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  • 1.
    Bailey, Arlene
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, Psychology and Social Work, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Institute for Innovation and Technology Management, Faculty of Business, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Bridging the generation gap in ICT use: Interrogating identity, technology and interactions in community telecenters2010In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 62-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the issues related to the generation gap in the use of information and communication technologies through an examination of relevant literature and findings from empirical field research in community-based telecenters in a developing country. Our findings show that intergenerational interaction is a key issue and social relations and interactions are explored through an analysis of social networks in conjunction with social identity theory and social representations theory. A conceptual framework is developed of the impact of intergenerational interactions at telecenters on community development. © 2010 Commonwealth Secretariat.

  • 2.
    Bjørn, Pernille
    et al.
    School of Communication, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Institute for Innovation and Technology Management, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 574 Bay Street, Toronto, ON M5G 2C5, Canada.
    Virtual Team Collaboration: Building Shared Meaning, Resolving Breakdowns and Creating Translucence2009In: Information Systems Journal, ISSN 1350-1917, E-ISSN 1365-2575, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 227-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing international teams with geographically distributed participants is a complex task. The risk of communication breakdowns increases due to cultural and organizational differences grounded in the geographical distribution of the participants. Such breakdowns indicate general misunderstandings and a lack of shared meaning between participants. In this paper, we address the complexity of building shared meaning. We examine the communication breakdowns that occurred in two globally distributed virtual teams by providing an analytical distinction of the organizational context as the foundation for building shared meaning at three levels. Also we investigate communication breakdowns that can be attributed to differences in lifeworld structures, organizational structures, and work process structures within a virtual team. We find that all communication breakdowns are manifested and experienced by the participants at the work process level; however, resolving breakdowns may require critical reflection at other levels. Where previous research argues that face-to-face interaction is an important variable for virtual team performance, our empirical observations reveal that communication breakdowns related to a lack of shared meaning at the lifeworld level often becomes more salient when the participants are co-located than when geographically distributed. Last, we argue that creating translucence in communication structures is essential for building shared meanings at all three levels. © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 3.
    Bollou, Felix
    et al.
    Institute for Innovation and Technology Management, Faculty of Business, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Institute for Innovation and Technology Management, Faculty of Business, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Are ICT investments paying off in Africa?: An Analysis of total factor productivity in six West African Countries from 1995 to 20022008In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 294-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past two decades, we have seen increasing debate about information and communication technology (ICT) as an engine of growth that could lift developing nations out of poverty. Many African nations have implemented market liberalization and invested huge sums of money into their ICT sectors. But few studies have been conducted to assess the effectiveness of these investments. Demonstrating ICT sector performance is especially important because of challenges of the development of ICT policy and the United Nations agencies inability to state firmly if there are benefits to these investments. In this article, we investigated the total factor productivity (TFP) of the ICT sectors in six West African countries from 1995 to 2002. While the findings demonstrate positive growth in TFP, there is cause for concern. TFP growth in the ICT sector has been declining, and these countries are not yet able to take advantage of scale efficiencies. Careful attention must be given to future ICT investment strategies and performance management of existing ICT infrastructure if continued growth is to be achieved. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 4.
    Cukier, Wendy
    et al.
    Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Bauer, Robert
    Institute for Organizational Studies, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria.
    Middleton, Catherine
    Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    A Critical Analysis of Media Discourse on Information Technology: Preliminary Results of a Proposed Method for Critical Discourse Analysis2009In: Information Systems Journal, ISSN 1350-1917, E-ISSN 1365-2575, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 175-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1980s, there has been a growing body of critical theory in information systems research. A central theoretical foundation of this research is Habermas’ theory of communicative action, which focuses on implications of speech and proposes general normative standards for communication. Habermas also places particular emphasis on the importance of the public sphere in a democratic society, critiquing the role of the media and other actors in shaping public discourse. While there has been growing emphasis on critical discourse analysis (CDA), there has been limited effort to systematically apply Habermas’ validity claims to empirical research. Moreover, while critical research in information systems has examined communication within the organizational context, public discourse on information technology has received little attention. The paper makes three primary contributions: (1) it responds to Habermas’ call for empirical research to ground and extend his theory of communication in every day critical practice; (2) it proposes an approach to applying Habermas’ theory of communication to CDA; and (3) it extends the reach of critical research in information systems beyond micro-level organizational concerns and opens up to critical reflection and debate on the impact of systematically distorted communication about technology in the public sphere.

