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  • 1.
    Diedrich, Andreas
    et al.
    Gothenburg Research Institute (GRI), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson-Zetterquist, Ulla
    Gothenburg Research Institute (GRI), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ewertsson, Lena
    Hagberg, Johan
    Gothenburg Research Institute (GRI), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallin, Anette
    Lavén, Fredrik
    Gothenburg Research Institute (GRI), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Kajsa
    Gothenburg Research Institute (GRI), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Raviola, Elena
    Gothenburg Research Institute (GRI), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rindzeviciute, Egle
    Gothenburg Research Institute (GRI), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Walter, Lars
    Gothenburg Research Institute (GRI), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Exploring the Performativity Turn in Management Studies2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the contemporary “turns” in management studies is the “performativity” turn. In this paper, we present a genealogy of the concept of performativity as it has been used in management and organization studies (MOS). Starting with the work of Austin, Bateson, Goffman and Lyotard, we move on to more recent debates surrounding the use of the concept by Butler and the STS researchers Callon, Latour and Law, as well as how their ideas have been further translated within MOS. The focus is on how the concept is defined and on the areas of study where performativity has been used. Taken together, the approach to performativity employed has implications for how the concept is understood and translated. Finally, we discuss the particular ontological position of the performative perspective, and its methodological consequences.

  • 2.
    Ewertsson, Lena
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Centre for Studies of Political Science, Communication and Media (CPKM). Gothenburg Research Institute, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Banking on (the) Line: Security & Authentication Practices in the Minimization of Internet Crime2012In: Conference track: Monitoring, identifying, displacing: on everyday surveillance & security practices., 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent decades, satellite systems and digital technology, the Internet included, gradually have begun to meet and become recombined with existing practices of banking. Homebanking, internet-banking, e-codes, cashpoints, debit cards, card readers in the home and other places, are perhaps some of the most visible expressions of such recombinations. By allowing new forms of organization and interaction, the marriage between banking, satellite and digital techniques has involved radical changes for banking activities as well as for  the individual and society at large. At the same time, it involves a number of dimensions and problems increasingly discussed in terms of crime, threats, uncertainties and risks deriving from particular innovative practices of recombination called, for instance, skimming, hacking and Trojan attacks. In this paper, I explore an issue which hitherto has been little investigated: what do banks do in practice when they deal with problems, threats and uncertainties related to such ’unwanted’ innovative activities? Here I concentrate on Nordea AB, a Stockholm-based financial services group operating in Northern Europe, which is described as ’the world leader of internet banking in terms of usage, having more than 5.9 million online customers doing more than 260 million payments/ year” (Wikipedia). By making more visible the work on security & authentication carried out by Nordea, I hope to illuminate, nuance and problematize more general imaginations of how technologies associated with the Internet can be used in attempts to enact, expand, destabilize or sabotage particular interactions and relations.

  • 3.
    Ewertsson, Lena
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Centre for Studies of Political Science, Communication and Media (CPKM).
    Governing the Digital Future Through Demonstrations?: An Example from the History of Television2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the emergence of ’high definition television’ (HDTV) as a new movement of experimentation and standardization in the 1970s and 1980s, spanning East and West in terms of sites, actors and issues. By exploring the circumstances, tactics and means through which a particular research, development and demonstration project (HD-Divine) evolved and came to the attention of others until July 1992, the paper opens up a window on some of the ways technical standards for television as well as new ’digital’worlds are created, governed and govern. Based upon this analysis, the paper demonstrates that the contingent and ’messy’ processes through which the analogue-digital divide has emerged and become entangled with the (re)creation of rules and routines in recent decades deserve more detailed empirical attention. In doing so, it also offers reasons for exploring an issue that hitherto has been devoted surprisingly little scholarly attention: how do ’thoughts’ (ideas, claims etc) gain–or fail to gain–credibility and persuasiveness in the creation of technical standards?

