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  • 1.
    Haraldsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Baigi, Aamir
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lydell, Marie C.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Marklund, B.
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Evaluation of a school-based adolescent health promotion programme with focus on well-being related to stress2008In: Proc. European Conference on Public Health: ”Health and innovation in Europe”, Centro Congressos de Lisboa 5-8 November 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Haraldsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hildingh, Cathrine
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Marklund, Bertil
    Sahlgrenska School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    What makes the everyday life of Swedish adolescent girls less stressful: a qualitative analysis2010In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 192-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress is a widespread phenomenon in society today, not least among children and adolescents. Stress-related ill-health has increased in this population and affects girls to a greater extent than boys. Against this background, it is important to acquire knowledge about measures that prevent stress, especially in girls. The aim of this study was therefore to illuminate adolescent girls' experiences and reflections about what makes everyday life less stressful. An explorative design, qualitative content analysis, was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with fifteen 17-year-old girls. The analysis comprised both manifest and latent content and revealed the girls' own experiences of and reflections about what makes everyday life less stressful. Three categories, 'Enjoyment and Recovery', 'Trust' and 'Insight and Influence', and nine subcategories emerged. The latent content of these categories is described by the theme 'access to sources of strength'. It is essential that persons in the girls' surroundings are aware of all sources that provide the strength to resist and prevent stress in everyday life. A climate has to be created in all arenas of the girls' everyday life in which they can access these sources of strength. Utilizing the girls' experiences and views about what needs to be done is the first step towards a preventive and promotive mode of working on their own circumstances and wishes. This approach is consistent with the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion, which emphasizes the importance of involving the target group.

  • 3.
    Haraldsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Research and Development Unit, General Practice and Public Health, Halland County Council, Falkenberg.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mattsson, Bengt
    Sahlgrenska School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Sahlgrenska School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Göteborg University.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Research and Development Unit, General Practice and Public Health, Halland County Council, Falkenberg.
    Adolescent Girls' Experiences of Underlying Social Processes Triggering Stress in Their Everyday Life: A grounded theory study2011In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 27, no 2, p. E61-E70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to generate a theoretical model of underlying social processes that trigger stress in adolescent girls’ everyday life. In-depth interviews regarding the experiences of stress at home, school and during leisure time were conducted with 14 17-year-old schoolgirls. Data were analysed by means of the grounded theory method. Stress was triggered in the interaction between responsibility and the way in which the girls were encountered. Triggered emotional reactions took the form of four dimensions of stress included ambivalence, frustration, despair and downheartedness. These reactions were dependent on whether the girls voluntary assumed responsibility for various situations or whether they were forced, or felt they were being forced, to assume responsibility in interaction with an encounter characterized by closeness or distance. These forms of stress reactions could appear in one dimension and subsequently shift to another. From the public health perspective, the generated stress model can be used in the planning and implementation of future actions to prevent stress and promote well-being related to stress in adolescent girls.

  • 4.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Håman, Linn
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Haraldsson, Katarina
    Department of Research and Development within Education, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden & Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Voices from Pupil Participation in the Health Promotion Intervention “Pulse for Learning and Health [PuLH]” in Primary and Middle School2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 22, article id 4543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to improve the learning conditions and health of schoolchildren, the Pulse for Learning and Health [PuLH] program in Sweden has introduced additional mandatory moderate to vigorous physical activity [MVPA] that lasts for 30 min three times a week. The PE teachers used a child-centered coaching approach to support all pupils. The aim of this study was to explore pupils’ perception and experience of PuLH that has been implemented in primary and middle schools in Sweden. We have taken into account children’s rights perspectives and adopted an exploratory and interpretive approach. In total, 73 pupils (34 girls, 39 boys, grades 4–9) were recruited through purposive sampling. 13 focus group interviews (n = 71) and individual interviews (n = 2) were carried out. All interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in three major themes: ‘promotes academic performance and a learning school environment’, ‘promotes health and well-being’, and ‘individual and structural barriers’. From children’s perspective, the results highlight the importance of teachers and principals taking into account the interests and needs of all pupils, to have a well-planned MVPA intervention and to deal with issues regarding body ideals. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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    Voices from Pupil Participation in the Health Promotion Intervention “Pulse for Learning and Health [PuLH]” in Primary and Middle School
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