  • 5.
    Eagen, Ward M.
    et al.
    Ryerson University Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 Canada.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Ryerson University Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 Canada.
    Prescod, Franklyn
    Ryerson University Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 Canada.
    The Design Charrette in the Classrooms as a Method for Outcomes-based Action Learning in IS Design2008In: Information Systems Education Journal, ISSN 1545-679X, Vol. 6, no 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the adaptation of a traditional studio technique in architecture – the Design Charrette – to the teaching of New Media design in a large information systems program. The Design Charrette is an intense, collaborative session in which a group of designers drafts a solution to a design problem in a time critical environment. The Design Charrette offers learning opportunities in a very condensed period that are difficult to achieve in the classroom by other means and we have adapted its application from the architecture studio to for New Media instruction. The teaching of information systems has tended to rely heavily on conventional pedagogical approaches although there is growing recognition of the importance of experiential and applied learning. Ac- creditation standards have also placed added emphasis on outcome-based learning and encouraged more mindfulness concerning instructional design (Lee et. al., 1995; McGourty et. al., 1999). As a consequence, more emphasis on experiential learning has emerged in recent years. Architecture has long been used as a reference discipline for Information Systems and much of the language used in information systems design is drawn from architectural discourse. However, while architectural design combines attention to history and form as well as function, most information systems design is driven by functional considerations. Teaching New Media design, like architecture, demands at- tention to the conceptual and aesthetic as well as the functional design perspectives and presents particular challenges. The Design Charrette, a short but intense effort to solve an architectural problem is an outcome focused form of action learning that has enormous potential to enrich the teaching of New Media design, in particular, and information systems in general.

  • 6.
    Iversen, Jakob
    et al.
    University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, 800 Algoma Blvd., Oshkosh, WI 54901-8675, USA.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Problems in Measuring Effectiveness in Software Process Improvement: A Longitudinal Study of Organizational Change at Danske Data2006In: International Journal of Information Management, ISSN 0268-4012, E-ISSN 1873-4707, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 30-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software process improvement (SPI) is a widely recognized approach that software companies implement to improve quality, productivity, and time-to-market. Assessing and analyzing performance improvements are important SPI activities. However, many SPI managers have found it difficult to develop and implement effective performance measurement programs for SPI, in part because guidelines for conducting SPI measurements are scarce. We address this gap in the SPI literature by examining major problems that SPI change agents encounter when developing and implementing SPI measurement programs. We report on a longitudinal study of an SPI change initiative and the challenges that the SPI Team faced in dealing with the issues of measuring effectiveness of the initiative. We systematically analyze an SPI performance measurement program to understand its limitations and the problems that the SPI Team encountered when implementing it. We used an organizational change theory framework to derive theoretical and practical insights that can help managers and researchers develop and implement better SPI performance measurement programs.

  • 7.
    Kositanurit, B.
    et al.
    Fiscal Policy Office, Information and Communication Technology Center, Ministry of Finance, Thailand.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Research Institute for Technology Management and Organizational Learning, School of Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Osei-Bryson, K-M
    Department of Information Systems, Information Systems Research Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, United States.
    An Exploration of Factors that Impact Individual Performance in an ERP Environment: An Analysis Using Multiple Analytical Techniques2006In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 556-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the factors that can impact individual performance when using enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Starting from the proposition that organizational performance depends on individuals' task accomplishments, we test a structural model of task-technology fit, ERP user satisfaction, and individual performance in ERP environments. This research utilizes a survey method to examine the perceptions of ERP users. We performed factor and reliability analyses to assess the validity of the survey instrument. Six factors were identified as having an impact on individual performance: System Quality, Documentation, Ease of use, Reliability, Authorization, and Utilization. To explore the relationships among these factors, we conducted regression and multivariate adaptive regression splines analysis, and compared the findings from these two analytical techniques. The study provides evidence that System Quality, Utilization, and Ease of Use are the most important factors bearing on individual performance in ERP environments. Our findings also provide IT managers and researchers with knowledge of how these factors can be manipulated to improve individual performance when using ERP systems.

