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  • 1.
    Almqvist-Tangen, Gerd
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Axelsson, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Considerations of the concept of infant health: a literature review2006In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275, Vol. 176, no 6, p. 575-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined a wide range of literature in order to describe factors associated with the concept of infant health. The design of the study is a literature review examining 21 research studies, written in the English language. The study explored which factors were found to exert an influence on the concept of infant health. The result showed that the concept infant health is dependent on many factors but what seems to exert an influence are foremost maternal health and well-being, the family's health care utilization and the parental assessment of their own health. Additional studies are needed to fully understand the concept of infant health. The need for an infant definition that empowers infant health arises because, if a common ground is not clearly established, miscommunication may arise. Furthermore, there is a need to initiate a model for infant health.

  • 2.
    Axelsson, Åsa B.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Zettergren, Margaretha
    Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Christer
    Institute of Nursing, Faculty of Health Caring Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Good and bad experiences of family presence during acute care and resuscitation. What makes the difference?2005In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Family presence (FP) in the resuscitation room is still controversial, and its appropriateness for patient and family has been discussed. We examined both positive and negative experiences in order to establish the reasons for the difference.

    Aim:

    The aim of the present literature review was to describe patients', relatives' and staff's opinions and experiences of FP during invasive procedures and resuscitation.

    Method:

    12 original papers, published between January 1995 and February 2003, were reviewed. Most patients and relatives agreed that they had positive experiences of FP. They described how FP enhanced the feeling of support and connectedness within the family. Family members believed that FP helped them in their grieving process. Most staff members without FP experience felt that FP would increase the risk of psychological distress for the family. Those who had participated in an FP programme believed that FP was not only beneficial for the family but also for staff.

    Conclusion:

    Family presence during resuscitation and acute care has the potential to enhance the care of the patient and to benefit everyone involved. However, implementation of FP during resuscitation must take account of potential problems.

  • 3.
    Thorén, Ann Britt
    et al.
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Åsa B.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Stig
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan D.
    Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Measurement of skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation-do professionals follow given guidelines?2001In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 169-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since it is suggested that only effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival rates, quality control of training outcomes is important and comparisons between different training methods are desirable. The aim of this study was to test a model of quality assurance, consisting of a computer program combined with the Brennan et al. checklist, for evaluation of CPR performance. A small group of trained medical professionals (cardiac care unit nurses) (n = 10) was used in this pilot study. The result points out several points of concern: half of the participants did not open the airway prior to breathing control. Over 90% of all inflations were ‘too fast’ and 71% were ‘too much’. Only 6.5% of the inflations were correct. On average, the participants made 5.4 inflations per minute. Concerning chest compressions, 40% were ‘too deep’ while only 4% were ‘too shallow’. In spite of the fact that the participants had an average rate at 95 compressions per minute the number of compressions varied between 32 and 51 during 1 minute. When new guidelines are discussed, it would be beneficial if they were tested by a number of people to investigate if following the guidelines is at all possible. © 2001 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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