Analysis of Variance was used to compare differences in the species composition between the ecoregions, followed by a Principal Component Analysis to visualize the variation. The composition varied significantly between all groups tested, and the ordination explained 61.8% of the variance. A partial redundancy analysis of ecoregions, land cover and water quality variables explained 71% of the variance in Odonata community structure. Ecoregion was the most important predictor, followed by water quality and land cover. Within these species assemblies, we could select certain species that were representative of a given ecoregion, to which their distribution within the Pampa biome was entirely or mainly confined. Of 24 representative species 41.7% were rare, while the rest were more abundant and, hence, easier to detect. We suspect that the differences found between the Pampa ecoregions might be due to geology, as such factors may be strong determinants of biodiversity. Specific ecological requirements at the family and genus levels also seemed to act selectively on the species compositions within the ecoregions. Today, the Pampa is highly fragmented due to agricultural activities such as rice cultivation, extensive cattle farming and forest plantations. We suggest that an ecoregion-based approach to the implementation of conservation measures may be the best way to help these distinct species assemblies survive. © 2018 Ecological Society of Australia

  • 3.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Schmidt Dalzochio, Marina
    Universidade do Vale do Taquari, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Water body type and land cover shape the dragonfly communities (Odonata) in the Pampa biome, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil2018In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogeographical region known as the Pampa biome in southern Brazil, was originally mainly covered with open fields or grassland, with areas of riparian forest surrounding the water bodies. Today this landscape appears highly fragmented due to agricultural activities such as rice cultivation, extensive cattle farming, and forest plantations. Studies have shown that the Pampa biome has high levels of biodiversity and endemism, but with regard to invertebrates, this biome is still one of the least known in Brazil. We therefore designed a study comparing the dragonfly (Odonata) communities to environmental and landscape features in this area, measuring diversity by species richness, relative abundance and Shannon index. Our results showed that the Pampa is a biome very rich in odonates, and that the species communities are highly dependent on the environmental conditions of the area. Habitats such as Rivers/Streams, bordered by native grasslands and riparian forests, were shown to harbour communities that were ecologically more complex and sensitive than other habitat types. Man-made lakes and agricultural areas displayed lower levels of biodiversity and odonate communities dominated by generalist species. By combining data on the communities of Odonata and other taxa, our analyses may be instrumental in determining priority areas for future conservation measures within the area. © 2018, Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.

  • 4.
    Schmidt Dalzochio, Marina
    et al.
    Ecology and Evolution, University of Vale do Taquari, UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Ecology and Evolution, University of Vale do Taquari, UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Renner, Samuel
    Ecology and Evolution, University of Vale do Taquari, UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Effect of tree plantations on the functional composition of Odonata species in the highlands of southern Brazil2018In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 808, no 1, p. 283-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in biodiversity have mainly been assessed using taxonomical diversity indices. Although these approaches contribute to the scientific understanding of species richness and composition patterns, trait-based metrics may be more useful for detecting responses to land use change. We used odonates as a model system to compare traits composition in mixed ombrophilous forest (MOF) and tree plantations: exotic species (Pinus sp.) and native species (Araucaria angustifolia). Our goal was to understand and compare how each vegetation type affects the selection of species traits, and which factors are responsible for the presence of the species in the environment. We recorded 36 Odonata species distributed across 14 functional groups. The functional composition varied between MOF and exotic tree plantations and was similar between these two habitats and native tree plantations. Native forest favoured specialist traits. Our results suggest that the conversion of MOF to tree plantations, especially exotic ones, results in a shift to less specialized Odonata communities with altered functional group composition. This result highlights the negative impact associated with the conversion of native forests into exotic plantations. Our results show that odonates with specialist traits are limited to natural forest sites, which makes the conservation of such areas crucial. © 2017 Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature

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