  • 8.
    Mathiassen, Lars
    et al.
    Center for Process Innovation, J. Mack Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University, PO Box 5029, Atlanta, GA 30302-5029, United States.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    School of Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria St., Toronto, Ont. M5B 2K3, Canada.
    Aen, Ivan
    Dept. of Computer Science, Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajersvej 7E, DK9220 Aalborg, Denmark.
    Managing Change in Software Process Improvement2005In: IEEE Software, ISSN 0740-7459, E-ISSN 1937-4194, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software process improvement has become the primary approach to improving software quality and reliability, employee and customer satisfaction, and return on investment. Although the literature acknowledges that SPI implementation faces various problems, most published cases report success, detailing dramatic improvements. Such best-practice cases are a great benefit when learning how to effectively implement SPI. However, it's equally important to critically examine the less glamorous cases of organizations that struggle to sustain STI benefits. 

    On the basis of experiences from SPI initiatives and insights into organizational-change management, we offer the following advice for successful SPI implementation: software managers must appreciate that each SPI initiative is unique and carefully negotiate the context of change. Managers must also understand the elements of change involved. SPI can't succeed without managerial commitment and a mastery of appropriate change tactics.

  • 9.
    Morawczynski, Olga
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    The Institute for Innovation and Technology Management, Ryerson University, Canada.
    Unraveling the Impact of Investments in ICT, Education and Health on Development: An Analysis of Archival Data of Five West African Countries Using Regression Splines2007In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, ISSN 1681-4835, E-ISSN 1681-4835, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than a decade African nations have been investing in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) as a strategy for fostering development. Under the auspices of international development agencies such as the United Nations (UN), and World Bank these nations have been constituting and implementing technology strategies that aim to bring ‘digital opportunities’ to all constituents—especially those who are impoverished and living in remote communities. These strategies have put new demands on national governments to invest both human and financial resources into the expansion of telecommunications infrastructure and the training of new users. Such investments, however, have received some scrutiny as some claim that developing nations should focus their limited financial resources on the improvement of education or healthcare. Others argue that these ICT investments are vital for development, but should be synergized with others such as education and healthcare. In this study we will employ Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) to explore the interaction amongst investments in ICT, education and healthcare. We further analyze how each class of investments impacts human development measures in five West African nations: Benin, Cameroon, Senegal, Ivory Coast and Niger. With such an analysis we illustrate the interdependencies amongst the three classes of investments and conclude that investments in ICTs alone are not enough to significantly impact human development. Complementary investments in education and healthcare must be given equal consideration.

  • 10.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    Institute for Research on Technology Management and Organizational Learning, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Andoh-Baidoo, F. K.
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA.
    Bollou, F.
    Institute for Research on Technology Management and Organizational Learning, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Morawczynski, O.
    Brussels School of International Studies, University of Kent at Brussels, 109 Boulevard du Triomphe, 1160 Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Is There a Relationship Between ICT, Health, Education and Development?: An Empirical Analysis of five West African Countries from 1997-20032006In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, ISSN 1681-4835, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Andoh-Baidoo, F.K.
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, United States.
    SSM Approach to Emancipatory Ideals in ERP Implementation2005In: 11th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS 2005): A Conference on a Human Scale, Vol 2 / [ed] Romano, N., Northampton, Mass.: Curran Associates, Inc., 2005, p. 935-942Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    Institute for Research on Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Bollou, Felix
    Institute for Research on Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Morawczynski, Olga
    Institute for Research on Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    The Impact of Investments in ICT, Health and Education on Development: A DEA Analysis of Five African Countries from 1993-19992006In: 14th European Conference on Information Systems: 2006 ECIS Göteborg; Göteborg, June 12-14, 2006; proceedings / [ed] Jan Ljungberg & Magnus Andersson, Göteborg: IT University of Göteborg , 2006, p. Paper 35-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    School of Information Technology Management, Institute for Research on Technology Management, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Canada.
    Guergachi, Aziz
    School of Information Technology Management, Institute for Research on Technology Management, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Canada.
    McLaren, Tim
    School of Information Technology Management, Institute for Research on Technology Management, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Canada.
    Using the Learning Curve to Maximize IT Productivity: A Desicion Analysis Model for Timing Software Upgrades2007In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 524-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information technology managers often feel pressure from stakeholders to continually upgrade their firm's software as soon as the software vendor releases a new version. However, this may not be ideal as the software's life cycle and the organization's learning curves are not necessarily aligned. If the firm upgrades its software too early, it may not achieve productivity gains and may lose investments from prior upgrades. If it upgrades too late, it may miss gaining important productivity gains offered by the new version. We present an approach to timing software upgrades that will maximize organization productivity gains. We use the learning curve as the theoretical basis for our mathematical model.

