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  • 1.
    Folke, Solgun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Views of xerostomia among health care professionals: a qualitative study2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 791-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To explore and describe views of xerostomia among health care professionals.

    BACKGROUND:

    Xerostomia (dry mouth) is caused by changes in quality and quantity of saliva due to poor health, certain drugs and radiation therapy. It is a common symptom, particularly among older people and has devastating consequences with regard to oral health and general well-being.

    METHODS:

    Data were obtained and categorised by interviewing 16 health care professionals. Qualitative content analysis was chosen as the method of analysis.

    DESIGN: Qualitative.

    RESULTS:

    The latent content was formulated into a theme: xerostomia is a well-known problem, yet there is inadequate management of patients with xerostomia. The findings identified three categories expressing the manifest content: awareness of xerostomia, indifferent attitude and insufficient support.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Although xerostomia was recognised as commonly occurring, it was considered to be an underestimated and an ignored problem. Proper attention to conditions of xerostomia and subsequent patient management were viewed as fragmentary and inadequate. Additional qualitative studies among patients with xerostomia would be desirable to gain further understanding of the problems with xerostomia, its professional recognition and management.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    A holistic view, positive professional attitudes and enhanced knowledge of xerostomia seem essential to augment collaboration among health care professionals and to improve compassion for and support of patients with xerostomia.

  • 2.
    Folke, Solgun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Malmö University, Sweden.
    The subjective meaning of xerostomia: an aggravating misery2009In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 245-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Xerostomia, the subjective sensation of dry mouth, is associated with qualitative and quantitative changes of saliva. Poor health, certain medications and radiation therapy constitute major risk factors. To gain further understanding of this condition the present study explored the main concern of xerostomia expressed by affl icted adults. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 participants and analysed according to the grounded theory method. An aggravating misery was identi-fi ed as the core category, meaning that the main concern of xerostomia is its devastating and debilitating impact on multiple domains of well-being. Professional consultation, search for affi rmation and social withdrawal were strategies of management. The fi ndings reveal that xerostomia is not a trivial condition for those suffering. Oral impairment as well as physical and psychosocial consequences of xerostomia has a negative impact on quality of life. There is an obvious need to enhance professional competence to improve the compassion for and the support of individuals affl icted by xerostomia

  • 3.
    Gavois, Helena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Mental health professional support in families with a member suffering from severe mental illness: a grounded theory model2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 102-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to develop a model of mental health professional (MHP) support based on the needs of families with a member suffering from severe mental illness (SMI). Twelve family members were interviewed with the focus on their needs of support by MHP, then the interviews were analyzed according to the grounded theory method. The generated model of MHP support had two core categories: the family members’ process from crisis to recovery and their interaction with the MHP about mental health/illness and daily living of the person with SMI. Interaction based on ongoing contact between MHP and family members influenced the family members’ process from crisis towards recovery. Four MHP strategies – being present, listening, sharing and empowering – met the family members’ needs of support in the different stages of the crisis. Being present includes early contact, early information and protection by MHP at onset of illness or relapse. Listening includes assessing burden, maintaining contact and confirmation in daily living for the person with SMI. Sharing between MHP and family members includes co-ordination, open communication and security in daily living for the person with SMI. Finally, the MHP strategy empowering includes creating a context, counselling and encouraging development for the family members. The present model has a holistic approach and can be used as an overall guide for MHP support in clinical care of families of persons with SMI. For future studies, it is important to study the interaction of the family with SMI and the connection between hope, coping and empowerment.

  • 4.
    Isaksson, R.
    et al.
    Cent Hosp, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nederfors, T.
    Cent Hosp, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Evaluation of an oral health programme for nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly. Part II: Clinical aspects.2000In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 1291-1291Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Isaksson, Rita
    et al.
    Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Nederfors, Tommy
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare. Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Evaluation of an oral health education program for nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly. Part II: Clinical aspects2000In: Special Care in Dentistry: managing special patients, settings, and situations, ISSN 0275-1879, E-ISSN 1754-4505, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 109-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, efforts are being made to create strategies for evaluating realistic dental treatment needs among the elderly, who are retaining more natural teeth. These strategies focus on the importance of maintaining adequate oral hygiene. Elderly in long-term-care facilities often depend on nursing personnel for carrying out daily oral hygiene procedures. Therefore, the nursing personnel’s knowledge about and attitudes toward oral health make oral health education for health care professionals an important concern. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical oral health outcome in residents after their caregivers had undergone a one-session, four-hour oral health education program. The study consisted of an intervention with a pre- and a post-test and was carried out in three municipalities in the southwestern part of Sweden. A newly developed oral health screening protocol was carried out for 170 subjects living in long-term-care facilities both before and 3-4 months after nursing personnel had attended an oral health education program. Following the Intervention, a statistically significant improvement was recorded for changes In oral mucosal color, a modified plaque index which measured oral hygiene status, and a mucosal index which recorded mucosal inflammation. This study indicated that a limited, one-session, four-hour oral health education, offered to caregivers within long-term-care facilities, had a positive impact on the oral health status of residents.

