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  • 1.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Telematics Group, Viktoria Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    Telematics Group, Viktoria Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    Telematics Group, Viktoria Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Assessing the Mobile-Stationary Divide in Ubiquitous Transport Systems2005In: Designing Ubiquitous Information Environments: Socio-Technical Issues and Challenges, New York, USA: Springer-Verlag New York, 2005, p. 123-137Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many transport organizations seek to develop seamlessly integrated computing environments. A central problem in attempts to realize such ubiquitous transport systems is the divide that exists between stationary transport management systems and mobile applications such as embedded vehicle sensor networks and in-vehicle services for message handling. Originating from different Innovation regimes, these technologies are heterogeneous in that they rely on different technological platforms and knowledge bases, as well as the institutionalized settings from which they have emerged. This paper assesses how the mobile-stationary divide plays out in practical efforts to develop ubiquitous transport systems in road haulage firms. This assessment is conducted through a multiple-case study that identifies socio-technical challenges associated with this divide. Building on this assessment, the paper contributes a set of implications for enterprise-wide ubiquitous computing environments where coordination of diverse sets of mobile units is central to organizational performance. On a general level, these implications are important for any organization attempting to integrate mobile and stationary information systems.

  • 2.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    et al.
    Viktoria Institute, Göteborg.
    King, John
    University of Michigan.
    Mercer, Glenn
    McKinsey Consulting.
    Pavlich, Dave
    Yellow Roadway.
    Scacchi, Walt
    University of California, Irvine.
    Socio-Technical Research Challenges in Ubiquitous Computing: The Case of Telematics2005In: Designing Ubiquitous Information Environments: Socio-Technical Issues and Challenges, New York: Springer, 2005, p. 359-362Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE), Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Lindgren, Rikard
    Viktoria Institute, Göteborg.
    Action Research in New Product Development2007In: Information Systems Action Research: An Applied View of Emerging Concepts and Methods / [ed] Ned Kock, New York: Springer, 2007, p. 193-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores the nature of action research in new product development. Characterized by pressures associated with product concept effectiveness and process performance, new product development is a challenging but rewarding setting for action research. By re-assessing a previously reported action research study in the automotive industry, we identify and analyze characteristics of managing such research in new product development. On the basis of this assessment, the chapter complements previous research on managing action research projects with specific insights applicable to settings in which new technologies are being built and tried out.

  • 4.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    et al.
    Viktoria Institute, Göteborg.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    Viktoria Institute, Göteborg.
    Multi-Contextuality in Ubiquitous Computing: Investigating the Car Case through Action Research2005In: Information and organization, ISSN 1471-7727, E-ISSN 1873-7919, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 95-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ubiquitous computing envisions seamless access of mass-scale services over the multitude of contexts that users encounter in their everyday mobility. However, to be successful such computing must simultaneously be designed to provide transparent, integrated, and convenient support in localized use contexts. Thus, the issue of multi-contextuality makes the design of ubiquitous computing services and environments a challenging endeavor. While ubiquitous computing requires attention to the multi-contextuality of people’s mobile device use encompassing spatial, temporal, and social dimensions of mobility, the typical avenue for IS research studies has been the single context (e.g., team, organization, or inter-organizational).

    This paper reports on a grounded action research study with the objective of developing and testing design principles for handling multi-contextuality in an increasingly important ubiquitous computing environment – the car. Already supporting people’s everyday mobility and promising to provide ubiquitous availability of computing and communication infrastructure, the car is indeed a relevant setting for investigating the co-existence of different use contexts in ubiquitous computing. Contributing to the early stage of the ubiquitous computing research tradition, this paper not only empirically demonstrates that the car as a ubiquitous computing environment can improve the convenience of people’s everyday mobile device use by providing multi-contextual support. The paper also suggests our design principles and their associated socio-technical implications to be valid for other ubiquitous computing environments. Indeed, synchronizing fluid use patterns, scaling service manipulation, and signaling context-switches through awareness support lie at the heart of weaving ubiquitous computing environments conveniently into the fabric of people’s everyday mobility.

  • 5.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    et al.
    Viktoria Institute & Jönköping International Business School.
    Olsson, Carl Magnus
    University of Limerick.
    Context-Aware Application Design at Saab Automobile: An Interpretational Perspective2007In: Journal of Information Technology Theory and Application, ISSN 1552-6496, E-ISSN 1532-4516, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 25-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE), Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    Viktoria Institute, Sweden.
    Ljungberg, Fredrik
    IT University of Göteborg, Sweden.
    SeamlessTalk: User-Controlled Session Management for Sustained Car Conversations2005In: The Interaction Society: Practice, Theories, and Supportive Technologies, Hershey, PA: Information Science Publishing, 2005, p. 304-318Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter approaches sustained car conversations across mobile phones and in-car phone resources as a session management problem. Addressing this problem, the chapter outlines a session management model for user-controlled media switches during ongoing phone conversations. The model makes a distinction between the user and the infrastructure levels of session management. To illustrate and validate the rationale of the model, the chapter presents an in-car mobile phone hands-free system, SeamlessTalk, developed to support sustained car conversations. The user-controlled session management model contributes to current research on session management by addressing the explicit/implicit session management dichotomy in multiple media situations.

  • 7.
    Holmström, Helena
    et al.
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE), Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Improving Packaged Software through Community Knowledge2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0905-0167, E-ISSN 1901-0990, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 3-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Packaged software development (PSD) is largely a knowledge-intense activity. Thus, it depends on the organizational capability of developing and combining market and technical knowledge into timely and competitive software products. Given customers’ situated knowledge of the software, software firms increasingly seek new ways to involve customers in their software development activities. As highlighted in the literature, one path for doing this is to use online communities. However, there exists little empirical research that examines the role that communities can play in the commercial endeavor of PSD. To address this omission, this paper examines the benefits and limits of online community use in PSD as it unfolds at the intersection between commercial software firm practices and voluntary community participation. On the basis of this examination, the paper presents implications for both research and practice.