  • 14.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    Institute for Innovation and Technology Management, Faculty of Business, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Morawczynski, Olga
    Sciences Studies Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH8 9EJ, UK.
    Factors Affecting ICT Expansion in Emerging Economies: An Analysis of ICT Infrastructure Expansion in Five Latin American Countries2009In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 237-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-quality information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure is essential for developing countries to achieve rapid economic growth. International trade and the structure of the global economy require a level of integration that is achievable only with sophisticated infrastructure. Since the early 1990s, international institutions have been pushing developing nations to deregulate and heavily invest in ICT infrastructure as a strategy for accelerating socioeconomic development. After more than a decade of continued investments, some countries have still not achieved expected outcomes. Recently, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has called for empirical research to assess the performance and impact of ICT expansion in developing countries. In this article, we respond to this call by investigating factors affecting the efficiency of ICT expansion in five emerging economies in Latin America. Our findings demonstrate that deregulation is not enough to effect efficient ICT expansion, and we argue that existing conditions (economic factors, human capital, geography, and civil infrastructure factors) must also be considered. We conclude by asserting that policy makers can more easily realize socioeconomic development via ICTs if they consider these conditions while cultivating their technology strategies. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 15.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Nørbjerg, Jacob
    Department of Informatics, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Building and Maintaining Alliances in SPI Projects: Implications for Organizing Effective SPI2005In: Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Information Systems, Information Systems in a Rapidly Changing Economy, ECIS 2005 / [ed] Dieter Bartmann, Federico Rajola, Jannis Kallinikos et al, Regensburg: Institute for Management of Information Systems, University of Regensburg , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    Ryerson Univ, Inst Innovat & Technol Management, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Nørbjerg, Jacob
    Copenhagen Sch Econ & Business Adm, Dept Informat, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Software Process Improvement with Weak Management Support: An analysis of the Dynamics of Intra-organizational Alliances in IS Change Initiatives2010In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software Process Improvement (SPI) projects are large-scale, complex organization-wide change initiatives. They require considerable investments in personnel, time and money and impact just about every aspect of software firms. The group charged with conducting an SPI project has, however, little formal authority to influence or force software professionals to engage in SPI work or to define and implement changes. The SPI literature suggests that successful SPI initiatives depend on strong commitment from top management. But what should the SPI group do if management support is weak? In this paper, we present an analysis of how an SPI group can use alliances to obtain influence and succeed when management support is weak. Our study is based on a 3-year longitudinal field study of SPI change initiatives at Denmark Electronics. Our findings show that a lack of top management support is not necessarily incompatible with success. This research opens an important new area of research on intra-organizational alliances and information system (IS) implementation. It has the potential to offer new theories and practical advice on how IS implementation projects can be more effectively managed.

  • 17.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    School of Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, Canada.
    Sullivan, W.E.
    IT University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The Role of Contracts in Measuring IS Outsourcing Risks: A Risk Analysis of Successful Outsourcing Contracts2006In: Proceedings of the Fourteenth European Conference on Information Systems, ECIS 2006, Göteborg, Sweden, 2006 / [ed] Jan Ljungberg & Magnus Andersson, 2006, p. 248-259Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    et al.
    School of Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Sullivan, William E.
    IT University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Outsourcing Contracts as Instruments of Risk Management: Insights from Two Successful Public Contracts2007In: Journal of Enterprise Information Management, ISSN 1741-0398, E-ISSN 1758-7409, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 615-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine contracts in public jurisdictions to compare academic theories related to outsourcing risks and risk management strategies to current practice in order to extend and refine theory concerning what risk management strategies can, or should, be included in outsourcing contracts.

    Design/methodology/approach: An automated content analysis tool is used to rigorously compare contract documents in two public jurisdictions to a comprehensive outsourcing risk framework from previous research.

    Findings: The findings indicate that although IS outsourcing risk factors are widely acknowledged in the literature, they are not fully specified in the outsourcing contracts that are implemented in some public organizations. This research surfaces some of the differences in the techniques implemented through actual contracts to manage the risks inherent in IS outsourcing, including some strategies not previously identified in the literature. Also, not all risks need to be addressed in the contract to have a successful outsourcing engagement.