  • 6.
    Nederfors, T.
    et al.
    Cent Hosp, Dept Hosp Dent, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Isaksson, R.
    Cent Hosp, Dept Hosp Dent, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Attitudes to the importance of preserving own teeth in an adult Swedish population1998In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 1335-1335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Nederfors, T.
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Isaksson, R.
    Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Ability to estimate oral health status and treatment need in elderly receiving home nursing - a comparison between a dental hygienist and a dentist2000In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 1291-1291Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nederfors, Tommy
    et al.
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Dentistry, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Holmström, Gunilla
    Spenshult Rheumatological Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden .
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Sahlberg, Dick
    Central Hospital Halmstad, Department of Internal Medicine, Halmstad, Sweden.
    The relation between xerostomia and hyposalivation in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia2002In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between xerostomia and hyposalivation in 100 subjects with either rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia, and further, to evaluate the predictive value of xerostomia on hyposalivation. Unstimulated and chewing stimulated whole saliva was collected in the morning with the subjects in a strict fasting condition and then about 2 hours later, after intake of a standardised breakfast. All participants filled in a questionnaire, mainly dealing with xerostomia. Forty subjects demonstrated a pathological fasting unstimulated whole saliva secretion rate, the corresponding number for fasting stimulated secretion being 39. For unstimulated, but not for stimulated saliva, the fasting secretion rate was significantly lower than the non-fasting. Xerostomia was reported by 74 subjects, this group having significantly lower both unstimulated and stimulated secretion rates than the non-xerostomic group. On the individual level, the predictive value of xerostomia on hyposalivation showed high sensitivity but unsatisfactory specificity. In conclusion, this study underlines the importance of applying strictly standardised procedures when collecting saliva, and that fasting unstimulated whole saliva is the diagnostic salivary secretion of choice. Finally, xerostomia was found to predict hyposalivation on a group, but not on an individual level.

  • 9.
    Nederfors, Tommy
    et al.
    Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Isaksson, Rita
    Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Ability to estimate oral health status and treatment need in elderly receiving home nursing: a comparison between a dental hygienist and a dentist2000In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 105-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare the estimation ability of a dental hygienist to that of a dentist when, independently, recording the oral health status and treatment need in a population of elderly, receiving home nursing. Seventy-three persons, enrolled in a home nursing long-time care programme, were recruited. For the oral examination a newly developed protocol with comparatively blunt measurement variables was used. The oral examination protocol was tested for construct validity and for internal consistency reliability. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank sum test for testing differences, while inter-examiner agreement was estimated by calculating the kappa-values. Comparing the two examiners, good agreement was demonstrated for all mucosal recordings, colour, form, wounds, blisters, mucosal index, and for the palatal but not the lingual mucosa. For the latter, the dental hygienist recorded significantly more changes. The dental hygienist also recorded significantly higher plaque index values. Also regarding treatment intention and treatment need, the dental hygienist's estimation was somewhat higher. In conclusion, when comparing the dental hygienist's and the dentist's ability to estimate oral health status, treatment intention, and treatment need, some differences were observed, the dental hygienist tending to register "on the safe side", calling attention to the importance of inter-examiner calibration. However, for practical purpose the inter-examiner agreement was acceptable, constituting a promising basis for future out-reach activities.

  • 10.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fenomenografi2008In: Tillämpad kvalitativ forskning inom hälso- och sjukvård / [ed] Monica Granskär & Birgitta Höglund-Nielsen, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2008, p. 73-84Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Munhälsa hos patienter med cancerdiagnos: en interventionsstudie av vårdpersonal och patienter2007In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 212-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Patienter med cancerdiagnos är en speciell grupp där komplikationer, dels i samband med själva grundsjukdomen, dels i samband med de behandlingar patienten genomgår, påverkar munhälsan. Upprätthållandet av en god munhälsa är därför av största betydelse för både nutrition, tillfrisknande och välbefinnande. Munvård betraktas som en betydelsefull men eftersatt omvårdnadsåtgärd och överskuggas ofta av andra behov som upplevs som mer angelägna. Munhälsodokumentationen måste förbättras, men detta bör göras inom ramen för en generell förbättring av rutinerna runt omvårdnadsdokumentationen, vilken ofta uppvisar brister. 