  • 4.
    Ewertsson, Lena
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre for Studies of Political Science, Communication and Media (CPKM).
    Governing the Digital Future through Demonstrations: An Example from the History of Television2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of this paper belongs to the history and sociology of innovation, or what Joseph A. Schumpeter (1934/2007:65.; 14 f.) called ’the carrying out of new combinations’: to do new things, or the same things differently, by combining ’materials and forces within our reach’ in a new way. The question addressed in this paper has been surprisingly little explored in the literature: What roles can be ascribed to staged demonstrations in the (re)creation of technical standards in processes of innovation and the (re)creation of markets? A provisional answer would be that carefully staged demonstrations, as a highly institutionalized device for persuasion, negotiation and the assertion of power, are important resources in making visible, defining, extending and enacting what can be connected to what and what cannot in the future. The paper examines the relations between demonstrations and the (re)creation of technical standards in the context of what in the 1980s and early 1990s was publicly reported upon as a ’war’ or ’battle’ over which technical standards should ultimately carry future ’high definition television’ (HDTV) and its market(s). Based upon a broad array of empirical materials collected in 1992-2009, I tell a story of a particular demonstration: the HD-Divine demonstration at the International Broadcasting Convention in Amsterdam in 1992 (IBC’92). HD-Divine was a Scandinavian research and development programme launched in 1990 to counteract the claims and strategies of the Eureka 95 – a programme for the introduction of HDTV in Europe. Through the HD-Divine programme various people were drawn together in joint action with a first common goal being to demonstrate a working prototype of a new (HD)TV-system at IBC’92. According to some of my interviewees, understanding the role of the demonstration of HD-Divine at IBC’92 is crucial for grasping the ways in which digital technology has entered and been combined with traditional national networks for television in Europe during the past decades. The paper also examines how the word ’digital’ began to be used to support arguments for changing people’s belief or action with regard to future (HD)TV-systems, including the (re)creation of technical standards and other social ’rules’ as a way to induce durable interactions and relations – and the abandonment of alternative paths of interaction. I also attempt to challenge dominant perceptions, both within and beyond the academy, related to the emergence of yet another dualism gaining strength during the recent decades: that between ’the digital’ and ’the analogue’. Focusing on empirical material from the history of television, I suggest that, rather than reiying and black-boxing the analogue-digital divide, we might use it as a point of departure for thinking inventively about the role of visibility in the (re)creation of markets and the mutations of politics and technology in staged demonstrations.

  • 5.
    Ewertsson, Lena
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre for Studies of Political Science, Communication and Media (CPKM), Media and Communication Science.
    Governing the Digital Future through Demonstrations: An Example from the History of Television2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of this paper belongs to the history and sociology of innovation, or what Joseph A. Schumpeter called ’the carrying out of new combinations’: to do new things, or the same things differently, by combining ’materials and forces within our reach’ in a new way. The question addressed has been surprisingly little explored in the literature: How are staged demonstrations used in the creation of technical standards? The paper attends to this question by discussing the (re)production of demonstrations in the context of what in the 1980s and early 1990s was publicly reported upon as a ’war’ or ’battle’ over which technical standards should ultimately carry future ’high definition television’ (HDTV) and its market(s). The author tells a story of the circumstances of a particular demonstration: the HD-Divine demonstration at the International Broadcasting Convention in Amsterdam in 1992, planned to demonstrate that digital HDTV was technologically feasible over conventional television networks. Based upon the story of HD-Divine, it is suggested that demonstrations are good points of departures for analyzing how new as well as old combinations are linguistically (re)named, categorized and publicly visualized in attempts to define, control, extend or destroy particular types of interactions and relations.

  • 6.
    Stranne, Frida
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Research on Education and Learning within the Department of Teacher Education (FULL).
    Bilstrup, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES).
    Ewertsson, Lena
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Behind the Mask – Attribution of antagonists in cyberspace and its implications on international conflicts and security issues2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyber systems and critical infrastructure are changing the dynamics of international conflicts, security issues, and challenge traditional ways of understanding warfare. Early warning and attribution of who is accountable for a cyber-attack and what is the intention with the attack is crucial information. To be able to efficiently response to a cyber-antagonist the measure of response must be decided at network speed, which is far beyond what is possible with traditional attribution methods. The ongoing “cyber arm raze” push towards the development and use of autonomous cyber response systems. An autonomous cyber response would most probably use the complexity of attack vector as a tool for attribution, not considering the identity of the antagonist for deciding the measure of response. This will challenge traditional ways of understanding conflict, war, and how nation states handle different kinds of aggressions. This leads to a new kind of deterrence increasing the need to theorize cyber conflicts, as well as empirically study how different actors are acting and reacting in relation to this new threat. This paper initiates the discourse on the implications of the use of autonomous cyber response systems for the international system/relations.

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