    Practical implications: The improved framework for thinking about risk management strategies in the contracting process shown within the paper can provide important ideas and insights for managers contemplating or renewing outsourcing engagements.

    Originality/value: This paper uses content analysis to rigorously compare academic theory to actual practice to extend theory. Specifically, it discovers several risk management strategies that have not been presented in previous research.

  • 19.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki
    et al.
    Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada & Faculty of Commerce, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Nielsen, Peter Axel
    Department of Computer Science, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark & Department of Information Systems, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Using organizational influence processes to overcome IS implementation barriers: lessons from a longitudinal case study of SPI implementation2014In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 205-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental tenet of the information systems (IS) discipline holds that: (a) a lack of formal power and influence over the organization targeted for change, (b) weak support from top management, and (c) organizational memories of prior failures are barriers to implementation success. Our research, informed by organization influence, compellingly illustrates that such conditions do not necessarily doom a project to failure. In this paper, we present an analysis of how an IS implementation team designed and enacted a coordinated strategy of organizational influence to achieve implementation success despite these barriers. Our empirical analysis also found that technology implementation and change is largely an organizational influence process (OIP), and thus technical-rational approaches alone are inadequate for achieving success. Our findings offer managers important insights into how they can design and enact OIPs to effectively manage IS implementation. Further, we show how the theory of organizational influence can enhance understanding of IS implementation dynamics and advance the development of a theory of effective IS change agentry. © 2014 Operational Research Society Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 20.
    Osei-Bryson, K-M
    et al.
    Department of Information Systems, The Information Systems Research Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1015 Floyd Avenue, Richmond, VA 23284, United States.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    School of Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, Canada.
    Managing Risks in Information Systems Outsourcing: An Approach to Analyzing Outsourcing Risks and Structuring Incentive Contracts2006In: European Journal of Operational Research, ISSN 0377-2217, E-ISSN 1872-6860, Vol. 174, no 1, p. 245-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information systems outsourcing is now almost standard practice for many companies. Outsourcing the information processing activities is a complex issue that entails considerable implications for the strategy of the firm. An important mechanism for managing the performance of outsourcing vendors is incentive contracts. But to develop an outsourcing contract the IS manager must quantify risks and benefits. However methods and tools for analyzing and quantifying outsourcing risks that IS managers have at their disposal are rudimentary. In this paper we offer a method and some mathematical models for analyzing risks and constructing incentive contracts for IS outsourcing. We are aware that most managers do not like to use mathematical models, consequently we have minimized the technical discussion and have illustrated how this model could be implemented using spreadsheet software for ease of use.

  • 21.
    Osei-Bryson, Kweku-Muata
    et al.
    Department of Information Systems, Information Systems Research Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284, United States.
    Dong, Linying
    Ted Rogers School of Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Institute for Innovation and Technology Management, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada.
    Exploring managerial factors affecting ERP implementation: An investigation of the Klein-Sorra model using regression splines2008In: Information Systems Journal, ISSN 1350-1917, E-ISSN 1365-2575, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 499-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predicting successful implementation of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems is still an elusive problem. The cost of ERP implementation failures is exceedingly high in terms of quantifiable financial resources and organizational disruption. The lack of good explanatory and predictive models makes it difficult for managers to develop and plan ERP implementation projects with any assurance of success. In this paper we investigate the Klein & Sorra theoretical model of implementation effectiveness. To test this model we develop and validate a data collection instrument to capture the appropriate data, and then use multivariate adaptive regression splines to examine the assertions of the model and suggest additional significant relationships among the factors of their model. Our research offers new dimensions for studying managerial interventions in IT implementation and insights into factors that can be managed to improve the effectiveness of ERP implementation projects.