  • 12.
    Paulsson, Gun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nederfors, T.
    Cent Hosp, Dept Hosp Dent, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Attitudes to oral hygiene procedures among nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly.1998In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 1335-1335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Paulsson, Gun
    et al.
    Oral and Dental Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nederfors, T.
    Oral and Dental Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Nurse managers' conception of oral health. A qualitative analysis.2000In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 1291-1291Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe how nurse managers perceive oral health in general and the oral health of the care-receiver in particular. Background: Oralhealth and general health are independent and influence each other through biological, psychological, emotional and developmental factors. To most adults, oral health is anatural daily routine of hygiene, whereas to people who are dependent on other people's assistance, it is a procedure carried out by nursing personnel. Methods: Data were collected through interviews and analysed according to the phenomenographical method. Findings: Five categories emerged describing how nurse managers perceive oralhealth: maintaining patients' well-being, having knowledge about oral health, behaviour towards the patient, feeling of being insufficient and creating the necessary conditions. Conclusion: The nurses considered oral health an important and obvious, but neglected, part of nursing. They expressed the wish to be updated in the knowledge area concerned, both for themselves and for their personnel. A majority called for standards for oral care, including documentation, which was considered necessary for the successful implementation. Implications: A suggestion for further research is to study whether the creation of national standards may increase its status and quality.

  • 14.
    Paulsson, Gun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nederfors, Tommy
    Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden; King Faisal Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    The effect of an oral health education program after three years2003In: Special Care in Dentistry: managing special patients, settings, and situations, ISSN 0275-1879, E-ISSN 1754-4505, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three years after providing an oral health education program (OHEP) to nursing personnel, the authors analyzed the effect of the program on knowledge of the importance of oral health and on perception among the nurses of the possibility to implement oral care in patient care. The study was based on a cross-sectional survey of all nursing personnel (N = 2,901) in five municipalities in the Southwestern Sweden, of whom 950 had attended four one-hour lessons during an OHEP in 1996. The response rate to the survey questionnaire was 67% (1,930 subjects). Statistical analysis was performed by means of descriptive and analytical statistics. The program was shown to have an independent effect on the dependent variables "knowledge of oral health" and "assessment of implementation possibilities," This study has given further evidence of the feasibility of an educational program to improve both knowledge and implementation of oral health care. through interviews with 17 nursing personnel, selected by strategic sampling. Analysis of the transcribed interviews showed that there were four strategies, related to staff education, hospital resources, and leadership motivation. The strategies were grounded in data and emerged from the interaction between the two main categories: 'the valuation of the importance of oral health' and 'the behavior towards oral health maintenance'. They were characterized as the routine, theoretical, practical, and flexible strategies, with the latter considered ideal. As increased knowledge is one important part in enhancing the nursing personnel's ability to perform oral hygiene procedures, there is a need for education among nursing personnel, primarily among those using a routine strategy.

  • 15.
    Paulsson, Gun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Nederfors, Tommy
    Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Recall of an oral health education programme by nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly2001In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 7-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the recall of oral health knowledge and confidence by nursing personnel in special housing facilities for the elderly, three years after an education programme.

    Design: A cross sectional design using a questionnaire.

    Sample: All nursing personnel, a total of 2,901 subjects, in five municipalities in south-western Sweden; of whom 950 had attended the programme. The response rate was 67% (1930 subjects).

    Intervention: An oral health education programme consisting of four one-hour lessons.

    Results: The oral health education programme still had an effect on the participants' attitudes towards oral health three years later. When comparing the trained group (OHEP+) which attended the programme with those who did not have training (OHEP-), the perceived ability, opportunity and the knowledge of oral health were significantly better in the former group, p<0.01 Eurther, within the OHEP- group who did not attend the programme there was a significant difference in the perceived ability, opportunity and the knowledge of oral health between those with a higher level of health care education, p<0.01.

    Conclusions: The effect of an oral health education programme on the participants' attitudes towards oral health persists at least for three years. The data indicate that trainees with a low level of health care education benefit most.