  • 8.
    Ihlström Eriksson, Carina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE), Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Henfridsson, Ola
    Viktoria Institute.
    Online Newspapers in Scandinavia: A Longitudinal Study of Genre Change and Interdependency2005In: Information Technology and People, ISSN 0959-3845, E-ISSN 1758-5813, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 172-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – To examine the evolution of the online newspaper genre in Scandinavia. To provide an understanding of the institutional context in which online newspapers initially were produced and modified over time.

    Design/methodology/approach – A longitudinal study of three different types of newspapers in three Scandinavian countries. The study is based on interviews with newspaper representatives conducted during recurring visits in 1996, 1999 and 2002, and web page analysis of their online newspapers.

    Findings – The study illustrates how online newspapers have established a number of communicative practices significant for recognizing them as a distinct digital genre, and it outlines a set of institutional factors shaping the ongoing change of these newspapers. In addition, the study demonstrates the emergence of sequential interdependencies between online and printed news.

    Originality/value – The focus on Scandinavian newspapers in this paper complements studies conducted in other parts of the world regarding online newspaper genre evolution.

  • 9.
    Lindgren, Richard
    et al.
    Viktoria Institute, Hörselgången 4, 417 56 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Viktoria Institute, Hörselgången 4, 417 56 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    Viktoria Institute, Hörselgången 4, 417 56 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Multi-Contextuality in Boundary Spanning Practices2009In: Information Systems Journal, ISSN 1350-1917, E-ISSN 1365-2575, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 641-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capability to establish boundary-spanning practices within and across organizations has for long been recognized as a key strategic resource. As organizations are becoming distributed and dynamic, they will be increasingly populated by multiple functional, geographical, hierarchical and professional boundaries. The inherent complexity of such settings makes it difficult for organizations to leverage their boundary-spanning practices. Information technology (IT) systems have been hailed as a critical enabler of boundary spanning. However, there is little knowledge on how organizations are affected by the introduction of different types of IT systems. Building on an interpretive case study of Swedish transport organizations, this paper explores consequences of sensor technology for boundary spanning. The paper contributes with an understanding of what coexisting use contexts mean for boundary-spanning practices. A theoretical implication is that such multi-contextuality requires an integrative view on boundary spanning that combines insights from the organizational innovation and work practice literatures.

  • 10.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    et al.
    Viktoria Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    Viktoria Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Using Competence Systems: Adoption Barriers and Design Suggestions2002In: Journal of Information & Knowledge Management, ISSN 0219-6492, E-ISSN 1793-6926, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 65-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines barriers to adopting competence systems in knowledge work practice. On the basis of a technology review and a user site investigation, the paper relates the technical features of the investigated competence systems to the adoption barriers identified in six user organizations. The multiple-case study shows that the competence systems can be described as merely traditional personnel administration systems complemented by features that passively archive formalized descriptions of competencies. Building on this observation, the general objective of the paper is to provide design suggestions that facilitate successful integration of competence systems in organizations. The main conclusion of this paper is that competence systems need to have features conveying a technology spirit more in line with the knowledge work practice found in organizations. By researching competence systems and their features specifically, this paper contributes technology-specific knowledge within the area of knowledge management systems.

  • 11.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    et al.
    Viktoria Institute, Hörselgången, 4 417 56 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    Viktoria Institute, Hörselgången, 4 417 56 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Schultze, Ulrike
    Cox School of Business, Southern Methodist University, P. O. Box 750333, Dallas, TX 75275-0333, United States.
    Design Principles for Competence Management Systems: A Synthesis of an Action Research Study2004In: Management Information Systems Quarterly, ISSN 0276-7783, E-ISSN 2162-9730, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 435-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though the literature on competence in organizations recognizes the need to align organization level core competence with individual level job competence, it does not consider the role of information technology in managing competence across the macro and micro levels. To address this shortcoming, an action research study was embarked upon that develops and tests design principles for competence management systems. This research develops an integrative model of competence that not only outlines the interaction between organizational and individual level competence and the role of technology in this process, but also incorporates a typology of competence. Six Swedish organizations participated in this research project, which took 30 months and consisted of two action research cycles involving numerous data collection strategies and interventions such as prototypes. In addition to developing a set of design principles and considering their implications for both research and practice, this article includes a self-assessment of the study by evaluating it according to the criteria for canonical action research.

  • 12.
    Olsson, Carl Magnus
    et al.
    Viktoria Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    Viktoria Institute, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Designing Context-Aware Interaction: An Action Research Study2005In: Designing ubiquitous information environments: sociotechnical issues and challenges : IFIP TC8 WG 8.2 international working conference, August 1-3, 2005, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. / [ed] Carsten Sørensen, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2005, p. 233-247Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-aware computing is an important research theme of ubiquitous computing. One of the most debated issues regarding context-aware applications is the extent to which such applications can capture the complexity of social context. This debate has been fueled by the fact that many of the documented context-aware applications convey a relatively simplistic view of context. The typical separation between human activity and context is problematic as context is not something simply in which interaction occurs.This paper applies and evaluates the plausibility of Dourish ’s (2001a, 2001b, 2004) interactional context view for designing context-aware applications that transcend the mainstream design agenda in context-aware computing. On the basis of a canonical action research study, we develop and test design principles for context-aware applications that convey an interactional view of context. Recognizing the car not only as an excellent example of a ubiquitous information environment, but also as an interesting and complex use setting already commonplace in the modern community, we have implemented and assessed a car infotainment application to provide us with a firm illustration of what such a context-aware application might be.

1 - 12 of 12
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