  • 22.
    Plaza, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Institute for Innovation and Technology Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas Street West, 9 Floor, Room 3-089, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5B 2K3.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Institute for Innovation and Technology Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas Street West, 9 Floor, Room 3-089, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5B 2K3.
    Rholf, Katrin
    Department of Mathematics Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    A comparative analysis of learning curves: Implications for new technology implementation management2010In: European Journal of Operational Research, ISSN 0377-2217, E-ISSN 1872-6860, Vol. 200, no 6, p. 518-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technology implementation projects are notoriously over time and budget resulting in significant financial and strategic organizational consequences. Some argue that inadequate planning and management, misspecification of requirements, team capabilities and learning contribute to cost and schedule over runs. In this paper we examine how learning curve theory could inform better management of new technology implementation projects. Our research makes four important contributions: (1) It presents a comparative analysis of learning curves and proposes how they can be used to help ERP implementation planning and management. (2) Based on empirical data from four ERP implementation projects, it provides illustrations of how managers can apply the curves in different project situations. (3) It provides a theoretical basis for empirical studies of learning and ERP (and other IT) implementations in different organizational settings. (4) It provides empirical justification for the development of learning curve theory in IT implementation. Crown Copyright © 2009.

  • 23.
    Scheepers, R.
    et al.
    Department of Information Systems, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Scheepers, H.
    Caulfield School of Information Technology, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    School of Information Technology Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Contextual Influences on User Satisfaction with Mobile Computing: Findings from Two Healthcare Organizations2006In: European Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0960-085X, E-ISSN 1476-9344, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 261-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile information technologies (IT) are transforming individual work practices and organizations. These devices are extending not only the boundaries of the 'office' in space and time, but also the social context within which use occurs. In this paper, we investigate how extra-organizational influences can impact user satisfaction with mobile systems. The findings from our longitudinal study highlight the interrelatedness of different use contexts and their importance in perceptions of user satisfaction. The data indicate that varying social contexts of individual use (individual as employee, as professional, as private user, and as member of society) result in different social influences that affect the individual's perceptions of user satisfaction with the mobile technology. While existing theories explain user satisfaction with IT within the organizational context, our findings suggest that future studies of mobile IT in organizations should accommodate such extra-organizational contextual influences.

  • 24.
    Shirazi, Farid
    et al.
    Institute for Research on Innovation and Technology Management, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Institute for Research on Innovation and Technology Management, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Morawczynski, Olga
    Sciences Studies Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    ICT Expansion and The Digital Divide in Democratic Freedom: An analysis of the impact of ICT expansion, Education and ICT filtering on democracy2010In: Telematics and informatics, ISSN 0736-5853, E-ISSN 1879-324X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, several case studies have appeared on how mobile telephones, SMS and the Internet had an impact on political activities. It has been widely argued that information and communication technology (ICT) is influencing democracy all over the world. However, few studies provide any analysis of how ICT expansion correlates with measures of democracy. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the global expansion of ICT and the level of democracy within nations. We analyze archival data on 133 countries from 1995 to 2003, which was the period-of-time of explosive ICT expansion. Some important findings of our study are: (a) there is a growing digitaldivide in democratic freedoms among countries; (b) in spite of rapid ICT expansion in some countries, Internet filtering is having a significant impact on democratic freedoms. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 25.
    Sullivan, William E.
    et al.
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284-4000, United States.
    Ngwenyama, Ojelanki K.
    Ryerson University, Toronto, Ont. MSB 2K3, Canada.
    How are Public Sector Organizations Managing IS Outsourcing Risks?: An Analysis of Outsourcing guidelines from Three Jurisdictions2005In: Journal of Computer Information Systems, ISSN 0887-4417, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few years the public sector has witnessed some of the most spectacular information systems (IS) outsourcing failures. Publicofficials have come under fire for sloppy management of IS outsourcing engagements. Citizens are demanding legislation to control outsourcingpractice and more accountability from public sector managers. In an effort to better understand the context of IS outsourcing management in thepublic sector, we analyze the IS outsourcing guidelines of three public jurisdictions: Alberta, Canada; Queensland, Australia, and Texas, USA. These guidelines offer insights into how some public organizations approach managing the risks inherent in the practice of IS outsourcing. In this paper we review the research literature on IS outsourcing to develop a risk framework and use it to analyze the guidelines. We use a contentanalysis methodology to identify the IS outsourcing risk factors and management mitigation strategies addressed by the guidelines. Our findings indicate that IS outsourcing risk factors are widely acknowledged in the literature but are not fully addressed in the IS outsourcing guidelines thatpublic sector managers use for decision making and the management of IS outsourcing engagements. Our findings point to the need for betterguidelines and more support for public sector managers who must make costly IS outsourcing decisions.

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