  • 16.
    Paulsson, Gun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Cent Hosp Halmstad, Oral Hlth Ctr, Halmstad, Sweden .
    Nederfors, Tommy
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Dentistry, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences Jönköping, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nursing personnel's views on oral health from a health promotion perspective: a grounded theory analysis2002In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to develop a model for how nursing personnel view oral health in general and the oral health of the care receivers in particular, applying a health promotion perspective and using grounded theory analysis. Data were collected through interviews with 17 nursing personnel, selected by strategic sampling. Analysis of the transcribed interviews showed that there were four strategies, related to staff education, hospital resources, and leadership motivation. The strategies were grounded in data and emerged from the interaction between the two main categories: 'the valuation of the importance of oral health' and 'the behavior towards oral health maintenance'. They were characterized as the routine, theoretical, practical, and flexible strategies, with the latter considered ideal. As increased knowledge is one important part in enhancing the nursing personnel's ability to perform oral hygiene procedures, there is a need for education among nursing personnel, primarily among those using a routine strategy.

  • 17.
    Paulsson, Gun
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Wårdh, Inger
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Andersson, P.
    Department of Health Sciences, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad.
    Öhrn, K.
    Department of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Dalarna, Sweden.
    Comparison of oral health assessments between nursing staff and patients on medical wards2008In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maintenance of good oral health is essential for nutrition, recovery and well-being. This requires the involvement of the nursing staff, especially in cases where oral care and any necessary dental treatment are vital to ensure medical treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of oral assessments performed by nursing staff using the revised oral assessment guide (ROAG), using comparisons with patients' self-assessment of oral problems. When a comparison was made of how the staff and patients assessed their oral status, a high level of agreement was found. In these assessments, with the exception of oral mucosa and teeth, the percentage agreement was >80. The kappa coefficient revealed slight to moderate agreement. When there was a disagreement, the staff assessed the oral health as being significantly poorer than the patients did. In the present study, it was shown that few oral assessments performed by the nursing staff and patient disagreed. The ROAG may therefore be useful for the nursing staff to make the patients' oral health problems visible. © 2007 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 18.
    Wårdh, Inger
    et al.
    Dept of Gerodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Department of Health Sciences and Statistical, School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nursing staff's understanding of oral health care for patients with cancer diagnoses: an intervention study2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 799-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-lasting changes in the nursing staff's understanding of oral health care for cancer patients after an oral health care intervention. The study also assessed whether there were changes between registered nurses and auxiliary nurses. Background. The maintenance of good oral health care in cancer patients is essential for nutrition, recovery and wellbeing and requires the involvement of nursing staff. However, several studies reveal that the need to prioritize oral health care has not been made sufficiently clear. Methods. The nursing staff (registered nurses, n = 133 and auxiliary nurses, n = 109) on five wards at different hospitals providing cancer care took part in a four-hour oral healthcare training session, including the use of an oral assessment guide and answered a questionnaire initially and after this intervention. The data were statistically analyzed. Results. Several aspects of implementation opportunities improved, but they did not include attitudes to oral health care. Knowledge of oral diseases decreased, more for auxiliary nurses than for registered nurses. Conclusions. A four-hour oral health training session and subsequent activities improve the nursing staff's understanding of oral health care for patients with cancer diagnoses in some respects but not in terms of attitudes to oral health care or specific oral knowledge. Relevance to clinical practice. Oral healthcare education and training activities for nursing staff can produce some improvements in the understanding of oral health care for cancer patients but not in attitudes and specific oral knowledge. These areas must be covered during the basic education period or/and by a routine oral healthcare programme for nursing staff, probably including an oral healthcare standard.

  • 19.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Hallberg, Ulrika
    Nordiska Högskolan för Folkhälsovetenskap.
    Paulsson, Gun
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Book review: "Developing grounded theory. The second generation"2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 5058-Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Developing Grounded Theory. The Second Generation is a very useful and clarifying book arisen from a one-day symposium on advances in qualitative methods in Alberta, 2007. The conference was sponsored by the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology (IIQM). For the first time, the students of Barney Glaser and Anselm Strauss, “the second generation” of grounded theory researchers, met to discuss grounded theory and its developments. With the exception of Janice Morse, the authors of this book worked directly with Anselm Strauss and Barney Glaser. In this volume they provide a description of the history, principles and practice of the grounded theory methods.

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